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The Daily Texan compiled the following spreadsheet and used it for "What's in a name?

", the Rows highlighted red mean the building has been destroyed. Rows highlighted orange means the building was named after a UT president, faculty member or Rows highlighted green means the building was named after a donor. Rows highlighted light blue mean the building was named after an indivudual who was neither a Rows highlighted yellow means the building is an unnamed building, and might get named in the The sole row highlighted purple is the UT Tower and Main. The Main building will likely never be

Year Building Name

1859 Arno Nowotny Building

1888 John W. Hargis Hall 18891935 Old Main Building

18891910 First Power Plant

18901952 B. Hall 18911926 Old Chemical Laboratory

1894 Littlefield Home 18961927 Clark Field 1 19031959 Woman's Building

Notes Arno Nowotny Building was built in 1859, and then renamed in 1983 for a former dean of student life. It was not originally owned by the University, and it was formerly apart of the State Asylum for the Blind. The John W. Hargis Hall was renamed in 1983 for former special assistant to the president of the University. It was not originally owned by the University, and was formerly apart of the State Asylum for the Blind. The Old Main Building was destroyed in 1935 to be replaced by the new Main Building. The first power plant was destroyed in 1910 when the second power plant was constructed. The first power plant quickly became inadequate for supplying the campus with energy. B. Hall was the University's first dormitory. Originally built for just 58 students, B. Hall was named after the University's longest serving regent and one of the Universities early donors. It was torn down in 1952. The Old Chemical Laboratory was destroyed by a fire in 1926. George Littlefield gave his home to the University when his wife died. To this day, it still stands on campus as one of the older buildings. The original Clark Field was used between 1896 and 1927. Taylor Hall, an engineering building, was built on the site. The Woman's Building, the first and for a time the only woman's dorm on campus, was built in 1903 and then destroyed by a fire in 1959. The Dorothy L. Gebauer Building was built in 1904. At the time, it was called the Engineering Building. The building was renamed multiple times until 1984, when it was named after Dorothy Gebauer. Gebauer was the dean of women from 1937-1959. The building was almost destroyed because of bad conditions, but then it was restored in 1993.

1904 Dorothy L. Gebauer Building

19081972 Pearce Hall

19101977 Second Power Plant

When it was built in 1908, Pearce Hall was called the Law Building. It's name changed in 1952 when it became home to the anthropology department. The building is named after James E. Pearce, a UT anthropology professor. The building was destroyed in 1972, and the Graduate School of Business Building now sits in its place. The second power plant was built in 1910. The University stopped using it as a power plant in 1927, but still used the building for 50 years for classes and other purposes. The building was destroyed in 1977. Battle Hall was built in 1911. Like many other old buildings on campus, it's named has changed many times in it's history. In 1973, the regents changed the building name to Battle Hall, to honor UT's sixth president William J. Battle. Sutton Hall was built in 1917, and named after William Sutton at a later time. Sutton was the University's first dean of the College of Education, and was a president from 1923 to 1924. The Biological Laboratories were built in 1924, and remain unnamed. The Biological Greenhouse was built in 1926, and it remains unnamed. Garrison Hall was built in 1926. It is named in honor of George P. Garrison, who was the head of the history department and one of the earliest UT faculty members. The Littlefield Dormitory is named after Alice Littlefield, the wife of George Littlefield. George Littlefield was a UT regent and one of the University's earliest big donors. The dormitory was built on plots of land owned by Littlefield. The Hal C. Weaver Power Plant, constructed in 1927, is the main source of power for the University. The plant is named in honor of a former professor and department chairman. Razed. The Anna His Gymnasium is named in honor of Anna Hiss, who was the director of physical training for women for 36 years. Hiss also helped plan construction of the building. Gregort Gym was built in 1931 and is named for Thomas Watt Gregory who was a president of The Ex-Students' Association, U.S. Attorney General under Woodrow Wilson and a former UT regent. Gregory also spearheaded fundraising for the building.

1911 Battle Hall

1917 Sutton Hall 1924 Biological Laboratories 1926 Biological Greenhouse

1926 Garrison Hall

1927 Littlefield Dormitory

1927 Hal C. Weaver Power Plant 19281974 Clark Field 2

1930 Anna Hiss Gymnasium

1930 Gregory Gymnasium

1930 Robert A. Welch Hall

1931 Waggener Hall

1932 Mary E. Gearing Hall

Robert A. Welch Hall, the largest academic building on campus, was completed in 1931. Since then, it has been enlrged twice and renovated once. It is named in honor of a Houston philanthropist who made a fortune in oil and left the majority of his estate to the University. It is the oldest building on campus to be named after an exclusive donor. Waggener Hall was completed in 1931, and is named in honor of Leslie Waggener. Waggener was one of the first faculty members, and the first University president. Mary Gearing Hall was built in 1931. It's named changed from the Home Economics Building in 1976, to honor Mary E Gearing. Gearing was a faculty member from 1912 to 1942, and headed the Home Ecnomics Department. Goldsmith Hall was named the Architecutre Building when it was built 1932. It was renamed in 1978 to honor Professor Goldwin "Goldy" Gold-smith, who served on the architecture faculty from 1928-1955. The Hogg Memorial Auditorium, built in 1932, was named in honor of former Texas Governor Jim Hogg. The new Main building and the tower replaced the old main building in 1937. Built in 1932, the Will C. Hogg Building is named in honor of a UT regent and benefactor. Just like B. Hall, Brakenridge Dormitory was named in honor of George Brakenridge, the longest serving UT regent. In 1974, the building was remodeled extensively and was renamed T. S. Painter Hall, a former University president. The School of Social Work Building was built in 1933 and is an unnamed building. The Union Building is an unnamed building that was built in 1933 and is an unnamed building. Taylor Hall was named in honor of Thomas Taylor, a dean of the College of Engineering that advocated for the engineering department. Taylor Hall was torn down for the Gates Dell Complex. The Andrews Dormitory was built in 1936 and is named for Jessie Andrews, UT's first woman student and first woman instructor. The Roberts Hall Dormitory was named in honor of M. Roberts, the governor of Texas who was instrumental in getting the University established. He became one of the first law professors. Carothers Dormitory, built in 1937, is named for Asenath Carothers. She was the first director of the Woman's Building.

1932 Goldsmith Hall

1932 Hogg Memorial Auditorium 1937 Main Building 1932 Will C. Hogg Bldg.

1933 Brackenridge Dormitory

1933 T.S. Painter Hall 1933 School Of Social Work Building 1933 Union Building

19332010 Taylor Hall

1936 Andrews Dormitory

1936 Roberts Hall Dormitory

1937 Carothers Dormitory

1937 Prather Hall Dormitory 1937 Texas Memorial Museum

1939 Littlefield Carriage House

Prather Hall was built in 1937, and is named for William L. Prather. Prather was president of the University from 1899 until 1905. The Texas Memorial Museum was built in 1937, and is an unnamed building. The Littlefield Carriage House is part of the Littlefield House. The Littlehield House is named after George Littlefield was a UT regent and one of the University's earliest big donors.

The Bernard and Audre Rapoport building was built in 1941 and is named in honor of Benard Rapport, 1941 Bernard And Audre Rapoport Building an American entrepreneur and philanthropist. The E.P. Schoch Building was named Dr. Schoch, who was a member of the faculty for 60 years. Rainy Hall was built in 1941 and named in honor of a former UT President several years later. Homey Rainey was a president from 1939-1944. Rainey was fired by the UT System Board of Regents, 1941 Rainey Hall despite faculty and student support. This black bar represents the halfway mark in the University's 130-year history. After this point, Batts Hall was built in 1951 and named for Judge Robert Lynn Batts, a distinguished jurist and law professor who was also chairman of the Board of 1951 Batts Hall Regents from 1930-1933. 1941 E.P. Schoch Building Benedict Hall was built in 1951 and named for H. Y. Benedict, a professor of mathematics who served as a University president from 1927 to 1937. The Geography Building was built in 1951 and is unnamed. Mezes Hall was built in 1951 and named Sidney Mezes, a University president from 1908 to 1914. The Pharmacy Building was named in 1951 and is an unnamed building. Townes Hall was named in 1952 and is named for John Charles Townes, the law dean in 1902 and again from 1907 to 1923. Blanton Dorm was built in 1955. The building is named in honor of Annie Webb Blanton, a rural education faculty member. Built in 1955, the dormitory was originally named for William Simkins, a law professor from 1899 to 1929. But after research showed that Simkins might have been involved with the Klu Klux Klan, the Board of Regents renamed the building the Creekside Residence. Former called the English Building, Parlin Hall was built in 1967. It was renamed in honor of W.T. Parlin in 1968, after working as the College of Arts and Sciences Deans for 21 years.

1951 Benedict Hall 1951 Geography Building

1951 Mezes Hall 1951 Pharmacy Building

1952 Townes Hall

1955 Blanton Dormitory

1955 Creekside Residence Hall

1955 Parlin Hall

1956 Moore-Hill Dormitory

1958 Kinsolving Dormitory 1959 Laboratory Theater Bldg.

1959 W.R. Woolrich Labs. 1961 Computation Center

Constructed in 1956, Hill Hall and Moore Hall are connecting buildings. Moore Hall connects with Hill Hall on the first, second and third floor. Hill Hall is named for Dr. Homer Barksdale Hill, who treated the UT Football team to dinner from the very first game in 1893 until his death on July 18, 1923. Moore Hall was named in memory of Dean Victor Ivan Moore who served as the Dean of Student Life from 1927-1943. The women's-only residence hall is named in honor of Episcopal Bishop of Texas George H. Kinsolving. The building was built 1958. Built in 1959, the Laboratory Theater Building is unnamed. Originally built in 1959, the labs were rennamed in 1977 to honor the W. R. Woolrich, engineering dean from 1936 to 1958. Built in 1961, the Computation Center is unnamed. Built in 1961, the Winship Drama Building was renamed in 1979 for Winship, who was associated with UT drama activities from 1938 until 1973. Built in 1962, the Art Building and Museum is unnamed. Built in 1962, the College of Business and Administration is unnamed. The FAC was built in 1962, and the building was later rennamed for Peter Flawn, president of the University 1979 from 1985. The Engineering Sciences Building was built in 1963 and is an unnamed building. The Etter-Harbin Alumni Center, built in 1964, is named after Lila Etter, the daughter of the first president of the University. She made UT the major beneficiary of her large estate, giving more than $500,000. $110,000 went towards the construction of the Alumni Center. Built in 1967, Calhoun Hall is named in honor of John William Calhoun, president ad interim of UT, 1937-1939. The Continuing Engineering Education was built in 1967 and is an unnamed building. The Jackson Geological Sciences Building was built in 1967 and renamed later for alumnus and benefactor John A. Jackson and his wife. The couple has donated up to hundreds of millions of dollars to the University. Patterson Laboratories was built and named in 1967 in honor of a former professor of zoology who was a professor at UT from 1913-1955. Completed in 1969, the Beauford H. Jester Center and Domitory are named after a former chairman of the UT System Board of Regents.

1961 F.L. Winship Drama Bldg. 1962 Art Building And Museum 1962 College Of Business Administration

1962 Peter T. Flawn Academic Center 1963 Engineering-Science Bldg.

1964 Etter-Harbin Alumni Center

1967 Calhoun Hall 1967 Continuing Engineering Education

1967 Jackson Geological Sciences Bldg.

1967 J.T. Patterson Labs.Bldg.

1969 Jester Dormitory

1969 Beauford H. Jester Center 1969 Music Building & Recital Hall

1970 Burdine Hall

1970 Sid Richardson Hall

Completed in 1969, the Beauford H. Jester Center and Domitory are named after a former chairman of the UT System Board of Regents. The Music Building & Recital Hall was built in 1969 and is an unnamed building. Completed in 1970, Burdine Hall is named in honor of John Alton Burdine, a professor of government, a dean of the College of Natural Sciences and a vice president of the University. Sid Richardson Hall was built in 1970. It is named after a prominent Fort Worth oilman and benefactor. Richardson gave the University $2 million to help in construction of the building.

1970 1971

1972

1972

1972

1973

1973

1973 1973

The Joe C. Thompson Conference Center was built in 1970 and named for named for a member of the Joe C Thompson Conference Center UT System Board of Regents from 1957 to 1961. Lyndon B Johnson Library Named for a former U.S. President. Constructed in 1972, L. Theo Bellmont Hall is named for the father of many of UT's athletic and L. Theo Bellmont Hall physical training programs. Built in 1972, the center is named for Harry Ransom, a former president and chancellor. Ransom played a large role in developing the Harry Ransom Center center. Robert Lee Moore Hall was built in and named in 1972 in honor of Professor Moore, who taught at Robert Lee Moore Hall the University from 1920-1969. The Jesse H. Jones Communications Buildings were completed in 1973, but they were not dedicated to Jesse H. Jones until 1982. Jesse H. Jones was a former banker and the owner and publisher of the "Houston Chronicle." Jones and his wife have provided millions in grants and scholarships to universities through the Houston Jesse H. Jones Comm. Ctr. (Bldg. A) Endowment, which they established. The Jesse H. Jones Communications Buildings were completed in 1973, but they were not dedicated to Jesse H. Jones until 1982. Jesse H. Jones was a former banker and the owner and publisher of the "Houston Chronicle." Jones and his wife have provided millions in grants and scholarships to universities through the Houston Jesse H. Jones Comm. Ctr. (Bldg. B) Endowment, which they established. The Hearst Student Media Buiding is named in honor of the Hearst Foundation, which has made William Randolph Hearst Bldg many gifts to the University. Built in 1973, the Nursing School Building is an Nursing School unnamed building. Walter Webb Hall was built in 1973 and named in honor of Walter Prescott Webb, a UT historian. Ernest Cockrell Jr. Hall was built in 1974. It is named for alumnus and benefactor Ernest Cockrell Jr.

1973 Walter Webb Hall

1974 Ernest Cockrell Jr. Hall

1975

1975 1975

1975 1977

1977

1977 1977

1979

The Biological Sciences Greenhouses is an Biological Sciences Greenhouses unnamed building that was built in 1975. The field is named for two of the University's former baseball coaches: W. J. "Uncle Billy" Disch and Ufcu Disch-Falk Field Bibb Falk. The Graduate School Of Business Building was Graduate School Of Business Bldg. completed in 1975, and is an unnamed building. The George Sanchez Building was built in 1975. The building is named in honor of the chairman of the University's Department of History from 19511959 and a former member of the advisory board to George I. Sanchez Building the Peace Corps. The Animal Resources Center is an unnamed Animal Resources Center building that was constructed in 1977. The Frank Erwin Center was built and named in honor of Frank Erwin in 1975. Erwin was a member of the Board of Regents from March 1963 until Frank C Erwin Special Events Center January 1975. The Perry-Castaneda Library was completed in 1977. The building was named for Dr. Ervin Perry, the first African-American at UT to be promoted to academic rank of professor, and Dr. Carlos Castaneda, a professor of Latin-American history Perry-Castaneda Library from 1927-1946. Lee & Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Built in 1977 and then named in 1993 for UT Ctr benefactors Lee and Joe Jamail. The E. William Doty Fine Arts Building was built and named in 1979 in honor of E. William Doty. He was dean of the College of Fine Arts from 1938-1963 E. William Doty Fine Arts Building and from 1965-1971. Jesse H. Jones Hall was built and named in 1980 in honor of Jesse H. Jones, a Houston philanthropist. The Performing Arts Center is an unnamed building built in 1980. It is named for A. P. Wooldridge, late mayor of Austin, bank president, and chairman of the Austin committee on location of the University. The Engineering Teaching Center II was built in 1983 and is an unnamed building. The University Teaching Center was built in 1984 and is an unnamed building.

1980 Jesse H. Jones Hall 1980 Performing Arts Center

1980 Wooldridge Hall Boiler Bldg. 1983 Engineering Teaching Center Ii 1984 University Teaching Center

The Chemical and Petroleum Engineering building 1986 Chemical And Petroleum Engineering was built in 1986 and is an unnamed building. The Moncrief-Neuhaus Athletic Center was built in 1986 and renamed after two University benefactors in 1996. The building is named after alumni benefactors Vernon F. Neuhaus and W. A. Tex 1986 Moncrief-Neuhaus Athletic Center Moncrief. The Penick-Allison Tennis Center was named in honor of two highly successful tennis coaches at 1986 Penick-Allison Tennis Center the University of Texas. It was built in 1986.

Darrell K Royal Texas Memorial 1988 Stadium

The Darrell K. Royal Memorial Stadium is named for UT football coach and athletic director Darrell K. Royal. The Moffett Molecular Biology Building was completed in 1997 and named after Jeff Moffett. Moffett and his company, Freeport-McMoRan Operating Co., donated a total of $3 million towards construction of the building. The building name was, however, shrouded in controversy. Faculty members and students opposed the building name because of allegedly poor environmental and human rights records at Freeport's mining operation in Indonesia. The UT System Board of Regents and its Chancellor pushed forward with the building name, despite resolutions against it from the Faculty Council and the Student Government. The Red and Charline McCombs Field is named for prominent donors. The Richard Mithoff Track and Soccer Fieldhouse was built in 1999 and named for a UT Law alum. The Mike A. Myers Track and Soccer Stadium was built in 1999 and named after a UT alumnus and benefactor.

1997 Moffett Molecular Biology Bldg. 1997 Red And Charline Mccombs Field

1999 Richard Mithoff Trk/Scr Fieldhouse Mike A.Myers Track & Soccer 1999 Stadium

2000

2000 2000

2002 2003 2005

2006

2006

The John B. Conally Center was built in 2000 and is named for a benefactor who was a member of the Board of Regents, governor of Texas, and the Connally Center For Justice United States secretary of the treasury. The Peter O'Donnell Jr. Building was finished in 2000, though the building was originally named the Applied Computational Engineering and Sciences Building. The O'Donnell Foundation paid for and built the building, but the O'Donnell's did so anonymously. The O'Donnell's shred their Peter Odonnell Jr. Building anonymity in 2010. The San Jacinto Residence Hall is an unnamed San Jacinto Residence Hall building that was built in 2000. The Sarah M. and Charles E. Seay Building was completed in 2002, and named after alumni benefactors. Sara and Charles Seay, who met at Sarah M. & Charles E. Seay Building UT, were longtime donors to the University. The Denton A. Cooley Pavilion was named for a Denton A. Cooley Pavilion University alumnus and heart transplant pioneer. The Neural And Molecular Science Building was Neural And Molecular Science Bldg. built in 2005, and is an unnmaed building. The Blanton Museum of Art was constructed in 2006 and named in honor of UT regent and donor Jack S. Blanton Museum Of Art Jack S. Blanton. Completed in 2006, the Faulkner Nanoscience and Technology Building is named after Larry Faulkner. Faulkner served served eight years as president of Larry R. Faulkner Nano Sci And Tech the University, from 1998-2006.

2007 Almetris Duren Residence Hall

2008 At&T Executive Educ & Conf Center 2008 Biomedical Engineering Building

Almetris Duren Hall was built and named in 2007 in honor of Almetris Marsh Duren, who was a University student development specialist and an adviser in the Dean of Students Office from 1968 through 1981. She was a mentor and advisor to the campus' African-American students. The AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center was completed in 2008. The building is named after the AT&T Foundation because of a $25 million donation. The Biomedical Engnineering Building was built in 2008. It is unnamed. The Edgar Smith Building was constructed in 2008. It is named in honor of Edgar Smith, who donated $4.5 million to help fund the building construction The Norman Hackerman Building was named for a former president of the University. The Belo Center for New Media was named in honor of the Belo Foundation, which donated $12 million to help construct the building. Construction was completed in 2012. The Dell Pediatric Research Institute is named after the Dell Foundation, which has donated multiple times to the University. The Gates Dell Complex was named in honor of the Gates and Dell Foundations. The Student Activity Center, built in 2010, is an unnamed building. The Caven Clark Field Support Building is named for Judge James Benjamin Clark, the first proctor of the University. The Liberal Arts Building, built in 2012, is an unnamed building.

2008 Edgar A. Smith Building 2008 Norman Hackerman Building

2009 Belo Center For New Media

2009 Dell Pediatric Research Institute 2010 Gates Dell Complex 2010 Student Activity Center

2011 Caven Clark Field Support Building 2012 Liberal Arts Building