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TUGAS KOMPUTER APLIKASI ARSITEKTUR 1

PENGENALAN PHOTOSHOP

Nama kelompok : 1. 2. 3. 4. Edy Ashari (10411005) Dicky Supriyadi (10413033) Meidita Trisna K. (10413011) Claudia Giovana (10413012)

Jurusan Teknik Arsitektur


Universitas Komputer Indonesia (UNIKOM) Bandung

Kata Pengantar
Assalamualaikum Wr. Wb. Ucapan terimakasih kami sampaikan kepada seluruh tim penyusun yang telah bekerjasama dengan baik, juga kepada seluruh kawan-kawan arsitektur unikom 2013 khususnya mahasiswa mata kuliah Komputer Aplikasi Arsitektur 1 atas bantuan informasi tugas dan informasi sumber-sumber tugas. Dengan hadirnya makalah ini diharapkan dapat berguna bagi teman-teman pembaca. Makalah ini berisikan tutorial-tutorial dengan pembahasan yang rinci untuk kemudahan para pembaca untuk mencoba langsung pada aplikasi photoshop. Seluruh isi dari makalah ini merupakan kompilasi dari tutorial-tutorial pengenalan dasar photoshop yang ada di website www.alexhogrefe.com. Materi yang diulas, berkenaan dengan teknik-teknik dasar manipulasi rendering, berupa file image dari software 3d modeling-rendering seperti sketchup-vray, 3dmax dan lainnya. Demikian kata pengantar yang dapat kami sampaikan kepada pembaca, semoga isi dari makalah ini dapat bermanfaat bagi teman-teman mahasiswa arsitektur unikom maupun pembaca lainnya. Terimakasih Wassalam.

Tim Penyusun

Daftar Isi

Kata Pengantar .............................................................................................................................................. 1 Daftar Isi.......................................................................................................................................................... 2 Pembahasan ................................................................................................................................................... 3 A. PAINTING LIGHT: EXTERIOR GLASS ................................................................................................. 3 B. RANBROOK PROJECT: BUILDING SECTION ..................................................................................... 6

Daftar Pustaka .............................................................................................................................................. 10

A. PAINTINGLIGHT:EXTERIORGLASS
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 | ALEX HOGREFE

Not everyone has the capabilities to render huge models with a ton of lights. I am one of those people where more times than not I have to manually add light to my illustrations because I don't have the computing power. At first, this method can seem tedious. But, when you think about the time that it takes to insert lights into a model and then the time that it takes to render so many lights, knowing how to do this in Photoshop can be a great resource to have as a backup. There is a typical workflow I use that consistently yields clean, realistic results without much effort. I am using the urban snow scene that I posted a few months back as the base case for this tutorial. The model was large, and there were way too many windows to try to render. The steps I used to Photoshop the light are outlined below. 1. SAVE THE REFLECTIONS - For scenes like the one above, I rendered the glass of the surrounding buildings with a strong reflection. This allows me to copy the reflections to their own layer and use them later on as an overlay. To copy them to their own layer, select the "polygonal tool", then select the glass of the windows you intend to light. Right-click on the selection and choose "Layer via Copy".

2. PAINT IN THE BASE LIGHT - Next, I created a new layer called "glass light". Again, I selected the glass part of the window. To speed things up, you can ctrl+click the reflections layer in the previous step instead of using the polygonal tool to reselect all of the glass. With the glass selected, choose the "Brush" tool, select a soft yellow paint color, select a "Soft Round" brush, and lower the opacity of the brush to around 15%. Begin painting color with most of the light at the bottom of the window fading away as you move towards the top of the window.

3. HIGHLIGHTS - This is one of those steps that is easy to forget or to treat as not important. In reality, it is the most crucial step in creating successful lighting. Without it, the light looks flat. Begin by creating a new layer and setting the blend mode to "Overlay". Select only the surfaces facing the window that would be hit by the light coming through the glass. A good way to determine this is by looking for surfaces that are 90 degrees to the glass. With the selections made, choose the "Brush" tool, select a soft yellow paint, select a "Soft Round" brush, and set the opacity to around 35%. Begin painting in the highlights. If the highlights seem weak, you can amplify the results by duplicating the highlight layer.

4. SOFT LIGHT GLOW - Another subtle, but important step. Create a new layer and choose an off white paint color. Choose the "Paint" tool, select a "Soft Round" brush, and set the opacity really low to something like 12% to 15%. Begin painting around the window edges being careful not to overdo it.

5. BRING BACK THE REFLECTIONS - The last step is to retrieve the reflections layer created in the first step. Bring that layer to the top of the layers pallet, and set the blend mode to "Screen". This will amplify the reflections since they were most likely diluted from the painting in the previous steps.

BEFORE

AFTER

B. CRANBROOKPROJECT:BUILDINGSECTION
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2013 | ALEX HOGREFE

When I originally designed this project back in undergrad, I put a lot of time into the design of the section. It's an important illustration and I therefore wanted to move away from the abstract illustrations described in the previous posts and move towards a clearer reading of the actual architecture. I didn't want the move to be too extreme so I kept remnants of the same gridded texture used in the other illustrations. Below I break down the image to show the steps taken to get to this point. 1. Export Line Work I exported several line work images from Sketchup. I typically export many line work options whether I know I am going to use them or not. It only takes seconds and gives me more options to experiment with once in Photoshop. In this case, I exported images with the face style set to "Hidden Line", then with "Hidden Line and X-ray", and an image with only the guides turned on.

2. Clay Rendering Next I did a quick clay model rendering of the Sketchup model. I used Kerkythea to render the image below but really any rendering program will suffice just as long as the rendered image aligns with the Sketchup exported line work. I also tweaked the levels and desaturated the rendering to get the image below. See this tutorial on CLAY MODEL RENDERINGS and also this post on ADJUSTING THE LEVELS . I should also say that I used the ZORRO PLUGIN to cut the model which allowed me to render the section.

3. Poche the Cut I wanted the cut geometry to be graphically strong, so I shaded it red. Nothing fancy here. I used the polygonal tool to select the cut areas and used the paint bucket tool to fill the selections with red color. This process is described in more detail in the QUICK SECTIONS tutorial.

4. Tone

The image at this point is too stark and needs more color. I want the ramps and three structural elements to stand out in the section. An easy way to solve this is to add some warm tone overlays. With this illustration, I'm not concerned with materials. It's still diagramatic and I plan to have the perspective illustrations later on to provide that information.

5. Interior Depth The design contains many ramps as well as layers of translucent materials but this is lost in the illustration. To fix this, a light blue paint with low opacity representing the translucent material was added above the ramps. I then copied this layer two more times to give a better perception of depth and layering between the ramps.

6. Texture In the previous posts, I have been overlaying a graphically strong grid pattern over the illustrations to convey the idea of shifting organizing grids. The concept still follows through to the section, however, I want the texture to be toned down. I took a texture of different colored squares, stretched it to give more directionality, and then scaled it to work with the column spacing of the architecture. I next duplicated the texture and rotated to match the second grid system. Both layers were set to 20% opacity.

7. People The section was populated with people to give a sense of scale. A quick way to change the people into silhouettes is to go to "Image>Adjustments>Hue / Saturation". Then move the "Lightness" slider all the way to the left.

8. Contrast At this point, I am happy with the illustration. But, the image still reads a little flat for my taste and is lacking hierarchy. More contrast helps to move the eye around the image. To do this, I duplicated the final image layer, desaturated it, and set the layer blend mode to "Overlay" on top of the original layer. This deepens the shadows and brightens the highlights. It's similar to adjusting the levels or curves, but gives a slightly different look. A similar workflow can be seen in the IMAGE SOFTENING tutorial. Below, the final image

Daftar Pustaka
Hogrefe, Alex. Painting Light: Exterior Glass http://www.alexhogrefe.com/blog/2013/2/24/paintinglight-exterior-glass.html (diakses tanggal 7 Oktober 2013)

Hogrefe, Alex. Cranbrook Project: Building Section http://www.alexhogrefe.com/blog/2013/9/23/cranbrook-project-building-section.html (diakses tanggal 7 Oktober 2013)

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