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Brandishing signs covered in

phrases like I am not just a bud-


get and Education shouldnt be
a debt sentence, a group of Uni-
versity students protested state
budget cuts to higher education
funding yesterday.
Te group, led by the student
organization KU Young Demo-
crats, held their protest before the
visit from representatives of the
Kansas House Appropriations
and Senate Ways and Means
committees met with Chancellor
Bernadette Gray-Little and other
University ofcials.
Its just not
right, said
Eric Schum-
acher, a senior
from Topeka
and vice pres-
ident of KU
Young Demo-
crats, referring
to the high-
er education
budget cuts.
We simply
believe this is
the wrong time to be cutting ed-
ucation, and its going to hurt the
future of the state.
Schumacher said, in contrast to
the cuts made in Kansas, many
states have recently increased
funding for higher education.
He added that he does not see
many benefts coming from the
budgetary decisions made, and
that they will instead do more
harm than good.
Tese cuts are harmful,
Schumacher said. Teyre not
going to improve our economy;
theyre not going to improve life
for everyday Kansans, especially
those being educated here.
Ashley Lewandowski, a sopho-
more from Pittsburg and a pro-
tester, said she thought the cuts
to funding werent purely a fscal
decision.
Its a refection on the people
who made the cuts, Lewandows-
ki said. It shows that they dont
fnd education to be an important
asset.
Schumacher added that the at-
titude coming from government
leaders is that students can shoul-
der the burden of cutting costs,
and said the state should make
sure students have the resources
they need to graduate.
Tis plan makes your degree
that much hard-
er to obtain,
S c hu ma c h e r
said. For a lot
of students, they
arent going to
be able to aford
it; their family
isnt going to be
able to aford it.
He said stu-
dents may have
to take out
higher loan
amounts and face even more dif-
fculty paying them back, thereby
increasing their level of debt.
Lewandowski added that an
education is essential in getting
hired for most jobs in the coun-
try. She also said she questioned
why the state would choose to
make cuts toward something so
important.
Education is something you
need to prosper in this coun-
try, Lewandowski said. Its a
key platform for the future and
enables you to continue your
dreams.
Edited by Duncan McHenry
Volume 126 Issue 39 kansan.com Thursday, October 31, 2013
All contents, unless stated otherwise, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2B
CROSSWORD 5A
CRYPTOQUIPS 5A
OPINION 4A
SPORTS 1B
SUDOKU 5A
T-showers. 70 percent
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at 14 mph.
Its Halloween! Index Dont
forget
Todays
Weather
Take it or leaf it.
HI: 58
LO: 38
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
WEEKEND
Disbelief, shock and worry were only a few of
the emotions that went through Hunter Sunder-
meyers head when he found out he needed sur-
gery for a moderately severe heart arrhythmia.
Afer years of distance running, a heart problem
was the last thing he expected. He thought, How
does a 19-year-old athlete end up needing heart
surgery?
In January, Sundermeyer, a sophomore from
Olathe, was told that two chambers of his heart
were abnormally interconnected and it was caus-
ing atrial fbrillation, which means those two
chambers were beating out of sync. Te issue had
to be fxed through surgery, and quickly.
Just a week afer fnding out about his condition,
Sundermeyer was heading to the operating table.
Tough the condition was dangerous, his young
age meant the operation would be much simpler
and the recovery time much shorter. But, even
with this reassuring news, Sundermeyer was ter-
rifed going in.
Tey said it was low risk, but heart surgery is
heart surgery, Sundermeyer said. It was really
scary, but I had a really good support system with
my friends and family.Te procedure itself was
fairly simple; the surgeons went in laparoscop-
ically, meaning they only made a few small in-
cisions in his chest, to separate the troublesome
chambers by cauterizing them. Tis also meant
they didnt have to crack his sternum, which al-
lowed for a faster recovery.
Sundermeyer was ordered to rest for an entire
month afer the surgery. He spent every day on
the couch watching TV and counting down the
days until he would fnally be able to run again.
When his month of couch arrest was up he
didnt timidly dip his toes in the water he
jumped right in and started training for a triath-
lon.
Sundermeyer said he realized that a heart sur-
gery shouldnt prevent him from doing what he
loves, and he wanted to put his newly fxed heart
to good use.
Afer the surgery everybody treated me difer-
ently, kind of delicately, Sundermeyer said. I
wanted to do something to show everybody that
Im better than I was before.
On May 18, just 16 months afer the procedure,
Sundermeyer will run in the Kansas City Sprint
Triathlon a 500-meter swim, 10-mile bike ride
and 5k run.
Until then, hes putting in several hours a week
training hard at the gym. On a typical evening he
will either run four miles, bike 16 miles or swim
for an hour, plus some weightlifing on top of that
Sundermeyers love for running started when
he was a kid and has grown from there. He ran
cross-country in high school and has run several
5k races, which he said are his favorite events.
I love being able to get from point A to point B
using nothing but my own body, Sundermeyer
said. I love to run to the top of the hill and look
back at how far Ive gone with just my two legs.
In the time since his operation, those two legs
have taken him from the couch to his frst triath-
lon.
As a pre-dental student, Sundermeyers course
load is pretty heavy and fnding time for training
can be difcult. But he said as long as he can get
in at least a small workout every night hes work-
ing toward his goal.
He said he is certain about the decision to work
hard and put his improved heart to the test, but
his true goal is crossing that fnish line in May.
Honestly I just want to fnish, Sundermeyer
said. I just want to get there and do as well as I
can and show how far Ive come in a year.
Edited by Duncan McHenry
ASHLEIGH TIDWELL
atidwell@kansan.com
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
KATIE MCBRIDE
kmcbride@kansan.com
Going the distance
Student runner trains for triathlon after undergoing heart surgery
KATIE MCBRIDE/KANSAN
KU Young Democrats protest education budget cuts
Number crunch

Its a reection on the


people who made the cuts.
It shows that they dont
nd education to be an
important asset.
ASHLEY LEWANDOWSKI
Pittsburg sophomore
A StudentPOLL conducted by
Art & Science Group found that
college rankings are becoming
increasingly important to high
school seniors. According to the
survey, two-thirds of the 39,000
surveyed college applicants had
taken rankings into account mak-
ing their fnal decision.
Te most reliable source is
taking an ofcial campus visit to
determine if the campus and pro-
gram is right for the student, said
Lisa Kress, the director of admis-
sions. We particularly encourage
students and families to do a deep
dive on their academic program of
interest as the quality of the indi-
vidual program is more relevant
than the rankings of the entire
university.
Kress said college rankings
should be used solely as a spring-
board for students to start re-
searching a college or university.
Other important aspects to look
into include afordability, academ-
ic programs, study abroad, un-
dergraduate research and making
sure the school is a good ft aca-
demically and socially.
Te study found that high school
seniors look to US News & World
Report as a predominant source
for help, in addition to annual
lists like Forbes Top Colleges and
Princeton Review.
Its good to have comparison
and a list is easy to look at, said
Conner Wade, a senior from Cher-
ry Creek High School in Denver,
Colo.
In a decision between a lesser-
and well-known school, Wade said
he would choose the bigger name
because of the higher possibility of
greater bonds and connections.
We ofen fnd that qualities re-
lated to a college or universitys
academic program, campus com-
munity, and other distinctions fac-
tor into students college decisions
more than its rankings do, wrote
the principal of Art & Science
Group, Richard A. Hesel, in the
study.
Winston Olsen, a senior from
Culver Academies in Indiana, is
searching for schools based on
location. He said the degree pro-
grams, surrounding town and
whether the school is a good ft is
all important when making a fnal
decision.
According to the study, students
with SAT scores of 1300 and
above were more likely to consult
college rankings when applying
than students with SAT scores un-
der 1300.
We work with students regard-
less of what their backgrounds are
and how they perceive the school
based on rankings published in
diferent publications, said Ran-
dall Brumfeld, the director of ad-
vising.
Edited by Jessica Mitchell

What: A Case for Social Resilience
When: Noon to 1 p.m.
Where: 706 Fraser Hall
About: Informal talk on social
resilience in Kansas with Robert
Wuthnow
What: Digital Wall Drawing:
Halloween
When: 4 to 5 p.m.
Where: Anschutz Library, Level 3
About: Spooky drawings, with
optional costumes
What: Application for Fall Graduation
Deadline
When: All day
Where: All university
About: Undergraduate and law school
deadline for fall graduation
What: Deaf Education: Current Research
and Issues
When: 11 a.m.
Where: 203 Joseph R. Pearson Hall
About: Lecture with Barbara Luetke
What: REDCap
When: 1 to 4 p.m.
Where: 445 Watson Library
About: Seminar for researchers covering
how to construct a REDCap database and
survey
What: Hear My Song, a Musical Revue
When: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where: Robert Baustian Theatre, Murphy
Hall
About: Recital presented by the School of
Music
What: Womens Basketball versus Emporia
State
When: 2 p.m.
Where: Allen Fieldhouse
About: First womens basketball game of the
season
What: An Evening with Ted Owens
When: 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, Ballroom
About: Discussion with former mens basket-
ball coach Ted Owens about his career and
new book
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
Allison Kohn
Dylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
Business manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren Armendariz
Hayley Jozwiak
Elise Reuter
Madison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole Anneberg
Allyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERS
Media director and
content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 PAGE 2A
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.com
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Twitter: KansanNews
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The University Daily Kansan is the student
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50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased
at the Kansan business ofce, 2051A Dole
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Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045.
The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-
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$250 plus tax. Send address changes to
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KJHK is the student voice
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is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center
1000 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
Jay?
Whats the
Friday Saturday Sunday
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Gettin leafy wit it. Gettin leaer by the day. Baby, dont leaf me.
Calendar
Tuesday, Oct. 31 Friday, Nov. 1 Saturday, Nov. 2 Sunday, Nov. 3
www.HomesForLease.org www.HomesForLease.org
KU /mrican Ro Crcss Club Prsnts
International
Humanitarian
Law Workshop
Saturday Nov 2nd 10am-2pm
Big 12 Room, Kansas Union
Pogistration Poquiroo-Ploaso Contact:
Chi Vu, Prsiont
KU Ro Crcss Club
ChiVu_ku.ou
kuarcc.wix.ccm/hcm
Fr /omissicn
Lunch Prcvioo
ENROLLMENT
AMELIA ARVESEN
aarvesen@kansan.com
SCIENCE
Applying students consider school rankings
JOSE MEDRANO
jmedrano@kansan.com
Professor nds biological cause of violent crime
Violent crimes are a serious issue
for societies worldwide and can be
unpredictable, but an experiment
conducted by molecular biosci-
ence professor
Dean Stetler
found a correla-
tion between vi-
olent crime and
the low activity of
a bodily enzyme.
Te experiment
focused on in-
mates in difer-
ent correctional
facilities and the
activity of Monoamine Oxidase
A Alleles (MAOA) in their bod-
ies. According to Stetler, low-
er-than-normal activity of the
enzyme, coupled with abuse as a
child, causes individuals to be in
an aggressive mood and exhibit
violent behavior.
MAOA exists frst as a gene that
codes for the MAOA enzyme,
which metabolizes dopamine,
noradrenaline and serotonin
substances that promote human
emotions such as happiness and
contentment.
It causes
peoples fght
or fight sys-
tems to be on
a majority of
the time, said
Stetler about
the low activ-
ity of MAOA.
Tese people
are pissed of
all the time.
Inmates selected for the experi-
ment were broken down into two
groups violent and nonviolent
and their genetic informa-
tion was gathered through cheek
swabs. Te MAOA allele exam-
ined was a specifc type called the
3-repeat allele, which produces
low amounts of MAOA. Inmates
who had committed crimes such
as murder, manslaughter, assault
and rape were considered violent
compared to inmates who had
committed thef, drug use, the
sale of drugs or had been convict-
ed of other nonviolent crimes.
Results showed 64.6 percent of
male inmates who had committed
a violent crime had the low-ac-
tivity MAOA allele. Stetler said
the alleles also seemed related to
childhood abuse. Only 20.5 per-
cent of the nonviolent inmates
had the low-activity allele.
Brunner Syndrome, a recessive
disorder linked to the male X
chromosome and caused by a lack
of MAOA, was something Stetler
looked at concerning low-activi-
ty MAOA. It is essentially a more
serious form of decreased MAOA
activity that has only been di-
agnosed a handful of times, and
causes extreme aggressiveness and
impulsiveness. Te inmates exam-
ined in the study, however, had
lessened enzyme activity without
qualifying as having Brunner Syn-
drome.
Stetler is currently looking to
conduct more research on the is-
sue, and stated he has other study
ideas planned concerning MAOA.
Edited by Duncan McHenry

[Low enzyme activity]


causes peoples ght or
ight systems to be on a
majority of the time.
DEAN STETLER
molecular bioscience professor

...the quality of the


individual program is more
relevant than the rankings
of the entire university.
LISA KRESS
Director of admissions
AMELIA ARVESEN/KANSAN
Prospective students and their parents attend a student-led campus tour.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3A
POLICE REPORTS
There will be a special Halloween
Tea @ Three on the 4th oor lobby
of the Kansas Union today. (@3:00)
A 26-year-old male was
arrested yesterday on the 2300
block of Iowa on suspicion of
driving while intoxicated and
no proof of liability insurance.
A $750 bond was paid.
A 25-year-old female was
arrested Tuesday on the
3600 block of 25th Street on
suspicion of theft by deception,
third offense. A $1,000 bond
was paid.
Emily Donovan
Information based on the
Douglas County Sheriffs
Ofce booking recap.

SUBMIT YOUR BALLOT NOW AT WWW.KANSAN.COM/VOTE


SUBMIT YOUR BALLOT NOW AT WWW.KANSAN.COM/VOTE
WIN A $100 VISA GIFTCARD
USE YOUR KU EMAIL AND BE ENTERED TO WIN A $100 VISA GIFTCARD
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LAWRENCE
Cause of SafeBus and SafeRide decline unclear
KU Parking & Transit recently
announced a decline in ridership
for SafeRide and SafeBus services
compared to last year, marking the
second year of decline for both.
According to KU Parking &
Transit, the department that over-
sees both programs, the overall
ridership for SafeBus four routes
has declined 17.1 percent since
last year. SafeRide ridership has
declined a 29.9 percent.
Drew Humphreys, the trans-
portation coordinator for Student
Senate, said the department is in-
vestigating various reasons for the
trend, looking into factors such
as the increase in Lawrence Po-
lice Departments eforts to crack
down on underage drinking, Safe-
Bus service routes, and Universi-
ty students level of awareness of
both services.
Scott Ross, a graduate student
from Nevada, Mo., said he was un-
aware of SafeRide, and didnt use
SafeBus because he lives on Mas-
sachusetts Street, the central hub
of all SafeBus routes.
If I didnt live downtown I
would probably use it, Ross said.
Mason Kilpatrick, a sophomore
from Hutchinson,
also said the location
of where he lived af-
fected how much he
utilized SafeBus.
Tis year I live
of-campus, so I hard-
ly use the SafeBuses,
but last year when I
lived in the dorms
I used it a lot on the
weekends, Kilpat-
rick said. Cause I
would make trips
downtown, I would make trips to
the Union and stuf like that late
at night, so I would always use the
SafeBus.
Kilpatrick also said the Safe-
Bus green line runs through his
of-campus living location, but
because the route has no stops on
the University campus, he uses the
service less.
Kilpatrick didnt have personal
experience with SafeRide, but has
heard mixed things about it from
friends.
Te in-
stances Ive
heard about
SafeRide ar-
ent very pos-
itive, not in
terms of the
at mos phere
of the ride,
but in terms
of the priority
of customers,
Ki l p a t r i c k
said.
In order to address some of the
decline in ridership of both ser-
vices, KU Parking & Transit is
looking at specifc factors that
have led to the decline and ate try-
ing to address those concerns.
Te programs and services that
we put out are reviewed each year,
Humphreys said. Well be con-
stantly looking at where our num-
bers are at, and if there are oppor-
tunities to put resources to better
use, then we will do that.
In the mean time, the depart-
ment will increase their social
media outreach and promotional
eforts in order to inform students
about the service.
Edited by Hannah Barling
MARK ARCE
marce@kansan.com
FRANK WEIRICH/KANSAN
SafeRide vehicles are small, compact cars. Unlike the SafeBus service,
SafeRide only gives rides home. Both services have seen decreased ridership.
CAMPUS
TOP OF
THE HILL
VOTE FOR A CHANCE
TO WIN A $100 VISA
GIFTCARD
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place your vote
Architecture students gathered
last night to participate in the
American Institute of Architecture
Students annual pumpkin carving
contest. Te group asked members
and non-members alike to gather
and partake in pizza and put their
design skills to the test.
Our organization has been doing
this for many years now and every-
one tends to have fun while taking
a much-needed break from studio,
said Austin Grifs, president of
AIAS.
Using pumpkins donated by Hy-
Vee, students armed with only their
trusty box cutters and creative in-
spiration carved jack-o-lanterns as
scary as they are aesthetically ap-
pealing.
Te completed jack-o-lanterns
were judged by architecture pro-
fessors based on creative input as
well as design skill. Te event also
served as the kickof for the fall
event schedule for the AIAS. Te
Kansan made it out to the event
and caught up with some of the de-
signers and their spooky works.
- Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell
CALEB SISK
csisk@kansan.com
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Winning pumpkins are displayed by the Marvin Hall steps. Eric Winkler won rst place with his No-Face Pumpkin, and
second place went to Hannah Rupprecht and Danielle Latzas Spiral-Cut Pumpkin.
Architecture school hosts
jack-o-lantern contest

The instances Ive heard


about SafeRide arent very
positive, not in terms of
the atmosphere of the ride,
but in terms of the priority
of the customers.
MASON KILPATRICK
Hutchinson sophomore
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 PAGE 4A
S
o I have this friendAbby.
Abby is crazy about the plan-
et and does her best to be
green and live a sustainable life-
style. When she can, Abby buys
local, organic food. She rides her
bike to work and walks instead of
taking the bus. Abby even prefers
to open the windows instead of
turning on the air conditioner.
When a room is dark she opens
the blinds instead of using a lamp.
But Abby has a problem.
Although she totally digs the
earth, shes starting to realize her
environmentalism is somewhat
seasonal. When the temperatures
start to drop and the Farmers
Market closes, Abby becomes a
weenie and starts buying her food
at Wal-mart and driving her not
fuel-efcient Mazda to work. And
Gabby even chooses to turn on
the heater rather than add another
layer of clothes. Did I say Gabby?
Oops. My secret is out. I am a
seasonal environmentalist. But,
hey, the frst step is admitting you
have a problem, right? I know Im
not the only one whose environ-
mentalism starts to falter in the
cold months. So today I en-
courage you to take the frst step
towards eco-recovery and admit
you have a problem.
Okay, now that weve gotten that
of our chests lets move forward
in the healing process together
by learning some tips to maintain
our environmental-savviness
throughout the winter.
It is tempting to grab the car
keys rather than hit the bike lane
as the days get colder. Rather
than increase carbon emissions,
bundle up Antarctica-style before
heading to school or work.
Mother Nature isnt interested in
whether your boots match your
jacket, so grab the feece-lined
pufy coat and mismatched wool
socks. Investing in appropriate
outerwear for winter will keep you
cozy, warm and willing to main-
tain environmentally friendly
transportation practices.
A second pitfall to avoid as the
nights cool down is increased
energy consumption. Conserving
energy is not only good for the
environment, but also good for
the wallet. Te US Energy Infor-
mation Administration projects
heating costs to increase this
winter as the prices of residential
natural gas, propane, and elec-
tricity increase. To decrease your
heating bill, set the thermostat 10
degrees lower before you leave the
house for work and when you go
to bed. Try opening the curtains
or blinds during the day to let in
solar radiation and closing them
at night to trap in heat. Addition-
ally, check that rugs or furniture
arent covering heating vents.
And as always, bundle upan-
other layer of socks never hurts.
Te hardest part about staying
green in the winter is eating
local. When the Farmers Market
closes for the season its easy
to drif to large chain grocery
stores. Fight the urge to fock to
Wal-mart and head to Te Merc.
Te Merc ofers more than 600
locally grown food items from
small-scale farmers within a 200-
mile radius of Lawrence. From
salad dressing to tofu, Te Merc
can ft the dietary needs of any
environmentalist wishing to stay
on track during the cold months.
Also, the Lawrence Farmers
Market hosts an annual Holiday
Market in December for handi-
crafs as well as winter crops.
It may seem trite to list such
simple ways to be environmen-
tally friendly in the upcoming
months, but its important to re-
member that seemingly insignif-
cant changes, if done collectively,
can make an impact. When
addressing environmental issues,
its important to understand that
the decisions we make wont have
immediate or even tangible re-
sults. Te beauty and satisfaction
lies in knowing that youve done
your best to contribute to a better,
cleaner planet for yourself and
the guy sitting next to you. So
this year, I urge you to fght back
against seasonal environmental-
ism and maintain your eco-love
all winter long.
Gabby Murnan is a sophomore
majoring in environmental studies
from Pittsburg.
Take care of the planet during all four seasons
Periodic sadness should be
accepted, not demonized
Incentivize charities
with for-prot model
ENVIRONMENT
MENTAL HEALTH
PHILANTHROPY
A
lthough WebMD has
kindly warned me over
the years that my sore
throat may indeed be West
Nile Virus, that my sore jaw is
probably bone cancer, and that
my stomach ache could very
likely be parasitic worms, there is
one symptom that their database
cannot seem to turn into a
horrifcally hyperbolic diagnosis
for me, and that is melancholy.
Te ailmenta tugging sadness,
an inability to let loose and
parallel the happiness surround-
ing mecould not be located
on the helpful Sim-esque virtual
click-where-it-hurts symptom
checker. But even if there were a
box to be checked, the causations
would be pinpointed to familial
distress or suppressed trauma,
and lumped under the umbrella
label of depression. With a
nearly picturesque childhood
and a tacit knowledge that
depression is not my issue, Im
lef with a lingering wistfulness
and the guilt of having neither
justifcation for it or ammunition
to combat it. Tis guilt is intensi-
fed by what I believe to be a very
dangerous modern opinion: to
be sad is to be incomplete.
Sadness is seen as weakness,
and a personality defciency
that can simply be carved out
with a smattering of checklists, a
cult of self-help books or endless
deliberate distractions. Pick your
poison. Run until youre sweating
so hard you cant dwell on what
upsets youcall it endorphins.
Cut out glutenits been linked
to depression afer allmaybe
the crazy-eyed lust for a dinner
roll will replace your gloom.
Te Hufngton Posts recent
headline Train Your Body To
Be Happy, summarizes this
notion quite efectively. Sadness
has come to be seen as a blemish
in our human nature that we
must actively combat in order to
improve ourselves. Tere is a
frenzy to fll up the emptiness, to
stuf down the sadness so deep
that it cant resurface. Te lan-
guage of training or tricking
ourselves into a warped mental
balance has become common-
place, and frankly I fnd that the
bluest of all.
Call me Sylvia Plath, but I
fnd sadness beautiful. I fnd it
powerful and assuring. Sadness
makes us complete beingsit
fghts against the portrayal of
our generation as mindless
texters only out to have fun
and feel good. Sadness makes us
complexit indicates our ability
to look at the world around us
in its entirety, to empathize with
those similar and distant to
ourselves. Sadness is our capacity
to notice things in our world we
dont like, things that arent just,
things that our society has blind-
ly perpetuated that we believe to
be inherently incorrect. Sadness
actively opposes ignorance; it is a
knowledge that our world exists
outside of ourselves and isnt all
fowers and rainbows. Sadness
is the victorious fag of sensi-
tivityit marks that we have
not been hardened to inequity;
that life hasnt ground us into
apathetic acceptance of its ills. So
I take pride in my melancholy.
I dont attempt to expunge it or
disguise it with a haphazard-
ly-knit web of idioms. I revel
in its ability to give my life and
my perception a rich depth of
dimension. Take that, WebMD.
Erin Calhoun is a sophomore pre-
med student from Naperville, Ill.
E
ven the most for-
ward-minded people I
know cringe at the thought
of a charity with a proft margin.
Taking a healthy salary of the
top of a charity isnt just morally
acceptable; its a damn good idea.
By condemning philanthropists
to careers of obscenely low sala-
ries, we damn the industry in one
fell swoop. Why would a brilliant
young mind with a platinum
education start a career with a
charity and make next to nothing
when they could take a top-tier
career path, make ten times as
much and donate a fraction of
their salary back to the charity
that they would have been stuck
with in the frst place?
We need to incentivize the
smartest and best-equipped men
and women in our work force to
join the philanthropic industry.
Giving them a pat on the back
and calling them noble is a slap
to the face. Arguing that someone
who professionally helps the
needy and unfortunate doesnt
deserve proper compensation just
doesnt make sense.
What I really dont understand
is why we detest anyone making
money while helping people, and
at the same time accept and even
expect wrinkled old men in suits
to rake in millions by underpay-
ing their employees and destroy-
ing the environment. When the
CEO of a soul-sucking, sweatshop
regime pulls in a seven-fgure
salary, no one bats an eye. When
the CEO of a charity so much as
makes a dime, theres a riot and
the Statue of Liberty gets pushed
over.
Its an antiquated, backward and
vaguely puritanical view of what
charity should be. Why is it seen
as a moral crime to not donate
every dollar directly to those
in need? Why are charities and
business considered completely
diferent? Why does putting some
of your profts into advertising
and administration make peoples
toes curl inward?
Overhead is a blessing, not a
curse. If it emerges that a charity
only spends 50 percent of their
funds on their cause, theyre
vilifed and shed donations like
dandruf. Tis shouldnt happen.
Before you start sharpening the
pitchfork for the next witch-hunt,
think about what the money
theyre spending means.
It means that this charity grows
each and every year, bringing in
millions and millions more to
their cause. It means that their
services and fundraisers are con-
stantly becoming more efcient
and more efective. It means that
smart and committed workers are
joining their organization and are
being paid enough to work full
time.
But it still doesnt feel right,
people say. Well, I dont care. Peo-
ple didnt feel right about Heelies
and Bowie for a long time, but it
was worth it in the end.
Bucking the stigma against prof-
itable charity will be difcult. It
starts with challenging the notion
that charity is able to properly
function any diferent from a
regular corporation.
Te Susan G. Komen For the
Cure foundation is the perfect
example of a well-advertised,
merchandised and incredibly
efective charity organization. I
want to see more charities adopt
this model and help turn the
non-proft sector into a proftable,
for-people sector.
Structuring philanthropic orga-
nizations like corporations means
accountability and competition.
I dont just want to Google char-
ities for X problem and then
throw money at them. I want
these companies to show me, the
consumer, what they do and in a
modern way.
When charity is no longer seen
as an obligation, but instead as
just another servicethe service
of helping othersthen well
know progress has really been
made.
Wil Kenney is a sophomore majoring
in English from Leawood.

The girls in front of me were on their
phones during the National Anthem
at the game. They need to apologize
to America. And to Allen Fieldhouse.
Its wrong how much I wish I was
Hudy so that I could stretch the boys
out before the game.
If you got camping problems, I feel
bad for you, son. I got 99 problems
but a seat aint one!
Whoever in the Kansan predicted
the Pitt game score, maybe should
tell me my GPA at the end of the
semester..#accuracy
To everyone who saw my poor, scared,
forgotten tablet in Eaton lab and
didnt steal it, I love you and hope
the rest of your life is blessed by
Zeus.
Maybe Embiid should be a hurdler for
the track team too...
I felt special for my 9 horoscope and
then realized everybody got a 9.
Thanks, UDK. For making every single
girl on campus want to marry Colby
Liston.
That feel when you instinctively look
for Withey on the stats page :(
Whoever keeps crop dusting in the
rec needs to knock that shit off. Pun
intended.
The ginger in my class just admitted
that her favorite jelly bean was
buttered popcorn. God.
Rare Beasts of KU: people with 620
area codes. Were out there, were
just really hard to nd!
Click-click-click-click-click-click-
click-click-click-click. How do I
always end up sitting next to a
rapid-re clicker in the library?! Its
so irritating!
These two guys in my class got
each others streetpasses, traded
Pokemon, and became best friends in
3 minutes at.
I miss the old drummer :(
Perry my boy, youll do great things
this season. Im calling it now.
So, when we win the big 12 champi-
onship again this year, are we gonna
call it our decade of dominance?
It must suck to be Aaron Carter. Dude
has to wear a Shaq jersey to his own
concert so people know who he is.
Jayhawks, you stand up at all times
for KU bball games or gtfo.
Is vajazzling still a thing?
Ah, time for the annual premature
building heatings.
Text your FFA
submissions to
7852898351 or
at kansan.com
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
Send letters to kansanopdesk@gmail.com. Write
LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the authors name,
grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
Trevor Graff, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
Dylan Lysen, managing editor
dlysen@kansan.com
Will Webber, opinion editor
wwebber@kansan.com
Mollie Pointer, business manager
mpointer@kansan.com
Sean Powers, sales manager
spowers@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director & content strategest
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board are Trevor
Graff, Allison Kohn, Dylan Lysen, Will Webber,
Mollie Pointer and Sean Powers.
By Gabby Murnan
gmurnan@kansan.com
By Erin Calhoun
ecalhoun@kansan.com
By Wil Kenney
wkenney@kansan.com
@starryparadox
@KansanOpinion Sam The Squid Dullard
from Rocket Power!
@BadBuddhist4
@KansanOpinion Drunk.
@MorganAideen
@KansanOpinion A Gypsy, gonna have my tarot
cards and everything. Best Holiday Ever!
@mebejenhen
@KansanOpinion Sexy Amish.
What are you being for
Halloween?
FFA OF
THE DAY

A girl fell asleep in


the front row with
a Red Bull still in
hand. Looks like
she should have
drank it faster!
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
The Lawrence Farmers Market, located at 8th and New Hampshire, offers food from
local farmers. The market is open from 8-11 a.m. every Saturday until Nov. 23.
Whether they are looking for a
haunted experience or not, a few
students have reported fnding
ghostly spirits on campus. Te
existence of ghosts remains ob-
jective, but even the most skepti-
cal students can fnd themselves
frightened in a spooky situation.
THE HAUNTING
OF SIGMA NU
It was nearly midnight when
Daniel Brocato, a 2013 gradu-
ate from Overland Park, began
to smell lavender. He had been
sanding a room on the third foor
of the Sigma Nu house, preparing
it for August when the rest of his
brothers would return. Brocato,
who was alone in the house, be-
gan to feel uneasy and checked the
hallway to see if one of his brothers
had returned. Nobody was there,
so he went back to his work.
Afer a few minutes, Brocato be-
gan to smell the lavender again. He
said it smelled like a womans per-
fume or a candle.
If anything, it should smell like
sawdust, Brocato, who was a ju-
nior at the time, said. It was very
strong and smelled like someone
had lit a candle in the room.
Afer checking the empty hallway
again, he slammed the door shut
and increased the volume on his
radio to fll the quiet and to calm
his nerves.
Ghost hunters confrmed the
following day that Brocato had
indeed encountered the ghost of
Sigma Nu.
Brocatos supernatural incident
is one of many ghost stories to
unfold in the Sigma Nu fraternity
house. Reports of the ghost have
been around since the men began
to occupy the former governors
mansion.
According Broacto, Te sup-
posed ghost, named Virginia, was
the servant of the former Kansas
governor Walter Stubbs. When
his wife noticed that Virginia and
Stubbs were quite close, she sus-
pected him to be having an afair
with Virginia. Ten, he walked
into his house on an April day to
fnd her lifeless body hanging
in a closet in the third foor. It is
unknown whether it was suicide
or murder, but many suspect mur-
der because governors wife had
been angry about their afair. Vir-
ginias body was entombed in the
freplace and eventually the closet
was rebuilt into a bedroom, where
a few lucky men of Sigma Nu live.
Te men of the fraternity know
she is around when they smell the
scent of lavender. Women who
stay the night ofen fnd scratch-
es, courtesy of Virginia, on their
backs the following morning.
Brocatos experience was creepy
enough for him to call in the pro-
fessionals. Ghost hunters arrived
the next day.
Tey said that she immediately
came into the house and came to
the room I was working at, Bro-
Come celebrate Halloween at
Te Bottleneck tonight with Te
Delta Saints, a bourbon-fueled
Bayou rock band from Nashville,
Tenn.
Te Delta Saints began play-
ing together in 2007, when their
three founding members all trans-
ferred to Belmont University in-
dependently. Ben Rigel, the lead
vocalist, transferred to Belmont
halfway through his college ca-
reer.
By the time you get to your ju-
nior year of college, most people
have their friend groups fgured
out, Rigel said. All three of us
were new on campus so we didnt
have that established friend group.
Music became a common ground
for us and thats when we started
playing together.
Ben Azzi, drummer, and David
Supica, bass player, both trans-
ferred from the University of Kan-
sas to Belmont.
Lawrence is like a second home
to these guys, said Casey Bridge-
man, management assistant for
Te Delta Saints. Tey love com-
ing up here and getting to per-
form.
Te band debuted their frst
full-length album, Death Letter
Jubilee, in January of this year.
Te band has also released two
EPs, Pray On and A Bird Called
Angola.
Te Delta Saints have been on
two extensive European tours and
have already confrmed a four-
month long tour across the Unit-
ed States with the band Blackber-
ry Smoke beginning in 2014. Te
band is also working on their
second album and hope to start
recording early next year.
Were just trying to carve out
our own place in the music indus-
try, Rigel said. We want to play
good rock and roll music, so we
add our own sort of delta blues-
soul-funk infuence to it.
Ringel attributed some of the
inspiration for their music to fa-
mous rock bands including Te
Black Keys and My Morning Jack-
et.
Te band will be playing at Te
Bottleneck tonight, but they are
not new to Lawrence. In 2008,
they performed their frst, unof-
cial gig at Abe and Jakes Landing,
a local Lawrence bar.
Tese guys have a great sound, a
lot of talent, and theyre all around
great performers, Bridgeman
said. Teyve got a triple threat
going for them.
Te Saints are known for their
highly energetic performances
and their crowd interaction.
We dont take ourselves too
seriously, its kinda our thing,
Rigel said. We aim to create an
environment where people can
let their hair down, dance, drink,
and enjoy themselves and just re-
lax. Tats the main thing we want
people to get out of our show.
Doors open tonight at 8 p.m.
Tickets are $9-$11, and are avail-
able for all ages. Te Delta Saints
will follow the opening perfor-
mance, Middle Twin.
Edited by Jessica Mitchell
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
HOROSCOPES
CROSSWORD
Because the stars
know things we dont.
SUDOKU
CRYPTOQUIP
CHECK OUT
THE ANSWERS
http://bit.ly/Hfz9uA
PAGE 5A
WHERE HAIR GOES TO MAN UP
$9.95 with
Student ID
2500 Iowa St
Lawrence, KS 66046 (785) 841-6640
M - F 9 8 Sat 9 6:00pm Union.KU.edu
CURRY DOESNT MEAN HOT!
KU Dining Services welcomed
Caf Spice Indian Cuisine to the
Underground in August 2013. Te
aromas are wonderful and the food
is mouth-watering, but there is still
some skepticism about Indian food.
Yes, Caf Spice ofers curry dishes,
but there are others on the menu as
well. Not all Indian cuisine is curry
and not all curry is Indian cuisine.
Ask the average man on the street
to defne curry and the answer
will probably be HOT and SPICY.
Before we assume that you cant eat
Indian food because it is too spicy,
lets look at the history of the word
curry and shed some light on the
spices that are used to enhance the
favors of Indian cuisine.
Te word curry comes from Kari
from the Tamil language and was
later Anglicized into curry. Curry
powder is not a single spice, but
rather a combination of spices that
generally include coriander, turmeric,
and pepper. Te blend of spices can
range from mild to hot depending on
amounts and other additions.
Curry has a diferent meaning in
the Western world than in India. In
India, curry refers to a gravy or stew
dish, which contains the Indian spice
mix of garam masala along with gin-
ger, chili, cumin, coriander, turmeric
and sometimes onion and garlic. Te
original Indian curry didnt have any
peppers in it since chili peppers or
red peppers were not native to India.
You can thank Christopher Columbus
for introducing chili seeds to world
trade, thus making them an addition to
the traditional Indian blend of spices.
Curries range from mild, to hot, to
melt your face of hot, and Caf Spice
ofers a tasty mix of these:
Korma Te mildest of curries, de-
signed for women who were constantly
being taken to curry houses by their
spicy food-loving boyfriends.
Chicken Tikka Massala Tis curry is
a good frst-timer dish, not too exotic
but very favorful.
Curry Yes, there is a curry called
curry. Te favors are reminiscent of
the traditional dish. Tis falls in the
middle of the heat scale.
Madras Hotter on the heat scale but
still not the hottest. If you want to
impress your friends without having a
fve-alarm rage on your tongue, this is
the dish for you.
Vindaloo Te famously hot curry.
Vindaloo is a very old and refned
recipe whose favors have been per-
fected over many years. Add a sweet
chutney to this dish to ofset the heat
and make it even more enjoyable.
So, there you have it. A wide range of
heat sources to warm you up from the
inside out. Stop by Caf Spice in the
Underground and ask for a free sample
from our knowledgeable staf who can
direct you to the dish that is best for
you or hand you a glass of water if
you choose poorly.
News from the U
MUSIC
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 9
Sometimes it's easy to get distracted
from what's important. Focus on
what and whom you love. Denitely no
gambling. Beat around the bush a bit
if you must, but say what you have to
say. Grow partnership and friendship.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 9
Put your heads together. Focus your
creative energy on practical ideas
to make money. Cut expenses. Plan
now and expand later. Get inventive
and come up with a clever costume
for free.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is an 8
Who said being in love was easy?
Make every move count and increase
the quality of your relationship.
Sometimes you really have to listen.
Enjoy the festivities without taking
expensive risks. Leave your wallet at
home and go play.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 9
There's another rush job coming in.
It's better to give each step it's due
than to hurry. Patience is a virtue,
especially now. Turn your attention
towards the comforts of home. You can
make it work.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 9
You're entering a learning phase.
Study and research get fun. Kids have
the best ideas. Create, build and
network. Don't buy the next round for
the gang. Enjoy moderation. A female
helps you nd harmony.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 9
Start getting practical. Scratch out
what you can't afford, and what you
don't really need. You're especially
powerful around nances now. Scale
a big idea to t, and avoid stepping
on toes.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is an 8
Energy surges are predictable. Make
good use of them, rather than getting
shocked. Take on a leadership role. You
may have to revise your routine once
you get the facts. Stay exible and
adaptable.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 9
Clean up old messes. Heed a practical
person's warning, and consider
potential outcomes. Women affect
your future, whether you like it or not.
Provide power tools. Work together for
common benet.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 9
You're entering a party phase, which
could interfere with work, which in
turn could interfere with romance.
Offer help to someone in need. Aim for
the perfect balance in your schedule.
Stay in communication. Rest when you
have downtime.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 9
The next two days are good for deci-
sions. Devote yourself to the process
fully. There will be time for fun and
games later. Watch out for strings
attached. Try to stay objective.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 9
There may be dark paths or even zom-
bies. Fortress walls could spring out
of nowhere. Stay exible, and balance
studies with fun. There are plenty of
sweet distractions. Quick action now
wins entry in. It's your choice which
direction.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20
Today is a 9
A lack of funds could threaten the
plan. Listen to all considerations,
then reappraise. Build your character.
Creativity with the details adds the
perfect touch. Consider the impact,
reaction and your response. The more
you enjoy it, the better the results.
Lawrence bar to feature
live music on Halloween
PAIGE STINGLEY
pstingley@kansan.com
Events on Halloween
Trick-or-Treat and Decorated
Truck Contest
Free Methodist Church
3001 Lawrence Ave.
Lawrence, KS
6-7 p.m.
Free
All Ages
Scary Larry Kansas Bike Polo
Edgewood Park, Maple Land and
Miller Drive
7-11 p.m.
Free
All Ages
Halloween Party
Replay Lounge
946 Massachusetts St.
Lawrence, KS 66044
9 p.m.
21+
$3-$5
SUNUs Halloween Party with DJ
Proog
Jazzhaus,
926 Massachusetts St.
Lawrence, KS 66044
10 p.m. - 2 a.m.
21+
$5
HAUNTINGS
On-campus housing residents
report supernatural activity
MEGHAN KETCHAM
mketcham@kansan.com

Denitely having ghost


hunters in there conrm-
ing it put me on edge.
DANIEL BROCATO
Former student
SEE HAUNTING PAGE 6A
Stull, located about 10 miles west
of Lawrence, is a town so small it
feels like its hiding in plain view.
Cars passing on its roads will be
in and out of it in less time than
it takes to process a full thought.
Te town consists of a United
Methodist Church that appears to
have been constructed in recent
years, and an old, darkened brick
bait shop to the west. Two small
houses sit almost adjacent to the
church, and across from the south
side of the small town there is a
cemetery containing tombstones
with dozens of German-sounding
last names written on them.
Attached to the cemetery gate
are multiple signs that read a sim-
ple message: No Trespassing. Its
a peculiar sign to be posted on a
regular cemetery gate, but Stull
isnt commonly defned as reg-
ular. Stull Cemetery has gained
a reputation for being the site of
supernatural happenings, includ-
ing associations with the devil,
the occult, and a supposed gate-
way to hell in the basement of an
old church, demolished in 2002,
which was supposedly sheltered
from rain despite its lack of a roof.
Despite the rumors and urban
legends that surround the cem-
etery, the most activity that has
been seen there in recent years are
acts of vandalismhence the tres-
passing signs and Stull residents
desire to keep outsiders of the
property.
It used to look a lot spookier
than it does now. It had a stone
structure adjacent to it, and it used
to have some pine trees, but those
pine trees died, said Lt. Steve
Lewis, Douglas County Sherifs
Ofce public information ofcer.
When I used to patrol out there, I
would stop people and they would
tell me that they were just trying
to see something scary, and I told
them they were looking at the
scariest thing they were going to
see all night, and I charged them
with a misdemeanor.
Besides an American fag at the
east end of the cemetery, there is
a large, bent tree that stands soli-
tary around one of the curves in
the looping gravel road around
the cemeterys premises. Toward
the northeast corner of the small
plot of land, the only remnants of
the roofess church are limestone
bricksmost of the attractions
that once brought people to the
cemetery have been removed, and
the sight is somewhat disappoint-
ing for a day in late October.
Te legend has had a surprising-
ly long legacy for how uneventful
the town of Stull truly is.
Edited by Madison Schultz
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6A
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Rumors, urban legends
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October has fown by once again
and soon the Halloween season
will be over. Now what? All that
time and efort to come up with the
best costume for one night? Con-
sider reliving your costume glory
while running a 5K.
KU Endowment is hosting a Hal-
loween 5K on Sunday, Nov. 3, at
8:30 a.m. Costumes are encouraged
but not required.
I have a full-body spandex leop-
ard suit from when I was in the mu-
sical Cats in high school, so I think
Im going to wear that to intimidate
the competition into thinking I am
a crazy fast runner, said Sam Ben-
son, a senior from Prairie Village.
At this 5K, awards will be given
to the best costumes. Awards will
be split up by age group and will
go to the overall male and female
winners. Additional awards will be
given to the top three male and top
three female winners of each age
group.
While the Crimson and Boo 5K
keeps the Halloween spirit going
throughout the weekend, it also
sponsors a good cause. Te pro-
ceeds for this event will help fund
the Student Leadership Award,
which is given to students who
have made a diference at the Uni-
versity.
I think one of the biggest dif-
ferences is that 100 percent of the
proceeds go to students, said Sar-
ah Morris, president of the Student
Endowment Board.
Morris said that while the cos-
tume aspect draws in attention,
students will also like being able
to see that they can help another
student.
While 5Ks help promote a healthy
lifestyle, they also promote being
involved in a cause. KU Endow-
ment picked up on this trend and
decided to join in.
Its an hour of social time, Mor-
ris said. In the end of the day, they
dont require a big time commit-
ment.
Allie Welch, a junior from Wichi-
ta, runs 5Ks every year.
Ive used running to stay in shape
in college, so signing up for a race is
always a good motivation, Welch
said.
Registration is $20 and starts at
7:30 a.m at KU Endowment, 1891
Constant Avenue.
Edited by Jessica Mitchell
CASSIDY RITTER
critter@kansan.com
ASHLEIGH LEE/KANSAN
Danielle Zimmerman, a sophomore from Maryville, Mo., and Anna Lavigne, a sophomore from South St. Paul, Minn., dress up as
a Despicable Me minion and Miss Kansas for the KU Endowment 5K run.
REGIONAL
KU Endowment extends holiday
spirit with Crimson and Boo 5K
TOM DEHART
tdehart@kansan.com

... I would stop people


and they would tell me
they were just trying to see
something scary.
LT. STEVE LEWIS
Douglas County Sheriffs Ofce
HAUNTING FROM PAGE 5A
cato said. Tere was a chair I had
brought in the room. Virginia was
sitting in the chair in the room, so
that was the smell I had smelled.
Afer confrmations of super-
natural activity, Brocatos incident
seemed more real rather than just
a nightmare.
Defnitely having ghost hunters
in there confrming it put me on
edge, he said.
CORBIN HAUNTING
Meg Werner always thought that
Corbin was haunted.
While living in the Corbin res-
idence hall last year, Werner and
her friend, Marti Belot, were using
a Ouija Board during the Feb. 21
snow day when they were startled
by the mirror falling from the wall.
It was in her room, and all of a
sudden her mirror just shattered,
Meg Werner, a sophomore from
Topeka said. Tere was a white
orb in front of it.
Tis orb is believed to be the
supposed ghost of Corbin, an un-
named girl who had lived in the
residence hall and had taken her
life inside of a dorm room. Even-
tually, her bedroom was converted
into a trash room afer residents
refused to live there.
Werners older sister Annie Wer-
ner, who had lived in the residence
hall seven years ago, had a super-
natural experience as well. Hers
involved the door that led to the
ghosts former room.
My older sister lived in Corbin
too, Werner said. She lived in 4
South. She was sitting in the living
area and the door just shuts, and
there was no one in the room.
Despite her experiences, Werner
remains skeptical on stories of the
Corbin ghost.
Tere are all sorts of stories,
Werner said. You never really
know whats true.
Edited by Jessica Mitchell

... All of a sudden her


mirror just shattered.
There was a white orb in
front of it.
MEG WERNER
Topeka sophomore

Full Moon Productions hosts its
39th season in the haunted house
scene located in the West Bottoms
of Kansas City, Mo. Tere are four
main attractions: Te Beast, Te
Edge of Hell, Macabre Cinema and
Te Chambers of Edgar Allan Poe,
each ofering something diferent
to a thrill-seeking audience. Te
Travel Channel featured the haunt-
ed houses in their Best Halloween
Attractions 2013 list because of the
unique experiences they ofer.

What: The Beast



When:
Thursdays and Sundays: 7:30 p.m. to
12:30 a.m.
Fridays and Saturdays: 7:30 p.m. to
1:30 a.m.
Oct. 28-31: 7:30 p.m. to indenite time
*Last weekend: November 8-9
Where:
1401 W. 13th St. Kansas City, Mo.
Why: The Beast is Americas largest
haunted house, according to the Full
Moon website, and supplies entertain-
ment inside and out as dancers per-
forming to Michael Jacksons Thriller
and a headless horseman greet visitors
on their way in. Inside, it incorporates
an open format to throw visitors right
into the action. Instead of a single-le
line, people are free to roam around at
their own risk. Included is a werewolf
forest that simulates the situation of
being stranded alone in a dark forest.
When, and if, those brave enough reach
the end, a four-story slide serves as the
grand exit.

What: The Edge of Hell


When:
Thursdays and Sundays: 7:30 p.m. to
12:30 a.m.
Fridays and Saturdays: 7:30 p.m. to
1:30 a.m.
Oct. 28-31: 7:30 p.m. to indenite time
*Last weekend: November 8-9
Where:
1300 W. 12th St. Kansas City, Mo.
Why: The Edge of Hell is the oldest
haunted house in Kansas City, having
been in operation since 1975. A group
of 45 live performers spread out
throughout the ve-story building to
haunt visitors using the element of sur-
prise. In addition to the roaming terrors,
it is also home to Medusa featured
in the Guinness World Records 2013
as the longest snake ever in captivity
at more than 25 feet. She perches in
her corner watching over those who
pass through. The experience ends
with a ve-story slide as a performer
masquerading as a devil waits to send
participants on their way.

What: Macabre Cinema


When:
Fridays: 8 p.m. to 12 a.m.
Saturdays: 7:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.
*Last weekend: Oct. 25-27, open on
Halloween from 8 p.m. to an indenite
time
Where:
1222 W. 12th St. Kansas City, Mo.
Why: Macabre Cinema is an attraction
centered on pop culture. Its open format
recreates
more than 30 scenes from 1930s horror
movies. For those wondering how they
would survive in a horror lm, now is
the chance. A dungeon awaits at the
end for the brave-hearted.

What: The Chambers of Edgar Allan Poe


When:
Fridays: 8 p.m. to 12 a.m.
Saturdays: 7:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.
*Last weekend: Oct. 25-27, open on
Halloween from 8 p.m. until an inde-
nite time
Where:
1100 Santa Fe St. Kansas City, Mo.
Why: The Chambers of Edgar Allan
Poe draws upon the spooky essence of
Poes works, such as The Raven, The
House of Usher and The Black Cat.
It brings to life many components of the
poems for visitors to experience. This
one allows participants to Experience
the feelings of being buried alive,
suffocating, or claustrophobia to the
extreme, according to the website.
Edited by Duncan McHenry
Recipe adapted from The Domestic Rebel
Ingredients
3 cups candy corn
1 cup peanut butter
1 can sweetened condensed milk
2 cups white chocolate chips
Instructions
Line a pan with foil and spray with
cooking spray.
Add candy corn and peanut butter
to a medium saucepan and melt over
low heat, stirring every 30 seconds
for about 3 minutes. Add sweetened
condensed milk and cook for another
3 minutes, stirring every 30 seconds
(you dont want the milk to boil; a slight
simmer is OK). Add white chocolate
chips and stir until everything melts
together.
Spread evenly in pan. Cool on counter
about 15 minutes, then chill until
hardened. Cut into squares.
Edited by Madison Schultz
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7A
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SPOOKY THRILLS
Kansas City haunted houses sure to scare
RECIPE
CHRISTINA OSTMEYER/KANSAN
Use up your extra candy corn and satisfy your sweet tooth with this easy candy treat.
Celebrate with Halloween fudge
CHRISTINA OSTMEYER
costmeyer@kansan.com
ART BY COLE ANNEBERG
KELSEY BARRETT
kbarrett@kansan.com
REGIONAL
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sun
Mon Tues Wed Thur Fri sat
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Te Jayhawks found themselves
with a comfortable 21-point lead
afer a dizzying, explosive run to
start the second half that included
two layups by Chelsea Gardner and
was capped by Lamaria Coles em-
phatic coast-to-coast layout. Fea-
turing a lineup flled mostly with
new faces and seldom-used players
from last season, the womens bas-
ketball team cruised to an 85-54
exhibition victory against the Pitts-
burg State Gorillas.
Without Carolyn Davis, who
graduated last season, garnering
most of the attention in the paint,
Gardner, a junior forward, proved
she could control the game down
low. She put up an 18-point, 11-re-
bound efort to lead the Jayhawks
to victory. She added three blocks
in 28 minutes.
I think Chelsea took advantage
sometimes, coach Bonnie Hen-
rickson said.
Overall, a lot
of good stuf
for us to see on
flm.
At halfime,
the Jayhawks
led 45-29.
During the
frst four min-
utes of the sec-
ond half, Pitts-
burg State forward Lizzy Jeronimus
tried to match the Jayhawk run
with two baskets of her own. She
was overshadowed by the ofensive
efciency of Kansas, and the Goril-
las didnt make another run the rest
of the night.
Other returning players also con-
tributed to the efort. Junior Natalie
Knight played in her frst game
since tearing her ACL last season.
With a brace on her knee, she con-
tributed seven points, six rebounds
and two assists. Henrickson said
it was good to see Natalie healthy
and playing again with some con-
fdence.
Cole, a sophomore point guard
who had limited minutes last sea-
son, started and had 12 points and
three assists. Cole is known for her
speed. While usually a positive,
sometimes she plays out of control
and loses the ball.
She really can fy, Henrickson
said. Sometimes thats too fast, but
the one she got in the frst half, she
started in front of me and I could
see that no one was in front of her.
It didnt take her long to get there.
Junior Asia Boyd was an efcient
5-7 from the feld for 15 points.
She also had seven rebounds in
her 30-minute outing. Senior Cece
Harper had 10 points.
I think Im a little more conf-
dent, Boyd said. Coach Bonnie
is a little more confdent, which
makes it easier too.
Te Jayhawks won the opening
tipof. Knight
found Gardner on
the frst possession
for two points, and
the Jayhawks led
the entire way af-
ter that.
With less than
nine minutes
in the frst half,
Knight stripped
the ball from the
Gorillas. She raced down the court
and passed the ball to Cole. Cole
had one defender on her as she
made her way toward the basket.
Without taking a shot herself, she
passed the ball back to a trailing
Boyd who easily put it in the basket.
On this young Jayhawk team,
Henrickson gave her newcomers
signifcant minutes to see what
they would do. Dakota Gonzalez,
a freshman guard, ended the night
with 12 points, fve rebounds and
four assists in 15 minutes. Jada
Brown, a freshman guard, had six
points in 13 minutes.
I thought Jada Brown, a fresh-
man, came in and gave us some
minutes, Henrickson said. She
did a really nice job in the short
corner, and really has a knack for
rebounds.
Jeronimus led the Gorillas with 15
points. Guard Antqunita Reed was
the only other Pittsburg State play-
er to reach double fgures with 11.
Te Jayhawks will play their sec-
ond exhibition game against Em-
poria State on Sunday, Nov. 3.
Edited by Jessica Mitchell
Volume 126 Issue 39 kansan.com Thursday, October 31, 2013
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
By Kory Carpenter
kcarpenter@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Jayhawks poised
to win Big 12
Te Jayhawks (17-5, 7-2) domi-
nated the Baylor Bears (11-14, 3-6)
25-14, 25-13, 25-15 last night at the
Horejsi Athletic Center.
In the frst set, where Kansas won
25-14, senior setter Erin McNorton
recorded nine assists. Tose nine
assists pushed her over the 1,000
assists mark this season. McNor-
ton ended the night with 30 assists,
which was her season low.
Erin was connecting with her
attackers all night and just to have
six hitting errors in three sets was
pretty astonishing, coach Ray Be-
chard said.
McNorton shrugged of her ac-
complishment last night. 1,000 as-
sists was just cool, she said.
Its cool, but were in the mid-
dle of the season, McNorton said.
Tose things will hit me later on
when were done and where we
head this year.
Te Jayhawks had .451 hitting
percentage last night, which was
just the second time this season
that Kansas hit over .400. McNor-
ton takes a lot of pride in a high
team hitting percentage because it
means she was setting the ball well.
I helped facilitate it, but I had
confdence in my hitters the whole
time, McNorton said. I dont
think there were many errors. I
had a little to do with it, but it was a
whole team efort.
A frequent recipient of McNor-
tons sets was redshirt senior mid-
dle blocker Caroline Jarmoc, who
led the team with 14 kills and seven
came within the frst set. Jarmocs
14 kills had a lot to do with Mc-
Norton and her relationship on the
court.
I think it helps that were oppo-
sites, McNorton said. Im kind of
quiet and shy and she is in my face,
and I like that.
Jarmoc and McNorton help each
other a lot during the game.
[Jarmoc] helps me a lot blocking
wise, McNorton said. Whenever
you see me mess up on a block,
shell look at me and tell me what
Im doing wrong, and I love that
about her.
Tis on-court relationship is a
two-way street. McNorton tells
Jarmoc about how to improve her
hitting.
Erin is very open to criticism,
Jarmoc said. Shes great at point-
ers, if I need a ball higher or lower,
and she has great adjustments. I
think we work very well together.
McNorton doesnt just set the
ball; she can block and dig as well.
McNorton recorded two blocks
and four digs tonight. Her two
blocks, one was sole, were second
on the team.
Every team tries to challenge her
[McNorton] and tries to see what
shes got, Bechard said. If we have
an Achilles, some teams think its
when Erin is at the net blocking,
but she held her own tonight.
Jarmoc had two blocks of her own
last night, which moved her into
second in Big 12 history for career
sole blocks. Jarmoc surpassed Tex-
as A&Ms Amber Woolsey. Tis
was the second consecutive match
where Jarmoc set a record. Last
week, she set the all-time career
block record against Iowa State.
Tis is a testament to my hard
work, Jarmoc said. Blocking is
a skill that is underrated and not
as big of a glory as attacking, so it
takes a lot of work and its great to
get the numbers.
Te Jayhawks backed the frst
set with a 25-13 victory, and the
11-point margin was the largest
during Big 12 Conference play this
season. Ten, fnished the Bears of
with a third set 25-15 win to swept
the Baylor Bears.
Coming of the loss to Iowa State,
coach Bechard thinks that the team
had something to prove every time
they play and needed gain respect
across the country.
We wanted to bounce back, and
we certainly played well, Bechard
said.
Edited by Jessica Mitchell
Jayhawks dominate Baylor Bears at Horejsi
BLAIR SHEADE
bsheade@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Kansas volleyball players were pleased with their performance, beating the Baylor Bears at home and moving to 17-5
overall.

Overall, a lot of good stuff


for us to see on lm.
BONNIE HENRICKSON
Womens basketball coach
VOLLEYBALL
RED SOX WIN WORLD
SERIES
PAGE 3B
WOMENS BASKETBALL
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
The Jayhawks defeated the Pittsburg State Gorillas 85-54 in an exhibition game at home last night, Oct. 30.
STARTING STRONG
STELLA LIANG
sliang@kansan.com
Jayhawks win easily in first home game of the season
T
he last time the Jayhawks
began the season as
something other than
the reigning Big 12 champs,
tweeting was something only a
bird did and Andrew Wiggins was
in the fourth grade. Weve held
three presidential elections in that
span and watched George Mason,
VCU, Butler and Wichita State
go to fve more Final Fours than
Missouri in its entire history.
In other words, a lot has hap-
pened since 2004.
And before the now much older
Andrew Wiggins committed to
Self and Kansas back in April, the
streak of nine consecutive regular
season championships seemed to
be in jeopardy. Oklahoma State
returned the bulk of last years
team, including future top-5 NBA
draf pick Marcus Smart.
But Wiggins arrival put the
spotlight and target back on
Lawrence if they had even lef
to begin with. Tere are still ques-
tion marks for the Jayhawks head-
ing into the season opener next
Friday against Louisiana-Monroe,
but here are six reasons why a
10th straight Big 12 title banner
will be hung in Allen Fieldhouse
next fall.
Te aforementioned Wiggins:
Te best amateur player in the
world could lead a lot of teams to
conference titles. But on a team
with this much talent around
him? Its a lock.
Bill Self: In the last 10 seasons,
Self has brought Kansas more Big
12 regular season championships
(nine) than home losses (eight),
which leads us to
Allen Fieldhouse: When oppo-
nents cant expect Kansas to lose
a conference game at home, their
window of opportunity is already
small. In Bill Self s tenure the
Jayhawks are 161-8, winning over
95 percent of games in the Phog.
Te Youngsters Will Be Ready:
Te non conference schedule is
brutal this season, which should
lead to a few early losses. But by
the time January rolls around, all
those freshmen in the lineup will
have enough big-game experience
(Duke, Florida, Georgetown and
New Mexico, to name a few),
to handle the 18-game Big 12
schedule.
Balance: Andrew Wiggins (small
forward), Wayne Selden (shooting
guard) and Joel Embiid (center)
are all projected to be top-10 NBA
draf picks next summer, and all
three will spend plenty of time
together on the court. A team
capable of slowing one part of the
trio down likely wont have the
weapons to stop the others.
Versatility: Tere are enough
lineup possibilities to give op-
posing coaches nightmares. We
could see a small lineup that looks
something like: Naadir Tarpe,
Wayne Selden, Andrew White
III, Andrew Wiggins and Perry
Ellis. Self could also throw a big
lineup on the court that is just
as dangerous: Selden, Wiggins,
Brannen Greene, Tarik Black, and
Joel Embiid. Tere isnt a defense
in the country that could stop
both of those groups.
Tis team is built for a Final
Four run, and anything less would
be a disappointment. But Self and
his players take a sense of pride
in continuing the streak of Big 12
dominance, as they should. And
there is nothing standing between
this team and title number 10.
Edited by Duncan McHenry
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K
ansas Basketball is overrated. Great,
now that I have your attention, I
would like to talk about an actual
season tip-of that occurred this past Tues-
day, the NBA season tip-of. No, exhibition
games do not count towards your regular
season record; therefore, basketball season
here in Lawrence has not ofcially started.
Now that I got that of my chest, Tuesdays
NBA tip-of consisted of a lot of interesting,
yet positive, headlines surrounding former
Kansas basketball players, that should be
noted.
XAVIER HENRY,
THE LAKERS SAVIOR?
Making a Lakers debut for the ages, this
Kansas alum came of the bench for the pur-
ple and gold and scored a career, and game
high, 22 points. Especially while Kobe Bry-
ant is rehabbing his torn Achilles tendon,
Henry could possibly be a crucial part to the
Lakers success early on in the season. His
improved shooting ability, and his big, ath-
letic body, are the perfect tools that Lakers
coach Mike DAntoni, looks for when assem-
bling a team.
Te excitement and energy that Henry,
along with the rest of the Lakers bench,
brought onto the court Tuesday to defeat the
Clippers are something that will be needed
on a consistent basis throughout the entire
season, even when Bryant returns. Henry
was also one of fve Lakers to come of the
bench and score double digits. While grab-
bing six rebounds, and knocking down a trio
of three pointers, his presence was defnitely
felt, as the Lakers score 15 more points than
the Clippers when he was on the foor.
MARIO CHALMERS,
THE DEFENSIVE ANIMAL
Te 2008 National Championship hero
made sure to put the most anticipated return
to the NBA since Jordans comeback
on hold by completely shutting down
Derek Rose Tuesday night. To com-
pliment his fve steals, Chalmers also
held Rose to 12 points on 4-15 shoot-
ing, while forcing Rose to commit
fve turnovers as well. And did you
see that crossover Norris Cole had on
Rose? Once, Rose literally fell to the
ground. I guarantee that Bulls fans
had a slight heart attack, hoping their prized
possession did not sufer another injury.
But all the Derek Rose news aside, if
Chalmers is able to keep up the defensive
ability that he showed on Tuesday, the Heat
are going to have a tough time fnding an-
other team that will be able to challenge
them in the Eastern Conference. Although
his ofensive skill-set may not be where peo-
ple anticipated, that is alright, because Cole
can have the responsibility to score the ball,
if Chalmers can do all of the defensive work.
THE NEW GUYS
As the 7th and 39th pick of this past years
draf, Ben McLemore and Jef Withey will
look to contribute early to their teams. Mc-
Lemore will most likely be starting for the
Sacramento Kings, who
are in desperate need
of a star, something Mc-
Lemore can provide for
that franchise. His shooting
ability and athleticism are
going to make him a possible
candidate for the Rookie of the
Year award. Although Withey
will not see as much playing time
as McLemore, his defensive contributions
to the New Orleans Pelicans are going to be
essential if they want to become a possible
playof team. His time on the foor might be
limited due to the crowded frontcourt the
Pelicans currently have, but he will provide a
much needed depth to a weak bench.
One thing that coach Bill Self has tradition-
ally done a good job of, is making his players
NBA ready. Judging by the talent of former
Jayhawks, and where they stand in the NBA
now, I think it is safe to say that McLemore
and Withey wont have much trouble mak-
ing the transition. Oh, and side note, I do
not think that Kansas Basketball is overrat-
ed.
Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell

This week in athletics


Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
Wednesday
No Events Mens Basketball
Fort Hays State
7 p.m.
Lawrence
Volleball
West Virginia
6:30 p.m.
Lawrence
Soccer
Quarternals
TBA
Kansas City, Kan.
Soccer
Oklahoma
3 p.m.
Lawrence
Womens Tennis
Houston Invitational
All Day
Houston
Womens Tennis
Houston Invitational
All Day
Houston
Womens Tennis
Houston Invitational
All Day
Houston
No Events
Football
Texas
2:30 p.m.
Austin, Texas
Cross Country
Big 12 Championships
10 a.m.
Waco, Texas
Womens Basketball
Emporia State
2 p.m.
Lawrence
Womens Rowing
Head of the Hooch
Final Results
Chattanooga, Tenn.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 2B
!
?
FACT OF THE DAY
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
Q: Who was the last Kansas basketball
player to be drafted number one overall
in the NBA?
A: Danny Manning, 1988 to the Clippers
NBA.com
The Lakers improved to 5-0 on season
openers without Kobe Bryant in the
lineup.
ESPN.com
Jayhawks succeed in the NBA
When we come in the game, we change
the pace, we change the tempo, and
we change the outlook of what we do.
Xavier Henry
on the Lakers bench
QUOTE OF THE DAY
By Ryan Levine
rlevine@kansan.com
CROSS COUNTRY
Tis weekend hosts Championship
Saturday for the Kansas cross coun-
try teams. Both the mens and wom-
ens teams will be competing in the
2013 Big 12 Cross Country Cham-
pionship on Nov. 2 in Waco, Texas at
the Cottonwood Golf Course. Te
event is hosted by the Baylor Bears.
Te mens team looks to follow up
on a strong efort from the Indiana
State Pre-National meet, where they
fnished 14th out of 52 teams. Te
Jayhawks fnished close behind fel-
low Big 12 schools Oklahoma State
(7th place) and Oklahoma (9th
place), and fnished ahead of fellow
Big 12 schools Texas Tech (22nd
place) and Baylor (49th place).
Te 2012 team took 4th place last
year at the Championship in Aus-
tin, Texas. Senior Josh Munsch and
juniors Reid Buchanan and Evan
Landes will lead the Jayhawks afer
having strong races last year.
Te womens team will focus
their eforts on pack running afer
a 36th place fnish in Terre Haute,
Ind. Tey fnished behind Oklaho-
ma State (20th place), Kansas State
(30th place) and Baylor (31st place).
Sophomore Hannah Richardson
has had an excellent season so far
and will lead the women along with
senior Natalie Becker. Te wom-
en came in 7th place at the Big 12
Championship last year.
Te top mens and womens teams
will be crowned the league cham-
pion, and the top 15 individuals in
each race will be named all-confer-
ence.
On the mens side, the Oklahoma
State Cowboys look to defend their
throne for the sixth consecutive
year.
Edited by Jessica Mitchell
Kansas sets sights on Big 12 title
DANIEL HARMSEN
dharmsen@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Sophomore Logan Sloan and junior Eric Lightfoot compete in the Rim Rock Classic.
The mens and womens teams will compete in the Big 12 Championship on Nov. 2.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3B
In the next few months, senior
Josh Munsch, a design major and
Kansas cross country runner, will
be approaching his college fnish
line at graduation in excellent ac-
ademic standing, and ready to see
what the real world has in store for
him.
But this Saturday hell get to en-
joy one of his childhood passions,
maybe for the fnal time.
Afer he crosses the 8k fnish
line in Waco, Texas, at the Big 12
Championships in a few days,
Munsch will close one chapter of
his life that is particularly dear to
the Hays native: hell be running
one of his fnal races in a Kansas
Cross Country uniform.

For the normal college student


at Kansas, the nights likely involve
copious amounts of alcohol, cheap,
greasy food and rash, regrettable
decisions. However, Josh Munsch
is not your normal college student.
Munsch is taking ibuprofen and
water early on a November morn-
ing, but for a diferent reason.
Instead of using painkillers for
hangovers, he uses them for his
3rd metatarsal, fractured on a run
a few days before the 2012 season.
Instead of getting ready for bed, at
5 in the morning, Munsch is get-
ting up and ready for the Big 12
Championships.

For as long as he can remember,


Munsch has had an afnity, and
a unique talent for running. He
remembers the small elementary
school gym that sparked the pas-
sion.
My earliest memory of running
goes back to my fourth grade year,
he said. We were doing the pres-
idential ftness testing and I broke
the 4th grade record.
It only made Munsch hungrier.
I started taking running serious-
ly in high school, Munsch said. I
began to realize that I could poten-
tially run in college, so I made that
my goal.
Smashing school records like
pumpkins, Munsch led the Hays
High Indians to 2010 WAC, re-
gional and state championship, all
the while being named a member
of the National Honor Society,
Academic All-State Team and is a
Kansas Honor Scholar.
It was safe to say that Munsch
was going to be successful on and
of the cross country course when
he made it to college. So he made
a trip up to Lawrence for his frst
ofcial visit and he kind of liked it.
It blew me away, Munsch said.
I had my mind made up before the
visit was over.

Doubling on the Kansas Cross


Country and Track teams, Munsch
had early success in Lawrence. In
cross country, he competed in fve
meets as a freshman and notched
two top-10 fnishes. And in track
he competed in the mile at the Big
12 Indoor Championships and
placed ninth with a time of 4:08.86.
His sophomore year was much
of the same. He ran his personal
best 8K time (25:10.2) at the Big
12 Championships and was named
Academic All-Big 12 First Team.
His mile time came down by a sec-
ond at the Big 12 Indoor Champi-
onships for a seventh place fnish.
During the outdoor season, he
was added to the All-American
Honorable Mention list afer fn-
ishing 22nd in the 1,500 meters at
the NCAA championship.
With so much early success,
Munsch was poised for a memora-
ble junior and senior campaign.

On a run just a few days before his


junior season, Munsch planted his
foot on some unstable footing and
suddenly felt a stinging sensation.
From that point, I couldnt put
that foot down without feeling
pain, Munsch said.
All his hard work and dedication
was going to be put on hold, and
his junior and senior season hinged
on how well the rehab would go.
Teres really not a lot you can do
but stay of it, Munsch said. Te
foot is obviously a difcult area to
deal with because youre always
putting weight on it, especially in
this sport.
Having something you worked
for your whole life taken away
so suddenly, so unceremonious-
ly, would discourage most, but
Munsch persevered.
Trough rigorous training, and
an unrelenting will to compete
once again, Munsch was back for
four races that year. And he was
faster.
Munsch ran last years Big 12
Championship 8k in 24:57.4 and
was part of a team that earned
All-Academic status.

Josh Munsch has had a very suc-


cessful encore performance this
year, running his best 8k in 24:20.30
at the Indiana State Pre-Nationals.
He leads a KU Mens team that is
one of the best in recent memory.
We have good leadership with
Munsch, head coach Stanley Red-
wine said. When you start to put
those types of people in front of
your freshmen and making sure
that they compete well together,
then our leaders are doing well for
the team.
Munsch works hard on the trails
and in the classroom, and he has
an uncanny knack for showing his
best at the Big 12 Championships.
Like that fateful gym period in the
fourth grade, this Saturday will be a
big day for the Kansan in so many
ways.
I have a ton of great memo-
ries from my time running cross,
Munsch said. Fortunately its not
over yet and Im hoping to make
even greater ones. Ill get back to
you on that.
Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell
DANIEL HARMSEN
dharmsen@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Senior Josh Munsch competes in Lawrences Rim Rock Classic on Oct. 5. Munsch
will compete in his nal Big 12 Championship event this weekend.
Senior Josh Munsch prepares for final collegiate run
CROSS COUNTRY
MLB
Red Sox win World Series, defeating Cardinals in six games
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON David Ortiz and the
Boston Red Sox romped to their
third World Series championship
in 10 seasons, thumping October
ace Michael Wacha and the St.
Louis Cardinals 6-1 Wednesday
night in Game 6.
Shane Victorino drove in four
runs and John Lackey pitched shut-
out ball into the seventh inning as
the Red Sox clinched a crown on
their own feld for the frst time
since 1918.
Ortiz drew three walks and scored
twice. He reached base a whopping
19 times in 25 plate appearances.
Lackey gave up one run in 6 2-3
innings, becoming the frst pitch-
er to start and win a World Series
clincher for two diferent teams,
having led the Angels past Barry
Bonds and the Giants in Game 7 in
2002 as a rookie.
Stephen Drew hit a solo home
run that someone in a Red Sox
jacket caught in the bullpen. Mike
Napoli, back in the lineup with Or-
tiz returning to the DH slot, hit an
RBI single into the B Strong cut-
out in the grass that pays tribute to
the victims of the Boston Marathon
bombings.
Te Cardinals dropped their
third straight game. Afer winning
Game 3 on an obstruction call, they
couldnt seem to get out of their
own way.
All around the ballpark and be-
yond, it was clear Boston was on
the brink of something special.
With the Prudential tower lit up
with Go Sox, fans fled past in-
creased a beefed-up security pres-
ence. Vendors outside the gates
urged Red Sox rooters to buy ex-
tra programs because they could
someday be valuable souvenirs.
Signs on the videoboard advised
of late-night changes to the public
transportation system.
Carlton Fisk, still worshipped at
Fenway for that winning home run
in 75, got right into the spirit that
has taken over these Red Sox be-
fore his toss, the Hall of Famer put
on a playful beard.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 4B
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Te goal is simple for the soc-
cer teamwin. If the Kansas soc-
cer team does not beat, or tie, the
Oklahoma Sooners in its last reg-
ular season match on Friday, the
season will be over. Kansas (6-10-
2, 1-5-1) sits in eighth place, out of
nine, in the conference, and oppo-
nent Oklahoma (4-12-1, 1-6) is at
the bottom of the standings.
Te Big 12 Tournament, which
will start on Nov. 6, accepts the
top eight teams in the league. Kan-
sas and Oklahoma will be playing
for the last spot in their matchup
on Friday. Te tournament will be
held at Swope Soccer Village in
Kansas City, Mo., For the last 16
years, the tournament has been
played in San Antonio.
Kansas heads into this match on
a two-game losing streak where it
has not scored a goal. In conference
play, the Jayhawks have been out-
scored 7-2, with both goals coming
from their victory against Baylor.
Te Sooners have not fared any
better. Teir lone conference win
was against TCU on Oct. 18.
However, they come in with some
momentum from their last game,
which was a hard-fought, dou-
ble-overtime loss to conference
leader West Virginia.
On their senior night, the Soon-
ers kept West Virginia scoreless
in the frst half and struck frst on
a goal from junior forward Daisy
Cardona in the second half. West
Virginia tied the game up midway
through the second half and even-
tually scored the game-winner in
the 101st minute of the match.
Cardona leads the team in goals
with fve. Redshirt freshman Kassi-
die Stade has 67 saves for the sea-
son and a .698 save percentage.
Fridays matchup is also senior
night for the Jayhawks. Te game
will be the last home match for for-
ward Caroline Kastor and defend-
ers Madi Hillis and Shannon Ren-
ner. Kastor currently leads the team
with six goals. Her 26 career goals
put her in a tie for second place on
Kansas all-time goal scoring chart.
If the team avoids a loss, the sea-
son will continue. Kansas hosts
Oklahoma Friday at 3 p.m. Te
match will be the last home game
held at Jayhawk Soccer Complex.
Next season, the team will move
to Rock Chalk Park when its com-
pleted.
Edited by Hannah Barling
Kansas plays Oklahoma
for last tournament spot
STELLA LIANG
sliang@kansan.com
EMILY WITTLER/KANSAN
Senior forward Caroline Kastor drives the ball downeld. The Jayhawks will compete
against Oklahoma on Nov. 1 for the last spot in the Big 12 Tournament.
SOCCER WOMENS BASKETBALL
Lamaria Cole
knew she had
some big shoes
to fll this sea-
son. With the
departure of
standout Angel
Goodrich, the
starting point
guard spot for the womens bas-
ketball team would likely be hers
to lose.
If she had any nerves Wednes-
day night in her frst career start,
she didnt show it. Cole, a soph-
omore guard, shone in an 85-54
victory against Pittsburg State in
an exhibition game at Allen Field-
house. Cole said she was excited
about starting.
Going from not playing at all to
playing a lot more, I was excited,
Cole said.
Cole came out with high energy
and scored on a driving layup on
the Jayhawks second possession
of the game. Two possessions
later, she cut to the basket and
scored on an assist from Asia
Boyd starting an 8-0 run early
in the game for the Jayhawks.
Last year I didnt play under
control at all, Cole said. Afer
watching Angel [Goodrich] and
seeing how she controls the foor,
I learned a lot.
One of the biggest questions
with Cole coming into this sea-
son was her ability to handle the
basketball. In her 45 total min-
utes played as a freshman, Cole
had 16 turnovers. Tat averages
out to just under one turnover
for every three minutes she was
on the foor last season. Against
Pittsburg State, she ran the of-
fense efectively, turning the ball
over only three times in 26 min-
utes on the foor while recording
three assists.
While waiting her turn, shes
developed discipline, coach
Bonnie Henrickson said. It has
allowed her to be successful to-
night, and it will be the reason she
has success [in the future].
Towards the end of the frst half
Cole went coast-to-coast afer a
missed free throw by Pittsburg
States Lizzy Jeronimus. Cole
forced an inbound violation on
the Gorillas afer a basket by
Markisha Hawkins and, on the
next possession for Kansas, scored
on another coast-to-coast drive to
the basket, showing her quickness
by sidestepping a defender. She
fnished the game with 12 points
on 6-for-12 shooting, joining four
other Jayhawks in double fgures.
Man, shes fast, Pittsburg State
coach Lane Lord said. I thought
she took care of the ball very well
and I thought she really harassed
us all night long. She had a great
frst start.
Cole came out hot to start the
second half for the Jayhawks as
well. She scored on the Jayhawks
frst possession and then drove
the lane and dished the ball to
Chelsea Gardner for an easy
layup.
Afer a missed shot by the Go-
rillas, Cole once again went coast-
to-coast for two points. Afer the
basket, Pittsburg State called a
timeout, and Cole looked to the
fans and let out a yell of passion.
I thought for [Lamaria] to push
in transition and take care of the
ball was good, Henrickson said.
She has the speed and athleti-
cism that we need in this league
to be successful.
Kansas plays its fnal exhibition
game against Emporia State on
Sunday, Nov. 3, at 2 p.m.
Edited by Hannah Barling
EVAN DUNBAR
edunbar@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Coach Bonnie Henrickson watches from the sidelines as the Jayhawks play against Pittsburg State on Wednesday, Oct. 30.
Kansas won the game 84-54.
Lamaria Cole shines in on-court
debut against Pittsburg State
Cole
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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 5B
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On a gloomy day in Lawrence,
Kansas defensive lineman Keon
Stowers sat in a room overlooking
Memorial Stadium at a round table
of reporters and gave his most de-
fnitive answer of the day. He was
asked if talking about getting an
upset each week ever got old.
No, Stowers said.
As a captain this year, Stowers
has been asked a similar question
each week. Te Jayhawks have been
largely unfavored, for good reason,
against each conference opponent
this season and their ffh confer-
ence matchup at Texas this week-
end is no diferent. Texas is cur-
rently favored by 28 points.
Were going to keep working un-
til it happens, so it will never get
old, Stowers said.
What is getting older is the streak
of consecutive Big 12 losses and
road games. Te Big 12 losing
streak stands at 25 games. Te road
game losing streak is at 21. Te Big
12 losing streak dates back to 2010,
while the road game streak extends
back to 2009. Tats old.
But what doesnt get old for Stow-
ers is going on the road, and this
week, Stowers is ready for the op-
portunity to end both.
I defnitely like road games. Its
good to go on the road just to get
that diferent feel from being at
home, Stowers said. You can get
a better energetic feel from the
crowd, not saying we dont have a
good crowd, but you get to actual-
ly see another setting and it has its
positives and negatives.
Te road may just have as many
positives as it does negatives for
Kansas. With losses abundant
home and abroad, can Kansas real-
ly say it has a home feld advantage?
Kansas has lost by an average
of more than 32 points per game
against conference opponents at
home this year. Its not a glaring
advantage.
What road trips can be for Kansas
is a break, a hiatus, something dif-
ferent, a switch up. Its why Charlie
Weis is even switching up the road
trip routine this week. Kansas is
leaving a day early to complete its
walkthrough at Texas instead of the
usual walkthrough performed in
Lawrence before the trip.
It could even help players like
Stowers get the tourist part of the
trip out of the way.
Last year I would go on some of
these road trips and see these sta-
diums and be like, Oh my God,
Im playing at Oklahoma and all
these other big stadiums, Stowers
said. Tats just another thing to
be intimidated by; the name of the
school rather than the actual play
of the players, so I think that plays
a factor into road games in addi-
tion to the travels and being out of
your element.
Although Kansas will be out of
its home element, they will be
more comfortable on defense. Ben
Heeney is back on the depth chart
for the Jayhawks. Heeney, Kansas
most valuable defensive asset, was
sidelined just over two weeks ago
against TCU, but is set to return for
the Jayhawks against a run-orient-
ed Longhorn team that is undefeat-
ed in conference play.
You cant replace a guy like Ben
with his tenacious attitude and
work ethic. You just cant replace a
guy like that, Stowers said. Look-
ing over my shoulder yesterday and
seeing number 31 defnitely made
me feel better.
Heeney will defnitely help, but
he alone cant push Kansas over the
edge. It will take more than Heeney
to shed an ugly pair of 20-plus los-
ing streaks.
I think the whole thing with us
being on the big stage, going to
Texas stadium with almost 100,000
people and being able to pull of
this upset can be used as a sort of
fre to get us going, Stowers said.
Te storyline is the same, Kansas
is a huge underdog. How big does
the fre have to be?
Edited by Hannah Barling
FOOTBALL
Stowers talks road games,
defense and stadium shock
ASHLEIGH LEE/KANSAN
Junior defensive lineman Keon Stowers (98) walks onto the eld with teammates junior linebacker Ben Heeney (31), junior
quarterback Jake Heaps (9) and senior running back James Sims (29) before the Oct. 26 football game against Baylor.
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chybl@kansan.com
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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 PAGE 6B THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
GAMEDAY
PREVIEW
F
O
O
T
B
A
L
L
KANSAS
KANSAS
PREDICTION FOR
4513
TEXAS KANSAS
CONNOR OBERKROM
coberkrom@kansan.com
STARTING LINEUP
OFFENSE DEFENSE
POSITION NAME NO. YEAR
X Tre Parmalee 11 So.
LT Pat Lewandowski 61 Jr.
LG Ngalu Fusimalohi 63 Jr.
C Gavin Howard 70 Sr.
RG Mike Smithburg 65 Jr.
RT Aslam Sterling 77 Sr.
TE Jimmay Mundine 41 Jr.
RB James Sims 29 Sr.
QB Jake Heaps 9 Jr.
F Brandon Bourbon 25 Jr.
Z Rodriguez Coleman 1 Jr.
LC JaCorey Shepherd 24 Jr.
Nickel Victor Simmons 27 Jr.
LE/T Kevin Young 90 Sr.
N Keon Stowers 98 Jr.
RE/T Keba Agostinho 96 Sr.
BUCK Ben Goodman 93 So.
CB Dexter McDonald 12 Jr.
SS Isaiah Johnson 5 So.
MLB Ben Heeney 31 Sr.
WLB Jake Love 57 So.
FS Cassius Sendish 33 Jr.
POSITION NAME NO. YEAR
PLAYER TO WATCH
The Jayhawk offense, which has failed to make big plays all season,
goes against a Texas defense on Saturday that is currently 50th in points
allowed. Kansas, who will roll out Jake Heaps and Montell Cozart, looks to
spread the ball a little more as Cozart is still learning the ropes of run-
ning the offense. James Sims has had 180 rushing yards the last three
games, but as teams adjust to the gameplan in the 2nd half, things
have gone sour. Look for Kansas to establish the run early once again
against a Texas defense, who notably struggled against the run earlier
in the season. Last year against Texas, Sims had one of his best career
days, rushing for 176 yards.
The defense, coming off a slaughtering at the hands of Baylor, faces an
entirely different brand of football a much more run-oriented team and
not as spread out as it faced last week. Texas uses three running backs,
but Malcom Brown and Jonathan Gray do most of the damage. Case
McCoy, the Texas quarterback, since taking over for an injured David Ash,
has ourished, but Kansas gets Ben Heeney back this week. Heeney will
be imperative as he tries to anchor a run defense that has given up 249
yards per game over the last three games.
SPECIAL TEAMS
Matthew Wyman has missed one eld goal and two extra points the last two games. Special teams could become
crucial if Kansas can stay in it. Kansas has to nd another way to score with their offense not being a reliable
source, and their return game provides that chance as it does every week.
Against one the best running tandems in the Big 12 Ben Heeney will have to be a driving force against Texas.
Heeney was out for the Baylor game and should make a noticeable difference this week. Heeney has 51 tackles on
the year.
AT A GLANCE
Mack Brown is 8-0 versus Kansas and Charlie Weis is just 0-1 against Texas in last years battle that came down
to the last two minutes. A win versus Texas would be a pretty big accomplishment considering Kansas hasnt
beaten Texas since the before the start of World War I.
COACHING
Weis said that he worked with the receivers about being more physical and that it has paid dividends so far. We
saw a little last week with Rodriguez Coleman breaking through, but that progress needs to be carried through
each game. It will be the focal point to see if Kansas can get any big plays from their wide receiving corps.
BABY JAY CHEERS IF
Jake Heaps and Montell Cozart make some form of progress. Cozart is still in the premature stages, while Heaps
cant catch a break behind the shaky offensive line. But if Cozart can patrol a legitimate drive, that should make
at least a few Jayhawk fans crack a little smile.
MOMENTUM
Kansas is coming off a drubbing, but I dont think it matters much especially with this teams circumstances. It
has shown that the past week doesnt affect them drastically, but a win would do absolute wonders.
QUESTION MARKS
Can the Jayhawks string some passes together to make the future feel
somewhat secure? Developing a quarterback for next year is the one
thing that can be focused on until seasons end. And if Weis has some
gem in Cozart or can morph Heaps into something, then thatd be worth
a whole lot. There may have been some short ashes, but nothing to
proclaim that you have the next Todd Reesing.
Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell
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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 PAGE 7B THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
GAMEDAY
PREVIEW
F
O
O
T
B
A
L
L
TEXAS
BY THE NUMBERS
16
10
3
The number of sacks the Texas defense has in the
last four weeks.
The number of big play touchdowns (45 yards or
longer) that Texas has this season between eight
players.
The number of turnovers that Texas forced leading
to scores last week against TCU.
Edited by Madison Schultz
MAX GOODWIN
mgoodwin@kansan.com
STARTING LINEUP
OFFENSE
SPECIAL TEAMS
POSITION NAME NO. YEAR
QB Case McCoy 6 Sr.
WR Jaxon Shipley 8 Jr.
WR Mike Davis 1 Sr.
RB Jonathan Gray 32 So.
FB Alex De La Torre 36 So.
TE Geoff Swaim 82 Jr.
RT Kennedy Estelle 77 So.
RG Mason Walters 72 Sr.
C Dominic Espinosa 55 Jr.
LG Trey Hopkins 75 Sr.
LT Donald Hawkins 51 Sr.
DE Cedrick Reed 88 Jr.
DE Jackson Jeffcoat 44 Sr.
DT Malcolm Brown 90 So.
DT Chris Whaley 96 Sr.
OLB Peter Jinkens 19 So.
OLB Steve Edmond 33 Jr.
MLB Dalton Santos 55 So.
CB Quandre Diggs 6 Jr.
CB Carrington Byndom 23 Sr.
FS Mykkelle Thompson 2 Jr.
SS Adrian Phillips 17 Sr.
POSITION NAME NO. YEAR
Case McCoy is 4-0 as starting quarterback of the Longhorns this
season as he replaces David Ash, who has been out with a concussion
for more than a month. The Texas offense is built around the run. The
Longhorns are third in the Big 12 in averaging 200 rushing yards a
game, with several running backs capable of busting a big play.
DEFENSE
Defensive coordinator Gregg Robinson was hired after the BYU game
on Sept. 7 to replace Manny Diaz, who had been red. In the last four
games Texas has become a more aggressive defense under Robinson.
The Longhorns are sixth in the FBS with 16 sacks in the last four
games.
Mack Brown has been the coach of the Longhorns for 15 years now, and during that time they have been
known for blocking kicks. Last season, Texas was third in the FBS with seven blocked kicks, and since 2001
the Longhorns have blocked more than any other team.
Jonathan Gray is 5-foot-11 and weighs 208 pounds. He has the ability to turn any play into a big run and has
rushed 90 yards or more in ve of the Longhorns seven games this season.
PLAYER TO WATCH
Texas plays the same style of football as the Kansas. Mack Brown has one of the Big 12s best running backs
and a solid defense. The Longhorns defense could make it a rough day for both Kansas quarterbacks.
AT A GLANCE
Mack Brown could be in his last season as the coach at Texas with athletic director DeLoss Dodds leaving, but
that seems less certain the more that Texas wins this season. Brown made a risky move changing his defen-
sive coordinator after the second game of the season, but the Longhorns have become a much more effective.
COACHING
Texas has a lot of it, as it has rolled to convincing victories in all four of its Big 12 games, after an ugly
nonconference performance.
MOMENTUM
BABY JAY WILL WEEP IF
The Longhorns take an early lead. If that happens, then it would be
difcult for the Jayhawks to make much of a comeback against the
good defense, and strong running game of Texas.
QUESTION MARKS
Will Texas come out looking motivated early after being shown the
video of last seasons near loss at Memorial Stadium?
Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Texas Chet Moss (13) blocks TCUs Phil Taylor (35) as Adrian Colbert (26) tries to recover a TCU punt return fumble during the
second half of a game on Saturday in Fort Worth, Texas. Texas beat TCU 30-7.
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