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Unlocking the Secrets of Eclipses

By Tim Bost
One of the great insights of financial and mundane astrology is that solar eclipses set up resonant fields, harmonic patterns that include hot spots in celestial longitude. These hot spots persist as sensitive areas in the zodiac long after the time of the eclipse itself, and in many cases actually becomes sensitive points prior to the time of the eclipse as well. When various planets resonate with these hot spots by transit, by progression, or by arc direction, the true effects of the eclipse become manifest. Sometimes these triggering events take place within a few days of the date of the eclipse; on other occasions it is months or even years later when their impact is felt. In interpreting eclipses, the challenge is often one of deciding which particular planet will provide the triggering influence, and of determining exactly how long the eclipses resonant field will remain active. When we apply astrology to the markets, we discover that eclipses not only create resonant fields in time, but in price, too. This added dimension can give us extra leverage in determining the likely impact of a particular eclipse. The equities markets and futures markets are always a reflection of mass psychology, and that psychological reality not only corresponds to the everchanging dynamics of the astrological realm, but also to an intricate underlying pattern of numerical relationships as well. By taking a look at what is actually happening with prices in the particular market we are analyzing, and by coordinating that price information with the astrological dynamics that are taking place at the time of an eclipse, we can gain valuable clues about the likely behavior of that market after the eclipse, or at least get some hints about the specific time periods and price zones we can most profitably examine for guidance and confirmation as we develop a trading plan. A Systematic Approach to Eclipse Analysis Here is one approach to opening up the forecasting potential of a solar eclipse. It is not designed to be a hypothetical exercise or a long-range forecasting tool, simply because it requires some direct observation of actual price levels at or near the time of the eclipse itself. In that sense, it is an active trading method, one which links observed market behavior to the development of specific trading strategies. When we use it to gather price data and successfully uncover its astrological and numerological connections to an eclipse, that data can then be used to pinpoint the specific time frames and astrological actions which can most reliably be taken into consideration to set up high-profit future trades. When we seek to unlock the price and time potential in a solar eclipse, we can follow these specific steps: 1. We examine the horoscope for the eclipse. Note the zodiacal position of the eclipse (the eclipse point), converting it to 360 notation. 2. We calculate the cardinal mirrors of the eclipse, including the equinoctial mirror point, and the eclipse antiscion (also known as the eclipse solstice point). To calculate the equinoctial mirror point, subtract the eclipses degree position within its zodiac sign from the constant arc of 30, then add the equinoctially mirrored sign, with eclipses in Aries mirroring into Pisces, eclipses in Taurus mirroring into Aquarius, eclipses in Gemini mirroring into Capricorn, eclipses in Cancer mirroring into Sagittarius, eclipses in Leo mirroring into Scorpio, eclipses in Virgo mirroring into Libra, eclipses in Libra mirroring into Virgo, eclipses in Scorpio mirroring into Leo, eclipses in Sagittarius mirroring into Cancer, eclipses in Capricorn mirroring into Gemini, eclipses in Aquarius mirroring into Taurus, and eclipses in Pisces mirroring into Aries. 3. Once we have calculated the equinoctial mirror point for the eclipse, we use it to determine the eclipse antiscionsimply change the zodiacal sign of the equinoctial mirror point to its polar opposite in the natural wheel of the zodiac (Aries to Libra, Taurus to Scorpio, Gemini to Sagittarius, etc.). 4. We convert the equinoctial mirror point and the eclipse antiscion to 360 notation. Keep a list of the 360 equivalents of the eclipse point, the equinoctial mirror point, and the eclipse antiscion handy. 5. Examine the daily prices for the market we are analyzing. Using decimal notation, we write down the figures for the opening price, the daily high, the daily low, and the closing price. We do this for the day of the solar eclipse and for the days prior to and immediately after the eclipse as well. Its especially important to note the trading days preceding and following the eclipse when the eclipse falls on a weekend or a holiday. 6. From the eclipse horoscope, we record the zodiacal positions of all the remaining planets, converting each of them to 360 notation. Be sure to include the True Lunar Node on the list. 7. We compare our two lists of 360 equivalent astrological positions (the main list of eclipse-related positions from Step 4 and the list of planetary positions from Step 6) to your list of prices from Step 5. We are looking for correspondences, which sometimes necessitate moving a decimal point in the figures we are examining. For example, a closing price from your list might be $31.81, which could correspond to a

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planetary position of 318.13 (the equivalent of 18 08 Aquarius, converted to 360 notation). On occasion it may also be necessary to add increments of 360 to a planetary position in order to bring its equivalent into the appropriate range of a trading priceas in the case of a planet at 9 48 Gemini corresponding to a price of $78.98 (9 48 Gemini = 69.8; 69.8 + 360 + 360 = 789.8). At times finding the numerical correspondence may involve some minor rounding-off, but in many cases we will discover precise correlations that are startlingly obvious. 8. We expand the comparison process by using a Gann Wheel to uncover additional price and degree equivalents. We can use a mechanical wheel like the original 24/360 Price and Time Chart used by W. D. Gann, or choose the streamlined Universal Clock version featured in Jeanne Longs book The Universal Clock: Forecasting Time and Price in the Footsteps of W. D. Gann. There is also a Universal Clock feature in the Galactic Trader software for astro-trading; click on Planets in the toolbar at the top of the screen, then select Universal Clock in the drop-down menu. The Universal Clock makes it easy to find price and degree correlations at different levels, based on adding or subtracting increments of 24 to any existing price or degree. For example, 100 (degrees or dollars)
Solar Partial Eclipse

corresponds to 76 and 52 by subtraction, and to 124, 148, 172, and 196 by addition. 9. Once we have selected the planet in the eclipse horoscope that most closely relates to the trading prices on the date of the eclipse, we use the transits of that planet to the eclipse point, the equinoctial mirror point, and the eclipse antiscion to forecast future price levels. Again, we may need to move decimal points to reflect market conditions accurately, and in most cases we find that the Universal Clock is an indispensable tool. An Historical Example How does this technique work in actual application? As an example, lets take a look at the solar eclipse of October 11, 1931 and its correlations to prices in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. This was a partial eclipse, with the Sun/Moon conjunction at 17 15 Libra. This particular eclipse is of some current interest because it was in the same Saros Series as the solar eclipse coming up on November 23, 2003. The eclipse point at 17 15 Libra corresponds to 197.25 in 360 notation, so we mark the numbers 197 and 198 on the inner, Time Wheel section of the Universal Clock diagram. The equinoctial mirror point for the eclipse falls at 12 45 Virgo, which translates to
Tim Bost - Astrologer 2831 Ringling Blvd., Ste B-108 Sarasota, FL 34237 USA 941-953-3545 Fax:941-953-3732 Web: http://www.TimBost.com Email: timbost@pipeline.com

Natal Chart Oct 11 1931 8:55 am EDT +4:00 New York, NY 40N42'51'' 074W00'23'' Geocentric Tropical Placidus True Node

16 15' 19

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25' 12 00' 17 0 8 ' 17 15' 26 07' 16 3 3 '

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162.75 in 360 notation and 162-163 on the inner wheel of Universal Clock; the eclipse antiscion is 12 45 Pisces, corresponding to 342.75 in 360 notation and 342-343 on the Universal Clock. The 1931 solar eclipse took place with the Sun/Moon conjunction at one corner of a grand cross which also featured Saturn, Pluto, and Uranus in cardinal signs. It was not that grand cross pattern which proved significant in market action, however. Instead, the planet Mars, in a T-Square pattern with Jupiter and Chiron, was the horoscope point which most actively connected with the stock market activity of the time. U.S. markets were closed on Sunday, October 11, the exact date of the eclipse. There was active trading on the preceding day, however, since in 1931 the markets were regularly open on Saturday as the closing day in a six-day trading week. On October 10 the Dow Jones Industrial Average made a high of 106.51, a low of 103.33, and closed at 105.61. It was the high of the trading day that most closely resonated with the zodiacal position of transiting Mars at the time of the eclipse. Mars, at 16 33 Scorpio, had a position in celestial longitude corresponding to 226.55 degrees in 360 notation. By using the Universal Clock we can easily see that 226 matches 106 (5 X 24 = 120; 226 120 = 106), so an exact equivalent to the position of Mars would be 106.55. Its correspondence with the daily close in the Dow at 106.51 confirms that Mars is the specific planet to watch in forecasting future prices impacted by this eclipse. We will thus also want to mark the 226-227 position on the inner wheel of the Universal Clock, as well as the 106107 position on the outer wheel, which is the Price Wheel section of the diagram. At this point we have four time zones associated with the solar eclipse noted on the inner Universal Clock wheel: the eclipse point at 197-198; the equinoctial mirror point at 162-163; the eclipse antiscion at 342-343; and the Mars point at 226-227. We also have one price zone marked in the price wheel, the Mars price area at 106-107, derived from our empirical observation of what the market was actually doing at the time of the eclipse. Our next task is to note the price zones that match the other time zones we have marked on the Universal Clock, taking into account the actual trading range of the market we are forecasting. Historical records show that between August, 1931 and March, 1932, the Dow Jones Industrials traded between a low of 71.80 and a high of 145.80. We will thus be working in that price range as we note price zone correspondences with the time zones. (If we were working with an example from the markets in 2003, we would simply adjust our price wheel by adding increments of 24 until we reached a price range for a Dow above 9,000; the time wheel would remain the same.) The price zones on the Universal Clock that match the eclipse point are thus 77-78, 101-102, and 125-126; the ones matching the equinoctial mirror point are 90-91, 114-115, and 138-139; the ones matching the eclipse antiscion are 78-79, 102-103, and 126-127; and the ones

matching the Mars point are 82-83, 106-107, and 130131. These are the particular prices for the Dow that we will be watching for as Mars transits the sensitive points in the eclipse horoscope, namely the eclipse point, the equinoctial mirror point, and the eclipse antiscion. We also note that since the eclipse antiscion is so close to being an increment of the eclipse point itself when it is positioned on the Universal Clock, we are really actually only looking at Mars transits to two positions, the equinoctial mirror point and the combined eclipse/eclipse antiscion zone. Because Mars in the eclipse horoscope is at a position in the zodiac that follows the eclipse point, we begin our analysis by looking for the date prior to the eclipse when Mars conjoined the eclipse point. If we discover a price correspondence on that date, it will provide further confirmation that Mars is the planet we need to be watching. A glance at the ephemeris reveals that Mars passed over the eclipse point on August 28, 1931. On that day the Dow Industrials traded with a high of 142.11 and a low of 138.82. Since that exactly overlaps the equinoctial mirror point price zone at 138-139, we have our confirmation! The next date we will consider comes after the eclipse, giving us our first opportunity to test the Mars transit as a forecasting tool. That date is October 23, 1931, when Mars passed over 24 45 Scorpio. This degree position equals 234.75 in 360 notation, corresponding to the 234-235 increment of the equinoctial mirror point time zone. On October 23 the Dow traded between 104.58 and 109.17, hitting the 106107 Mars price zone on the Universal Clock. On November 7, 1931, Mars transited 5 15 Sagittarius, at the 245-246 increment of the eclipse point time zone. On that date the Dow had moved up to trade between 112.42 and 117.30, hitting the 114-115 equinoctial mirror point price zone. Less than two weeks later, on November 26, 1931, Mars transited 18 45 Sagittarius, at the 258-259 increment of the equinoctial mirror point time zone. U.S. markets werent open on November 26 because of the Thanksgiving Holiday, but on November 27, 1931, the Dow traded between 90.65 and 93.79, hitting the 90-91 equinoctial mirror point price zone. On December 11, 1931, Mars hit 29 15 Sagittarius, at the 269-270 increment of the eclipse point time zone. On December 11 the Dow Industrials traded between 79.26 and 83.11, a price range that hit both the 78-79 eclipse antiscion price zone and the 82-83 Mars point price zone on the Universal Clock. Then on December 27, 1931, Mars passed over 12 45 Capricorn, at the 282-283 increment of the equinoctial mirror point time zone. December 27 was a Sunday which followed a two-day market holiday with the NYSE closed for Christmas on December 25 and 26, so the most recent trading had taken place on Thursday, December 24. On that day the Dow posted a low of 75.14

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and a high of 77.45, hitting the 77-78 eclipse point price zone. As the New Year got underway, Mars transited 23 15 Capricorn on January 11, 1932, at the 293-294 increment of the eclipse point time zone. January 11 saw the Dow trading between 77.25 and 82.20. This trading range hit the 77-78 eclipse point price zone, the 78-79 eclipse antiscion price zone, and the 82-83 Mars point price zone on the Universal Clock! On January 27, 1932, Mars transited 6 45 Aquarius, at the 306-307 increment of the equinoctial mirror point time zone. The trading range for the Dow Jones Industrial Average on that date was between 76.66 and 79.20, hitting both the 77-78 eclipse point price zone and the 78-79 eclipse antiscion price zone. On February 11, 1932, with Mars hitting the 317-318 increment of the eclipse point time zone as it transited 17 15 Aquarius, the Dow gapped upward to trade between 74.27 and 79.62. Again, this coincided with both the 77-78 eclipse point price zone and the 78-79 eclipse antiscion price zone. A couple of weeks later, on February 26, 1932, Mars passed over 0 45 Pisces, at the 330-331 increment of

the equinoctial mirror point time zone. On February 26 the range for the Dow was between 81.37 and 83.53, hitting the 82-83 Mars point price zone. Finally, on March 12, 1932, Mars conjoined the eclipse antiscion at 12 45 Pisces. On that day the Dow Industrials traded between 83.24 and 85.00, again hitting the 82-83 Mars point price zone. Significant Results. . . and a Word of Caution This example, which documents eleven separate transits of a single planet to sensitive points in an eclipse horoscopetransits that precisely link time and price clearly illustrates just how powerful the resonant effect of an eclipse can be in the markets. With the Dow Industrials covering a trading range of roughly 75 points during the time frame under consideration, and with just 21 specific price points generated by the eclipse, this string of price correlations is certainly remarkable. A caveat is in order here, however. In this example of the 1931 eclipse, the average trading range for the Dow on the Mars transit dates was just 3.53 points. While that makes the precision of the price correspondences in the example even more significant, it presents a

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challenge when we seek to apply this technique to todays volatile markets, when a daily trading range of more than 100 points is not unheard of. That sort of market activity lights up every number in the Universal Clock! It suggests that this technique should be used judiciously, with particular consideration given to the volatility of the market under analysis. In any case, this approach to eclipse analysis can be applied to futures markets or to individual equities just as easily as it can be used with a market index. The key to the technique is in studying the planetary positions in the eclipse horoscope, and then looking for an actual price correspondence in the market entity under analysis. When we discover that kind of correspondence, we can then rest assured that the eclipse will soon reveal its secrets!

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