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Graduate WOU/ESOL Lesson Plan Template 2012-2013

Name: Stephanie Strasdin Date: July 10, 2013 ED. 691 POLISHED VERSION Grade level: 9-12

Salem Witch Trials


GOALS Content Area: Language Arts, United States History Standard (ODE/CORE or CCSS): Understands how political institutions and religious freedom emerged in the North American colonies. Language Arts Standards (if applicable): Demonstrates a familiarity with selected literary works of enduring quality. ESOL Goal (Function): Retelling/Relating past events. OBJECTIVES Content: Students will understand the following In 17th-century New England, people were persecuted for allegedly practicing witchcraft. Students of this period have looked into the allegations and offer alternatives to witchcraft to explain the people's behavior. Arthur Miller wrote the play The Crucible, using the 17th-century case of witch trials (and fictionalizing it) to comment on a 20th-century phenomenonthe hunting of communists as if they were witches. Through writing their own version of the story and being able to include these main points within it. ESOL Objectives (Forms): [List proficiency levels of ELLs in your class, or choose two if hypothetical] B: ______, ______ EI: In the 17th century New England, people were persecuted for __.

Graduate WOU/ESOL Lesson Plan Template 2012-2013

I: In the ___ century ______, people were persecuted for ____. EA: In the ___ century ______, people were______ for ____. A: In the ___ century ______, people were______ for ____, because _____. Targeted Language Skills: ! Reading: They are reading The Crucible. " Writing: Writing their own alternate version for the story. # Listening: They are listening to each other read the story out loud and follow along. $ Speaking: Participating in discussion. Learning Strategy: % MATERIALS Copies of Arthur Miller's The Crucible for all students PROCEDURE (Choose your label) Anticipatory Set (or Motivation or Hook or Building Background) An introduction to the two main bullets (below under Teaching/modeling) that will set the context for the students as well as give them some vocabulary that may need to be explained (use a T-chart to show the vocabulary, important topics, and or characters with their meaning or description). My sentence frames can be a jumping point for the important points or vocabulary that we need to hit on and put into our T-chart. B: ______, ______ EI: In the 17th century New England, people were persecuted for __. I: In the ___ century ______, people were persecuted for ____. EA: In the ___ century ______, people were______ for ____. A: In the ___ century ______, people were______ for ____, because _____. Teaching/Modeling-

Graduate WOU/ESOL Lesson Plan Template 2012-2013

(A side text on the background on the time period could also accompany this part of the lesson and then a jigsaw activity about the article divided up could be done). In order to bring home the emotional power of the Salem witch trials, devote time to a wholeclass dramatic reading of Arthur Miller's The Crucible (Students will have their own copy as well as the T-chart made in the anticipatory set on the wall to reference during the reading of this book.) Assign your students to the roles, giving different students an opportunity to play each character if you like. Before you begin the play and during the reading, keep emphasizing two facts to students: As many experts agree, Miller used the names of real 17th-century people, but he took many liberties in ascribing motivations to them. (You might refer those students who are interested to crucible, part of a Web site put together by a student of 17th-century New England; the site enumerates historical inaccuracies and discrepancies in Miller's work.) Miller was motivated to write The Crucible in the 1950s in order to criticize the activities of Senator Joseph McCarthy, who was leading a movement to find and prosecute, suspected communists as if he were carrying out a witch trial.

Guided Practice (or Group Application) When the reading is complete, ask your students to discuss in groups which scenes affected them most strongly and why. (Read-Pair-share sharing and guided worksheets about topics will be administered here). The sentence frames will be a starting point for the guided worksheet as well as any other vocabulary or topics we decided to add to our T-chart. B: ______, ______ EI: In the 17th century New England, people were persecuted for __. I: In the ___ century ______, people were persecuted for ____. EA: In the ___ century ______, people were______ for ____. A: In the ___ century ______, people were______ for ____, because _____.

Graduate WOU/ESOL Lesson Plan Template 2012-2013

Go on to lead a discussion on the value of literaturein this case, literature written in the 20th century about a period 300 years earlierin trying to understand the historical period dramatized. There are no right and wrong answers to this question, but it is important for students to think about how a literary version of history can help them as well as how it might mislead them.

Independent Practice (or Independent Application) Proceed to asking students to choose any scene from Miller's work and rewrite it from the perspective of today. (Students will be able to start project in class to ask other students for ideas or ask me questions and then will be given 1 week outside of class to finish it). If students are stumped by this assignment, lead a class discussion that covers the following questions: (Practice answering these questions and then I will take some of these answers to show students a model of how I would structure my own version on a color coded chart with my answers in one color and my other details in another color. Obviously, my version will be more basic and shorter than theirs so they can feel free to add more detail in theirs). 1. How would the characters be different in the modern-day United States? 2. Which events would change? 3. How would the dialogue differ? 4. Might witchcraftthe issue for which the characters in Miller's play are being persecutedbe replaced by some other issue? Which issue? Why? Closure Students can share their alternate versions with the class and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each other's work.

DIFFERENTIATION ESOL strategies are highlighted (or underlined).

Graduate WOU/ESOL Lesson Plan Template 2012-2013

Group work/discussion, read-pair-share (pairing up in order to help students who struggled with the book), guided worksheets can be given to help students who are struggling with concepts, visuals - vocabulary given ahead of time with concepts, and jigsaw activity. ASSESSMENT Informal: Sharing their alternate versions to the class. Plans for formal: A paper is written about the book and connecting the time period/history with the events as well as with their opinion on the concepts. (For example, say they choose the general topic of witchcraft they can write a paper that explains why they think that witchcraft is wrong, or what should have been done in this situation. Students can choose a concept from the T-Chart, if they desire).

REFLECTION Note progress toward content objectives for students in general and ELLs in particular. Note progress toward ESOL objectives for ELLs.

Graduate WOU/ESOL Lesson Plan Template 2012-2013

Lesson Planning Checklist: CONTENT Are they eager to participate or know why this information is meaningful (anticipatory set)? Did you teach about and model what you expect them to do (content objectives)? Do students have a chance to practice in groups/pairs what you modeled for them (guided practice)? Does your content objective match the independent practice (progression)? Are you checking for understanding of both content and directions (informal assessment)? Do the plans for formal assessment match the objectives and what students did for independent practice? ESOL Explicit Language Instruction Did I use vocabulary strategies (the bricks)? Did I teach/model the ESOL forms (the mortar)? Do I have a place for students to practice the forms (bricks and mortar)? TARGETED LANGUAGE SKILLS Where possible, ensure the students are actively and meaningfully using the four language skills. Is there a balance of oracy and literacy? Are productive skills combined with receptive skills? ! Reading: " Writing: # Listening: $ Speaking: MATERIALS Are the materials and technologies Im using appropriate for ELLs? Can anything be modified to be more accessible to language learners? SHELTERED STRATEGIES Do I have strategies that benefit ELLs highlighted (sheltered strategies)? Do I have sheltered strategies throughout the lesson plan (ideally in each part of the procedure)?