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High Voltage Multiplier


by burningsuntech on November 8, 2007 Table of Contents High Voltage Multiplier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Intro: High Voltage Multiplier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 1: The Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 2: The Parts List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 3: Build It! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 4: Bury It! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 5: Notes, Warnings, Safety Procedures and Disclaimer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 7

http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/

Author:burningsuntech
Born in New Mexico on or about the time of the crashed alien ship near Roswell(changeling maybe?), I am a direct decendent of the Apache warrior Geronimo. I like bodybuilding, computers and high powered devices. Wow! An indian with an attitude.

Intro: High Voltage Multiplier


Need more voltage than your supply can deliver? This is the device to build. Based upon the Villard doubler, cascaded in multiple stages, this circuit will multiply a small AC voltage into a huge potential. With a 6000 VAC Oil Burner Transformer and just three stages, you can multiply the potential from 6000 to 51,000 VDC! Also, the higher the voltage ratings on your components, the higher the input voltage can be and therefore, more bang for your buck. One side benefit of a stack like this is you can tap off various voltages from stage to stage. In this example, three outputs of 17000, 34000, and 51000 volts are available. Nice!

Image Notes 1. Tap #3 High Voltage Output 2. Low Voltage Input. (If 6000 volts can be considered low voltage) 3. 12 Guage ground wire. 4. Tap #2 High Voltage Output 5. Tap #1 High Voltage Output 6. Ceramic High Voltage Doorknob Capacitors 7. HV03-12 12KV PIV High Voltage Diodes

Image Notes 1. Finished multiplier shown connected to OBT and with output connection at top. I chose to build a container for my supply multiplier.

Image Notes 1. This test was at 25,000 Volts or 50 percent setting on my supply. The bright blue white spark is evidence of high current and lots of ultraviolet rays.

http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/

Step 1: The Theory


Each stage of this multiplier is a doubler circuit and is made up of (2) Capacitors and (2) Diodes. On the positive half-cycle of the input, the capacitors charge in parallel to the peak value of the voltage presented through the forward biased diode. The other diode is reversed biased. Each cap charges to 8484 peak volts. On the negative half-cycle of the input, the forward biased diode becomes reversed biased while the reversed biased diode becomes forward biased. This effectively connects the capacitors in series allowing them to discharge into the load at the output. The result is a doubled voltage presented to the load or 16968 peak volts. Each connected stage adds its potential to the total output. To calculate the expected voltage at the output with a given input and number of stages, plug the numbers into this formula: Eout = (2 x Ein) x S x 1.414 Eout is the Output Voltage, Ein is the Input Voltage, and S is the number of stages in your design. I used a 6,000 VAC Oil Burner Transformer for my input and built 3 stages. Eout = (2 x 6000) x 3 x 1.414 Eout = 12000 x 3 x 1.414 Eout = 36000 x 1.414 Eout = 50,904 volts

Image Notes 1. Tap #3 High Voltage Output 2. Low Voltage Input. (If 6000 volts can be considered low voltage) 3. 12 Guage ground wire. 4. Tap #2 High Voltage Output 5. Tap #1 High Voltage Output 6. Ceramic High Voltage Doorknob Capacitors 7. HV03-12 12KV PIV High Voltage Diodes

Step 2: The Parts List


All of the critical parts are available on EBay. Here's what you will need: (6) 470 picofarad, 20KV Ceramic Doorknob Capacitors. (6) HV03-12 12KV PIV High Voltage Diodes. (7) Brass or copper wiring posts (homemade). (8) 8-32 x 1 in. brass screws. A length of 50KV High Voltage wire for the output. A length of 20KV High Voltage wire for the input. A length of 12ga. Stranded wire for ground. (3) #8 Wire lugs. (1) Ziploc Food Storage Container big enough to hold the multiplier(not a bag). (1) qt. Mineral Oil. RTV Silicon Rubber Sealant.

http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/

NOTE: Only the voltage rating on the components is critical. The higher the rating, the higher the input voltage can be, resulting in a higher output voltage. The input limit on this design is 10KV (with safety margin built in). Ignition wire or coax cable with the shield removed may be substituted for high voltage wiring if need be.

Image Notes 1. Tap #3 High Voltage Output 2. Low Voltage Input. (If 6000 volts can be considered low voltage) 3. 12 Guage ground wire. 4. Tap #2 High Voltage Output 5. Tap #1 High Voltage Output 6. Ceramic High Voltage Doorknob Capacitors 7. HV03-12 12KV PIV High Voltage Diodes

Step 3: Build It!


This step isn't rocket science, just common sense building techniques. Just copy the design shown with the binding studs added. Start by cutting (7) pieces of 16 guage brass or copper wire two inches long. Bend each piece around a drill bit and shape with a loop at one end. Next, cut the heads off of four of the screws to make the studs that join the capacitors together. Screw a stud into one of the caps. Place a binding post over the stud and screw on another capacitor. Screw in another stud, place a binding post over it and screw on the last capacitor. Repeat the previous step to create two stacks of three caps each. Lay the two stacks side by side with the binding posts pointing up. Cut the four remaining screws to 1/2 inch long. Attach binding posts to the right side end of each stack using a screw. Attach a binding post to the left end of the bottom stack using a screw. Attach the diodes as shown and solder them to the binding posts. Cut off any excess binding post tops and file them flush to the soldered diodes. No sharp edge here or you will get an unwelcomed breakover which could ruin your project. Attach the wires with lugs. Tighten the screws and make sure the entire assembly is tight.

http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/

Image Notes 1. 3 of 7 binding posts shown. Insulation was added but not necessary.

Image Notes 1. With leads attached before burying it in mineral oil.

Step 4: Bury It!


Now that the multilpier is finished, we need to encase it in oil. With the lid still on the Ziploc container, punch three holes in the lid at the approximate locations where the leads will exit it. Remove the lid from the container and set it aside. Slowly fill the empty, clean Ziploc container half way with mineral oil without creating any bubbles in the oil. Oil good! Air bad! Hold the multiplier by its leads and slowly lower it into the oil bath. Continue holding the leads with one hand and slowly pour more oil over the multiplier until it has at least a 1/2 inch covering and about 1/2 inch head space between the oil and the lid. Now pass the leads one at a time through the holes in the lid then work the lid down onto the container while holding the leads. Do Not get oil on the leads at the lid level or the sealant won't stick or seal the wires. Snap the lid onto the container. Finally, seal the leads and if you like, the lid to the container with the RTV sealant and set the project aside for 24 hours until the RTV is cured. Your Done! PLEASE READ THE SAFETY SECTION BEFORE POWERING THIS DEVICE! THANKS!

http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/

Image Notes 1. Ziploc container half full of Mineral Oil 2. Multiplier without leads. Add leads before sinking in oil and sealing.

Image Notes 1. Finished multiplier shown connected to OBT and with output connection at top. I chose to build a container for my supply multiplier.

Image Notes 1. This test was at 25,000 Volts or 50 percent setting on my supply. The bright blue white spark is evidence of high current and lots of ultraviolet rays.

Step 5: Notes, Warnings, Safety Procedures and Disclaimer


NOTES This multiplier is part of a 0 to 50KV adjustable High Voltage Power Supply capable of sourcing 20 milliamps of current. An instructable on building the supply is my next project, so hold on! SAFETY WARNINGS and PROCEDURES **WARNING*** This device produces LETHAL CURRENTS at HIGH VOLTAGE. The output of this device WILL KILL YOU if you do not follow standard common sense safety procedures. Safety Precautions and Procedures 1. Wear safety goggles or glasses, rubber safety gloves, and stand on a rubber safety mat when powering or using this device. 2. GROUND the output of this device after powering it off. It can retain a lethal voltage for several minutes after powering down. 3. DO NOT TOUCH the device AT ANY TIME during operation. 4. Do not allow others who are not familiar with high voltage devices to touch or use this device without proper supervision.

http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/

5. Do Not operate this device alone! Have an emergency person available when performing your experiments who is familiar with proper rescue procedures. DISCLAIMER By building and operating this device, you acknowledge that you understand the dangers improper operation can pose and you accept all risks associated with the operation of this device. You also acknowledge that I am not nor will be responsible for any death or dismemberment by this device whatsoever and that you assume all risk by the use of this device.

Image Notes 1. This test was at 25,000 Volts or 50 percent setting on my supply. The bright blue white spark is evidence of high current and lots of ultraviolet rays.

Related Instructables

Build a Variable High Voltage Power Supply by burningsuntech

How to make a Voltage multiplier by Mudbud

Bring dead led to light by morphic cu ion

Variable Cheap High Voltage Power Supply by rwilsford07

High Voltage Power Supply For Marx Generator by Plasmana

High Voltage Switch Mode Power Supply (SMPS)/Boost Converter for Nixie Tubes by ian

Comments
50 comments Add Comment view all 85 comments

jj.inc says:
You could try starting with voltage from a Old tube TV or Monitor

Nov 28, 2010. 10:19 PM REPLY

burningsuntech says:

Nov 29, 2010. 5:36 AM REPLY JJ.inc The output of the high voltage section of a tv or monitor is too high. Typically, they output from 25,000 to 50,000 volts in the microamp range. The current won't be a problem. But the design of my HVM is for low inputs up to 10,000 volts. The project would fail on the first try. To overcome the problem, you would need to change the values of the caps and diodes for it to withstand the much higher voltage of a tv or monitor output. Raving Apache

http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/

jj.inc says:
Yea I figured as much thanks

Nov 29, 2010. 8:25 PM REPLY

bs1500 says:
burningsuntech, what's the best way to discharge the capacitors after use?

Nov 2, 2010. 6:33 PM REPLY

burningsuntech says:
bs1500 Short them to ground. RA

Nov 4, 2010. 1:13 PM REPLY

bs1500 says:

Nov 2, 2010. 6:00 PM REPLY burningsuntech, I have a 9030v, 30 ma neon sign transformer. I see the 20kv capacitors should be enough to handle the voltage, but the diodes may not be enough, particularly since the HV03-12 reverse voltage is 8400, possibly leading to a lot of smoke. I found some 15000v, .30 forward current, 100ns recovery time rectifiers (part number Z150UFG) at http://www.voltagemultipliers.com/html/selection_guide_hv_diodes.html. How do these look to build this for my transformer? Thanks! bs1500

burningsuntech says:
bs1500 Looks like they will work fine. Good luck RA

Nov 4, 2010. 1:12 PM REPLY

qazwsx755 says:
will a 10kv 23ma transformer work?

Aug 26, 2010. 7:13 PM REPLY

burningsuntech says:

Aug 27, 2010. 5:49 PM REPLY Good Question, Q. The voltages on all AC devices are usually shown as the R.M.S. (root mean square) of the actual Peak value of that voltage. Your 10,000 volts R.M.S. would be 14,100 volts peak-to-peak or just 12,293 volts peak. The average voltage (R.M.S.) is .707 of the peak voltage. We know that 10,000 volts is .707 of the peak or 70% of the peak voltage. That means that the peak is 30% more than the average or in this case about 13,000 volts. I need to know the peak figure so I can determine if the P.I.V (peak inverse voltage) of the diodes can withstand that high a voltage and in this case... They cannot!. The diodes have a PIV of 12,000 volts. If you put a peak voltage of 13,000 volts across these diodes, all you will get is lots of smoke and not much more. What I telling you is that the peak voltage of your transformer is higher that the PIV of the diodes by 1000 volts and you will destroy them. If you get diodes with a PIV of say 15,000 volts, then you will be safe using this transformer. The capacitors in this multiplier have a much higher rating and you dont need to worry about them until you reach 20,000 volts on the input. The diodes, however, have to be changed. RA

qazwsx755 says:

Aug 28, 2010. 3:03 PM REPLY So you're saying all I have to do to get my transformer working with your design is buy 15,000 volt diodes instead of 12,000 volt diodes?

burningsuntech says:

Aug 29, 2010. 6:38 AM REPLY Q. Yep. Thats about it. Something else to consider is how you are going to "pot" or cover the assembly to remove air and prevent breakdown from occurring. i have tried potting in epoxy, oil, and wax (parafin). Epoxy does not allow you to change anthing or to harvest components if you should decide to change the number of stages. Oil is hard to control and to prevent leakage you will need to pay attention to the seal on the container you put it in. That leave Parafin. This is what I am currently using and it seems to be the best of all worlds. Enjoy your build. Good Luck opening that stargate worm hole. RA. :)

jpoopdog says:

Aug 4, 2010. 5:50 PM REPLY hi, i would like to know how this could be modified to work with a 6 volt current to activate my 12v relay, and no there is no other posible way to get more voltage for me other than a voltage multiplier, so anyway what do i need to it will work on 6 volt?

burningsuntech says:

Aug 5, 2010. 4:59 AM REPLY jpoopdog First of all, I f we are talking about DC current, this cannot be used on DC and cannot be modified to do so. If we are talking about AC current or Pulsating DC current, then it's just a matter of choosing the number of stages needed for the amount of voltage required. This is nothing more than a voltage doubler 6 times over. So for 6 volts to be doubled to 12 volts you would need one stage to double it. Rather than take the time to design it for you, which I do not have, please look at the first section on theory and calculate the number of statges needed. I would use 1n4007 diodes and .01uf caps for a common application with small current requirements. good luck in your design. RA

jpoopdog says:

Aug 6, 2010. 12:46 AM REPLY its just that on every single voltage multipliers schematics ive ever seen , it always says ac in and ac out not dc in or dc out. plus youve just said that this cannot be used on dc, why? so this means a battery cant be used on the voltage multiplier? youve confused me a bit and the theory makes no sense to me either

http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/

burningsuntech says:
Here is a link that will explain it better: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cockcroft%E2%80%93Walton_generator

Aug 6, 2010. 5:48 PM REPLY

You have to know that this is a PASSIVE device. There are no active components in it that cause a change in the voltage like a transistor or voltage amplifier would. It depends on the input to do the switching for it; that is, supply a changing voltage to cause the device to work. DC does not change, therefore this device will not work on pure DC. However, pulsating DC does change and therefore this device will work on pulsating DC as well as AC. The output of a battery is pure DC. It will not make this device work. Thats why I keep saying that the input can be AC or pulsating DC. RA

savish05 says:

Jun 29, 2010. 7:26 AM REPLY hi Thanks for the project.I was wondering,Does the value of the capacitor really matter can i use 680pf .I cant find a 470pf. Thanks

burningsuntech says:

Jun 30, 2010. 4:28 AM REPLY savish05 Nope. Not really. Only if you want to keep loading to a minimum. If you are going directly from mains to this device, consider using diodes designed for mains like the 1N4007 instead of the Microwave oven diodes. The high PIV of the MO diodes will make this work incorrectly if used directly to Mains. Good Luck on your build. RA

andyouthoughtyouwereevil says:

Jun 9, 2010. 7:02 AM REPLY If i use a battery (1.5v - 9 v) with a 5nF cap in series will it produce enough output to power a marxs generator? Will i still need to insulate it with mineral oil ?

burningsuntech says:
AYTYWEvil You can bury it in wax. Works well for smaller voltages. RA

Jun 10, 2010. 2:57 PM REPLY

burningsuntech says:

Jun 10, 2010. 2:55 PM REPLY AYTYWEvil First of all, this device is NOT a DC device. It will not work off a 9 volt battery. And neither will a Marx Generator. Both of these devices will only work off of AC or Pulsating DC, not straight DC. Secondly, This device as I have designed it works best at 6000 Volts AC. Thats a far cry from 9 volts. To use this at 9 volts, you would have to build a pulsating 9 volt AC source that produces either a sine wave or squarewave output that varies above and below zero volts. You would also scale down the PIV values of the diodes and the Maximum value of the caps to more closely match the voltage you are working with. Hope this helps. Good Luck with your project. RA May 18, 2010. 10:04 AM REPLY

jonrb says:
Great instructable! Just a few things: 1. Would a disposable camera flash be a good input (minus the capacitor) 2. what is the output like

burningsuntech says:

May 24, 2010. 5:26 PM REPLY Hi Jon Thanks. The flash camera oscillator would work but there is a problem with the amount of current that it produces as well as with the frequency it operates at. You would need to modify this multiplier by changing the caps to .01 mfd @ 10Kv and the diodes should be IN4007 which have a PIV of 1000 Volts. The multiplier shown is for 60 Hz while the flash camera oscillator is around 15 Khz. That is a big difference and needs to be compensated for. So leaving off the cap is a good idea. Btw - This device requires either AC or Pulsating DC to work. It will not work by pumping a voltage spike through it. For output characteristics, go here: http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_3/chpt_3/8.html RA

manicmonday says:
I think you might want to double check your equation. There seems to be a problem with it. I started with 125vac, and made a 6 stage multiplier. (2 * 125) *6 * 1.414 = 2121 When I tested it I got 467vdc. Or does that equation only work with the same components that you used?

Nov 30, 2009. 7:16 PM REPLY

When you get into your higher voltages, is there is there a way to check that voltage, instead of having to depend only on a math equation? Thanks

http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/

burningsuntech says:
Manic Sorry for the late reply. A partial explanation of the CW multiplier can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cockcroft%E2%80%93Walton_generator . A stage consists of two caps and two diodes. Therefore you would have 12 caps and diodes in your network.

Dec 6, 2009. 6:57 AM REPLY

Also, the lower the voltage, the higher the value of the caps in order to offset the impedance of the network at 60 Hz . Alternatively, you can raise the frequency of your input to compensate for the impedance. As far as being able to measure the output of higher voltages, thats not possible without a high voltage probe or a bank of high voltage resistors calculated so you can use Ohm's Law to figure a more accurate reading. Otherwise, math will have to do. BTW - the output of this device is pulsating DC, therefore your meter will only read effective voltage, not peak voltage as the formula implies. Thanks for the post. RA

serith says:

Nov 28, 2009. 6:04 AM REPLY I want to run a similar circuit off of an external battery supply. How do I pulse the current like the schematic says to be able to use a DC input and still get a solid DC output? Nov 13, 2009. 7:05 PM REPLY

pankaj83 says:
Hi,

I have a question - While operating a pulsed load (frequency around 5 kHz) at the output, I can hear strong acoustic noise. I have molded the entire stuff with Silicon molding - so the noise definitely is not from component vibration. There seems to be some other reason. Can you please advise me on this. By the way, you can either leave your comment here or mail me on pankaj_ag_iitk@hotmail.com Best Regards. Pankaj

burningsuntech says:
pankaj83 If you are familiar with plasma speakers, what you are hearing is what is called the a "singing arc". Here is a link to wikipedia on the subject. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singing_arc Another posibility is that you have an air bubble in your multiplier and the arc is playing from that. Good luck in discovering the cause. Many an invention has been created by accident. Raving Apache

Nov 17, 2009. 5:56 PM REPLY

vivdal says:

Sep 21, 2009. 4:34 PM REPLY Dear sir, Please explain the Alternating Current source you are using to power it and what is the optimum frequency for this type of Multiplier given the values of the capacitors used. I am currently trying to construct a high frequency inverter for this.. Thank you Vivian

burningsuntech says:
vivdal

Sep 23, 2009. 6:42 PM REPLY

It would be easier to point you to a tutorial on the string of half wave voltage doublers known as CocKroft Walton Multipliers. http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_3/chpt_3/8.html will point you in the right direction for the theory. As for the OBT it is a 60 Cycle AC transformer so the primary frequency is 60 Hz. As for the caps values, the chosen value has more to do with the ripple in the output than it does "the operating frequency". You can design this type of multiplier for any given frequency within the confines of the source voltage frequency but there are upper limits. RA

UbuntuNinja says:
This multiplier as shown runs off of 60Hz right?

Oct 11, 2009. 12:14 PM REPLY

http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/

burningsuntech says:
UN This multiplier has been designed to work with 50 or 60 cycles AC or Pulsating DC. No special requirements. RA

Oct 11, 2009. 6:50 PM REPLY

UbuntuNinja says:

Oct 12, 2009. 7:26 AM REPLY Thanks, does the multiplier have a fairly stable output or is there a lot of ripples in the output voltage (I think due to capacitive reactance)?

burningsuntech says:
UN The higher the voltage, the more ripple. This is typical of a halfwave device like this one. RA

Oct 12, 2009. 6:17 PM REPLY

hansg says:
I found some 20kv diodes on ebay, but they're only rated for 10mA. Would they survive in this application?

May 13, 2008. 8:34 AM REPLY

kikiclint says:

Aug 14, 2009. 10:04 AM REPLY I suppose that depends on how much you step up the voltage. More voltage = less amperage. You will have to do the power conversions from the power your transformer gives out to solve for the voltage and the amps. Pretty simple calculations.

kikiclint says:

Aug 30, 2009. 5:43 PM REPLY then again, dealing with capacitors, if they build up a charge, and then suddenly discharge, there could be a good amount of current for a short amount of time going through the diodes.

Derin says:
no

Jun 21, 2008. 8:01 AM REPLY

Plasmana says:

May 7, 2008. 2:03 PM REPLY Were can I find an oil burner transformer?!? Do you know any website that sells oil burner transformers?!? I know that ebay sometimes sell those things, but I cannot use ebay because I am too young (15 years old).

kikiclint says:
If you find places with broken neon light signs, they usually have a pretty large transformer on them.

Aug 14, 2009. 10:02 AM REPLY

burningsuntech says:

May 7, 2008. 5:18 PM REPLY HV2K Have your rent call a local fuel oil or burner service company and ask for the service manager and tell em you are working on a project. Do they have any old working OBT's. Also google "6Kv 20Ma transformer" and your local postal code for parts supply houses. Be resourceful. Half the fun of building is the scavenger hunt. raving apache

pos3idon says:
Will this OBT work? http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/2E509 thanks for the help!! :-)

Jun 27, 2008. 1:21 PM REPLY

Plasmana says:
OK, I will try look there, thank you burningsuntech!

May 8, 2008. 2:46 PM REPLY

imgod22222 says:

Oct 23, 2008. 5:53 PM REPLY Okay, being completely self-taught in all things electrical, I am very big on safety, very moderate on how-to, very noobish on "how to make sure it will work". So: How is current effected by a voltage multiplier? Ex) If I got a 3-prong 120VAC @ Lowe's or something, and hooked up a voltage multiplier as you described, what current output should I be expecting? Also: Should all the components be properly rated for the input voltage (120V) or the output voltage (20+kV)? [I'm guessing output voltage because higher in the chain, each component's input is increasing] More capacitance (uF) = faster discharge rate. Is there any formula or approximation for this? If I want to make a good old-fashioned jacob's ladder, I need (-) or (+), and does it need a fast discharge rate?

http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/

kikiclint says:

Aug 14, 2009. 9:55 AM REPLY I made one out of a 9000 vac neon light transformer without multiplying. It worked pretty good, and had a maximum spark gap of about an inch. I am tempted to step it up now and give it a wider gap.

Shawn_nwahS says:

May 26, 2009. 3:22 PM REPLY HV Newb here and I've been out of EE for quite a while, I'm having trouble understanding what is obviously a simple circuit. I've tried a 2 stage villard multiplier with, - 2, 1500 v, .0027uf caps along with 4, 1n 4003 diodes. Hooked it up to the output of a driver circuit for the light tube in a photo scanner. It's output is 240v. After the first stage of the multiplier I got well over 300v, after the second stage I got about 10 volts less than what was on the first stage. Probably, the original circuit simply can't put out enough current to keep more and more stages going? I've built a generator some time ago that puts out about 60,000v from 2 ignition coils. Maximum, self-generated (no pulling) arc is 1/2 to 3/4 inch under perfect circumstances. I want longer and longer arcs, for the next circuit, at least double that. My questions, - Do I need a support circuit or AC to pulse the villard multiplier? I feel like a 555 based circuit may do that. - Is it simple enough to hook straight, or nearly straight to 120v AC and get arcs that way? - Is there anything simple that can amplify my existing generator's voltage? - Can anyone give out a schematic for something that would drive 1 or 2 ignition coils to get longer arcs than 3/4 inch? Feb 11, 2009. 10:07 PM REPLY waits so why does it multiply with that formula on plasmanas lower voltage one of these it each stage just adds the peak voltage of the input and on the picture of your supply at 25kv how long is that spark i cant really tell how big that thing is nice instructable though

The 4th Doctor says:

burningsuntech says:

Feb 15, 2009. 11:58 AM REPLY Doctor Who Each stage is a voltage doubler separated by a diode that allows all the caps to charge in parallel on one half cycle of the input (AC or Pulsed DC) and then discharge in series on the negative half cycle thereby adding the total stored charges of all the caps together and multiplying the input voltage to the desired output. As far as the spark length, I didn't want to test that just in case something goes boom and destroys all my work. It was about 3/8 inch. raving apache

The 4th Doctor says:


alright i think i get it thanks

Feb 16, 2009. 12:05 PM REPLY

WastelandMan says:

Dec 18, 2008. 5:06 PM REPLY Awesome! Hey I live in NM too! great state! anyway if I was going to use this to charge a capacitor with a spark gap would it be wise to put a bridge rectifier in between the large cap and the multiplier? or would the pulsed DC already be rectified at the end of the multiplier? Thanks for the great instructible! to be clear: lowvoltage source -> villard multiplier -> ?full wave bridge recifier? -> Large capacitor -> Spark gap

burningsuntech says:

Dec 27, 2008. 10:41 AM REPLY Hey fellow desert rat a bridge rectifier is not required. The output is already DC. BTW your cap should be rated at 50KV or greater or else ... BOOM! raving apache

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http://www.instructables.com/id/High-Voltage-Multiplier/