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(Annex 5)

Instruments for Monitoring and Evaluating National INSET


Pre-INSET Evaluation Questionnaire
NB: the instrument applies to all subject departments (Mathematics, Science and Technology, Biology and Home Economics).

School: Sex:

The purpose of this questionnaire is to evaluate the SMASSE Mathematics trainees’ opinion on their roles during normal
school teaching sessions in their respective schools/districts.

Please consider each of the following statements and indicate the response that reflects your opinion about your situation
by checking (✔) in the appropriate column on a separate mark sheet using a pen or pencil. the stem to items under
category A also applies to all other categories in this instrument.

Key: 0- Strongly Disagree; 1- Disagree; 2- Not Sure; 3- Agree; 4- Strongly Agree

Category A
Item
Statements regarding your teaching/learning or INSET activities 0 1 2 3 4
No.
1 Mathematics students are encouraged to think logically during teaching/learning sessions.
2 Students are helped to understand procedures in mathematics experiments/practical work
3 Mathematics students are encouraged to think creatively during teaching/learning sessions.
Students are assisted to view the relevance of the mathematics learned in class in relation to
4
what they come across in real-life situations
Students are encouraged to design investigations aimed at solving problems on mathematics
5
issues.
6 Mathematics is not primarily a theoretical and abstract subject.
Students voluntarily opt to do mathematics work above and beyond the minimal
7
expectations.
Mathematics is usually taught to enable students to master the subject content and not
8
necessarily to excel in the final examinations.

Category B
Item
No.
Statements regarding your teaching/learning or INSET activities 0 1 2 3 4
Mathematics students are helped to make precise/and accurate observations during the
9
practical sessions.
10 Class discussions are encouraged during mathematics teaching/learning sessions.
Mathematics students are encouraged to write reports on the experiments/practical work
11
they do in class
During mathematics experiments/practical work sessions, students are encouraged to make
12
their own predictions/hypotheses.
Students are encouraged to verify their predictions or hypothesis through evidence/facts in
13
science text books/journals in class.
Students are encouraged to verify their predictions or hypothesis by doing experiments that
14
are based on a scientific idea.
15 Students take notes as mathematics lessons progress.
16 Individual attention is paid to students in a mathematics class
17 Group work is encouraged during mathematics teaching sessions.
(Annex 5)

Item
Statements regarding your teaching/learning or INSET activities 0 1 2 3 4
No.
18 Mathematics teachers are able to guide students with poor study habits.
19 Mathematics is not taught/learned as sets of rules and experiments.
Mathematics students with difficulties are given more exercises and practice on
20
observations/practical work.
Mathematics teachers can use appropriate question/answer techniques with reinforcement
21
of students’ responses accordingly.
Mathematics teachers provide their students with comprehensive instruction that includes
22
what to do, how to do it and when and why to do it.
Mathematics teachers promote retention of content taught by occasional review activities
23
and with opportunities for students to practice what they have learnt.

Category C
Item
Statements regarding your teaching/learning or INSET activities 0 1 2 3 4
No.
School duties, other than teaching, do not hinder effective teaching/learning sessions in
24
mathematics.
High student/teacher ratio in school does not hinder effective teaching during mathematics
25
sessions.
Teachers incorporate students’ practical experience (or ideas) when planning for
26
teaching/learning sessions.
Where class experiment sessions are not possible, mathematics teachers plan for other
27
meaningful learning activities for their students to do.
Mathematics teachers try out experiments or any other practical work and obtain sample
28
results before going to class to teach.
Mathematics teachers prepare worked-out examples related to subject content they are
29
going to teach.
Mathematics teachers prepare teacher-friendly but student-centred work-plans for their
30
daily lessons.
31 Mathematics lessons are based on aims and objectives of learning the topic.
Mathematics lessons are designed such that sequence of ideas or events makes sense and
32
the relationships among them are clear to the student.

Category D
Item
Statements regarding your teaching/learning or INSET activities 0 1 2 3 4
No.
Mathematics teachers conduct teacher demonstration sessions where facilities are limited in
33
school.
Mathematics teachers are able to conduct class experiment sessions with the facilities
34
available in school.
Mathematics teachers are able to conduct teaching sessions even where there is shortage of
35
conventional teaching media and aids in school.
36 Mathematics sessions are not hindered by low morale among fellow teachers in school.
Mathematics teachers are able to deal with students with different socio-economic
37
backgrounds in class.
38 Low morale among students does not hinder teaching of mathematics in school.
39 Team teaching enhances teaching/learning of mathematics.
40 Teachers usually practice improvisation to supplement shortage of equipment and materials.
41 Teachers usually practice improvisation to raise the interest and curiosity of the student.
(Annex 5)

Category E
Item
Statements regarding your teaching/learning or INSET activities 0 1 2 3 4
No.
Mathematics students are usually made to perform experiments to aid learning of scientific
42
concepts.
Mathematics students are usually made to perform experiments not necessarily to
43
understand the science involved.
Mathematics students are usually made to perform experiments for them to develop various
44
scientific skills.
45 Teachers are able to conduct practical sessions that require elaborate safety precautions.
46 Where necessary, mathematics teachers simplify or modify experiments.
47 Mathematics teachers usually conduct small scale experiments.
48 Mathematics teachers guide their students on project work.

Category F
Item
Statements regarding your teaching/learning or INSET activities 0 1 2 3 4
No.
49 Mathematics teachers plan for assessment as a basic part of the teaching/learning process.
Mathematics students’ achievement during the teaching/learning process is continuously
50
monitored by a series of tests and quizzes.
Continuous assessment is not necessarily used to prepare mathematics students for the
51
national examinations.
52 Continuous assessment is used to promote mastery of mathematics content.
Continuous assessment contributes more to effective teaching/learning of mathematics than
53
just converting the whole syllabus in time.
Mathematics teachers use results of classroom assessment to gauge their own effectiveness
54
in teaching the subject.
The learner’s mental state of readiness is usually considered when designing mathematics
55
assessment.
In designing mathematics assessments, provision is made for the learner to experience
56
moments of success.
57 Suitable assessment procedures are used to determine the level of readiness of the learner.
Effort is usually made, through suitable assessment procedures, to identify the root cause of
58
students’ persistent learning difficulties in mathematics.
Students’ level of achievement in mathematics practical work is assessed through the
59
performance of the actual tasks.
Effort is made to check textbook questions for their suitability before assigning them to
60
students.
Effort is usually made to give learners a variety of questions that promote their interest and
61
understanding.
Mathematics teachers, when assessing, set positive and realistic goals for their classes and
62
for individual students.
Question-answer technique is used in teaching/learning of mathematics as an important
63
assessment tool.
Results of mathematics classroom assessment are used to improve on the process of
64
teaching/learning the subject.
65 Students are given an opportunity to give the teacher feedback on the lesson presentation.
From time to time, fellow teachers are asked to sit through a lesson presentation to evaluate
66
it and give feedback.
67 Assessment results are used to guide students to choose careers or areas for further studies.