Anda di halaman 1dari 7

The Diversion of Water from the Meuse (Netherlands v.

Belgium) case brief


The Diversion of Water from the Meuse (Netherlands v. Belgium) Procedural History: The Netherlands (P) claimed that Belgium (D) violated an agreement by building certain canals. Overview: The Netherlands (P) objected to the construction of certain canals by Belgium (D) that would alter the water level of the Meuse River in violation of an earlier agreement. Belgium (D) counterclaimed based on the construction of a lock by Netherlands (P) at an earlier time. The Court rejected both claims. Issue: Do principles of equity form a part of international law? Rule: the principles of equity form a part of international law. Analysis: The Court also referred to Roman Law. A similar principle in Roman Law made the obligations of a vendor and a vendee concurrent. Neither could compel the other to perform unless he had done, or tendered. his own part . Outcome: (Hudson, J.) Yes. Principles of equity form a part of international law. Under Article 38, and independently of that statute, this Court has some freedom to consider principles of equity. The maxim, He who seeks equity must do equity, is derived from AngloAmerican law.

The anglo-norwegian fisheries case

Since 1911 British trawlers had been seized and condemned for violating measures taken by the Norwegian government specifying the limits within which fishing was prohibited to foreigners. In 1935, a decree was adopted establishing the lines of delimitation of the Norwegian fisheries zone. On 24th September 1949 the government of the United Kingdom filed the registry of the international court of justice an application instituting proceedings against Norway. The subject of the proceeding was the validity, under international law, of the lines of delimitation of the Norwegian fisheries zone as set forth in a Decree of 12th July 1935. The application referred to the declaration by which the united Kingdom and Norway had accepted the compulsory jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice in accordance with article 36 (2) of its statute. The parties involved in this case were Norway and the United Kingdom, of Great Britain and Northern Ireland . The implementation of the Royal Norwegian Decree of the 1935 was met with resistance from the United Kingdom. The decree covers the drawing of straight lines, called baselines 4 miles deep into the sea. This 4 miles area is reserved fishing exclusive for Norwegian nationals. Under article 36(2) both UK and Norway were willing to accept the jurisdiction of the ICJ on this case and with no appeal. The issues that constitute the case were submitted to the court and the arguments presented by both countries. The issues claims the court to: declare the principles of international law applicable in defining the baselines by reference to which Norwegian government was entitled to delimit a fisheries zone and exclusively reserved to its nationals; and to define the said base lines in the light of the arguments of the parties in order to avoid further legal difference; and secondly to award damages to the government of the United Kingdom in respect of all interferences by the Norwegian authorities with British fishing vessels outside the fisheries zone, which in accordance with ICJ's decision, the Norwegian government may be entitled to reserve for its nationals. The United Kingdom argued that; Norway could only draw straight lines across bays The length of lines drawn on the formations of the Skaergaard fjord must not exceed 10 nautical miles( the 10 Mile rule) That certain lines did not follow the general direction of the coast or did not follow it sufficiently , or they did not respect certain connection of sea and land separating them That the Norwegian system of delimitation was unknown to the British and lack the notoriety to provide the basis of historic title enforcement upon opposable to by the United Kingdom

The Kingdom of Norway argued;

That the base lines had to be drawn in such a way as to respect the general direction of the coast and in a reasonable manner. The case was submitted to the International Court of Justice by the government of the United Kingdom. The government of United Kingdom wants the ICJ to declare the validity of the base lines under international law and receive compensation for damages caused by Norwegian authorities as to the seizures of British Fishing vessels. The judgment of the court first examines the applicability of the principles put forward by the government of the UK, then the Norwegian system, and finally the conformity of that system with international law. The first principle put forward by the UK is that the baselines must be low water mark, this indeed is the criterion generally adopted my most states and but differ as to its application. (Johnson 154). The court considered the methods of drawing the lines but, the court rejected the trace Parallele which consists of drawing the outer limits of the belt following the coast and all its sinuosity. The court also reje cted the courbe tangent (arcs of a circle) and it is not obligatory under international law to use these methods of drawing the lines. The court also paid particular attention to the geographical aspect of the case. The geographical realities and historic control of the Norwegian coast inevitably contributed to the final decision by the ICJ. The coast of Norway is too indented and is an exception under international law from the 3 miles territorial waters rule. The fjords, Sunds along the coastline which have the characteristic of a bay or legal straits should be considered Norwegian for historical reasons that the territorial sea should be measured from the line of low water mark. So it was agreed on the outset of both

parties and the court that Norway had the right to claim a 4 mile belt of territorial sea. The court concluded that it was the outer line of the Skaergaard that must be taken into account in admitting the belt of the Norwegian territorial waters. (Johnson 154- 158). There is one consideration not to be overlooked, the scope of which extends beyond geographical factors. That of certain economic interests peculiar to a region, the reality and importance of which are clearly evidenced by a long usage (Johnson 160) The law relied upon mainly international Law of the sea; how far a state can modify its territorial waters and its control over it, exclusively reserving fishing for its nationals. In this case, rules that are practiced for instance how long a baseline should be. Only a 10 mile long straight line is allowed and this has been the practice by most states however it is different in the case of Norway because of Norway's geographic indentation, islands and islets. The international customary law has been a law of reference in the court arguments. Judge Read from Canada asserts that Customary international law does not recognize the rule according to which belts of territorial waters of coastal states is to be measured. More so public international law has been relied upon in this case. It regulates relation between states; the United Kingdom and Norway.

Maritime Law Coastline Rule


The judgment was rendered in favor of Norway on the 18th December 1951. By 10 votes to 2 the court held that the method employed in the delimitation of the fisheries zone by the Royal Norwegian decree of the 12th July 1935 is not contrary to international law. By 8 votes to 4 votes the court also held that the base lines fixed by this decree in application are not contrary to international law. However there are separate opinions and dissenting opinions from the judges in the court. Judge Hackworth declared that he concurred with the operative part of the judgment because he considered that the Norwegian government had proved the existence of historic title of the disputed areas of water. Judge Alvarez from Chile relied on the evolving principles of the law of nations applicable to the law of the sea. States have the right to modify the extent of the of their territorial sea Any state directly concerned may object to another state's decision as to the extent of its territorial sea International status of bays and straits must be determined by the coastal state directly concerned with due regard to the general interest and Historic rights and concept of prescription in international law. Judge Hsu Mo from china opinions diverge from the court's with regards to conformity with principles of international law to the straight lines drawn by the Decree of 1935. He allowed possibility in certain circumstances, for instance, belt measured at low tide, Norway's geographic and historic conditions. But drawing the straight lines as of the 1935 degree is a moving away from the practice of the general rule. (Johnson 171) The dissenting opinions from judge McNair rested upon few rules of law of international waters. Though there are exceptions, in case of bays, the normal procedure to calculate territorial waters in from the land, a line which follows the coastline. Judge McNair rejected the argument upon which Norway based its decree including: Protecting Norway's economic and other social interests The UK should not be precluded from objecting the Norwegian system embodied in the Decree because previous acquiescence in the system and An historic title allowing the state to acquire waters that would otherwise have the status of deep sea. Judge McNair concluded that the 1935 decree is not compatible with international law.(Johnson173)

Furthermore, Judge Read from Canada was unable to concur with parts of the judgment. Read rejected justification by Norway for enlarging her maritime domain and seizing and condemning foreign ships (Johnson 173); Sovereignty of the coastal state is not the basis for Norway to claim 4 mile belt from straight base lines Customary international law does not recognize the rule according to which belts of territorial waters of coastal states is to be measured. Norwegian system cannot be compatible with international law.

Legal Consequences of the Construction of a Wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory ADVISORY OPINION The Court finds that the construction by Israel of a wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and its associated rgime are contrary to international law ; it states the legal consequences arising from that illegality THE HAGUE, 9 July 2004. The International Court of Justice (ICJ), principal judicial organ of the United Nations, has today rendered its Advisory Opinion in the case concerning the Legal Consequences of the Construction of a Wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory (request for advisory opinion). In its Opinion, the Court finds unanimously that it has jurisdiction to give the advisory opinion requested by the United Nations General Assembly and decides by fourteen votes to one to comply with that request. The Court responds to the question as follows: A. By fourteen votes to one, The construction of the wall being built by Israel, the occupying Power, in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including in and around East Jerusalem, and its associated rgime, are contrary to international law ; B. By fourteen votes to one, Israel is under an obligation to terminate its breaches of international law; it is under an obligation to cease forthwith the works of construction of the wall being built in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including in and around East Jerusalem, to dismantle forthwith the structure therein situated, and to repeal or render ineffective forthwith all legislative and regulatory acts relating thereto, in accordance with paragraph 151 of this Opinion ; C. By fourteen votes to one, Israel is under an obligation to make reparation for all damage caused by the construction of the wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including in and around East Jerusalem ; D. By thirteen votes to two, All States are under an obligation not to recognize the illegal situation resulting from the construction of the wall and not to render aid or assistance in maintaining the situation created by such construction; all States parties to the Fourth Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War of 12 August 1949 have in addition the obligation, while respecting the United Nations Charter and international law, to ensure compliance by Israel with international humanitarian law as embodied in that Convention ; E. By fourteen votes to one, The United Nations, and especially the General Assembly and the Security Council, should consider what further action is required to bring to an end the illegal situation resulting from the construction of the wall and the associated rgime, taking due account of the present Advisory Opinion. Reasoning of the Court The Advisory Opinion is divided into three parts: jurisdiction and judicial propriety; legality of the construction by Israel of a wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory; legal consequences of the breaches found. Jurisdiction of the Court and judicial propriety The Court states that when it is seised of a request for an advisory opinion, it must first consider whether it has jurisdiction to give that opinion. It finds that the General Assembly, which requested the opinion by resolution ES-10/14 of 8 December 2003, is authorized to do so by Article 96, paragraph 1, of the Charter. The Court, as it has sometimes done in the past, then gives certain indications as to the relationship between the question on which the advisory opinion is requested and the activities of the General Assembly. It finds that the General Assembly, in requesting an advisory opinion from the Court, did not exceed its competence, as qualified by Article 12, paragraph 1, of the Charter, which provides that, while the Security Council is exercising its functions in respect of any dispute or situation, the Assembly must not make any recommendation with regard thereto unless the Security Council so requests. The Court further refers to the fact that the General Assembly adopted resolution ES-10/14 during its Tenth Emergency Special Session, convened pursuant to resolution 377A (V), which provides that if the Security Council fails to exercise its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security, the General Assembly may consider the matter immediately with a view to making recommendations to Member States. The Court finds that the conditions laid down by that resolution were met when the Tenth Emergency Special Session was convened; that was in particular true when the General Assembly decided to request an opinion, as the Security Council was at that time unable to adopt a resolution concerning the construction of the wall as a result of the negative vote of a permanent member. The Court then rejects the argument that an opinion could not be given in the present case on the ground that the question posed in the request is not a legal one. Having established its jurisdiction, the Court considers the propriety of giving the requested opinion. It recalls that the lack of consent by a State to its contentious jurisdiction has no bearing on its jurisdiction to give an advisory opinion. It adds that the giving of an opinion would not have the effect, in the present case, of circumventing the principle of consent to judicial settlement, given that the question on which the General Assembly requested an opinion is located in a much broader frame of reference than that of the bilateral dispute between Israel and Palestine, and that it is of direct concern to the United Nations. Nor does the Court accept the contention that it should decline to give the advisory opinion requested because its opinion could impede a political, negotiated solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. It further finds it has before it sufficient information and evidence to enable it to give its opinion, and emphasizes that it is for the General Assembly to assess the usefulness of that opinion. The Court concludes from the foregoing that there is no compelling reason precluding it from giving the requested opinion. Legality of the construction by Israel of a wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory Before addressing the legal consequences of the construction of the wall (the term which the General Assembly has chosen to use and which is also used in the Opinion, since the other expressions sometimes employed are no more accurate if understood in the physical sense), the Court considers whether or not the construction of the wall is contrary to international law. The Court determines the rules and principles of international law which are relevant to the question posed by the General Assembly. The Court begins by citing, with reference to Article 2, paragraph 4, of the United Nations Charter and to General Assembly resolution 2625 (XXV), the principles of the prohibition of

the threat or use of force and the illegality of any territorial acquisition by such means, as reflected in customary international law. It further cites the principle of self-determination of peoples, as enshrined in the Charter and reaffirmed by resolution 2625 (XXV). As regards international humanitarian law, the Court refers to the provisions of the Hague Regulation of 1907, which have become part of customary law, as well as the Fourth Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War of 1949, applicable in those Palestinian territories which before the armed conflict of 1967 lay to the east of the 1949 Armistice demarcation line (or Green Line ) and were occupied by Israel during that conflict. The Court further notes that certain human rights instruments (International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child) are applicable in the Occupied Palestinian Territory. The Court ascertains whether the construction of the wall has violated the above-mentioned rules and principles. It first observes that the route of the wall as fixed by the Israeli Government includes within the Closed Area (between the wall and the Green Line ) some 80 percent of the settlers living in the Occupied Palestinian Territory. Recalling that the Security Council described Israel's policy of establishing settlements in that territory as a flagrant violation of the Fourth Geneva Convention, the Court finds that those settlements have been established in breach of international law. It further considers certain fears expressed to it that the route of the wall will prejudge the future frontier between Israel and Palestine; it considers that the construction of the wall and its associated rgime create a fait accompli' on the ground that could well become permanent, in which case, . . . [the construction of the wall] would be tantamount to de facto annexation . The Court notes that the route chosen for the wall gives expression in loco to the illegal measures taken by Israel, and deplored by the Security Council, with regard to Jerusalem and the settlements, and that it entails further alterations to the demographic composition of the Occupied Palestinian Territory. It finds that the construction [of the wall], along with measures taken previously, . . . severely impedes the exercise by the Palestinian people of its right to self-determination, and is therefore a breach of Israel's obligation to respect that right . The Court then considers the information furnished to it regarding the impact of the construction of the wall on the daily life of the inhabitants of the Occupied Palestinian Territory (destruction or requisition of private property, restrictions on freedom of movement, confiscation of agricultural land, cutting-off of access to primary water sources, etc.). It finds that the construction of the wall and its associated rgime are contrary to the relevant provisions of the Hague Regulations of 1907 and of the Fourth Geneva Convention; that they impede the liberty of movement of the inhabitants of the territory as guaranteed by the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; and that they also impede the exercise by the persons concerned of the right to work, to health, to education and to an adequate standard of living as proclaimed in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and in the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Lastly, the Court finds that this construction and its associated rgime, coupled with the establishment of settlements, are tending to alter the demographic composition of the Occupied Palestinian Territory and thereby contravene the Fourth Geneva Convention and the relevant Security Council resolutions. The Court observes that certain humanitarian law and human rights instruments include qualifying clauses or provisions for derogation which may be invoked by States parties, inter alia where military exigencies or the needs of national security or public order so require. It states that it is not convinced that the specific course Israel has chosen for the wall was necessary to attain its security objectives and, holding that none of such clauses are applicable, finds that the construction of the wall constitutes breaches by Israel of various of its obligations under the applicable international humanitarian law and human rights instruments . In conclusion, the Court considers that Israel cannot rely on a right of self-defence or on a state of necessity in order to preclude the wrongfulness of the construction of the wall. The Court accordingly finds that the construction of the wall and its associated rgime are contrary to international law. Legal consequences of the violations found The Court draws a distinction between the legal consequences of these violations for Israel and those for other States. In regard to the former, the Court finds that Israel must respect the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination and its obligations under humanitarian law and human rights law. Israel must also put an end to the violation of its international obligations flowing from the construction of the wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and must accordingly cease forthwith the works of construction of the wall, dismantle forthwith those parts of that structure situated within the Occupied Palestinian Territory and forthwith repeal or render ineffective all legislative and regulatory acts adopted with a view to construction of the wall and establishment of its associated rgime, except in so far as such acts may continue to be relevant for compliance by Israel with its obligations in regard to reparation. Israel must further make reparation for all damage suffered by all natural or legal persons affected by the wall's construction. As regards the legal consequences for other States, the Court finds that all States are under an obligation not to recognize the illegal situation resulting from the construction of the wall and not to render aid or assistance in maintaining the situation created by such construction. The Court further finds that it is for all States, while respecting the United Nations Charter and international law, to see to it that any impediment, resulting from the construction of the wall, in the exercise by the Palestinian people of its right to self-determination is brought to an end. In addition, all States parties to the Fourth Geneva Convention are under an obligation, while respecting the Charter and international law, to ensure compliance by Israel with international humanitarian law as embodied in that Convention. Finally, the Court is of the view that the United Nations, and especially the General Assembly and the Security Council, should consider what further action is required to bring to an end the illegal situation resulting from the construction of the wall and its associated rgime, taking due account of the present Advisory Opinion. The Court concludes by stating that the construction of the wall must be placed in a more general context. In this regard, the Court notes that Israel and Palestine are under an obligation scrupulously to observe the rules of international humanitarian law . In the Court's view, the tragic situation in the region can be brought to an end only through implementation in good faith of all relevant Security Council resolutions. The Court further draws the attention of the General Assembly to the need for . . . efforts to be encouraged with a view to achieving as soon as possible, on the basis of international law, a negotiated solution to the outstanding problems and the establishment of a Palestinian State, existing side by side with Israel and its other neighbours, with peace and security for all in the region . Composition of the Court The Court was composed as follows: Judge Shi, President; Judge Ranjeva, Vice-President; Judges Guillaume, Koroma, Vereshchetin, Higgins, Parra-Aranguren, Kooijmans, Rezek, Al-Khasawneh, Buergenthal, Elaraby, Owada, Simma and Tomka; Registrar Couvreur. Judges Koroma, Higgins, Kooijmans and Al-Khasawneh append separate opinions to the Advisory Opinion. Judge Buergenthal appends a declaration. Judges Elaraby and Owada append separate opinions. _ A summary of the Advisory Opinion is published in the document entitled Summary No. 2004/2, to which summaries of the declaration and separate opinions appended to the Advisory Opinion are attached. This Press Communiqu, the summary of the Advisory Opinion and the latter's full text can also be accessed on the Court's website by clicking on Docket and Decisions (www.icj-cij.org).

KURODA VS. JALANDONI 83 PHIL 171


FACTS: Shigenori Kuroda, formerly a Lieutenant-General of the Japanese Imperial Army and Commanding General of the Japanese Imperial Forces in The Philippines during a period covering 1943 and 1944 who is now charged before a military Commission convened by the Chief of Staff of the Armed forces of the Philippines with having unlawfully disregarded and failed "to discharge his duties as such command, permitting them to commit brutal atrocities and other high crimes against noncombatant civilians and prisoners of the Imperial Japanese Forces in violation of the laws and customs of war" comes before this Court seeking to establish the illegality of Executive Order No. 68 of the President of the Philippines: to enjoin and prohibit respondents Melville S. Hussey and Robert Port from participating in the prosecution of petitioner's case before the Military Commission and to permanently prohibit respondents from proceeding with the case of petitioners. In support of his case petitioner tenders the following principal arguments. First. "That Executive Order No. 68 is illegal on the ground that it violates not only the provision of our constitutional law but also our local laws to say nothing of the fact (that) the Philippines is not a signatory nor an adherent to the Hague Convention on Rules and Regulations covering Land Warfare and therefore petitioners is charged of 'crimes' not based on law, national and international." Hence petitioner argues "That in view off the fact that this commission has been empanelled by virtue of an unconstitutional law an illegal order this commission is without jurisdiction to try herein petitioner." RULING: Executive Order No. 68, establishing a National War Crimes Office prescribing rule and regulation governing the trial of accused war criminals, was issued by the President of the Philippines on the 29th days of July, 1947 This Court holds that this order is valid and constitutional. Article 2 of our Constitution provides in its section 3, that The Philippines renounces war as an instrument of national policyand adopts the generally accepted principles of international lawas part of the of the nation. In accordance with the generally accepted principle of international law of the present day including the Hague Convention the Geneva Convention and significant precedents of international jurisprudence established by the United Nation all those person military or civilian who have been guilty of planning preparing or waging a war of aggression and of the commission ofcrimes and offenses consequential and incidental thereto in violation of the laws and customs of war, of humanity and civilization are held accountable therefor. Consequently in the promulgation and enforcement of Execution Order No. 68 the President of the Philippines has acted in conformity with the generally accepted and policies of international law which are part of the our Constitution. The promulgation of said executive order is an exercise by the President of his power as Commander in chief of all our armed forces as upheld by this Court.