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Integration of Science and Practice P6071 Section 16

CLASS SESSIONS Wednesday, 2:30pm 3:50pm, 600 West 168th Street, 4th Floor Conference Room INSTRUCTOR Bhaven Sampat bns3@columbia.edu TEACHING ASSISTANT Ben Spoer brs2138@columbia.edu COURSE DESCRIPTION The different studios in the Mailman Core teach a set of foundational perspectives, knowledge, and skills. But the practice of public health requires applying this education in a context characterized by uncertainty, risk, competing interests, and conflicting values. The Integration of Science and Practice (ISP) uses case studies of actual events to help students analyze the complicated nature of public health practice. On the one hand, the course immerses students in the complex arena of public health decision-making and debate, placing them in the role of stakeholders and policy-makers who must marshal both their core knowledge and disciplinary perspectives to explore different options and create and justify interdisciplinary responses to public health challenges. On the other hand, the cases also provide an opportunity to identify crosscutting themes and questions. The cases serve as archive of sorts, a library of examples to draw on as points of comparison when they encounter similar problems and issues in other classes or in the course of their careers. PREREQUISITES ISP Semester 1 COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES Students who successfully complete this course will be able to: Select among potential responses to a public health problem Propose a plan of action to address a public health problem Identify knowledge sources and knowledge gaps when proposing a course of action Integrate analytical and qualitative skills to draw on available evidence and identify knowledge gaps Synthesize information from multiple sources to propose public health interventions Synthesize empirical evidence to support a course of action Integrate alternative, divergent, or contradictory ideas and perspectives to public health action Collaborate with colleagues with different perspectives and expertise to address public health challenges Reinforce active listening skills as demonstrated by response to and further development of ideas presented by others Weigh the feasibility of a course of action using experience, past studies and experts opinions.

Mailman School of Public Health

Spring 2014

ASSESSMENT AND GRADING POLICY ISP is a pass/fail course. Far from suggesting that the course therefore is of minimal value or rigor, we hope instead that this grading schema will help students focus less on the final outcome of their grade and more on the process of skill development in professional, cognitive, and interpersonal domains. Student grades will be based on: Policy memo ........................................................30% Press release . 25% Group press conference.....................................25% Class participation..20% COURSE REQUIREMENTS Participation is based on attendance and contribution to class discussions. Students are expected to arrive on time, have read each case carefully at least once (twice is strongly recommended), and to be fully engaged in all aspects of the class discussion and activities. Use of computers and phones/handheld devices in a manner unrelated to discussion is not permitted. Your faculty member and TA will use the rubric you collaboratively developed last semester to assess your participation with written comments at the end of the semester. Course handbook: Booth, et al. (2008.) The craft of research. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Available at the Columbia University Medical Center Bookstore and through library reserves. Students should bring laptops to each of the Policy Memo sessions (Sessions 7, 9, and 11) to submit their policy memo assignments to the course wiki. In order to retrieve the case for Session 2 (Chemical Fallout: The Milwaukee Journal and the BPA Story) students are required to log into the Knight Case Studies Initiative site through the Columbia Journalism School (https://casestudies.jrn.columbia.edu/casestudy/www/layout/login.asp). The log-in is bpacase@columbia.net and password is chemical COURSE STRUCTURE The ISP will combine case-based learning and discussion, writing policy memos, and a press conference exercise. Case studies Students will explore six case studies throughout the semester. Policy memos Students will complete one individual policy memo as they did in the previous semester. The policy memo is due March 12. Press release and conference activity This semester, students will have an opportunity to work in groups to draft a press release and then lead a press conference, fielding questions from an audience of their peers. Groups will select a case of particular interest to them and will write a press release announcing a new policy related to the issues in the case. With group members playing different stakeholder roles (e.g., Health Commissioner, Mayor, City Council Member, etc.), they will then hold a press conference elaborating on the new policy and taking questions from a press corps composed of their student peers.

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Case exploration activity The final case of the semester will break from the mold of cases as students have experienced them previously. Rather, students will be immersed in an issue by exploring primary source material such as first-hand accounts, news clippings, and other documents to develop an understanding of an issue or dilemma, propose a response to it, and weighing alternative approaches.

MAILMAN SCHOOL POLICIES AND EXPECTATIONS Students and faculty have a shared commitment to the Schools mission, values and oath. http://mailman.columbia.edu/about-us/school-mission/ Academic Integrity Students are required to adhere to the Mailman School Honor Code, available online at http://mailman.columbia.edu/honorcode. Disability Access In order to receive disability-related academic accommodations, students must first be registered with the Office of Disability Services (ODS). Students who have, or think they may have a disability are invited to contact ODS for a confidential discussion at 212.854.2388 (V) 212.854.2378 (TTY), or by email at disability@columbia.edu. If you have already registered with ODS, please speak to your instructor to ensure that s/he has been notified of your recommended accommodations by Lillian Morales (lm31@columbia.edu), the Schools liaison to the Office of Disability Services.
COURSE SCHEDULE

Please see the lecture section of Courseworks to download the readings. Session 1 Measure or Assist? Arsenic Mitigation in Bangladesh 1/22/14 Learning Objectives: Students will be able to Appreciate the problem of intended consequences Propose appropriate public health interventions Reading: Measure or Assist? Arsenic Mitigation in Bangladesh Session 2 Chemical Fallout: the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and the BPA Story 2/5/14 Learning Objectives: Students will be able to Identify stakeholder motivations and desires Describe the limits of evidence-based actions and the ambiguity of science Reading: Chemical Fallout: the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and the BPA Story In order to retrieve the case for Session 2 (Chemical Fallout: The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and the BPA Story) log into the Knight Case Studies Initiative site through the Columbia Journalism School (https://casestudies.jrn.columbia.edu/casestudy/www/layout/login.asp). The log-in is bpacase@columbia.net and password is chemical

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Session 3 Technology for Sex Determination and the Gender Gap in India 2/19/14 Learning Objectives: Students will be able to Analyze the impact of cultural norms on public health work Justify a response to a complex cultural issue with public health impacts Reading: Technology for Sex Determination and the Gender Gap in India

Session 4 Credible Voices: WHO-Beijing and the SARS Crisis 3/5/14 Learning Objectives: Students will be able to Consider the impact of governmental and cultural factors in public health interventions Propose public health responses to an emerging epidemic Reading: Credible Voice: WHO-Beijing and the SARS Crisis POLICY MEMO DUE MARCH 12 No class meeting 3/12/14 Session 5 Faculty Choice 3/26/14 Case to be assigned by instructor; your faculty member will provide more information in class

Session 6 PRESS RELEASE ACTIVITY I 4/2/14 Learning Objectives: Students will be able to Select among cases to identify an issue of interest Propose a policy-level response to the issue Communicate the policy, rationale, and implication in a press release Anticipate needs and concerns of stakeholders Tailor communication to stakeholder needs Reading: Students are required to watch the VoiceThread tutorial on best practices for press releases and press conferences, including examples of both, prepared by Tim Paul (MSPH Communications) This session will be led by TAs. Faculty are not present in the session.

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Session 7 PRESS RELEASE ACTIVITY II 4/9/14 Learning Objectives: Students will be able to Communicate the policy, rationale, and implication in a press conference Anticipate needs and concerns of stakeholders Tailor communication to stakeholder needs Effectively respond to questions

Session 8 Managed Housing case part 1 4/23/14 Learning Objectives: Students will be able to Use primary sources to develop a point of view on an issue Identify points of agreement among disparate groups Reading: TBA Session 9 Managed Housing case part 2 4/30/14 Learning Objectives: Students will be able to Strategize communication to build consensus among divergent points of view Reflect upon effectiveness of these strategies Reading: TBA

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