Anda di halaman 1dari 5

University of Louisville Course Syllabus African American Music MUH/PAS 214-01, 02, 03 Spring 2014

Course Name: African American Music Course No: MUH 214-01 (5278), 214-02 (5279), 214-03 (5550)/PAS 214-01 (5368), 214-02 (5369), 214-03 (5551) Meeting Time: Section 01 TR 11:00-12:15; Section 02 TR 1:00-2:15 PM; Section 03 TR 4:00-5:15 PM Location: School of Music Bldg Rm 161 (Sections 01 & 02); School of Music Rm 125 (Section 03) Credit Hrs: 3 Instructor: Professor Gerald (Jerry) Tolson, Professor Office: School of Music Bldg #327 Office Hrs: W 2:00-3:00 PM; TR 2:30-3:30 PM; Other times by appointment only Phone: 852-6972 E-Mail: jerry.tolson@louisville.edu Teaching Assistants: Israel Cuenca (idcuen01@louisville.edu), Jose Oreta (jmoret01@louisville.edu), Rachel Spears (rdspea01@louisville.edu) Text(s): The Music of Black Americans, 3rd Edition, Eileen Southern, W.W. Norton & Co., 1997, 1983 African American Music: An Introduction, Earl L. Stewart, Schirmer Books, 1998 Supplemental Text: The Power of Black Music, Samuel A. Floyd, Oxford University Press, 1995 (On closed reserve in the U ofL Music Library) Course Description: This course is designed to introduce the student to African American Music from a historical perspective as it is traced from its origins to the present. The course will explore the development of the various stylistic trends that characterize African American music. Socio-economic factors and events which have influenced the course of the various styles of African American music will be included in the discussion as will the evolution of and changes in the musical style and form. In addition, students will be introduced to the major innovators of each style through audio and video recordings. Objectives: As a result of this class, the student will 1. Be introduced to various styles of African American music through lecture, demonstration, and listening activities. 2. Become aware of the elements of African American music that define and distinguish it from other styles of American music. 3. Become knowledgeable about the various styles of African American music from a historical perspective. 4. Become acquainted with the major artists who have influenced the various styles of the music. 5. Be introduced to sociological factors and events that have influenced the stylistic evolution of the music. 6. Become more aware of the diversity that exists within the genre of African American music. Arts and Humanities are concerned with understanding texts of art, music, theatre, literature, philosophy, and religious thought. Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to do all of the following: 1. Communicate an understanding of vocabulary, concepts, materials, techniques, and methods of intellectual inquiry within the arts and/or humanities; 2. Describe and evaluate texts using primary and secondary materials; 3. Analyze and synthesize texts, recognizing the diversity of cultures and historical contexts. Content Outcomes: As a result of this class, 1. The student will gain a working knowledge of concepts and techniques used to create the diversity of musical styles that are categorized as African American music. The student's understanding of these concepts and techniques will be assessed via four (4) written examinations which will not only require the students to recognize appropriate vocabulary and stylistic characteristics, but will require the students to apply their understanding through analysis of musical excerpts and aural identification of distinguishing stylistic characteristics. 2. The student will demonstrate an understanding of, and be able to discuss via essay examination and four(4) concert reviews, the historical context and significance of various African American musical styles. In addition, the student will be able to compare and contrast the relevance and impact of African American musical styles on the cultural and sociological development of American society. 3. The student will develop an understanding of the diversity of styles that exists within the genre of African American music and how these styles have evolved within the context of United States history. The student will demonstrate this understanding via written essay examination questions. Understanding Cultural Diversity means students will have a broad exposure to a variety of social systems, cultures, and subcultures, both within the United States and the rest of the world. This portion of the curriculum encourages an appreciation of the realities of a racially and culturally diverse world. Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to do all of the following: 1. Recognize that social and cultural systems develop out of adaptation to environmental and historical circumstances; 2. Communicate an understanding of the ways in which race, ethnicity, and/or gender are socially constructed; 3. Communicate an understanding that different cultures may hold different views of the same issues; 4. Evaluate pertinent information and assertions for relevance, bias, stereotyping, manipulation, and completeness.

Competency Outcomes: In order to establish a better understanding of cultural diversity as a result of this class 1. The student will recognize that the evolution of African American music represents the creative expression of musical artists in response to sociological and cultural factors that were influenced by the environmental and historical context of the given period. 2. The student will be able to communicate an understanding of the ways in which race and ethnicity have impacted not only the development of African American music, but all American music and artistic expression. As a result, the student will be able to place African American music in appropriate sociological and historical contexts. 3. The student will understand how the events of American history have impacted different racial and ethnic groups in different ways resulting in artistic expression that reflects the response of minority populations, specifically African Americans, to those historical events. Since music is reflective of a group's response to their environment, the student will develop an understanding of an African American perspective of American history as expressed through their music. 4. The student will develop the ability to evaluate information from more than one perspective to judge its authenticity and to analyze the impact of an event from different ethnic perspectives to judge its influence on American culture. As it relates to African American music, the student will evaluate the impact of racial biases, stereotypes, and the manipulation of information and people to determine the influence of these factors on the evolution of the music. Format: Instructional methods will include lecture, audio-visual presentations, guest lecturers, and live demonstration. Evaluation: The student will demonstrate their ability to communicate their understanding of the content and competency areas listed above via the completion of 1. Four (4) written examinations that will include objective as well as aural recognition and analysis questions. 2. Four (4) analytical reviews of four different live performances of African American music using criteria developed through the student's understanding of vocabulary, stylistic characteristics, methods, concepts, and compositional techniques presented in class as utilized in the production of African American music. 3. Aural identification and critical evaluation of the differences among the various styles and innovators of African American music via listening and critical evaluation questions on each of the four course examinations. 4. Class discussion and participation that requires the student to evaluate and analyze their own cultural experiences and background in order to contribute significantly to the topic of the moment. There will be 300 points possible with the following point assignments: - Class participation/attendance 20 points - Exam 1 (Week 4) 50 points - Midterm Exam (Week 9) 50 points - Exam 3 (Week 13) 50 points ` - Final Exam (Week 16) 50 points - Four (4) reviews of live music performances 20 points each Due Jan 23, Feb 27, Mar 20, Apr 17 (Criteria for reviews discussed below) The grading scale for evaluation will be as follows: 300-291 = A+ 239.9-231 = C+ 290.9-280 = A 230.9-220 = C 279.9-270 = A219.9-210 = C269.9-261 = B+ 209.9-201 = D+ 260.9-250 = B 200.9-190 = D 249.9-240 = B189.9-180 = D179.9-0 = F Requirements: 1. All written papers must be typed or completed on a word processor. a. Margins should be 1 b. Text should be double-spaced c. Typeface should be no larger than 12 pt. 2. All papers will be evaluated not only on content, but also on manner of expression (including spelling and grammar) and will be scrutinized with regard to the University policies on plagiarism. 3. Students will be responsible for a listening list that will be available on-line from the UL music library. 4. Written assignments must be turned in on time (By the end of class period assignment is due) for consideration of full credit. Late papers will be accepted at the instructor's discretion and will not receive full credit. Five points will be deducted for each day/class period that they are late. Papers that are more than two weeks late will not be accepted. 5. Attendance is an essential part of class participation. Since many class sessions will involve listening and live examples, absence from more than two class sessions will affect the participation component of the student's evaluation. After the second absence, two participation points will be deducted for each successive absence. A student who misses more than 12 classes will receive a failing grade for the class. Being on time for class is also very important as is staying for the entire class. Every two tardies or early departures will count as one absence.

12/26/13

AAM

6. Each exam will cover only the portion of the syllabus indicated for that exam. All exams will include listening components. Make-up tests will be given only in the case of excused absences, and only if (a) medical documentation is presented, or (b) the instructor has been notified promptly of an emergency, or (c) the instructor has been notified in advance of a school function or religious holiday (within two weeks of the beginning of the semester for religious holidays). Tests missed because of unexcused absence may not be made up for credit. 7. The reviews of live music performances should be three pages in length, must be of a performance within three (3) weeks of the review due date, must feature music of African American origin, must be written in narrative form, and should include the following: A. Name of the performing group B. Date of the performance C. Location of the performance D. Instrumentation of the performing group including names of performers on each instrument E. Titles and styles of selections performed F. Level of group interaction and energy G. African American and any other unique performance techniques displayed H. The student's reflections on the performance including what made the performance memorable I. Accurate identification and discussion of concepts and vocabulary discussed in class as appropriate 8. Students may review no more than two concerts/performances of the same style of music. At least one concert/performance must be of Black Gospel music. 9. All reviewed concerts must be attended live. Webcasts are not acceptable. Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism: "All forms of academic dishonesty are prohibited at the University of Louisville. It is a serious offense because it diminishes the quality of scholarship, makes accurate evaluation of student progress impossible, and defrauds those in society who must ultimately depend upon the knowledge and integrity of the institution and its students and faculty." It is expected that a student in this class will refrain from plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism is defined as: Representing the words or ideas of someone else as one!s own in any academic exercise, such as: 1. Submitting as one!s own a paper written by another person or by a commercial ghost writing service. 2. Exactly reproducing someone else!s words without identifying the words with quotation marks or by appropriate indentation, or without properly citing the quotation in a footnote or a reference. 3. Paraphrasing or summarizing someone else!s work without identifying the words with a footnote or a reference. 4. Using facts, data, graphs, charts, or other information without acknowledging the source with a footnote or reference. Plagiarism and cheating are serious breaches of academic conduct and may result in severe academic penalties including an F for the assignment, failure of the class or dismissal from the university. Each student is advised to become familiar with the various forms of academic dishonesty as explained in the Code of student Rights and Responsibilities (see Catalog). Ignorance of these responsibilities is not an acceptable defense against charges of academic dishonesty. Instructional Modifications: Students with disabilities, who need reasonable modifications to complete assignments successfully and otherwise satisfy course criteria, are encouraged to meet with the instructor as early in the course as possible to identify and plan specific accommodations. Students will be asked to supply a letter from the Disability Resource Center to assist in planning modifications. Campus Closure: In the event of a campus-wide closure, students will be expected to submit assignments electronically and use electronic interface for assigned topics and meetings. In the event of a school closure, students may report to campus to meet with their instructors. Note: The instructor reserves the right to alter the sequence of material and assignments as needed.

12/26/13

AAM

Selected Bibliography: America's Black Musical Heritage, Tilford Brooks, Prentice Hall, 1984. African American Music, Mellonee V. Burnim & Portia K. Maultsby, Routledge Press, New York, NY, 2006. The Outline History of American Jazz, David Sharp, et al, Kendall/Hunt Publishing, Dubuque, IA, 1998. The Making of Jazz: A Comprehensive History, James Lincoln Collier, Dell Publishing, New York, NY, 1978. Jazz: From Its Origins to the Present, Lewis Porter, et al, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1993. Black Music of Two Worlds, John Storm Roberts, Schirmer Books, 1998. Go Down, Moses, Richard Newman, Clarkson Potter Publishers, New York, NY, 1998. Behind the Burnt Cork Mask, William Mahar, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, IL, 1999. Nowhere to Run: The Story of Soul Music, Gerri Hirshey, Da Capo Press, New York, NY, 1984. A Change Is Gonna Come: Music, Race, & the Soul of America, Craig Werner, Penguin Putnam Inc., New York, NY, 1998. Funk: The Music, The People, and The Rhythm of The One, Rickey Vincent, St Martin's Griffin, New York, NY, 1996. Buppies, B-Boys, Baps, & Bohos: Notes on Post-Soul Black Culture, Nelson George, Harper Collins Publishers, New York, NY, 1992. People Get Ready! A New History of Black Gospel Music, Robert Darden, Continuum Publishing, New York, NY, 2004. From Jubilee to Hip Hop, Readings in African American Music, Kip Lornell, Ed., Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2010.

12/26/13

AAM

Class/Exam Schedule: Date Week 1 1/7, 9 Week 2 1/14,16 Week 3 1/21,23 Week 4 1/28, 1/30 Week 5 2/4,6 Week 6 2/11,13 Week 7 2/18,20 Week 8 2/25,2/27 Week 9 3/4,6 Week 10 Week 11 3/18/20 Week 12 3/25,27 Week 13 4/1/3 Week 14 4/8,10 Week 15 4/15,17 Week 16 Topic Introduction Elements of Music Elements of African American Music Role of Music in African American Society The African Legacy The Antebellum Years Review 1 Due Post-War Folk Traditions Exam 1 The Blues African American Music Heritage Institute* (Feb 3-4) The Blues/Jazz Jazz The Early Church Music Review 2 Due Jazz Week* (Feb 27-Mar 1) The Harlem Renaissance Midterm Exam Spring Break The Classical Movement Review 3 Due Rhythm and Blues: The Golden Age of the 50's The Civil Rights Movement Soul Music Soul Music Exam 3 The Modern Church Music Rap and Beyond Review 4 Due Final Exam Section 01 Tuesday, April 29, 11:30 AM 2:00 PM Section 02 Friday, April 25, 2:30-5:00 PM Section 03 TBA Southern, Chapter 13 Stewart, Chapter 11 Supplemental Rdg TBA Stewart, Chapter 12 Stewart, Chapter 12 Reading Assignment Stewart, Chapter 1

Floyd, Chapter 1-2 Southern, Chapter 1 Southern, Chap. 3-5 Southern, Chap 6-8 Southern Chapter 9 Southern, Chapter 10 Southern, Chapter 12 Floyd, Chapter 3

Southern, Chapter 11 Floyd, Chapter 5

Southern, Chapter 14 Stewart, Chapter 13

12/26/13

AAM