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American Conference Institutes

3rd Advanced Industry Summit on Complying with

GLOBAL ENCRYPTION CONTROLS


Practical Compliance Strategies from:
Google Xilinx Apple Cisco Systems Chevron NetIQ Hewlett-Packard QLogic Weatherford Symantec Ingram Micro

April 18 19, 2012 Hilton San Francisco Airport Bayfront San Francisco, CA

Gain Invaluable Local Insights on Global Encryption Controls Requirements and Policy Developments
CHINA: Working with Chinese agencies to facilitate your encryption imports RUSSIA: Determining what is required to secure a license ISRAEL: Complying with encryption registration and distribution requirements to prevent penalties and license revocation HONG KONG & MALAYSIA: Minimizing transshipment and re-export challenges MEXICO: How new export controls will impact your encryption compliance strategy INDIA: Understanding restrictions on key length and strength of encryption UK/IRELAND/NETHERLANDS: Interpretating the Cryptography Note and types of required licenses CLOUD COMPUTING: Minimizing the risks of unauthorized technology transfers presented by shared networks and collaborative platforms INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS: How the Wassenaar Arrangement, Trans Pacific Partnership and WTO affect the import/export of your cryptography Interactive Working Groups April 17, 2012 Group A: When and How to Obtain an ERN, Apply License Exception ENC and Self-Classify: A Practical Guide to What Every Export Controls Professional Needs to Know Group B: Employee Travel with Encryption Controlled-Items: Preventing Unauthorized Access and Setting up Internal Compliance Procedures for International Travel
Media and Association Partners:
Earn

Insights on Russias Membership in the WTO:


Elizabeth Hafner Director for Russia and Northern Eurasia Office of the U.S. Trade Representative

International Perspectives:
Alexander Zubarev Information Security Director Hewlett Packard (Russia) Nora Ochoa Latin America Regional Trade Compliance Manager Weatherford (Mexico) Michael Morgan Labarge Weinstein (Canada) Eric Carlson Covington & Burling (China) Eyal Roy Sage AYR (Israel) Anita Esslinger Bryan Cave (London)

CLE
Credits

Register Now 888-224-2480 AmericanConference.com/encryption

I enjoyed the interaction among panelists and with the audience

Qualcomm, Inc.

Conference organization, speaker selection and information delivered were perfect. Hitachi Data Systems (Russia) I learned a lot about the main focus areas. Dell Inc.

Meet and Benchmark with In-House, Government and Private Practice Speakers from the U.S. and Abroad. See Why Export Professionals Attend this Unique Conference Each Year to Learn the Latest on Global Encryption Controls.
How this conference differs from other events: American Conference Institutes 3rd Advanced Summit on Global Encryption Controls is an industry-led program that will provide an optimal benchmarking opportunity for companies on how to reduce new, complex and emerging compliance risks worldwide. Dont miss this opportunity to obtain critical information that is not available in print or on the web. Network and learn from export counsel and compliance officers experienced in navigating foreign encryption control regulations, in key jurisdictions, including China, Asia and Europe. Countries such as China, Russia, India, France, Ireland, the UK and Canada are all developing comprehensive laws on the import and export of encryption items requiring specific licenses or authorizations to import, use and export items with encryption technology. The Wassenaar Arrangement and other international agreements such as the Trans Pacific Partnership, are becoming more influential as countries seek to work together on developing a comprehensive set of encryption regulations. Knowing each countrys specific laws is essential for companies that do business on a global scale. As the global landscape is changing dramatically each year, export compliance professionals must understand both foreign and U.S. encryption regulations. More and more, companies are using encryption items to protect the integrity of their information. In addition, more employees are traveling internationally, bringing up the challenge of remaining compliant with import laws as they enter each country. The need for a comprehensive compliance program that incorporates all regulations and policy developments is necessary to prevent severe monetary fines, loss of import/export privileges and criminal penalties. Key topics will include: How international agreements affect the import and export of cryptography Obtaining export permits from the SEMB in China Preventing steep fines for export violations in Malaysia and Hong Kong How to handle technology transfers through cloud computing without violating encryption regulations around the globe Russias recent joining of the WTO, the U.S.-Russia 2006 Bilateral Agreement and what this means for your export compliance program How to use Ireland and the Netherlands as key software and hardware EU distribution centers Complying with Israeli encryption registration and distribution requirements to prevent strict penalties and license revocation Complying with Canadian and Mexican export controls to prevent business losses and delays

Also, benefit from interactive pre-summit working groups: April 17, 2012 Group A: When and How to Obtain an ERN, Apply License Exception ENC, and Self-Classify: A Practical Guide to What Every Export Controls Professional Needs to Know Group B: Employee Travel with Encryption Controlled-Items: Preventing Unauthorized Access and Setting up Internal Compliance Procedures for International Travel Reserve your seat early by calling 1-888-224-2480, faxing your registration to 1-877-927-1563 or registering online at: www.americanconference.com/encryption

A Must-Attend Event For


Vice Presidents, Directors and Managers of : Export and Import Compliance Export Administration Export and Import Controls IT Security Export Policy Export Licensing International Trade Compliance Government Affairs Corporate Counsel Import and Export Compliance International Trade Counsel Trade and Regulatory Counsel Private practice attorneys and consultants practicing in: Export controls International trade Corporate Compliance and Governance E-commerce Chief Technology Officers Engineers

Register now: 888-224-2480 Fax: 877-927-1563 AmericanConference.com/encryption

AGENDA AT-A-GLANCE
INTERACTIVE WORKING GROUPS Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Group A:

9:00am 12:30pm

Group B:

1:30pm 5:00pm

When and How to Obtain an ERN, Apply License Exception ENC and Self-Classify: A Practical Guide to What Every Export Controls Professional Needs to Know

Employee Travel with Encryption ControlledItems: Preventing Unauthorized Access and Setting up Internal Compliance Procedures for International Travel

MAIN CONFERENCE DAY 1 Wednesday, April 18, 2012


8:00 9:00 9:15

MAIN CONFERENCE DAY 2 Thursday, April 19, 2012


9:00 9:05

Registration Opens Opening Remarks by Conference Co-Chairs How International Agreements Affect the Import & Export of Cryptography: Wassenaar Arrangement, Trans Pacic Partnership and the WTO Networking Coffee Break CHINA: Overcoming Import and Export Challenges Posed by Your Encryption-Related Items and Technology INDIA: Incorporating Emerging Encryption Compliance Risks and Business Development Opportunities into Your Global Export Program Networking Lunch

Conference Co-Chairs Opening Remarks U.S. Encryption Policy Update: Status Report on Current and Pending EAR, ITAR and OFAC Reforms Russias Membership in the WTO and the U.S.- Russia 2006 Bilateral Agreement: The Latest on Russia Encryption Compliance Expectations and Inter-Agency Cooperation Coffee Break CUSTOMS UNION OF RUSSIA, KAZAKHSTAN & BELARUS: Satisfying Complex Encryption Import Licensing Requirements NETHERLANDS & IRELAND as Key Software and Hardware Distribution Centers: Overcoming Clearance, Re-Export and Tax Implications Networking Lunch ISRAEL: Complying with Encryption Registration and Distribution Requirements to Prevent Strict Penalties and License Revocation Networking Break MEXICO: Managing the Practical Impact of New Export Controls on your Encryption Compliance Strategy Lessons Learned for Updating Your Global Encryption Compliance Program
Email questions to crypto@americanconference.com

9:35

10:30 10:45

10:05 10:20

11:45

11:30

12:45 2:00

12:30

HONG KONG & MALAYSIA: Minimizing Transshipment and Re-Exports Challenges Refreshment Break CLOUD COMPUTING: Reducing Compliance Risks Posed by Shared Networks and Collaborative Platforms CANADA: Complying with Complex Encryption Regulations to Prevent Business Losses, Delays and Reduced Competitiveness End of Day 1

1:45

2:45 3:15

2:45 3:00

4:30

4:00

5:15

5:00

End of Summit

Register now: 888-224-2480 Fax: 877-927-1563 AmericanConference.com/encryption

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKING GROUPS


Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Working Group A
9:00am 12:30pm

Working Group B
1:30pm 5:00pm

When and How to Obtain an ERN, Apply License Exception ENC, and Self-Classify: A Practical Guide to What Every Export Controls Professional Needs to Know
Steve Bird Export Compliance Manager Cisco Systems, Inc. (San Jose, CA) Karla Haynes Export/Import Compliance Attorney Chevron Corporation (San Ramon, CA) Export compliance professionals in the high tech, oil & gas, fi nance, defense and health care industries face daunting compliance challenges impacting the export of encryption-controlled items. Benefit from strategic, proven-effective licensing and compliance strategies at this highly in-depth, practical working group. Understand when to self-classify v. seek a government review, utilize exception ENC to expedite exports, and know when and how to obtain an ERN from a manufacturer. Topics include: What is an ERN and how do you obtain one What is SNAP-R and how do you use it How to determine if an item is 740.17 (b)(2), (b)(3), or (b)(1) under the new product descriptions When to update your company registration and whether to rely on a manufacturers self-classification and registration How do you self-classify an item or determine if an item is subject to controls under 740.17 When is self-classification permitted and what product information is sufficient Review of items with weak encryption and authentication When and how to prepare a Supplement No. 8 report

Employee Travel with Encryption Controlled-Items: Preventing Unauthorized Access and Setting up Internal Compliance Procedures for International Travel
Dr. Alexander Zubarev Information Security Director Hewlett-Packard (Moscow, Russia) Darie Achstein-Conway Global Trade and Compliance Manager QLogic Corporation (Orange County, CA) Melissa Duffy Attorney Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP (Washington, DC) Which export/import regulations do you need to comply with when you are traveling abroad with an encrypted Blackberry or laptop? What are some best practices for providing clean machines? What are some logistical challenges that multi-national companies face when conducting business around the world? This interactive working group is designed to provide specific examples of what you should do when traveling with encryption items outside the U.S. Please bring your questions to this session, as ample time will be used to address common challenges faced by industry. Topics will include: Complying with section 734.2 (b)(9), 740.17 (a)(2), and 740.9(a) (temporary exports) Determining what type of license is required for a foreign national Dealing with foreign import and re-export controls on encrypted items transported by employees What is the proper procedure for carrying a product or technical data out of the U.S. Working with HR and other affected departments to assess risks of unauthorized access Tracking employee transfers to a new location and succession planning: Ensuring EAR compliance when assigning employees to new projects and roles Protecting technical data on laptops for employee travel When emails should be encrypted

Continuing Legal Education Credits


Accreditation will be sought in those jurisdictions requested by the registrants which have continuing education requirements. Th is course is identified as nontransitional for the purposes of CLE accreditation. ACI certifies that the activity has been approved for CLE credit by the New York State Continuing Legal Education Board in the amount of 8.5 hours. An additional 4.0 credit hours will apply to each workshop participation. ACI certifies that this activity has been approved for CLE credit by the State Bar of California in the amount of 11.0 hours. An additional 3.5 credit hours will apply to each workshop participation. CLE Credits You are required to bring your state bar number to complete the appropriate state forms during the conference. CLE credits are processed in 4-8 weeks aft er a conference is held. ACI has a dedicated team which processes requests for state approval. Please note that event accreditation varies by state and ACI will make every effort to process your request. Questions about CLE credits for your state? Visit our online CLE Help Center at www.americanconference.com/CLE

Register now: 888-224-2480 Fax: 877-927-1563 AmericanConference.com/encryption

DAY 1 Wednesday, April 18, 2012


8:00 9:00

Registration Opens Opening Remarks by Conference Co-Chairs


Steve Bird Export Compliance Manager Cisco Systems (San Jose, CA) Roszel C. Thomsen, III Partner Thomsen & Burke LLP (Baltimore, MD) Co-Chair, Encryption Working Group, Bureau of Industry and Securitys Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee
11:45

General Administration of Customs Ministry of Foreign Affairs SEMB Obtaining export permits from the State Encryption Management Bureau (SEMB) Understanding Chinas export control regime, MOFCOM administration, and Foreign Trade Law Preventing product confiscation, forfeiture of illegal income, and criminal prosecution

INDIA: Incorporating Emerging Encryption Compliance Risks and Business Development Opportunities into Your Global Export Program
Dr. Kamlesh Bajaj Chief Executive Officer Data Security Council of India (DSCI) (New Delhi, India) Roszel C. Thomsen, III Partner Thomsen & Burke LLP (Baltimore, MD) Joel M. Margolis Director, Policy Advocacy U.S.-India Business Council (Washington, DC) Working with the Department of Information Technology, Ministry of Communications and Information Technology to help facilitate entry of your encrypted products into India Restrictions on key length and strength of encryption Status of regulations on importing encrypted hardware and security implications of encryptionrelated items coming in country Implementation of requirements on telecom companies to provide source code Review of key policy developments affecting your compliance status

9:15

How International Agreements Affect the Import and Export of Cryptography: Wassenaar Arrangement, Trans Pacic Partnership and the WTO
Michael F. Angelo Senior Architect, Office of the CTO NetIQ Corporation (Houston, TX) Co-Chair, Encryption Working Group, Bureau of Industry and Securitys Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee Elizabeth Hafner Director for Russia and Northern Eurasia Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (Washington, DC) Danielle Kriz Director, Global Cybersecurity Policy Information Technology Industry Council (Washington, DC) Join our panelists for an in-depth discussion on the transforming global landscape of encryption controls, and the key policies and agreements that are impacting your compliance strategies. Each panelist brings unique experience, having been personally involved in the process and negotiations that are helping to shape this new global encryption controls environment.
12:45

Networking Luncheon for Attendees and Speakers HONG KONG & MALAYSIA: Minimizing Transshipment and Re-Exports Challenges
Darie Achstein-Conway Global Trade and Compliance Manager QLogic Corporation (Orange County, CA) Complying with permit requirements and use of permit exceptions Impact of the Strategic Trade Act (STA) Regulations of 2010 Addressing re-export concerns when sending products into China through Hong Kong Obtaining permits in Malaysia, including: single use, multiple use, bulk or special Applying applicable exceptions to permit requirements in Malaysia Preventing severe penalties for export violations, including steep fi nes and imprisonment Operating within the new vetting process for moving encrypted goods

2:00

10:30 10:45

Networking Coffee Break CHINA: Overcoming Import and Export Challenges Posed by Your Encryption-Related Items and Technology
Joseph Kim Director, Global Trade Compliance Xilinx (San Jose, CA) Eric Carlson Covington & Burling LLP (Beijing, China) Working with Chinese agencies to facilitate your imports Identifying when a CCATS is required MOFCOM

Register now: 888-224-2480 Fax: 877-927-1563 AmericanConference.com/encryption

2:45 3:15

Refreshment Break CLOUD COMPUTING: Reducing Compliance Risks Posed by Shared Networks and Collaborative Platforms
Ramakrishna Dasari Product & Technology Classification Manager Apple Inc. (Cupertino, CA) Neil Martin Trade Compliance Manager Google (Mountain View, CA) The challenge of fi nding a common defi nition for cloud computing and why vocabulary matters How to identify the agencies that regulate your cloud computing products and services How to dissect cloud computing services and assess your regulatory obligations for each facet of the product Best practices for compliance, such as implementing IP fi lters and restricted-party screening
9:00 9:05

DAY 2 Thursday, April 19, 2012


Conference Co-Chairs Opening Remarks U.S. Encryption Policy Update: Status Report on Current and Pending EAR, ITAR and OFAC Reforms
Daniel M. Fisher-Owens Partner Berliner, Corcoran & Rowe LLP (San Francisco, CA) State of play for ERN fi ling and self-classification reporting Impact of potential restructuring on category 13 of the USML: Commercial v. military encryption U.S. perspective on potential Wassenaar reforms to Category 5, Part 2 How the changes to OFAC general license for personal communications/ web browsers has impacted export operations
9:35

4:30

CANADA: Complying with Complex Encryption Regulations to Prevent Business Losses, Delays and Reduced Competitiveness
Michael Morgan Partner Labarge Weinstein (Ottawa, Canada) Obtaining necessary permits with the Trade Controls & Technical Barriers Bureau (TCTBB) Impact of the October 2010 Export Controls Division of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (ECD) policies on permits for export or transfer of information security goods, soft ware and technology Establishing an efficient and comprehensive compliance plan to ensure export and transfer of controlled goods and technology Obtaining different Canadian permits including: Multi-destination, broad based, co-development, and regime decontrol permits

RUSSIAs Membership in the WTO and the U.S.- Russia 2006 Bilateral Agreement: The Latest on Russia Encryption Compliance Expectations and Inter-Agency Cooperation
Elizabeth Hafner Director for Russia and Northern Eurasia Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (Washington, DC) Betsy Hafner will provide strategic insight on the current Russian import and export requirements for encryption items. Hear the latest on how these recent developments impact your export program and what to watch out for in 2012 from the FSB in Russia.

10:05 10:20

Networking Coffee Break CUSTOMS UNION OF RUSSIA, KAZAKHSTAN & BELARUS: Satisfying Complex Encryption Import Licensing Requirements
Dr. Alexander Zubarev Information Security Director Hewlett-Packard (Moscow, Russia) Lynn Wallace Manager, Trade Compliance Symantec Corporation (Mountain View, CA) Michael T. Gershberg Of Counsel Steptoe & Johnson LLP (Washington, DC) What is required to secure a license Determining what proprietary information is protected and increasing your communication with the FSB FSBs definition of strong encryption Complying with requirements for bulk products with identical encryption parameters Reconciling US encryption export rules with Russian import licensing requirements

5:15

End of Day 1

Global Sponsorship Opportunities


With more than 500 conferences in the United States, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Latin America, American Conference Institute (ACI) provides a diverse portfolio devoted to providing business intelligence to senior decision makers who need to respond to challenges spanning various industries in the US and around the world. As a member of our sponsorship faculty, your organization will be deemed as a partner. We will work closely with your organization to create the perfect business development solution catered exclusively to the needs of your practice group, business line or corporation. For more information about this program or our global portfolio of events, please contact: Wendy Tyler Head of Sales, American Conference Institute Tel: 212-352-3220 x5242 | Fax: 212-220-4281 w.tyler@AmericanConference.com

Register now: 888-224-2480 Fax: 877-927-1563 AmericanConference.com/encryption

Whether mass market items qualify for notification requirements Managing the effect of the new rule on mobile devices New initiatives on simplification of import of products with cryptography in the CU countries
11:30

2:45 3:00

Refreshment Break MEXICO: Managing the Practical Impact of New Export Controls on your Encryption Compliance Strategy
Martin Hagerman Partner Hagerman Abogados (Mexico City, Mexico) Nora Ochoa Latin America Regional Trade Compliance Manager Weatherford (Mexico City, Mexico) Review of the new Mexican export control regulations and when they go into effect Scope of controlled products, and restriction on setting up a new entity in Mexico When and how to fi le an end-user statement When to file a license per sales order or a blanket license Determining which exemptions are available for your encryption items When would you be subject to the regulations as a multinational corporation, and what triggers compliance requirements

NETHERLANDS & IRELAND as Key Software and Hardware Distribution Centers: Overcoming Clearance, Re-Export and Tax Implications
Anita C. Esslinger Partner Bryan Cave LLP (London, England) Daniel Minutillo Partner DCM, A Professional Law Corporation (San Francisco, CA) Understanding where the exporter is established and knowing which export control authority is the regulator Comparing EU/UK/Irish export encryption controls Comparison to CCL and the absence of 992 and EAR99 on the EU Dual-Use List Understanding what licenses are available in the UK and Ireland Working with Customs to declare and clear your goods in the Netherlands Working within the Irish export control system for exporting US-origin goods Key regulatory differences for EU distribution through Ireland vs. UK: Hardware v. soft ware distribution

4:00

A Round-Up of Encryption Controls Compliance Best Practices: Lessons Learned for Updating Your Global Encryption Compliance Program
Led by: Steve Bird Export Compliance Manager Cisco Systems (San Jose, CA) Linda Gamaunt Senior Export Analyst Ingram Micro Inc. (Santa Ana, CA) At this unique panel, you will hear directly from industry experts on their experiences and challenges to implementing and monitoring a global encryption compliance program. Learn key lessons on how to blend conflicting U.S. and foreign requirements, and prepare for increased global encryption regulation and enforcement. This interactive discussion will have ample time for Q & A so please submit questions before the Summit! Email questions to crypto@americanconference.com.

12:30 1:45

Luncheon for Attendees and Speakers ISRAEL: Complying with Encryption Registration and Distribution Requirements to Prevent Strict Penalties and License Revocation
Ramakrishna Dasari Product & Technology Classification Manager Apple Inc. (Cupertino, CA) Eyal Roy Sage Partner Amar Reiter Jeanne Sage Cohen & Co. (Tel Aviv, Israel) How to distribute, register and notify the Israeli Government of your encryption products coming into the country Working with Israels Ministry of Defense (MOD) to ensure compliance How Israels IT and cryptography industry fit into their national security framework Working with the Director-General to facilitate the granting of encryption licenses Obtaining special, restricted and general use licenses, and defining free means How to prepare a successful license application, and license renewals

Benchmarking and Compliance Strategy Panel


5:00

End of Summit

The speakers are great! Huawei Symantec Did a good job at obtaining local speakers Google Very informative forum and excellent networking.
Exxon Mobil
American Conference Institute, 2012

Register now: 888-224-2480 Fax: 877-927-1563 AmericanConference.com/encryption

American Conference Institutes

3rd Advanced Industry Summit on Complying with

Practical Compliance Strategies from: Google Xilinx Apple Cisco Systems Chevron NetIQ
Registration Fee
The fee includes the conference all program materials continental breakfasts lunches and refreshments.

GLOBAL ENCRYPTION CONTROLS


R E G I S T R AT I O N F O R M
PRIORITY SERVICE CODE
883L12_WEB

Hewlett-Packard QLogic Weatherford Symantec Ingram Micro

Payment Policy
Payment must be received in full by the conference date. All discounts will be applied to the Conference Only fee (excluding add-ons), cannot be combined with any other offer, and must be paid in full at time of order. Group discounts available to individuals employed by the same organization.

Cancellation and Refund Policy


You must notify us by email at least 48 hrs in advance if you wish to send a substitute participant. Delegates may not share a pass between multiple attendees without prior authorization. If you are unable to find a substitute, please notify American Conference Institute (ACI) in writing up to 10 days prior to the conference date and a credit voucher valid for 1 year will be issued to you for the full amount paid, redeemable against any other ACI conference. If you prefer, you may request a refund of fees paid less a 25% service charge. No credits or refunds will be given for cancellations received after 10 days prior to the conference date. ACI reserves the right to cancel any conference it deems necessary and will not be responsible for airfare hotel or other costs incurred by registrants. No liability is assumed by ACI for changes in program date content speakers or venue.

ATTENTION MAILROOM: If undeliverable to addressee, please forward to: VP/Director/Manager, Export Compliance; International Trade Counsel CONFERENCE CODE: 883L12-SNF YES! Please register the following delegate for Global Encryption Controls

Hotel Information
American Conference Institute is pleased to offer our delegates a limited number of hotel rooms at a preferential rate. Please contact the hotel directly and mention the ACI-Global Encryption Controls conference to receive this rate: Venue: Hilton San Francisco Airport Bayfront Address: 600 Airport Blvd. Burlingame, CA 94010 Reservations: 650-340-8500

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