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Perbezaan KBSR dengan KSSR

Kurikulum Bersepadu Sekolah Rendah (KBSR) Reka bentuk kurikulum berasaskan tiga bidang: Komunikasi Manusia dan alam sekeliling Perkembang diri Individu

Bahan kurikulum: Sukataan pelajaran Reka bentuk kurikulum: Linear Organisasi kurikulum: Tahap I Tahun !," dan #$ Mata pelajaran Teras, %ajib dan Tambahan Tahap II tahun &, ' dan ($ Mata pelajaran Teras, %ajib dan Tambahan Elemen Memahiran berfikir Se,ara Kritis dan Kreatif Fokus: #M Memba,a, menulis dan mengira$

Kurikulum Standard Sekolah Rendah (KSSR) Reka bentuk kurikulum berasaskan enam tunjang: Komunikasi Kerohanian, sikap dan nilai Kemanusiaan, Perkembangan fizikal dan estetika Sains dan teknologi Ketrampilan diri Bahan Kurikulum: Dokumen Standard Kurikulum Reka bentuk kurikulum: Modular Organisasi kurikulum: Tahap I Tahun !," dan #$ Modul Teras )sas, Modul Teras tema dan modul *lektif+ Tahap II tahun &, ' dan ($ Mata pelajaraan Teras dan *lektif Elemen Kreativiti dan inovasi, keusaha-anan serta teknologi Maklumat dan komunikasi I.T$ se,ara e/pli,it+ Fokus: &M Memba,a, menulis dan menaakul$

KSSR: BUKU TEKS DAN BUKU AKTIVITI KSSR 2011 Apakah ciri-ciri buku pelajaran yang akan digunakan dalam Kurikulum Standard Sekolah Rendah (KSSR)?

Terdapat dua komponen iaitu buku teks dan buku aktiviti !engandungi nota guru untuk membantu guru menjalankaan pengajaran dan pembelajaraan ("#") dengan berkesan !engandungi rujukan halaman buku aktiviti ke buku teks dan buku teks ke buku aktiviti

!engandungi pelbagai aktiviti pengukuhan$ pengayaan dan cadangan aktiviti pemulihan %uku aktiviti menggalakkan murid untuk menggunakan kemahiran psikomotor seperti menggunting$ menampal$ menyurih dan me&arna !aklumat asal dimuatkan bersebelahan dengan kandungan teks bagi guru membuat rujukan Setiap kemahiraan baru yang diperkenalkan akan diikuti dengan penilaian mudah untuk menaakul atau mendorong kepada perbincangan "enulisan berbentuk modular dengan persembahan kandungan berdasarkan pencapaian standard pembelajaran bagi sesuatu subjek

KBSR vs. KSSR After the course, I believe that many teachers now have a somewhat clearer picture of how KSSR differs from KBSR. During the slot on the transformation of the nglish language curriculum, we have touched upon a few !ey changes that the teachers are going to face in "#$$ under KSSR% $. &urriculum Documentation ' (he Syllabus and &urriculum Specifications are replaced by Standard Document and the &ontent and )earning Standards. ". &urriculum *rganisation ' +odular Structure is being introduced in KSSR. (he three broad areas ,-orld of Knowledge, -orld of Stories, -orld of Self. and the integration of s!ills that we have in KBSR are still retained. /. &urriculum &ontent ' KSSR would still focus on the four language s!ills. -hat we !now as Sound System in KBSR would be replaced by a broader and more focused Basic )iteracy with an emphases on 0honics. Apart from that, we would now have the )anguage Arts component ,my favourite1. and also penmanship. 2rammar is still going to be taught in conte3t. 4. Approach ' (he most significant change in pedagogy, from my point of view. 5or KBSR, we have the -hole )anguage approach. 6nder KSSR, it is going to be replaced by 0honics. 7. Added value% 6nder KSSR, we would have &reativity and ntrepreneurship in addition to ducational mphases. 8ow loo! at number 4. (he Approach. In my previous post, I have discovered how the -hole )anguage practitioners are at odds with the 0honics proponents in a number of ways through my cursory reading of a few resources on the Internet. 5or ten years, we have been comfortable with the -hole )anguage approach under KBSR. 8ow, through KSSR, most probably we are about to see the pendulum swings to the other side. (he +alaysian &urriculum Development &entre, through its e3tensive researches,

has concluded that phonics would be (9 way to go in this new curriculum ' most probably until the ne3t revision in "#"#. -hether we li!e it or not, it is going to be in our system for the ne3t ten years. So, as a teacher, what would you do about it: +y suggestion would be% before we pass any ;udgment or being negative about it, it would be fair to get to !now more about it first. (his is because more often than not, negativity usually stems out of unfamiliarity. (o !now is to love. As Abraham )incoln puts it, <I don=t li!e that man. I must get to !now him better<. 2etting to !now someone, or something that you do not li!e better would ma!e a big difference to your mindset, and attitude towards it, as whole.

So, what is phonics? According to &hitravelu et al. ,$>>7. in )( +ethodology% 0rinciples and 0ractise, phonics or phonemic approach is a system of teaching reading that pays <special initial attention to helping children see the relationships between the sounds of nglish and the letters or combination of letters that produce them<. At first, isolated sounds are learnt and then the s!ill of putting sound together to form whole words is taught. (he theory underlying this approach% $. that the language being learnt is phonemically regular? ". that once a child has learned the phonemic elements, he can obtain the pronunciation of the printed word by assembling the sounds together in blended se@uence? /. that once he gets the pronunciation of the word, he will understand what he has read.

,&hitravelu et al. ,$>>7., ELT Methodology: Principles and Practise, 5a;ar Ba!ti, pp. >> ' $##.. I bet many +alaysian teachers would not find phonics as being totally alien to our system. +any nglish teachers, especially optionists, are already being e3posed to it in &ollege or 6niversity. In school itself, in addition to the KBSR te3tboo!, we do have Readers programs such as the Sound Start and the )adybird series that focus on phonics as the main approach to teaching reading. So, all in all, phonics is not something that is totally new to most of us.

-hat would be new is the use of phonics as the +AI8 approach to teaching reading. )oo!ing through the new KSSR te3tboo! ,or +odule, as they prefer it to be called. and imagining going about the lessons in the classroom, one could not but be reminded of the puppets ,or is it muppets:. in Sesame Street animatedly vocaliAing the sounds of B!B...BaeB... and BtB...repeatedly and in dynamic paces, and in the process combine the sounds together to produce the word =cat=. 9as the above ever been the approach to teaching reading in a +alaysian primary classrooms: *f course, I can=t answer the @uestion on behalf of others, but since my schooling years, it has always been the =)oo! and Say=. I can=t recall any of my teachers to ever do any blending and segmenting, and I didn=t remember learning to read nglish by corresponding individual letters to certain sounds. It has always been whole word, the =)oo! and Say=, loo! at the words and say it. As a teacher, though I do use phonics materials ,I have invested on the =I &an Read= series by Al' Ameen for my nglish panel=s literacy program., the approach has always been =)oo! and Say= through and through. 9ence, though the approach has always been heard of and discussed on, the materials being purchased and brought into the classrooms, the real phonics approach has never really been applied as it should be. (he reason for it: It is an unfamiliar approach. -e !now about it, but we are not used to it. 0erhaps now would be the best time to get to !now it better, and to get used to it ,it=s going to be another ten years, remember: 9eheh1. 5or the sa!e of comparison, I suggest that it would be best to refresh our minds a little bit on what the -hole )anguage approach is all about. KBSR and the Whole Language Approach -hole language reading instructions is also !nown as the =)oo! and Say= or =Sight -ords= method. It describes a literacy philosophy which emphasiAes that children should focus on meaning and strategy instructions. -ith -hole )anguage, teachers are e3pected to provide a literacy'rich environment for their students and to combine spea!ing, listening, reading and writing. -hole )anguage teachers emphasiAe the meaning of te3ts over the sounds of letters, and phonics instruction become ;ust one component of the -hole )anguage classroom. -hole )anguage is considered a =top'down= approach where the reader constructs a personal meaning for a te3t, based on using their prior !nowledge to interpret the meaning of what they are reading. In KBSR, the -hole )anguage approach is being implemented through topical lessons arranged in such a way in the KBSR te3tboo!s to provide the students with ample opportunity to learn reading in conte3t. 6nder KBSR, the integration of the

four language s!ills is vital ' each and every nglish language lesson plans must contain all the four s!ills. (his is perhaps another one of the most significant change that the &urriculum Development &entre has decided to adopt in the new curriculum. (hough integration of s!ills is still important in the new KSSR, the +odular &oncept re@uires that only one s!ill is being focused on at any one time in any lesson. 3perts in education has labeled the -hole )anguage as an approach where children are allowed to learn how to read through natural means, and in conte3t. 6nder this method, children are given the opportunity to be e3posed to as many sight words as possible. (here should be no rote memoriAation where the children are being =forced= to remember sounds, rules and patterns. 0roponents of the -hole )anguage approach has maintained that this is the best way to teach reading to children, because it is more fun, natural and =child'friendly= as opposed to the 0honics method which according to some, is =boring= and =mechanical=, and to some e3tent, =more suitable for more matured learners=. 5or ten years since the implementation of KBSR in "##$, this has been the main approach to teaching reading in all +alaysian primary schools. The Swing of the Pendulu Reading through several +alaysian educational resources for ( S) which were written before the year "###, I realiAe that at the dawn of the "$st century, the -hole )anguage method is considered the =in= thing, the modern, more relevant, more pro'active approach whilst 0honics is beginning to be viewed as somewhat =conventional= and =old'fashioned=. I might be wrong ,as far as the +alaysian education system is concerned, I am somewhat comparable to a toddler who is ;ust learning how to wal!., but that is the idea that I get. ven if we loo! at international resources for the history of both approaches, the ongoing debates, and the opinions of proponents and advocates from both sides, we can see that though 0honics has an e@ually large number of supporters, the -hole )anguage is always considered more =hip= and =trendy=. -hy: Simple. Because 0honics is indeed a conventional method, while -hole )anguage is considered revolutionary. But I would not go into that in this post, let=s save that for the ne3t one. 0ondering over this, I thin! it is understandable why our curriculum planners would want to apply the -hole )anguage aproach in our system bac! during the beginning of the KBSR era. It was seen as the best approach during that time, the most relevant, the one that would fulfill the needs of our students the best. After ten years, however, we see a change ta!ing place. -e are getting bac! to 0honics. *r, as outlined by one of the basic principles of KSSR ' we are getting =bac! to

basics=. 8aturally, the unspo!en @uestion lingers. 9as the -hole )anguage approach failed: 9as KBSR failed: As much as I would love to answer this now, this is beginning to get somewhat long and windy. 9eheh. So why not stop here for now, and I=ll pic! up where I left off in myne3t post. Part ! In 0art /, I will try to deal with% $. ". /. 4. the the (9 my history and controversy of both approaches? general concerns about both approaches? approach and personal conclusions.

C AR $ ,intermediate. 5*&6S % )istening D Spea!ing (9 + ? -orld of Knowledge (*0I& % nvironmental sounds (I+ % E# minutes ) AR8I82 S(A8DARD % $.$.$, $.$./, $.$.4 0R FI*6S K8*-) D2 % 9ave e3posed to sounds at pre'school ( A&9I82 AIDS % )&D, &D player, large pictures, newspapers, empty bottles, twigs, sand, water, stones, blan!et, song chart +*RA) FA)6 S % appreciation of nature, co'operation &*8( 8( S(A8DARD% $.$ By the end of the E year primary schooling, pupils will be able to pronounce words and spea! confidently with the correct stress, rhythm and intonation. ) AR8I82 S(A8DARD% $.$.$ Able to listen and respond to stimulus given with guidance % a. environmental sound $.$./ Able to listen to, say aloud and recite rhymes or sing songs with guidance $.$.4 Able to tal! about a stimulus with guidance. ) AR8I82 *BG &(IF S% By the end of the lesson, pupils should be able to % )isten and state the environmental sounds. &reate environmental sounds in meaningful and fun way. 09AS B(I+

PR"PARAT#$% ,$# min. $.$. *bservation $." Analysis $.$.$ mengguna!an deria penglihatan, pendengaran, sentuhan, rasa atau bau. $.$.H mengenal pasti ob;e!, situasi atau fenomena se!eliling yang ber!aitan ( A&9 RIS R*) $.(eacher as!s the pupils to listen attentively to the cd player. ". (eacher plays recorded sounds of nature e.g. birds chirping, raining, rustling of leaves, waterfalls, cars hon!ing, construction site. /.(eacher gets the pupils to tal! about the sounds. Samples of Juestions % -here can you find the sound : -hy do you say itIs a waterfall : -hich sound do you li!e B disli!e : -hy: 060I)IS R*) $.0upils listen and tal! about the sounds. ".0upils give reasons to their li!es and disli!es. ) AR8I82 S(A8DARD $.$.$ a. $.$.4 (eaching aids % &d on sounds of birds chirping, raining, rustling of leaves, waterfall, cars hon!ing, construction site. &d player 09AS B(I+ #&A'#%AT#$% , $7 min . ".$ 0en;anaan idea ".$." +enghasil!an idea'idea yang baru ( A&9 RIS R*) $.(eacher shows large pictures of environmental sounds using )&D. ". (eacher as!s the pupils to imagine the sounds and ma!e the sounds. Samples of Juestions % -hat can you see in the picture : &an you ma!e the sound : 060I)IS R*) 0upils study the picture and ma!e the sounds. ) AR8I82 S(A8DARD $.$.4 (eaching aids % )&D

0ictures of bees buAAing, baby crying, strong wind blowing, starting a motorbi!e 09AS B(I+ (")"L$P&"%T , "7 min. /.$ 0enambahbai!an /.$.$ meno!o! tambah idea /.$." +engubah suai idea ( A&9 RIS R*) $.(eacher divides the pupils into E groups. ". ach group is given a few types of ob;ects. /. (eacher as!s the pupils to discuss with their peers and create sounds using the things around. 4. (eacher as!s each group to present . 7. (eacher rewards the pupils. Samples of Juestions % -hat other sounds that you can ma!e using the things around you : 060I)IS R*) $.0upils sit in groups of si3. ". 0upils discuss with their peers and ma!e the sounds using the things provided. /. 0upils present their wor! in groups. ) AR8I82 S(A8DARD $.$.$ $.$.4 (eaching aids % a few pieces of newspapers, sand, empty mineral bottles, water, dry twigs, stones, dry leaves, blan!et. 09AS A*T#$% , $# min. 4." Amalan berterusan 4."./ mempra!ti!!an proses !reatif untu! menghasil!an idea baru secara berterusan. ( A&9 RIS R*) $.(eacher displays a song chart on environmental sounds. ". (eacher sings the song and gets the pupils to repeat. /. (eacher guides the pupils to put in the appropriate actions to the song. 4. (eacher ends the lesson by recapping the dayIs lesson and discusses the moral values. Samples of Juestions %

Show me the action for Kbees are buAAingI : 060I)IS R*) 0upils listen and sing along. 0upils show appropriate actions. 0upils tal! about the dayIs lesson and the moral values. ) AR8I82 S(A8DARD $.$./ (eaching aids % Song chart

early 'esson "lan (or )ear *

RANCANGAN PENGAJARAN TAHUNAN BAHASA INGGERIS TAHUN 1

WE EK

THEME

TOPIC

LEARNING OUTCOME/ OBJECTIVE

SKILLS

LEARNING STANDARDS

NOTES/ VOCAB

1 2 TRANSISI 3-6 World Of Sounds By the end of"istenin , 1.1.1 Able to listentt...tt... Self, around us the lesson,Speakin , and respond to))...))... Family pupils are be"an ua e syimulus i#enmoo..moo. And able to : Arts !ith uidance: .. Friends $a% oo...oo... 1. talk about en#ironmental rr...rr... the picture sounds ss...ss... 2. Sin !ith $f% #oicemm...mm.. action. sounds . 1.1.& Able to listen!o!* to, say aloud andShh. recite rhymes or+ am sorry. sin son s !ith,nn... uidance. -room* 1.1.' Able to talk about a stimulus !ith uidance. '.1.2 Able to recite nursery rhymes, (a)) chants and sin action son s !ith correct

pronunciation and rhythm. 7- World OfAll aboutBy the end of"istenin , 1.1.& Able to listen 11 Self, me the lesson,Speakin , to, say aloud and Family pupils are be/eadin , recite rhymes or And able to : Writin sin son s !ith Friends uidance. 1. Sin usin the 1.2.1 Able to names of participate in daily pupils. con#ersations: 2. +ntroduce $b% themsel#es. introduce oneself &. Say the 2.1.1 Able to phonemes. identify and '. .o form the distin uish the letters shapes of the letters in the alphabet. 2.1.2$a% Able to reco ni)e and articulate initial, medial and the final sounds in sin le syllable !ithin i#en conte0t: $a% 121 &.1.1 $a% Able to demonstrate fine motor control of hands and fin ers by: $a% handlin ob(ects and manipulatin them. 12- World Of"et3s beBy the end of"istenin , 1.1.1 $d% 4ar 15 Self, friends the lesson,Speakin , 1.1.2 5outh Family pupils are be/eadin , 1.1.' ,ose And able to : Writin 4yes Friends 1. say parts of the body 2. read 6rammar: sentences

16- World Of8laces +nBy the end of"istenin , 1.1.2 +dentify the:anteen 19 7no!led 5y School the lesson,Speakin , correct sound: :lassroom e pupils are be/eadin , a% #o!els in the4raser able to : Writin initial position b% :onsonants in 1. name places the initial position. in school 1.2.1 "isten to and 6rammar: 2. read repeat the sentences pronunciation of &. listen to the simple instructions monosyllable '. follo! !ords. instructions 1.&.& "isten to all 9. read a story the !ords in the !ord list and point to the pictures. 2.2.1 Ask simple ;uestions re;uirin <es1,o replies. 2.2.2 Ask simple ;uestions to et some information 2.&.2 6i#e one !ord replies !hen namin thin s. /eco nise complete !ords &.2.2 /ead and learn the meanin of fi#e key !ords for each topic tau ht &.&.1 /ead and understand phrases by matchin simple phrases to pictures. &.'.1 /ead aloud !ords in lists and labels. &.'.& /ead aloud sentences in simple story. '.1.' :opy

sentences $&=' !ords% in clear and le ible print. '.2.& Write !ords and phrases in clear and le ible print. '.'.2 Write sentences in clear and le ible print. '.'.& :omplete missin letters in te0ts. '.'.' :omplete simple descriptions !ith the missin !ord$s% 2 - World Of5y Family By the end of"istenin , 1.1.1 "isten to andFather 23 Self, the lesson,Speakin , repeat the5other Family pupils are be/eadin , pronunciation ofSister And able to : Writin simple Brother Friends monosyllable ?ncle 1. name family !ords. Aunty members a% #o!els in the 2. ans!er initial position ;uestions b% :onsonants in &. talk about the initial position. 6rammar: your family 1.1.2 +dentify the correct sound: a% #o!els in the initial position b% :onsonants in the initial position. 1.2.1 "isten to and repeat the pronunciation of simple monosyllable !ords. 1.&.& "isten to all the !ords in the !ord list and point to the pictures. 1.>.1 "isten to

simple short stories and responds non #erbally. 2.&.& i#e replies pertainin to 1=9 2.&.9 /efuse statements and i#e correct name or number. 2.@.9 6i#e details of oneself 2.@.> .ell about one3s family. &.2.1 /eco nise complete !ords &.&.1 /ead and understand phrases by matchin simple phrases to pictures. &.&.2 ?nderstand simple sentences $1=& !ords in sentence &.'.& /ead aloud sentences in simple story. '.1.' :opy sentences $&=' !ords% in clear and le ible print. '.2.' Write sentences $ &=' !ords% in clear and le ible print '.&.1. 5atch !ords to pictures '.&.& 5atch simple sentences to pictures '.'.2 Write sentences in clear and le ible print. '.9.1 Form simple

2!- World Of"earnin 27 7no!led AboutA e

sentences by arran in !ords $ 1=' !ords in a sentence% By the end of"istenin , 1.1.1 "isten to andBlue the lesson,Speakin , repeat the/ed pupils are be/eadin , pronunciation of<ello! able to : Writin simple /ed monosyllable Black 1. name colours !ords. 2. name clothes a% #o!els in the 6rammar: &. read initial position sentences b% :onsonants in '. spell the initial position. 1.2.1 "isten to and repeat the pronunciation of simple monosyllable !ords. 1.&.9 "isten to and understand simple spoken phrases and sentences 2.1.1 8ronounce monosyllable !ords correctly 2.2.1 Ask simple ;uestions re;uirin <es1,o replies. 2.2.2 Ask simple ;uestions to et some information 2.&.2 6i#e one !ord replies !hen namin thin s. 2.&.1 /espond !ith <es1,o replies. 2.&.9 /efuse statements and i#e correct name or number. 2.>.1 6i#e a non #erbal response to

the story heard or read 2.>.2 Say !hether one likes or does not like the story heard or read &.2.2 /ead and learn the meanin of fi#e key !ords for each topic tau ht &.&.1 /ead and understand phrases by matchin simple phrases to pictures. &.&.2 ?nderstand simple sentences $1=& !ords in sentence &.'.& /ead aloud sentences in simple story. &.'.2. /ead aloud phrases &.9.1 ?nderstand the meanin of !ords by lookin at picture clues. '.1.' :opy sentences $&=' !ords% in clear and le ible print. '.&.2 5atch phrases to pictures '.&.& 5atch simple sentences to pictures '.'.2 Write sentences in clear and le ible print. 2"- World OfBo! Co +By the end of"istenin , 1.2.1 "isten to and"eft 31 7no!led 6et .here the lesson,Speakin , repeat the /i ht e 1 World pupils are be/eadin , pronunciation of?p

Of Stories

able to : 1. say !here you li#e 2. i#e directions &. read a story

Writin

simple Co!n monosyllable !ords. 1.2.2. "isten to and repeat6rammar: correctly phrases 2.2.2 Ask simple ;uestions to et some information 2.&.1 /espond !ith <es1,o replies. &.2.2 /ead and learn the meanin of fi#e key !ords for each topic tau ht &.&.1 /ead and understand phrases by matchin simple phrases to pictures. &.&.2. /ead and understand simple sentences $1=& !ords in sentence &.'.1 /ead aloud !ords in lists and labels. &.'.2. /ead aloud phrases &.9.1. ?nderstand the meanin of !ords by lookin at picture clues '.'.& :omplete missin letters in te0ts. '.'.' :omplete simple descriptions !ith the missin !ord$s% '.@.2 ?se the full stop at the end of

a sentence. 9.' preposition 32- World Of.oday +sABy the end of"istenin , 1.2.2. "isten to5onday 35 7no!led the lesson,Speakin , and repeat.uesday e 1 World pupils are be/eadin , correctly phrasesWednesda Of Stories able to : Writin and e0pressions y 2.2.1 Ask simple.hursday 1. say days of ;uestions Friday the !eek re;uirin <es1,oSaturday 2. read replies. Sunday sentences 2.2.2 Ask simple &. read a story ;uestions to et some information 6rammar: &.2.1 /eco nise complete !ords &.2.2 /ead and learn the meanin of fi#e key !ords for each topic tau ht. '.&.&. 5atch simple sentences to pictures '.&.2 5atch phrases to pictures '.&.& 5atch simple sentences to pictures '.'.2 Write sentences in clear and le ible print. '.'.& :omplete missin letters in te0ts. '.'.' :omplete simple descriptions !ith the missin !ord$s% 36- World Of"et usBy the end of"istenin , 2.2.2 Ask simpleWalk 39 7no!led learn the lesson,Speakin , ;uestions to et8lay e 1 Worldmore... pupils are be/eadin , some information /un Of Stories able to : Writin 2.&.1 /espondDump !ith <es1,o

1. talk about parts of the body 2. read a story

replies. &.2.1 /eco nise complete !ords &.2.2 /ead and6rammar: learn the meanin of fi#e key !ords for each topic tau ht. &.&.1 /ead and understand phrases by matchin simple phrases to pictures. &.'.1 /ead aloud !ords in lists and labels. &.'.& /ead aloud sentences in simple story. &.9.1 ?nderstand the meanin of !ords by lookin at picture clues. '.&.& 5atch simple sentences to pictures. '.'.1 :omplete missin letters in te0ts. '.'.2 :omplete simple rhyme !ith the missin !ord$s% '.9.2 form simple sentences by matchin se&nteces part '.@.1 spell common si ht !ords '.@.1 ?se capital letter for

the first !ords for a

sentence the pronounce Ei3 names of people the days of the !eek.

'.@.2 spell seen !ords '.@.2 ?se the full stop at the end of a sentence. . 9.1 nouns 9.2 articles 9.' preposition ! - World Of"et us putBy the end of"istenin , 2.2.2 Ask simple !1 Self, it the lesson,Speakin , ;uestions to et Family to ether. pupils are be/eadin , some information And able to : Writin 2.&.1 /espond Friends1 !ith <es1,o 1. say time of World Of replies. the day 7no!led &.2.1 /eco nise 2. talk about e 1 World complete !ords thin s learned Of Stories &.2.2 /ead and &. read a story learn the meanin of fi#e key !ords for each topic tau ht. &.&.1 /ead and understand phrases by matchin simple phrases to pictures. &.'.1 /ead aloud !ords in lists and labels. &.'.& /ead aloud sentences in simple story. &.9.1 ?nderstand

the meanin of !ords by lookin at picture clues. '.&.& 5atch simple sentences to pictures. '.'.1 :omplete missin letters in te0ts. '.'.2 :omplete simple rhyme !ith the missin !ord$s% '.9.2 form simple sentences by matchin se&nteces part '.@.1 spell common si ht !ords '.@.1 ?se capital letter for

the first !ords for a sentence the pronounce Ei3 names of people the days of the !eek.

'.@.2 spell seen !ords '.@.2 ?se the full stop at the end of a sentence. . 9.1 nouns 9.2 articles 9.' preposition

(his whole thing started during our session on 0honics this morning, when in the midst of the learning session the spea!er, a lecturer from I02, suddenly e3pressed her own long'held view on 0honics and its efficiency in the teaching of reading. (o cut a long story short, I would say that this very e3perienced and respectable educator can be grouped together with those who are a little s!eptical towards embracing 0honics as =(he +ethod= for teaching beginning reading. It is from her that I learn about the ongoing debate among educators, parents and e3perts on the best way to teach beginning reading. (o be honest, before this I was completely clueless about it, let alone aware that there is indeed a debate going on. ,+y bad1. I find this small piece of information intriguing and it has driven me to do a little bit of reading on the sub;ect. In a way, I am glad, very glad indeed. It opens my eyes to see the teaching of reading in a much broader view and perspective and it truly enriches and enlightens me as a teacher. I have not, of course, conducted an in' depth study on the sub;ect yet ,though this might very possibly become my ne3t =big pro;ect= ' !ononnya lah1.. But from the few readings that I have done, I learn that there are four main approaches to teaching beginning reading, and they are%

$. ". /. 4.

0honics =)oo! and Say= or =-hole )anguage= )anguage 3perience &onte3t Support

,(o read more, visit this% 5our Reading +ethods.. (hough all four are valid methods and has proofs of success all over the world, it is interesting to note that =controversies= do e3ist ,111 %'*., especially with regard to +ethod $ and +ethod ". Apparently, I am the last teacher on earth to be aware that such debate as =0honics vs. -hole )anguage= has e3isted since 2od'!nows' when1 ,+y bad111 Again111.. I would not want to write about it here, at least not now ,it=s /.77 in the morning., but for those who are curious about it, I would recommend you to read what -i!ipedia has to say about the two methods% 0honics according to -i!ipedia -hole language according to -i!ipedia

*pinions from educators and teachers are also worth loo!ing at% $. 9alcyon 9ouse is a division of ducational Research Associates in the 6nited States of America, a nonprofit research organiAation formed more than /# years ago to help provide some information on the nation=s educational system and issues related to it. (his writing clearly e3presses its view on the 0honics vs. -hole )anguage debate% -hole )anguage vs. 0honics ". (his is an interesting article by Dr Gon Reyhner of 6niversity of 8orthern AriAona that loo!s into each of these two methods of teaching reading from a psychological view point. Apparently, from the psychological perspective, the -hole )anguage vs. 0honics debate can also be viewed as the &onstructivism vs. Behaviourism debate. Refreshing, isn=t it: (o read more% (he Reading -ars /. (his particular site, Succeed to Read, is also worth visiting. Read its view on this whole =Reading -ars= sub;ect% (each a &hild to Read (here are, of course, many more e3cellent resources on this matter. All you have to do is do some 2oogle search, and ta!e it from there. -e tal!ed about this matter over cold double cheese burger and soggy fries brought from town by my lovely roommate a few hours ago. After a few minutes of listening patiently to me blabbering away, 9aniAa finally as!ed me the inevitable @uestion% <So do you consider yourself to be =pro'0honics=, or =anti'0honics=:< 9mm. (hat, my friend, is a @uestion that I would love to answer. But not now. 8ot yet. In my ne3t post, perhaps.