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Citta

En espaol ms abajo Citta (Pali) is one of three overlapping terms used in the nikayas (Nikya is a Pi word and
literally means "volume." It is similar to the Sanskrit word agama meaning "basket." [1] It is also used to mean "collection," "assemblage," "class" or "group" in both Pi and Sanskrit.[2] It is most commonly used in reference to the Buddhist texts of the Sutta Piaka, but can also refer to the monastic divisions of Theravda Buddhism. In addition, the term Nikya is sometimes used in contemporary scholarship to refer to the early Buddhist schools) to refer to the

mind, the others being manas (Manas often indicates the general thinking faculty.[3] Thinking is closely
associated with volitions, because mental activity is one of the ways that volitions manifest themselves: "Having willed, one acts through body, speech, and thoughts."[4] Furthermore, willing is described in terms of deliberate thinking. [5]

Manas is mainly the mental activity which follows from volitions, whether immediately, or separated by time and caused by the activation of a latent tendency.[7])and via (Vijna (Sanskrit; Devanagari: ) or

. Each is sometimes used in the generic and non-technical sense of "mind" in general, and the three are sometimes used in sequence to refer to one's mental processes as a whole.[1] Their primary uses are, however, distinct.[2]
via (Pli; Devanagari: ) is translated as "consciousness," "life force," "mind," or "discernment."

[1]

[2]

[3])

According to Bhikkhu Bodhi, the post-canonical Pali commentary uses the three terms via, mano and citta as synonyms for the mind sense base (mana-ayatana)( yatana (Pli;
Sanskrit) is a Buddhist term that has been translated as "sense base", "sense-media" or "sense sphere." In Buddhism, there are six internal sense bases (Pali: ajjhattikni yatanni; also known as, "organs", "gates", "doors", "powers" or [2] [3] "roots" ) and six external sense bases (bhirni yatanni or "sense objects"; also known as vishaya or "domains" ). [4] [5]; Thus, there are six internal-external (organ-object) pairs of sense bases: eye and visible objects ear and sound;nose [6] [7] and odor; tongue and taste; body and touch; mind and mental objects . See also Heart Sutra - Mahayana text that shows the ayatanas in Mahayana discourse; Indriya - "faculties", which include a group of "six sensory faculties" similar to the six sense bases; Prajna (wisdom); Sadayatana - a discussion of the "six sense bases"; Satipatthana Sutta - includes a meditation using sense bases as the meditative object; Skandha - a similar Buddhist construct; Twelve Nidanas - the chain of endless suffering of which the sense bases are the fifth link);
[1]

however,

in the Sutta Pitaka, these three terms are generally contextualized differently:

Via refers to awareness through a specific internal sense base, that is, through the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body or mind. Thus, there are six sense-specific types of Via. It is also the basis for personal continuity within and across lives. Manas refers to mental "actions" (kamma), as opposed to those actions that are physical or verbal. It is also the sixth internal sense base (ayatana), that is, the "mind base," cognizing mental sensa (dhamm) as well as sensory information from the physical sense bases. Citta includes the formation of thought, emotion and volition; this is thus the subject of Buddhist mental development (bhava), the mechanism for release.[36]

The citta is called "luminous" in A.I.8-10.[37]


Vijana meaning:

Sri Ramakrishna defines vijna as

"What is vijnana? It is to know God (Supraconsciousness) distinctly by realizing His existence through an intuitive experience and to speak to Him intimately."[43] Based on ancient texts, V.S.Apte (1890, rev. 1957-59) provides the following definition for vijnam ( ): 1. Knowledge, wisdom, intelligence, understanding; ... Panchatantra (Pt.) 1.24;5.3; 'the sheath of intelligence' (the first of the five sheaths of the soul). 2. Discrimination, discernment. 3. Skill, proficiency; - Shringara Tilaka (.) 1.2. 4. Worldly or profane knowledge, knowledge derived from worldly experience (opp. which is 'knowledge of Brahma or Supreme Spirit'); $ - Bhagavad Gita (Bg.) 7.2;3.41;6.8; (the whole of the 7th Adhyya of Bg. explains and ).

In addition, Monier Williams (1899; rev. 2008) provides the following definition: 1. to distinguish, discern, observe, investigate, recognize ascertain, know, understand Rig Veda (RV.), etc., etc. (with na and inf.: 'to know not how to'); 2. to have right knowledge - Katha Upanishad (KahUp.) 3. to become wise or learned - Mn. iv, 20; 4. to hear or learn from (gen.) - Chandogya Upanishad (ChUp.); Mahabharata (MBh.); 5. to recognize in (loc.) - Panchatantra (Pacat.); 6. to look upon or regard or consider as (two acc.), Mn.; MBh., etc.; Kv., etc.; 7. to explain, declare - BhP.[45]

Citta Usage
The Pali-English Dictionary suggests citta is heart / mind, and emphasizing it is more the emotive side of mind as opposed to manas as the intellect or mind-sense in the sense of what grasps mental objects (dhammas). Citta is the object of meditation in the third part of Satipatthana, also called four foundation of mindfulness. "Citta" primarily represents one's mindset, or state of mind.[3][4]

Citta is the term used in to refer to the quality of mental processes as a whole.[5] Citta is neither an entity nor a process; this likely accounts for its not being classified as a skandha (In Buddhist phenomenology and soteriology, the skandhas (Sanskrit) or khandhas (Pi), aggregates in
English, are the five functions or aspects that constitute the sentient being. 1. 2. 3.
[e] [a][b] .

The sutras describe five aggregates:

[d]

4.

5.

"form" or "matter" (Skt., Pli rpa; Tib. gzugs): external and internal matter. Externally, rupa is the physical [f] world. Internally, rupa includes the material body and the physical sense organs. [g] "sensation" or "feeling" (Skt., Pli vedan; Tib. tshor-ba): sensing an object as either pleasant or unpleasant [h][i] or neutral. "perception", "conception", "apperception", "cognition", or "discrimination" (Skt. samj, Pli sa, Tib. 'du-shes): registers whether an object is recognized or not (for instance, the sound of a bell or the shape of a tree). "mental formations", "impulses", "volition", or "compositional factors" (Skt. samskra, Pli sakhra, Tib. 'du-byed): all types of mental habits, thoughts, ideas, opinions, prejudices, compulsions, and decisions [j] triggered by an object. [k] [l] "consciousness" or "discernment" (Skt. vijna, Pli via, Tib. rnam-par-shes-pa): [5][m] [6][n] 1. In the Nikayas/gamas: cognizance, that which discerns [o] 2. In the Abhidhamma: a series of rapidly changing interconnected discrete acts of cognizance. [p] 3. In some Mahayana sources: the base that supports all experience.

The Buddhist literature describes the aggregates as arising in a linear or progressive fashion, from form to feeling to [q] perception to mental formations to consciousness. ), nor mentioned in the paticcasamuppada

formula.[6] The complex causal nexus of volitions (or intentions) which one experiences continuously conditions one's thoughts, speech, and actions. One's state of mind at any given time reflects that complex; thus, the causal origin of actions, speech, and thoughts is sometimes associated with the state of mind (citta), in a manner of speaking. This does not mean that it is that causal nexus; it is better understood as an abstract reflection.[7] One's mind-set can be out of tune with one's desires or aspirations. In that it reflects the volitions, the citta is said to go off with a will of its own if not properly controlled.[8] It may lead a person astray or, if properly controlled, directed, and integrated, ennoble one. One may "make citta turn according to" his wishes most effectively by developing skill in meditative concentration which brings mental calm and clarity.[9] An individual undergoes many different states of mind; M.II.27 asks: "Which citta? for citta is manifold, various, and diverse."[10] Generally speaking, a person will operate with a collection of changing mindsets, and some will occur regularly. While these mindsets determine the personality, they are not in control of themselves, but fluctuate and alternate. There is thus the need for the meditative integration of personality to provide a greater, more wholesome consistency.[11] Regarding volitions, there is a similarity between vina and citta; they are both associated with the qualitative condition of a human being. Vina provides awareness and continuity by which one knows one's moral condition, and citta is an abstraction representing that condition.[12] Citta is therefore closely related to volitions; this connection is also etymological, as citta comes from the same verbal root in Pali as the active terms meaning "to will".[13] Citta also reflects one's cognitive condition/progress.[14]

Citta as a mindset can become "contracted" (i.e., unworkable), "distracted", "grown great", "composed", or the opposite of such qualities (M.I.59). It can be dominated by a certain emotion, so as to be "terrified", "astonished", or "tranquil." It can be "taken hold of" by pleasant or unpleasant impressions (M.I.423). A host of negative emotionally charged states can pertain to it, or it may be free of such states, so it is vital to develop or purify it: "For a long time this citta has been defiled by attachment, hatred, and delusion. By defilement of citta, beings are defiled; by purity of citta, beings are purified" (S.III.152).[15] Attaining a purified citta corresponds to the attaining of liberating insight. This indicates that a liberated one's state of mind reflects no ignorance or defilements. As these represent bondage, their absence is described in terms of freedom.[16]

See also
Theravada: Khandavagga suttas (a selection), translated primarily by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Mahayana: The Five Skandhas, table showing the five skandhas, prepared by Alan Fox (Dept. of Philosophy, U. of Delaware). Vajrayana: A View on Buddhism: Mind and Mental Factors, web page including description of the Five Aggregates.

Cit (consciousness) Chit () is a Sanskrit word meaning consciousness,[1] "true consciousness", "to be
consciousness of", "to understand", "to comprehend". It is a core principle in all ancient spiritual traditions originating from the Indian subcontinent. In Upanishads it is referred to as the Drishta or the Seer, the Sense that makes sense of all other sense experiences. Chit is one of the three aspects forming the Satcitananda nature of the Absolute, according to the Vedic scriptures. The term is widely used and discussed among Hinduism, Sikhism, Jainism and other religious systems. Chitaranjan is who gives you the feeling of awareness and total consciousness.
[2] [2] [2]

Satcitananda : Satcitnanda, Satchidnanda, or Sat-cit-nanda (Sanskrit:


[1] [note 2]

) "being, consciousness, bliss", is a description of the subjective experience of Brahman. This sublimely blissful experience of the [5] boundless, pure consciousness is a glimpse of ultimate reality. The description comprises the three Sanskrit words satchit-ananda: [note 3] [web 2] sat (present participle); [Sanskrit root as [1], "to be"]: "Truth", "Absolute Being", "a palpable [6] [web 2] force of virtue and truth". Sat describes an essence that is pure and timeless, that never changes. [web 2] [citation needed] [7] cit (noun): "consciousness", "true consciousness", "to be consciousness of", "to [7] [7] understand", "to comprehend". [web 2] [citation needed] [web 3] [web 3] [web 3] nanda (noun): "bliss", "true bliss", "happiness", "joy", "delight", [web 3] "pleasure" [note 4] "Sat-Chit-Ananda" or "Saccidnanda" is the Sanskrit compound form of the word, which can be [note 5] translated in various ways:

[note 1]

"Eternal Consciousness Bliss" [web 2] "Absolute Consciousness Bliss" [web 4] (adj.) "Consisting of existence and thought and joy"

[8]

References 1. Jump up ^ Maharishi's Teaching, Meaning of the word Satcitananda (Sat Chit Ananda)

2.

^ Jump up to:

abc

Sanskrit Dictionary, chit

Further reading: Gupta, Bina (2003), CIT consciousness, Oxford University Press External links: Arthur Aavalon, Shakti and Shkta. Chapter 14: Cit-Shakti (The Consciousness Aspect of the Universe)

Luminous mind Yogacara

References
1. Jump up ^ Sue Hamilton, Identity and Experience. LUZAC Oriental, 1996, pages 105-106. 2. Jump up ^ Bodhi, Bhikkhu (trans.) (2000b). The Connected Discourses of the Buddha: A Translation of the Samyutta Nikaya. (Part IV is "The Book of the Six Sense Bases (Salayatanavagga)".) Boston: Wisdom Publications. ISBN 0-86171331-1., pp. 769-70, n. 154. 3. Jump up ^ Sue Hamilton, Identity and Experience. LUZAC Oriental, 1996, pages 106. 4. Jump up ^ Peter Harvey, The Selfless Mind. Curzon Press, 1995, page 111. 5. Jump up ^ Sue Hamilton, Identity and Experience. LUZAC Oriental, 1996, pages 110-111. 6. Jump up ^ Sue Hamilton, Identity and Experience. LUZAC Oriental, 1996, page 111. 7. Jump up ^ Sue Hamilton, Identity and Experience. LUZAC Oriental, 1996, page 112. 8. Jump up ^ Peter Harvey, The Selfless Mind. Curzon Press, 1995, pages 112-113. 9. Jump up ^ Peter Harvey, The Selfless Mind. Curzon Press, 1995, page 113. 10. Jump up ^ Peter Harvey, The Selfless Mind. Curzon Press, 1995, page 114. 11. Jump up ^ Peter Harvey, The Selfless Mind. Curzon Press, 1995, page 114. 12. Jump up ^ Sue Hamilton, Identity and Experience. LUZAC Oriental, 1996, page 112. 13. Jump up ^ Sue Hamilton, Identity and Experience. LUZAC Oriental, 1996, page 112. 14. Jump up ^ Sue Hamilton, Identity and Experience. LUZAC Oriental, 1996, pages 112-113. 15. Jump up ^ Peter Harvey, The Selfless Mind. Curzon Press, 1995, page 112. 16. Jump up ^ Sue Hamilton, Identity and Experience. LUZAC Oriental, 1996, page 113.

Further reading

Thanh, Bhikkhu Thich Minh (2001), The Mind in Early Buddhism

External links

Thich Nhat Tu, Nature Of Citta, Mano And Via

Citta ( Pali ) es uno de los tres trminos que coincidan utilizados en los nikayas para referirse a la mente , los otros son manas y vinnana . Cada uno se utiliza a veces en sentido genrico y no tcnica de la "mente " en general , y los tres se utilizan a veces en la secuencia para referirse a los procesos mentales de uno en su conjunto. [ 1 ] Sus usos principales son , sin embargo , distinta . [ 2 ] uso El Diccionario Pali - Ingls sugiere citta es el corazn / mente , y haciendo hincapi en que es ms el lado emotivo de la mente en lugar de manas como el intelecto o la mente - sentido en el sentido de lo que agarra objetos mentales ( dhammas ) . Citta es el objeto de la meditacin en la tercera parte de Satipatthana , tambin llamado cuatro fundamentos de la atencin plena . " Citta " representa principalmente la propia forma de pensar, o el estado de nimo [ 3 ] [ 4 ] Citta es el trmino utilizado para referirse a la calidad de los procesos mentales en su conjunto [ 5 ] Citta es ni una entidad , ni un proceso, . . Este probablemente representa su no est clasificado como skandha , ni se menciona en la frmula paticcasamuppada . [ 6 ] El complejo nexo causal de voliciones ( o intenciones ) que se experimenta continuamente las condiciones pensamientos, palabras y acciones . Un estado de la mente en un momento dado refleja ese complejo , por lo que el origen causal de acciones, palabras y pensamientos a veces se asocia con el estado de la mente ( citta ), en una manera de hablar. Esto no quiere decir que se trata de ese nexo causal , sino que se entiende mejor como una reflexin abstracta [ 7 ] Uno de mentalidad puede estar fuera de sintona con los deseos o aspiraciones de uno. . En la que refleja las voliciones , se dice que la citta para irse con una voluntad propia , si no se controla adecuadamente . [ 8 ] Todo ello puede conducir a una persona por mal camino o si son controlados adecuadamente , dirigida e integrada , ennoblecer una. Uno puede " hacer girar citta segn" sus deseos con mayor eficacia mediante el desarrollo de habilidades en la concentracin meditativa que trae calma y claridad mental [ 9 ] Un individuo se somete a diferentes estados de nimo ; M.II.27 pregunta: . " Qu citta para ? citta es mltiple , diverso, y diversa " . [ 10 ] Por lo general, una persona va a operar con una coleccin de cambio de mentalidad , y algunos se producir con regularidad. Si bien estas mentalidades determinan la personalidad, que no estn en control de s mismos , pero fluctan y se alternan . Existe, pues, la necesidad de la integracin de meditacin de la personalidad para proporcionar una mayor consistencia ms sana . [ 11 ] En cuanto a voliciones , existe una similitud entre vinnana y Citta ; ambos estn asociados con la condicin cualitativa de un ser humano . Vinnana proporciona la conciencia y la continuidad mediante el cual uno conoce la propia condicin moral , y citta es una abstraccin que representa esa condicin [ 12 ] Citta est estrechamente relacionado con las voliciones ; . Este respecto, es tambin etimolgico , como citta viene de la misma raz verbal en Pali como los trminos activos que significan " a voluntad " . [ 13 ] Citta tambin refleja la propia condicin cognitiva / progreso. [ 14 ]

Citta como un modo de pensar puede llegar a ser " contratado " (es decir , inviable ) , " distrado ", " hecho grande ", " compuesta " , o lo contrario de tales cualidades ( MI59 ) . Puede ser dominado por una cierta emocin , de manera que sea " aterrado " , " sorprendido " , o " tranquilo . " Puede ser " apoderado de " por las impresiones agradables o desagradables ( MI423 ) . Una gran cantidad de negativos estados de carga emocional puede pertenecer a la misma, o puede ser libre de este tipo de estados, por lo que es vital para desarrollar o purificarla : . " Durante mucho tiempo este citta ha sido contaminada por el apego , el odio y la ignorancia Por contaminacin de citta , los seres se han corrompido ; . por la pureza de citta , los seres son purificados " ( S.III.152 ) [ 15 ] La consecucin de una citta purificada corresponde a la consecucin de una visin liberadora. Esto indica que el estado de un liberado de la mente no refleja ignorancia o corrupciones. Al tratarse de la esclavitud , su ausencia se describe en trminos de libertad. [ 16 ] ver tambin Cit (conciencia) mente luminosa Yogacara Referencias 1 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Sue Hamilton , identidad y experiencia . LUZAC Oriental, 1996 , pginas 105106 . 2 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Bodhi, Bhikkhu ( trad. ) ( 2000b ) . Los discursos conectadas de Buda : la traduccin de la Samyutta Nikaya . (Parte IV es "El Libro de las Seis Bases Sensoriales ( Salayatanavagga ) " . ) Boston : Wisdom Publications . ISBN 0-86171-331-1 . , Pp 769-70 , n . 154 . 3 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Sue Hamilton , identidad y experiencia . LUZAC Oriental, 1996 , pginas 106 . 4 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Peter Harvey , The Mind desinteresado . Curzon Press, 1995 , pgina 111 . 5 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Sue Hamilton , identidad y experiencia . LUZAC Oriental, 1996 , pginas 110111 . 6 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Sue Hamilton , identidad y experiencia . LUZAC Oriental, 1996 , pgina 111 . 7 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Sue Hamilton , identidad y experiencia . LUZAC Oriental, 1996 , pgina 112 . 8 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Peter Harvey , The Mind desinteresado . Curzon Press, 1995 , pginas 112113 . 9 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Peter Harvey , The Mind desinteresado . Curzon Press, 1995 , pgina 113 . 10 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Peter Harvey , The Mind desinteresado . Curzon Press, 1995 , pgina 114 .

11 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Peter Harvey , The Mind desinteresado . Curzon Press, 1995 , pgina 114 . 12 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Sue Hamilton , identidad y experiencia . LUZAC Oriental, 1996 , pgina 112 . 13 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Sue Hamilton , identidad y experiencia . LUZAC Oriental, 1996 , pgina 112 . 14 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Sue Hamilton , identidad y experiencia . LUZAC Oriental, 1996 , pginas 112-113 . 15 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Peter Harvey , The Mind desinteresado . Curzon Press, 1995 , pgina 112 . 16 . Salta hacia arriba ^ Sue Hamilton , identidad y experiencia . LUZAC Oriental, 1996 , pgina 113 . Otras lecturas Thanh , Bhikkhu Thich Minh ( 2001 ) , La mente en el budismo temprano enlaces externos Thich Nhat Tu, Naturaleza de Citta, Mano Y vinnana