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Saturday
High: Mid-40s
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Partly cloudy
Sunday
High: Lower 40s
Low: Mid-20s
Mostly cloudy
Record
Tuesdays high: 73
Overnight low: 31
24 hour precipitation: 0.00
Monthly precipitation: 0.66
Yearly precipitation: 0.81
24 hour snowfall: 0.00
February snowfall: 13.4
Yearly snowfall: 14.60
Thursdays Sunrise: 7:15
Thursdays Sunset: 6:14
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
The Abilene
Senator
declares
marriage
bill dead
By JOHN HANNA
The Associated Press
TOPEKA An anti-gay marriage pro-
posal that roiled Kansas politics is dead,
the chairman of a state Senate committee
assigned to review it said Tuesday.
But the declaration from Senate Judi-
ciary Committee Chairman Jeff King
didnt appear likely to end the debate
over providing legal protections for
people and organizations refusing for re-
ligious reasons to provide goods and ser-
vices to gay and lesbian couples. King,
an Independence Republican, said hell
still have hearings on whether Kansas
needs to enact
religious liberty
protections in
case the federal
courts strike
down the states
g a y - ma r r i a g e
ban.
The House ap-
proved a bill last week to prohibit gov-
ernment sanctions or anti-discrimination
lawsuits when individuals, groups and
businesses cite their religious beliefs in
refusing to provide goods, services, ac-
commodations and employment benefts
related to a marriage, civil union, domes-
tic partnership, or a celebration of such
relationships.
Supporters said their intent was to pre-
vent forists, bakers and photographers
from being punished for refusing to
participate in same-sex weddings, keep
churches from having to provide space
or clergy for such ceremonies and keep
religiously affliated adoption agencies
from being forced to place children with
gay couples. Critics said the bill was
much broader than advertised and would
encourage discrimination against gays
and lesbians.
Senate leaders already had said the bill
would not pass their chamber, but King
said Tuesday that his committee wont
even take it up.
Were not working House Bill 2453,
said King, an Independence Republican,
referring to the measure by number.
King said hes not drafting a narrower
alternative. He said hell have hearings
so interested parties can have national
experts discuss whether Kansas needs a
new law.
Something new would have to arise
out of these hearings, he said.
Supporters said frequently that the bill
has been misrepresented. Rep. Steve
Brunk, a Wichita Republican and chair-
man of the House committee that han-
dled the bill, said the intent was reli-
gious liberties protection.
The issue is not going to go away,
Brunk said. As the topic progresses,
well refne the language.
But some House members felt burned.
Its so tainted now, it needs to go
away, said Rep. Scott Schwab, a con-
servative Olathe Republican, who sup-
ported the bill. Did I make a vote that I
regret? Yeah; that happens.
Huelskamp fnds friendly crowd at town hall
By GREG DOERING
greg.doering@abilene-rc.com
Term limits shouldnt just be for
elected offcials.
That was one of the messages
Rep. Tim Huleskamp relayed dur-
ing at town hall meeting Tuesday at
the Eisenhower Presidential Library
auditorium to a crowd of nearly two
dozen area residents.
After blasting leaders of both par-
ties for their failure to lead, Huel-
skamp said term limits should be
extended to federal judges and bu-
reaucrats.
Theres a lot of folks out of touch,
Huelskamp told the audience. Term
limits would help that.
The two-term representative al-
lowed that a constitutional amend-
ment would be necessary to imple-
ment term limits at the federal level,
something he said was politically
impossible.
Huelskamp also said he would put
passing a marriage amendment and
balanced budget amendment ahead
of setting term limits.
The Fowler Republican said he
believes Congress is too election-
focused to operate effciently, which
allows bureaucrats ample opportu-
nity to exert powers not granted by
legislators.
Often at odds with leaders in his
own party, Huelskamps arguments
fell on sympathetic ears.
Greg Doering
Refector-Chronicle
Rep. Tim Huelskamp
speaks about the
federal debt at a town
hall meeting Tuesday
at the Eisenhower
Presidential Library
auditorium.
Residents
take delight
in sunshine
Above: Brittany Scruby pushes
Aubrey Watson, daughter of
longtime friend Liddya Snyder,
at Eisenhower Park. Scruby and
another friend brought their own
children and a few others to
play outside in the unseasonably
warm weather Tuesday after-
noon.
Right: Alexianna Barham
expresses delight as she takes a
cautious slide down playground
equipment at Eisenhower Park.
Barham and her father (not
pictured) took advantage of the
warm weather Tuesday afternoon
as an opportunity to get outside.
See: Huelskamp, Page 6
The issue is
not going to go
away. As the topic
progresses, well
refine the language.
Steve Brunk
See: Marriage, Page 6
Fun in
the sun
Photos by
Tiffany Roney
By CHASE JORDAN
c.jordan@thedailyunion.net
CHAPMAN Police
Chief Emil Halfhill is work-
ing to make registration a
habit for pet owners in town
by offering free tags for a lim-
ited time.
I intend to food the mar-
ket with information, Half-
hill said. It hasnt been ad-
dressed in so many years.
The Chapman City Council
approved to waive pet licens-
ing fees until April 1.
If I can entice people to
come get their animals regis-
tered, maybe we can get this
process started and get peo-
ple into the habit to get their
tags, Halfhill said.
Last year, Halfhill said the
city had 116 animal com-
plaints. In 2012, 79 tags were
issued, and 68 were issued in
2013. So far in 2014, 13 have
been issued.
To help promote awareness,
Mills Veterinary Service LLC
is offering reduced vaccina-
tions March 8 at the Chapman
City Fire Department, 402 N.
Marshall St.
According to the city pet
ordinance, cats and dogs will
be registered and owners
shall be charged $2 for each
animal spayed or neutered. It
also states owners of animals
not spayed or neutered will be
charged $5 per pet.
Halfhill said its not about
the city making a proft off of
registration. Rather, the prob-
lem is the time and money
city offcials spend on hous-
ing animals in Abilene.
I dont think citizens realize
how costly it is, per day, for
those animals being housed,
City Council member Luan
Sparks said. Its more ex-
pensive than if we had some-
one in a hotel in Junction City
overnight. During the meet-
ing, city offcials said a three-
day stay in Abilene could cost
the city about $300, plus other
fees for processes such as eu-
thanasia.
The ordinance also states
each animal not registered
by March 1 each year will be
charged an additional late fee
of $2. Currently, the fees have
been waived until April 1.
After April 1, residents vio-
lating the ordinance will be
charged both the regular and
late fees.
In addition, possible charges
through the Chapman Police
Department may be fled for
failing to register the animal.
Those charges could include
a possible fne of $25 and a
court cost of $95.
Residents should bring a
current rabies vaccination
during the registration pro-
cess at the Chapman Munici-
pal Building at 402 N. Mar-
shall St.
People
2 Wednesday, February 19, 2014 www.abilene-rc.com
Tim Horan,
Editor and Publisher
Janelle Gantenbein,
Associate Publisher
Tammy Moritz,
Advertising
Jenifer Parks
Advertising Assistant
Greg Doering,
Managing Editor
Ron Preston,
Sports
Tiffany Roney,
Reporter
Daniel Vandenburg,
Circulation/Distribution
(USPS 003-440)
Official City, County Newspaper
Abilene Reflector-Chronicle
P.O. Box 8 Abilene, Kansas
67410 Telephone: 785-263-1000
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
Reflector Vol. 126, No. 205
Chronicle Vol. 141, No. 246
Periodical postage paid at Abilene,
Kansas. Published daily Monday
through Friday, except Saturday
and Sunday and these holidays:
Christmas, New Years, Memorial Day,
Independence Day, Labor Day and
Thanksgiving at 303 N. Broadway,
Abilene, Kansas. Subscription by city
carrier or mail inside Abilene, Chapman,
Enterprise, or Solomon, $7.50 monthly
or $87 a year; by mail $93 per year, tax
included, a zip code addressed within
Dickinson County, where carrier service
is not offered; Motor Route delivery,
$9.50 monthly or $110 per year.
Postmaster: Address changes to
Abilene Reflector-Chronicle, P.O.
Box 8, Abilene, KS 67410
Member of Kansas Press Association and National Newspaper Association
Staff Delivery Legal
The Abilene
Health Care
Scholarships
Memorial Health
System is seeking
qualifed candidates
who have applied to
one of the following
medical felds:
Must apply
on or before
Feb. 28, 2014
Applicant must hand
deliver resume &
cover letter to -
Medical Lab Technician
Medical Technologist
Radiologic Technologist
Licensed Prctical Nurse
Registered Nurse
Physcial Therapist
Physical Therapy Assistant
and more!
1x6
Memorial Health System
511 NE 10th St, Abilene
Human Resources Assist.
For more info:
785-263-6635
www.caringforyou.org

The Jeffcoat Studio
Museum is trying to
identify all of our
photographs. If you can
identify this photograph
please contact us.
Jeffcoat Studio Museum
321 N. Broadway,
Abilene, KS
785-263-9882
jeffcoatstudio@att.net
Open Monday &
Tuesday
from 9am-4pm
Admission is free
Reference #292
Last weeks photo was
unidentifed
90th Birthday
Card Shower
90th Birthday
Card Shower
For Lorene Harris Debenham
Born Feb. 22, 1924
Sterling House of Abilene II
Apt. 711 1102 N Vine St
Abilene, KS 67410
Anniversary
Ledys to mark
70th anniversary
Marvin and Lois Ledy, of
Abilene, will celebrate their
70th wedding anniversary on
Saturday, March 8, with a 5 to
7 p.m. light buffet and recep-
tion and a dance following
from 7 to 10 p.m., featuring
Classic Heart Band at the Elks,
417 N.W. Fourth St..
All friends and relatives are
invited. The couple requests
no gifts.
Their children and their
spouses are Patti and Bob An-
deres, of Hope; Mike and Dee
Ledy, of Winfeld; and Marlo
and Steve Zumbrunn, of Junc-
tion City.
They have seven grandchil-
dren and 10 great-grandchildren.
Marvin and Lois Ledy, the former Lois Hahn, were married
March 8, 1944, in Abilene.
Cards may be sent to 120 N. Elm, Apt. A, Abilene, KS
67410.
Photo provided
A day with the zoo
Melissa Mahoney, volunteer coordinator at Rolling Hills Zoo, introduces the children of Learn and Grow Depot to a new furry
friend, the ferret, during the zoos visit to the child care center Thursday. Anita Butler, director of education and volunteers at
Rolling Hills Zoo, began the program by reading the story Porcupining to the children followed by an up-close view of porcupine
quills. In addition to the ferret, the children were also given the opportunity to touch a rat and hedgehog.
Free pet registration in Chapman
Sliding
snowman
Kian Mather, 6, show his snowman
going down the slide. Mathers snow-
man was submitted to Abilene Parks
and Recreation Deparments snowman
building contest, which runs through
March 31. To participate, contestants
must build a snowman and submit a
picture including at least one of the
builders to aprd@abilenecityhall.com
or mail the photo to 1020 N.W. Eighth
St., Abilene, KS 67410. Submissions
can also be dropped off at the offce
located at the same address.
Photo provided
Club news
Christian Womens Club
The Abilene Christian Womens Club guest luncheon is
planned for 11:30 a.m. Thursday, March 6 at First United
Methodist Church, 601 N. Cedar St. The event was originally
scheduled for Feb. 6, but was postponed due to inclement
weather.
The buffet-style lunch will be catered by Wests Country
Mart.
Bill Manginelli, of Lee Summit, Mo., will be the speaker.
Manginelli served in the U.S. Marine Corps in Vietnam,
graduated from the University of Florida and overcame alco-
holism and his fear of death.
Joe Basso will also present Origins of Words.
Cost of the luncheon is $12. Reservations are due no later
than Saturday, March 1, to Marge Green, 1508 N. Campbell,
Abilene KS 67401. For more information, call Marge at 263-
1199.
Briefy
Rock Springs supper
Friends and neighbors of the Rock Springs 4-H Center are
invited to the annual Community Soup Supper on Monday,
March 10.
Chili, chicken noodle soup and cinnamon rolls will be
served from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in Williams Dining Hall. No
take-out meals will be provided. However, cinnamon rolls in
packages of one-half dozen each, will be available for sale.
Originally the supper was held as a thank you to farm
families living near Rock Springs that had to endure extra
traffic and bustle during busy days at the 4-H Center, located
at 1168 K-157 Highway.
Reservations are requested for the Community Soup Sup-
per by calling 785-257-3221 by Friday, March 7. Pre-orders
for cinnamon rolls sales also are welcome.
Homestead tax returns
The Dickinson County Department of Aging is scheduling
appointments for the free preparation of homestead tax
returns. Homestead returns are only available for hom-
eowners. There is no longer a food sales tax return for any
citizen.
Appointments can be scheduled at the Hilltop Senior Cen-
ter in Herington and the Dickinson County Clerks Office.
Call 263-1562 to make an appointment. No federal or state
returns will be prepared by the department.
Auction tickets on sale
Tickets for the annual St. Andrews Auction are now on
sale. The annual event, which benefits St. Andrews Elemen-
tary School, is set for Saturday, March 1, beginning at 6 p.m.
at the school gym.
Payment for purchases at the auction will be accepted
via debit or credit card. Reserved tickets are $30 each and
include buffet dinner and drinks.
Tickets may be purchased at the school office. For more
information, call 263-2453.
Daily record
www.abilene-rc.com Wednesday, February 19, 2014 3
Calendar
Wednesday
6 p.m. Abilene Table
Tennis Club, Abilene Com-
munity Center, 1020 N.W.
Eighth St.
6:30 p.m. Duplicate
Bridge, Abilene Elks Club,
417 N.W. Fourth St.
7 p.m. Bingo at
Abilene Elks Lodge, 417
N.E. Fourth St.
7 p.m. Al-Anon, Com-
munity Bible Church, 121
W. Fifth St., Abilene
7 p.m. Youth Group,
First Baptist Church, 501 N.
Spruce St., Abilene
7:30 p.m. Chapman
Rebekah Lodge No. 645,
Chapman Senior Center
Thursday
8:30 a.m. TOPS 595,
weigh-in, meeting at First
Christian Church, Seventh
and Buckeye
5:15 p.m. TOPS 444,
weigh-in and meeting First
Christian Church, Seventh
and Buckeye
5:30 p.m. Hospice
Volunteer Meeting, Hering-
ton Pizza Hut, 555 U.S. 77
7 p.m. NA, First United
Methodist Church, 601 N.
Cedar St., upstairs library
7 p.m. Bingo, Frater-
nal Order of Eagles Aerie
No. 2934, 207 Eagle Drive
8 p.m. AA, St. Johns
Episcopal Church, Sixth and
Buckeye
Friday
10 a.m. USD 435
PAT Play Group at First
Presbyterian Church, 1400
N. Cedar
12:10 p.m. Abilene
Rotary Club, Mr. Ks Farm-
house Restaurant, 407 S.
Van Buren.
7:30 p.m. Bible Talk,
Abilene Senior Center
8 p.m. AA, non-smok-
ing, Catholic Parish Center,
210 E. Sixth St., Chapman
Stocks:
02/19/14 $
AM Change
DJIA 16209.99 +79.59
ALCO 10.62 +0.38
Apple 542.70 -3.29
ADM 40.38 -0.15
AT&T 32.92 +0.10
Bank of Am. 16.39 -0.08
BP 49.66 +0.25
Caterpillar 97.51 +0.95
Coca-Cola 72.74 -0.39
Conoco 65.83 +0.46
Deere 85.41 +0.31
Exxon 94.93 +0.86
Ford 15.45 +0.06
Harley 63.92 +0.16
IBM 184.70 +1.51
Johnson & Jo. 92.50 +0.33
Kinder Mgn. 78.41 -1.51
McDonalds 96.47 +0.45
Microsoft 37.59 +0.17
Monsanto 110.27 +0.26
Pepsico 77.90 -0.28
Pfizer 31.84 -0.04
Potash 33.70 +0.12
Sprint 8.20 +0.01
Boeing 130.25 -0.38
Home Depot 76.98 -0.59
Union Pacific 178.02 -0.28
UPS 96.17 -0.32
Wal-Mart 75.09 -0.24
Westar 34.71 +0.05
Source: Yahoo Finance
Grains:
Prices at 10 a.m. Wednesday:
Wheat $6.63
Wheat new crop $6.49
Milo $4.52
Milo new crop $4.35
Soybeans $13.17
Soybeans new crop $10.90
Corn $4.25
Corn new crop $4.35
Market
Watch
3.5 x 2
Bryce C Koehn, AAMS
Financial Advisor
.
200 N Broadway
Abilene, KS 67410
785-263-0091
3.5 x 2
Bryce C Koehn, AAMS
Financial Advisor
.
200 N Broadway
Abilene, KS 67410
785-263-0091
C.L. HOOVER OPERA HOUSE
2013 WINTER & SPRING EVENTS
REZA: ILLUSIONIST
March 14 [7:30 pm]
Dont expect rabbits out of hats!
Reza is a world-famous magician
who will create seemingly
impossible illusions
LET ME BE FRANK
AN EVENING WITH SINATRA
April 13
Be enchanted by big-band
favorites by Sinatra and newer
talents such as Michael Buble
3 DIVAS AND A MIC
May 4
Comics Just June, Barbara Carlyle
& Julie Scoggins will have you in
sttches!
TALLGRASS FILM FESTIVAL
ROAD SHOW
March 1 [7:30 pm]
A selecton of independent short
dramas & documentary lms
COLONIAL CLASSIC FILM:
SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE
February 9 [7:30 pm]
Timeless romantc comedy starring
Tom Hanks & Meg Ryan
COMMUNITY THEATER:
THE MIRACLE WORKER
February 15-16 [7:30 pm]
February 17 [2:00 pm]
Inspiratonal and heartwarming
story of hope and the triumph of
human spirit
COMMUNITY THEATER:
INTO THE WOODS
May 10-11
May 12
Stephen Sondheim musical

ACOUSTIC JUNCTION
April 6
The best local & regional
musicians unplugged
C.L. HOOVER OPERA HOUSE
2013 WINTER & SPRING EVENTS
REZA: ILLUSIONIST
March 14 [7:30 pm]
Dont expect rabbits out of hats!
Reza is a world-famous magician
who will create seemingly
impossible illusions
LET ME BE FRANK
AN EVENING WITH SINATRA
April 13
Be enchanted by big-band
favorites by Sinatra and newer
talents such as Michael Buble
3 DIVAS AND A MIC
May 4
Comics Just June, Barbara Carlyle
& Julie Scoggins will have you in
sttches!
TALLGRASS FILM FESTIVAL
ROAD SHOW
March 1 [7:30 pm]
A selecton of independent short
dramas & documentary lms
COLONIAL CLASSIC FILM:
SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE
February 9 [7:30 pm]
Timeless romantc comedy starring
Tom Hanks & Meg Ryan
COMMUNITY THEATER:
THE MIRACLE WORKER
February 15-16 [7:30 pm]
February 17 [2:00 pm]
Inspiratonal and heartwarming
story of hope and the triumph of
human spirit
COMMUNITY THEATER:
INTO THE WOODS
May 10-11
May 12
Stephen Sondheim musical

ACOUSTIC JUNCTION
April 6
The best local & regional
musicians unplugged
C.L. HOOVER OPERA HOUSE
2013 WINTER & SPRING EVENTS
REZA: ILLUSIONIST
March 14 [7:30 pm]
Dont expect rabbits out of hats!
Reza is a world-famous magician
who will create seemingly
impossible illusions
LET ME BE FRANK
AN EVENING WITH SINATRA
April 13
Be enchanted by big-band
favorites by Sinatra and newer
talents such as Michael Buble
3 DIVAS AND A MIC
May 4
Comics Just June, Barbara Carlyle
& Julie Scoggins will have you in
sttches!
TALLGRASS FILM FESTIVAL
ROAD SHOW
March 1 [7:30 pm]
A selecton of independent short
dramas & documentary lms
COLONIAL CLASSIC FILM:
SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE
February 9 [7:30 pm]
Timeless romantc comedy starring
Tom Hanks & Meg Ryan
COMMUNITY THEATER:
THE MIRACLE WORKER
February 15-16 [7:30 pm]
February 17 [2:00 pm]
Inspiratonal and heartwarming
story of hope and the triumph of
human spirit
COMMUNITY THEATER:
INTO THE WOODS
May 10-11
May 12
Stephen Sondheim musical

ACOUSTIC JUNCTION
April 6
The best local & regional
musicians unplugged
C.L. HOOVER OPERA HOUSE
2013 WINTER & SPRING EVENTS
REZA: ILLUSIONIST
March 14 [7:30 pm]
Dont expect rabbits out of hats!
Reza is a world-famous magician
who will create seemingly
impossible illusions
LET ME BE FRANK
AN EVENING WITH SINATRA
April 13
Be enchanted by big-band
favorites by Sinatra and newer
talents such as Michael Buble
3 DIVAS AND A MIC
May 4
Comics Just June, Barbara Carlyle
& Julie Scoggins will have you in
sttches!
TALLGRASS FILM FESTIVAL
ROAD SHOW
March 1 [7:30 pm]
A selecton of independent short
dramas & documentary lms
COLONIAL CLASSIC FILM:
SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE
February 9 [7:30 pm]
Timeless romantc comedy starring
Tom Hanks & Meg Ryan
COMMUNITY THEATER:
THE MIRACLE WORKER
February 15-16 [7:30 pm]
February 17 [2:00 pm]
Inspiratonal and heartwarming
story of hope and the triumph of
human spirit
COMMUNITY THEATER:
INTO THE WOODS
May 10-11
May 12
Stephen Sondheim musical

ACOUSTIC JUNCTION
April 6
The best local & regional
musicians unplugged
C.L. HOOVER OPERA HOUSE
2013 WINTER & SPRING EVENTS
REZA: ILLUSIONIST
March 14 [7:30 pm]
Dont expect rabbits out of hats!
Reza is a world-famous magician
who will create seemingly
LET ME BE FRANK
AN EVENING WITH SINATRA
April 13
Be enchanted by big-band
favorites by Sinatra and newer
talents such as Michael Buble
3 DIVAS AND A MIC
May 4
Comics Just June, Barbara Carlyle
& Julie Scoggins will have you in
sttches!
TALLGRASS FILM FESTIVAL
ROAD SHOW
March 1 [7:30 pm]
A selecton of independent short
dramas & documentary lms
COLONIAL CLASSIC FILM:
SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE
February 9 [7:30 pm]
Timeless romantc comedy starring
Tom Hanks & Meg Ryan
COMMUNITY THEATER:
THE MIRACLE WORKER
February 15-16 [7:30 pm]
February 17 [2:00 pm]
Inspiratonal and heartwarming
story of hope and the triumph of
human spirit
COMMUNITY THEATER:
INTO THE WOODS
May 10-11
May 12
Stephen Sondheim musical

ACOUSTIC JUNCTION
April 6
The best local & regional
musicians unplugged
OPERA HOUSE
BOX OFFICE: 785-238-3906
www.jcoperahouse.org
Tallgrass Film Festival Road Show
A selection of independent short comedies, dramas and
documentary films from Kansas own Tallgrass Film Festival
Its an evening of music & comedy
for grown-ups when Salina-based
folk singer Ann Zimmerman opens
for comic Dan St. Pauls hilarious
take on parenting, life and aging.
March 7 7:30 pm
Kenya Safari Acrobats
in a performance that will have you on the edge of your seat!
March 26 7:00 pm
Death-defying stunts, comedy and heart-pounding music combine

Hands Down
Ever Seen
-Switchfoot
Tickets:
Adults - $20
Military/Seniors - $18
Students - $15
Dan St. Pauls
February 28
7:30 pm
Sponsored
by:
February 2014
Wellness Month
special pricing
Comprehensive exam - $27
rabies - $7.50
Da2pp for Dogs or fvrCp
for Cats - $9.50
(eaCh 3 year with proof of prior vaCCine)
all other wellness
serviCes at a 25%
DisCount also!
Abilene Animal Hospital
320 N.E. 14th
Abilene, KS
263-2301
Thanks
Te family of Paul
Geist would like to
thank the community
for all the kind
expressions of
sympathy and support
at this dicult time.
We have been so
uplifed by everyone
who has shared a
memory about Paul.
Tank you.
Cheril Geist
Adrian &
Matt Hettenbach
Marvin & Marion Geist
Sex ed bill backers seek parental control
By JOHN MILBURN
The Associated Press
TOPEKA Supporters of
Kansas legislation requiring
parental consent for students
to receive sex education in
public schools said Tuesday
that the policy change would
force parents to become more
active participants in the sub-
ject matter.
The bill heard by the House
Education Committee would
make the consent requirement
a statewide policy. Currently,
each district decides whether
parents must agree to have
their children take sex educa-
tion.
The overriding objective
of this legislation is to ensure
that parents have the ability to
view sex education material
in a manner that is appropri-
ate to them, said Sen. Mary
Pilcher-Cook, a Shawnee Re-
publican and sponsor of the
legislation.
Tom Krebs, lobbyist for the
Kansas Association of School
Boards, said the organization
had a policy statement that
encouraged districts to make
sex education an opt-out de-
cision by parents. He said
association members would
change that if the bill passed.
He also suggested voters
could always elect new mem-
bers of their local boards to
bring about a policy change.
The bill was drafted in re-
sponse to a January incident
in Johnson Countys Shaw-
nee Mission district in which
a suggestive poster used in
sex education classes was put
on a classroom door in view
of students not authorized by
their parents to receive sex
education.
Mark Ellis, parent of an
eighth-grader, said his daugh-
ter took a photo of the poster
and brought it home to show
him. Ellis has always signed a
slip opting his daughter out of
sex education instruction.
I wanted to believe it was a
prank, Ellis said.
He spoke with district of-
fcials and learned the school
board had authorized spend-
ing money to use a program
called Making a Difference
to teach sex education in the
schools. The poster was a
supplemental material used in
the instruction. Ellis said the
poster was removed after he
spoke to district offcials.
Ellis said while he may be
a little old fashioned when
it came to discussing sex
education with his daughter,
he felt it was his responsibil-
ity and not one he wanted to
leave to educators.
Legislators said they sup-
port parents having the say
on sexuality and morals and
wanted to make a change.
Some issues are important
to mandate and take state-
wide. This is one of them,
said Rep John Bradford, a
Lansing Republican.
Measure aims to cut Kansas
out of health overhaul
By JOHN HANNA
The Associated Press
TOPEKA Kansas Republicans who
loathe the federal health care overhaul
have embraced a national movement
aimed at helping states opt out of its re-
quirements, but backers conceded Tues-
day that the effort depends on a power
shift in Congress.
Secretary of State Kris Kobach and
two GOP legislators urged the House
Federal and State Affairs Committee to
pass a bill bringing Kansas into a com-
pact among states to assert control over
health care policy within their borders.
The committee could vote on the mea-
sure later this week.
You would be able to address the
specifc medical care needs of Kansans
instead of having to labor under the regu-
lations established by a one-size-fts-all
bureaucracy in Washington, Kobach, a
former law professor, told the commit-
tee.
But the compact cant take effect with-
out congressional approval, and support-
ers acknowledged thats unlikely with
President Barack Obamas fellow Demo-
crats in control of the U.S. Senate.
It is a frivolous measure that does
nothing at best and at worst puts seniors,
Kansans with disabilities and children
at risk, David Wilson, a spokesman for
AARPs Kansas chapter, told the com-
mittee.
Eight other states have enacted simi-
lar laws, including Missouri and Texas,
according to Competitive Governance
Action, the Houston-based group advo-
cating the interstate compact. The group
says on its website that consolidated
power in Washington is a threat to the
nation, and it also favors repealing the
amendment to the U.S. Constitution per-
mitting a federal income tax.
The group and other compact support-
ers are pushing the idea because congres-
sional ratifcation of the interstate agree-
ment wouldnt require the presidents
signature.
The compact language is broad enough
that the states could seek to exempt
themselves from federal rules regarding
Medicaid, which provides health cov-
erage for the needy and disabled, and
Medicare, which provides coverage for
the elderly.
Senate Public Health and Welfare Com-
mittee Chairwoman Mary Pilcher-Cook,
a Shawnee Republican, said the com-
pact, if approved by Congress, would al-
low states to simply rewind the clock
on health care policy. Because Congress
would consent to the compact, member
states still would receive federal health
care funds.
The other lawmaker pushing the bill,
Rep. Brett Hildabrand, also a Shawnee
Republican, told the committee: The
topic of health care is too large and too
complex of an issue for a cookie-cutter
approach to be applied broadly across
the nation. That is why health care needs
to be addressed at the state level.
Supporters of the federal law, including
Obama, argue that its helping Ameri-
cans fnd affordable health coverage,
but GOP lawmakers in Kansas and Re-
publican Gov. Sam Brownback have
been highly critical. They view the laws
mandates as burdensome, harmful to the
economy and an overreaching extension
of federal power.
The antipathy of GOP state offcials has
kept Kansas from expanding its Medic-
aid program as encouraged by the over-
haul or setting up its own online health
insurance marketplace. Kansas also en-
acted a largely symbolic health care
freedom law at Pilcher-Cooks urging
in 2011 to protest the federal overhauls
mandate that most Americans purchase
health insurance.
Many Kansas Republicans had predict-
ed that the U.S. Supreme Court would
overturn the law; instead, a majority of
justices upheld most of it in 2012. GOP
critics of the overhaul then pinned their
hopes on Obama losing re-election, but
he won a second term.
Rep. Valdenia Winn, a Kansas City
Democrat who is skeptical of the latest
proposal, said promises that a compact
would allow Kansas to assert control
over health care policy are speculative.
All these are dreams, she said.
Investigation questions foundation spending
The Associated Press
TOPEKA Federal investigators
said they found so much dubious
spending by a foundation dedicated
to the landmark Brown v. Board of
Education school desegregation case
that it questioned all funds given to
the group.
A months-long investigation by the
Department of the Interiors Offce of
Inspector General found unallow-
able, unreasonable and unsupported
spending by the Brown Foundation
of Education Equity, Excellence and
Research in Topeka, The Topeka
Capital-Journal reported Tuesday.
The investigation began after an
audit last year questioned nearly
$620,871 in spending by the founda-
tion, which used to receive most of
its funding from the National Park
Service, from October 2008 to Sep-
tember 2011.
Investigators said it was impossible
to conduct a complete review of the
Brown Foundations spending be-
cause of poor fnancial management,
commingling of funds and missing
documentation to justify expenses.
As a result, we question all funds
given to the foundation, the OIG re-
port states.
The Brown Foundation issued a
statement in response Tuesday, saying
that the report confrms the Brown
Foundations position throughout
this process that reimbursements and
expenditures involving federal dol-
lars received the prior approval of the
National Park Service.
The report says that the National
Park Service did not review Founda-
tion spending due to a hands-off ap-
proach to managing the agreement.
The foundation refused to comment
beyond the statement.
Cheryl Brown Henderson, the
daughter of the lead plaintiff of in the
Brown v. Board of Education case,
was the founder and executive direc-
tor of the foundation, and was briefy
superintendent of the Brown v. Board
of Education National Historic Site.
The report indicates investigators
asked Brown Henderson about foun-
dation records showing purchases
such as limousines, gift cards, tickets
to a Broadway show and a hotel va-
cation package.
Body
IDd as
missing
JC
woman
The Associated Press
JUNCTION CITY Au-
thorities in northeast Kansas
say a body found last week
in rural Geary County is that
of a Junction City woman
missing since Feb. 7.
Junction City police also
said Tuesday that the death
of 24-year-old Amanda
Clemons has been ruled a
homicide.
Witnesses reported seeing
Clemons being placed in a
car outside a Junction City
motel the night she disap-
peared. Her body was dis-
covered Feb. 12.
A Manhattan man and a
woman from Colorado were
arrested last week on suspi-
cion of frst-degree murder.
Police also arrested a Fort
Riley man on suspicion of
aiding a murder.
Bond for the three sus-
pects was set at $1 million.
4 Wednesday, February 19, 2014 www.abilene-rc.com
The Grizzwells
The Born Loser
Frank and Earnest
Beetle Bailey
Alley Oop
For Better For Worse
Baby Blues
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- Spending your hard-
earned cash on frivolous pur-
chases or helping others will
lead to financial trouble. Ad-
here to a strict budget before
its too difficult to dig your
way out of debt.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Neglecting your love life will
be emotionally costly. Plan to
share quality time with some-
one special, or engage in
events geared toward finding
love. You deserve to be happy
for a spell.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- Maintain patience and un-
derstanding when dealing
with others. A troublesome
situation will escalate quickly
if you arent sensitive to the
problems and challenges
faced by others. Do whats
right.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Youll be offered unwanted
advice. Disregard any such
counsel and remain on the
path that you feel most com-
fortable with. Discipline and
commitment will bring you
success.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- Give your spirits a lift by
spending time with children or
close friends. Treating your-
self to a guilty pleasure will
add to your enjoyment. Your
good humor will be appreci-
ated.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- It may seem as though
others are taking advantage
of you. Make your feelings
known in a firm but tactful
way. Your frustration will only
increase if you dont speak up.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Regardless of from whence
it comes, do not repeat gos-
sip. You will be looked upon
as untrustworthy, and it could
cause irreparable damage to
your reputation. Concentrate
on work, not meddling.
VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)
-- Focus on romance. Revi-
talize your relationship with
someone special. Unexpected
expenses may cramp your
style, but you can still show
your affection without trying
to buy love.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- You are in need of some
peace and solitude. Avoid
conflicts that may cause emo-
tional and physical distress. A
quiet evening alone will calm
your nerves.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- Refrain from discuss-
ing your financial status. Only
a trusted professional adviser
has the qualifications neces-
sary to provide the informa-
tion you require. Relying on a
well-meaning friend will result
in future problems.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -- Offering unsolic-
ited advice to peers will lead
to trouble. Dont be afraid to
admit that you dont have all
the answers. Instead, devote
your energy to doing what
you do best.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- There are many re-
sources available that provide
practical ways to refocus your
attitude. Consider a discus-
sion group or seminar that
would inspire you to approach
life in a positive manner.
In yesterdays column, a read-
er asked whether she should
be tested for genes linked to
Alzheimers disease. Today, I
thought Id give you my view on
the larger question: Will studies
of our genes change the practice
of medicine and improve our
lives?
My answer: During my career,
progress in human genetics has
been greater than virtually any-
one imagined. However, human
genetics also has turned out to
be much more complicated than
people imagined. As a result, we
have not moved as rapidly as we
had hoped in changing medical
practice.
I graduated from medical
school in the late 1960s. We
knew what human genes were
made of -- DNA -- and we were
beginning to understand how
genes work. We had even identi-
fed a handful of genes that were
linked to specifc diseases. We
assumed that disease resulted
from an abnormality in the struc-
ture of a gene.
If I had asked any biologist on
the day I graduated, Will we
ever know how many genes we
have, and the exact structure of
each gene? Ill bet the answer
would have been: Not in my
lifetime, or my childrens life-
time.
They would have been wrong.
Today we do know those an-
swers. Indeed, some diseases are
caused by an abnormality in the
structure of genes. In fact, some-
times it is very simple: one par-
ticular change at one particular
spot in just one particular gene
leads to a specifc disease. Sickle
cell anemia is an example.
Unfortunately, with most dis-
eases its far from that simple.
The frst complexity: Most dis-
eases are infuenced by the struc-
ture of multiple genes, not just
one. Examples are diabetes and
high blood pressure.
The second complexity: Many
diseases are explained not by
an abnormal gene structure, but
by whether genes are properly
turned on or off. Most cancers
fall into this category.
What do I mean by that? Every
cell in our body has the same set
of genes. Yet, a cell in our eye
that sees light is different from
a cell in our stomach that makes
acid. Why? Because different
genes are turned on in each type
of cell.
Similarly, if a gene with a nor-
mal structure is not properly
turned on or off, a cell can mal-
function -- it can become dis-
eased. Whether a gene is turned
on properly is proving to be a
more important cause of disease
than we once imagined.
The third complexity: We have
10 times as many bacterial cells
living on and inside our body as
there are cells in our body. And
the genes of those bacterial cells
-- not just the genes in our own
cells -- affect our health, perhaps
profoundly. Bacterial genes may
play an important role in obesity,
heart disease, even autism spec-
trum disorders.
So, am I discouraged about
whether progress in human ge-
netics will improve our lives?
To the contrary, Im more con-
vinced than ever that it will. We
are already seeing earlier and
more accurate diagnosis and
prognosis and improved treat-
ments.
And just as 40 years ago very
few would have imagined what
has been achieved by 2014, very
few today can imagine what will
be achieved in the next 40 years.
(Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at
Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go
to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10
Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)
Family Circus
Kit n Carlyle
Ask
DOCTOR K.
Progress in human
genetics will lead to
better diagnosis
by Bernice Bede Osol
Big Nate
Some defenses are
too tough
BRIDGE by
PHILLIP ALDER
Joseph-Marie de Maistre,
a French philosopher, writ-
er, lawyer and diplomat who
died in 1821, said, It is one
of mans curious idiosyn-
crasies to create difficulties
for the pleasure of resolving
them.
At the bridge table, we cre-
ate deals, either by hand or
with a computer program,
and then enjoy trying to solve
them. Most can be handled
correctly if our analysis is
accurate. But occasionally a
layout will arise that requires
doing something so abnormal
that it is easy to overlook.
Cover the West and South
hands. West leads the heart
eight against four spades.
After East takes dummys 10
with his queen, what should
he do next?
If West had opened one
heart, North would have
overcalled one no-trump.
But in the balancing posi-
tion (a pass by North would
have ended the auction), one
no-trump would have shown
only 11-15 points. Then, af-
ter South advanced with one
spade, indicating 0-8 points,
Norths raise to two spades
promised 17-19 points.
East has three defensive
tricks: his aces and the heart
queen. If the heart king will
automatically score later,
East can cash those aces and
exit with a diamond. Here,
though, that does not work.
East should realize that
West has led a singleton or
high from a doubleton. (West
would have led low from a
tripleton because he had not
supported hearts.) Then, if
East makes the weird-looking
lead of a heart at trick two, he
will defeat the contract. Here,
South wins in the dummy and
plays a trump, but East takes
the trick, cashes the diamond
ace, and gives West a heart
ruff for down one.
2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for
UFS
Classifed
www.abilene-rc.com Day, Month Date, Year 5
(The Reflector-Chronicle
does not intentionally accept
advertisements that are mis-
leading or from irresponsi-
ble firms seeking down
payment in advance. Pay-
ments made as the result of
the follow-up correspon-
dence are made at the
readers own risk.)
Classifieds Classifieds
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TRUCKS
MISCELLANEOUS
PUBLIC SALE
CALENDAR
SERVICES
OFFERED
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
Alm. sheets ..........263-1000
Photo copies ........263-1000
Fax services ........263-1000
Lamination ............263-1000
Color Photos ........263-1000
Abilene Reflector-Chronicle - www.Abilene-RC.com - Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Page 5
1 2 3
28 43 61
4 3
77 90
Cosi Pcr word
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&
80SldSSS
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Short Woiting List
IRONTIIR ISTATIS
6o1 N. Buckeye
AbIIene, Ks
1 Bedroom ApurLmenLs
H.U.D. SecLIon 8 HousIng
ULIIILIes ncIuded
6z yrs & OIder
AppIy In person
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to ool ovo trcc|.
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soo woo|uoys.
Coll 795-=7-5u7

Diane Landers
280-0628
3 bdr, 2 bath,
Nice neighborhood.
Price Reduced
$191,500
ETHERINGTON
& CO.
REALTORS
www.crcr:uqrcurcarcrs..c
115 N.W. 3rd 263-1216
Abilene, Ks.
1606 1ayhawk
Parksidc Homcs, Inc. is
sccking caring, dcpcndablc
CMA/CMA Tcam
Mcmbcrs. join an
organization that cmbraccs
a culturc tocuscd on
tricndlincss, compassion,
rcspcct, tlcxibility and
coopcration. Wc havc
grcat bcnctits!
Applications can bc pickcd
up at
200 Willow Bd.
Hillsboro KS
or contact
Marci Hcidcbrccht, HB at
(620) 947-2301 or
marcihQparksidcks.org.
Wc would lovc to
visit with you.
Criminol bockground checks run
o| |he |ime ol [ob oller. Porkside is
proud |o be o druglree ECE
workploce.
SELLER: LEROY TIMM
To place your CLASSI-
FIED AD just call 785-263-
1000. Ads need to be in
the office before NOON
the day before you want
ad to run. Prepayment is
required.
WORLDS LARGEST
GUN SHOW, April 6 & 7,
Tulsa, OK Fairgrounds,
Saturday 8-6, Sunday 8-4,
Wanemacher Productions.
Free appraisals. Bring your
guns! www.tulsaarmsshows.-
com.
If you dont find the serv-
ice you are looking for
here, check out our BUSI-
NESSES & SERVICES
DIRECTORY too.
TAPLIN COMPUTER
REMEDIES - top notch Mi-
crosoft certified system
engineer, guarantees your
computer is repaired to
your satisfaction. Call 785-
200-5618, open Monday -
Saturday, 9 am - 6 pm.
SALINA TREE INC.- res-
idential, commercial tree
trimming and removal. In-
sured. 785-827-2977.
A childless, young, suc-
cessful woman seeks to
adopt. Will be HANDS-ON
mom! Financial security.
Expenses paid. Jodi, 1-
800-718-5516.
ADOPTION: Educated,
financially secure, affec-
tionate married couple
want to adopt a baby into
a nurturing, warm, and lov-
ing environment. Ex-
penses paid. Cindy and
Adam, 1-800-860-7074.
AIRLINES CAREERS -
Become an Aviation Main-
tenance Tech. FAA ap-
proved training. Financial
aid if qualified. Housing
available. Job placement
assistance. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance,
888-248-7449.
ATTEND COLLEGE ON-
LINE from home. *Med-
ical, *Business, *Criminal
Justice, *Hospitality. Job
placement assistance.
Computer and Financial
aid if qualified. SCHEV au-
thorized. Call 888-220-
3977, www.CenturaOn-
line.com.
Happy Jack Skin Balm:
Stops scratching & gnaw-
ing. Promotes healing &
hair growth on dogs & cats
suffering from grass & flea
allergies without steroids!
Orscheln Farm & Home.
www.happyjackinc.com.
MEDICAL LABORA-
TORY TECHNICIAN at
POL. Certification pre-
ferred, 36 hours/week, no
weekends or call. Must
have excellent people
skills and attention to de-
tail. Contact Brittni
Oehmke, Laboratory Man-
ager at 785-632-2181,
Ext. 274 for more informa-
tion or send resume to:
Clay Center Family Physi-
cians, PO Box 520, Clay
Center, KS 67432.
Abilene USD 435 is now
accepting credentials for
the following certified posi-
tion: Abilene High School:
SCI ENCE/ PHYSI CS
TEACHER. Please send
letters of interest and re-
sumes to: Dr. Denise Guy,
Acting Superintendent, PO
Box 639, Abilene, KS
67410. For further infor-
mation, please see our
website at www.abile-
neschools.org.
USD 473, Chapman, is
accepting applications for
a 40 hour/week, 12 month
CUSTODIAL POSITION
at Chapman Middle
School. Applications may
be requested by calling
785-922-6521 or online at
usd473.net. Applications
will be accepted until posi-
tion is filled.
BROWN MEMORIAL
HOME, a lovely old retire-
ment home, south of Abi-
lene, KS, is in need of
Housekeepers and Dining
Room Hostesses. Stop by
the home at 1974 Hawk
Road to pick up a job ap-
plication.
Heavy Equipment Oper-
ator Career! Three week
hands on training school.
Bulldozers, backhoes, ex-
cavators. National Certifi-
cations. Lifetime job
placement assistance. VA
benefits eligible! 1-866-
362- 6497.
You got the drive, we
have the direction. OTR
Drivers, APU equipped,
pre-pass EZ-pass passen-
ger policy. Newer equip-
ment. 100% NO touch.
1-800-528-7825.
Drivers: Inexperienced?
Get on the road to a suc-
cessful career with CDL
training. Regional training
locations. Train and WORK
for Central Refrigerated,
877-369-7885, www.cen-
traltruckdrivingjobs.com.
Exp. Flatbed Drivers:
Regional opportunities
now open with plenty of
freight & great pay! 800-
277-0212 or primeinc.com.
Transfer Drivers: Need
20 Contract Drivers, CDL
A or B to relocate vehicles
to and from various loca-
tions throughout US-No
forced dispatch: 1-800-
501-3783, www.mamo-
transportation.com.
Tuesday, April 2, 2013.
Farmland Auction start-
ing 7 pm. Location: Ra-
mada Inn Conference
Center, 1616 W. Craw-
ford, Salina, KS. 80
Acres Saline County
Bottomland. Leonard
and Frances Sippel
Trust, Seller. Auction
conducted by Riordan
Auction & Realty.
Thursday, April 4, 2013.
Farmland Auction start-
ing 7 pm. Location: Ra-
mada Conference
Center, 1616 W. Craw-
ford, Salina, KS. 79
Acres Saline County
Bottomland. Robert E.
Riordan Trust, Seller.
Auction conducted by
Riordan Auction and
Realty.
Saturday, April 6, 2013.
Auction starting 9:33
am. Location: Sterl Hall,
619 N. Rogers, Abilene,
KS. Car, Antiques, Fur-
niture and Miscella-
neous. LeRoy Timm,
Seller. Auction con-
ducted by Ron Shivers
Realty and Auction Co.
Saturday, April 6, 2013.
Estate Auction starting
9 am. Location: 575 Old
Highway 40 (Sand
Springs), Abilene, KS.
Firearms, Farm Equip-
ment, Farm Related
Items, ATV & Mowers,
Antique & Modern Fur-
niture, Modern House-
hold, Disassembled
Grain Bins, Antiques &
Collectibles. John Lar-
son Estate, Seller. Auc-
tion conducted by
Reynolds, Mugler, Geist
Auction Service.
Saturday, April 13, 2013.
Auto Auction starting 10
am. Viewing at 9 am.
Location: 912 E. 7th,
Junction City, KS.
Gross Wrecker.
FREE QUOTES, easy
pay, lowest price, and
SR22, auto insurance.
Call 785-263-7778.
Youre reading the Reflector-Chronicle
Classifieds Work!
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
(The Reflector-Chronicle
does not intentionally accept
advertisements that are mis-
leading or from irresponsi-
ble firms seeking down
payment in advance. Pay-
ments made as the result of
the follow-up correspon-
dence are made at the
readers own risk.)
Classifieds Classifieds
Reflector
Chronicle
303 N. Broadway 785.263.1000
Abilene Reflector-Chronicle - www.Abilene-RC.com - Monday, April 22, 2013 - Page 5
WHAT TOOK YOU A LIFETIME
TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.
WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.
Learn the warning signs at
StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE
2004 American Heart Association
Made possible in part by a genereous grant from The Bugher Foundation
Miscellaneous 270
Do you have a product or service to
sell? For $300, your 25-word CLAS-
SIFIED AD will be placed in over 100
newspapers across Kansas with a
readership of over 500,000! Contact
The Abilene Reflector-Chronicle,
785-263-1000 for details.
Public Notices 310
Public Notices 310
(First Published in the
Abilene Refector Chronicle
Wednesday, February 19, 2014)
LEGAL NOTICE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN AND
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
THAT ON MARCH 11th, 2014 AT
7:00 P.M. IN THE COURTHOUSE
MEETING ROOM, THE DICKINSON
COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION
WILL MEET TO CONSIDER THE
FOLLOWING CASES:
DK-14-02
DK 14-02 is a request for the creation
of a subdivided plat at the following:
That portion of the southwest Quarter
of Section 34, Township 13 South,
Range 2 East of the 6
th
Principal
Meridian, Dickinson County, Kansas,
being more particularly described as
follows:
Commencing at the Northwest
Corner of said Southwest Quarter;
thence on an assumed bearing of
S000000 W along the West line of
said Southwest Quarter, a distance of
767.29 feet to the point of beginning;
thence N895950 E a distance of
556.62 feet; thence S 005337 W
a distance of 480.71 feet; thence S
111534 W a distance of 74.04 feet;
thence N 894037 W a distance of
534.40 feet to a point on said West
line; thence N000000 E along said
West line, a distance of 550.23 feet to
the point of beginning.
Contains 6.98 acres, more or less.
Owner/Applicant: Ross Taplin,
1321 NW 2
nd
St., Abilene, Kansas
As provided in the Dickinson County
Zoning Regulations, the above
application will be discussed and
considered by the Board. All persons
interested will be heard concerning
their wants and wishes. Any protest
against the provisions of this
application will be considered by the
board.
CERTIFIED THIS 14
TH
DAY OF
FEBRUARY, 2014.
DUSTIN PARKS
Zoning Administrator
1-785-263-0061
1T
(First Published in the
Abilene Refector Chronicle
Wednesday, February 19, 2014)
NOTICE OF A GENERAL
ELECTION FOR THE CITY OF
WOODBINE
DICKINSON COUNTY,
STATE OF KANSAS
Notice is hereby given that a General
Election for the City of Woodbine,
Dickinson County, Kansas will be
held on the 1
st
day of April, 2014.
The candidates and the positions for
which they have fled are as follows:
FOR MAYOR
VOTE FOR ONE
Mary Sue Roller
FOR CITY COUNCIL MEMBERS
VOTE FOR THREE OR FEWER
Janet Conner
Dawn D. Harold
Shiryl J. Pauley
The polling place will be the
Woodbine United Methodist Church.
Notice is further given that the polls
will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00
p.m.
Signed this 20
th
day of February,
2014.
BARBARA M. JONES
Dickinson County Election Offcer
1T
Announcements 330
For more information and assistance
regarding the investigation of financ-
ing, business opportunities and work
at home opportunities, The Central
Marketplace urges its readers to con-
tact the Better Business Bureau, Inc,
328 Laura, Wichita, KS 67211,
1-800-856-2417.
Help Wanted 370
Salina based company
needs OTR-CDL drivers
for fatbed & cattle.
Good wages, benefts.
Call 785-476-5076
GARDEN CENTER CASHIER. Enjoy
the outdoors? Kaw Valley Green -
houses is bringing a garden center to
the Abilene area and looking for
cashiers to work seasonally. Looking
for part and full time candidates.
Must be able to run cash register,
put up merchandise, water plants
and work with customers. Starting
pay $9/hr. Complete online applica-
tion at kawvalleygreenhouses.com
for questions contact 800-235-3945.
Help Wanted 370
ASSEMBLY AND FAB
POSITIONS, 1ST AND
2ND SHIFT
PARTS WAREHOUSE
POSITIONS DAY SHIFT
SEASONAL AND
FULL TIME EMPLOYEES
STACKING & BOXING
- afternoon and evening
shifts
CALL TODAY
785-825-4545
or apply online
expresspros.com
The City of Abilene Parks
and Recreation Department
is accepting applications
for a part-time Activity
Supervisor- duties include
supervising recreation
activities, scheduling facility
usage, light janitorial duties,
and assisting with special
events. Hours available
include Saturdays, Sundays
and two to three nights a
week. There is opportunity
to work between 14 and 18
hours per week. Applications
may be picked up at the
Parks and Recreation offce,
1020 NW 8th, Abilene
Kansas. Applications will be
accepted until
February 27, 2014 at 5 p.m.
Solomon Recreation
Commission has opening
for summer ball feld
superintendent. Must
be available evenings
and some weekends. Job
description available
upon request. Pay
commensurate with
experience. Deadline for
applications is March 17,
2014. Contact: Dean Ann
Zsamba, Board Clerk for
more information at
785-655-2541.
Position open until flled -
EOE
ALERT 89 yr old ABILENE WOMAN
needs help with daily tasks/bathing,
meal prep., light housekeeping, er-
rands. Approximately 25 hours per
week. Call 785-479-0930 after 7:00
pm.
EXPERIENCED HVAC & APPLI -
ANCE service person. Must have ex-
perience. 785-258-3355 Herington.
PERSONAL ASSISTANT NEEDED!
Housekeeping, meal prep,childcare,
various tasks. Must have valid
driver's license and your own trans-
portation to/from Talmage area. If in-
terested pl ease cal l Mel i ssa
785-210-4134 for more information.
25 hrs/week through OCCK. Must be
dependable.
INTERESTED in LEARNING a
TRADE while getting paid? Midco
Plastics is looking to hire a depend-
able, responsible person with an eye
to detail to train in flexible printing.
Apply in person at 801 South Bluff,
Enterprise, KS. We are an EOE.
PINNACLE BANK is TAKING appli-
cations for a part-time teller position.
Appl y onl i ne at websi t e
pinnbank.com and click on careers
link.
HIRING FULL TIME & part time
cook. Apply in person at Ikes Place,
100 NW 14th, Abilene.
Help Wanted 370
CLERK of the DISTRICT COURT II:
Permanent full-time position in Geary
County District Court, Eighth Judicial
District. Job Description: This is a
highly supervisory, administrative
and participatory work as a Clerk of
the District Court. Work involves the
overall management of the Civil,
Criminal, Probate, Limited Action
and Juvenile functions of the district
trial level court. Education/Experi -
ence: High School graduate with four
years clerical experience, including
at least two years of court related or
other legal related work. College
hours may be substituted for some
experience. Classification: Grade 22,
step I, and a starting salary of
$1,400.72 bi-weekly. Send applica-
tions and resumes to Cecil Aska,
Court Administrator, Geary County
Courthouse, 138 E. 8th. Junction
City, KS 66441: (785) 762-5221
x1445. Applications are available
from Clerk of District Court, Geary
County Courthouse, 138 E. 8th St.,
Junction City, KS 66441 OR may be
obtained on the Internet by going to
www.kscourts.org and clicking on the
"Human Resources" link. Dedline:
February 21, 2014 by 5:00pm. The
KS Judicial Branch does not discrimi-
nate on the basis of race, religion,
color, sex, age, national origin or dis-
ability, EEO/AA.
CONSTRUCTION HELP WANTED.
Full-time employment with medical,
dental & 401K. Call 785-223-1786 or
785-479-6687.
Musical Instruments 440
WEEKLY PIANO SPECIAL:
Stunning white w/gold trim Young
Chang grand piano! Nearly $20K
new, SPECIAL: $9988! Mid-America
Piano, Manhattan. 800-950-3774.
piano4u.com
Misc For Sale 530
GIRL SCOUT COOKIE Booth, M&M
Tire in Abilene. 9am-5pm on Satur-
day, Feb. 22nd. Only $3.50 a box.
Enter a drawing to win a FREE case
of assorted cookies. One chance for
every box purchased.
Automobiles 680
ENTERPRISE CREDIT UNION is
accepting sealed bids on a 2007
Chevy Equinox. 91,303 miles. Bid
form may be obtained at, and vehicle
may be seen at 109 E. 1st Street,
Enterprise, KS. Bids accepted until
Wednesday, February 19, 2014. En-
terprise Credit Union reserves the
right to reject any and all bids.
FREE QUOTE INSURANCE, SR22,
pay by credit or debit card monthly &
discounts. 785-263-7778.
Rooms, Apts. For Rent 740
ApArtments for rent
enterprise estates Apartments
1 Bedrooms Available
301 south factory
enterprise, Ks
phone: 913-240-7155
VERY NICE ONE bedroom apart -
ments overl ooki ng downtown
Abilene. All bills paid, $550. Also,
very nice two bedroom apartment in
triplex unit with garage and private
patio. Water and trash paid, $625.
For mor e i nf or mat i on cal l
785-479-0374.
TWO BEDROOM LOFT apartments
on the corner of 3rd & Cedar in
Abilene. Recently reduced prices - If
interested, please contact Darcy
Hopkins. 785-827-9383.
ONE BEDROOM UPSTAIRS apart-
ment all bills paid, stove & refrigera-
tor furnished $450. 785-263-2034
Rooms, Apts. For Rent 740
WOW!!
LOOK AT THIS
1 Bedroom Apts.
Water & Cable Paid
Walk-in showers
On site laundry
Senior
Community
(55yrs. +)
NEW YEAR
SPECIAL RATE
$0.00 to move in
First month rent free
No security deposit
No applicaton fee
Chisholm
Manor
CALL 785-210-9381 for
more informaton
Ofce Hours:
Mon - Thurs 1pm - 3pm
Houses For Rent 770
(2) HOUSES, LARGE 3 bedroom/2
bathroom, fenced yards, pets ok,
large garage/basements, 503/521
Layton, Enterprise. Pictures/Info @
ahrn.com, 785-280-2024.
1 BEDROOM DUPLEX, central air,
stove, refrigerator, dishwasher, extra
st or age i n basement wi t h
washer/dryer hookups. $400 rent,
water & trash paid. No pets.
785-452-0331
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH,
$550/MONTH. Pets welcome with
pet deposit. 785-280-2520 or
619-884-6383.
One bedroom, two bedroom, three
bedroom & four bedroom (price re-
duced, $950) HOUSES FOR RENT!
Call 785-263-2034.
EXTRA NICE! ONE BEDROOM Du-
plex, 1505 North Olive, $550.00 rent
plus deposit. 263-1346.
SMALL 3 BEDROOM at 1507 N Oak
550.00 Rent, 550.00 Deposit. 2 Bed-
room at 324 NE 4th 475.00 Rent,
475.00 Deposit. 1 Bedroom Duplex
at 321 NE 12th 450.00 Rent, 450.00
Deposit. No Smoking, No Pets, Ref-
erences. 785-263-5838.
Services Offered 790
Need to send a letter and/or docu-
ment? Let us FAX IT for you. $2.00
for 785 area code; $2.50 outside 785
area code; $3.00 for out of state.
Customer must provide fax number.
Abilene Reflector-Chronicle, 303 N.
Broadway.
PHOTO COPIES - 20 cents per
copy. Abilene Reflector-Chronicle Of-
fice, 303 N. Broadway.
Real Estate For Rent 800
OAK CREEK STORAGE units avail-
able 10x10 & 10x20. 280-1113.
Planning a
and want a
good turnout?
Place an ad with us today.
THE DAILY UNION.
785-226-2708 785-263-1000
Thank you for being the
party of no, one constituent
told Huelskamp, referencing
the representatives efforts to
block spending legislation.
Huleskamp spent most of
his opening statement talking
about excessive regulations
and the federal debt two
topics that dominated the fol-
lowing question and answer
session.
A dry streambed shouldnt
be regulated by the EPA,
Huelskamp said in response
to a question about water
rights.
He was referencing a draft
rule proposed by the EPA that
is intended to clarify the ju-
risdiction of the Clean Water
Act.
Huelskamp fears the pro-
posal would expand the Acts
jurisdiction and sees it as
overreach from the agency.
According to the EPAs
website, The proposed rule
does not propose changes to
existing regulatory exemp-
tions and exclusions, includ-
ing those that apply to the
agricultural sector that ensure
the continuing production of
food, fber and fuel to the ben-
eft of all Americans.
While the EPA was a target
more than once Tuesday, the
Affordable Care Act also
known as Obamacare re-
ceived Huelskamps derision.
It gets rewritten everyday,
he said, answering if he or his
staff had read the act. We
havent read the whole thing,
but its diffcult to keep up on
the regulation.
Huelskamp said he was frus-
trated by the endless changes,
noting that President Barack
Obama had just recently post-
poned a mandate for employ-
ers with 50 to 99 employees.
Huelskamp was also asked
about rural post offces being
closed and Veterans Affairs
hospitals.
The representative told the
audience that no decision on
post offce closings would be
made until mid-summer and
hes in favor veterans being
able to use local hospitals for
routine services.
6 Wednesday, February 19, 2014 www.abilene-rc.com
The Abilene Reflector-Chronicle
&
Businesses
services
Calendar Month Rates:
One Line $27.50 Two Lines $55.00
Three Lines $82.50
Call 785-263-1000 To Place Your Ad Today!
Automotive
Johns Service - 263-4444
Auto Lockout Service
Childcare
L&G Depot - 263-6645
mmalo@mhsks.org
Computer Services
Christner Tech - 280-2599
The Teck Shop - 263-3424
Guttering
Gorilla Guttering - 785-280-1814
Hearing
Midwest Hearing - 263-2117
Housecleaning
Merry Maids - 263-2779
Insurance
American Family - 263-2512
Barbieri Insurance Serv. - 263-2287
Smart Insurance - 263-1920
State Farm Insurance - 263-2230
Mini Storage
Northwood - 263-3322/263-1829
Monuments
Lynn Peterson - 479-0122
Oil Change/Lube
Dons Tire - 263-7838
FasTrack Lube - 263-4341
Real Estate
Etherington & Co. - 263-1216
Black & Co. Realtors - 200-6300
Biggs Realty Co. - 263-4428
Remodeling
ADM Construction - 479-0765
Roofing
Best Roofing - 200-4595
Everett Larson - 263-7760
Jesse Howard Roofing - 280-3411
Security/Alarms
Crossroads Electronics &
Security LLC - 785-829-1223
Small Engine Repair
Abilene Rent-All - 263-7668
Trash Pick-up
Superior Sanitation - 263-3682
&
Businesses
services
Huelskamp
Continued from Page 1
Tom Witt, executive direc-
tor of Equality Kansas, the
states leading gay-rights
group, said hes pleased
by Kings declaration that
the House bill is dead but
doesnt expect the issue to
vanish. His group and sev-
eral others are planning a
Rally for Equality next
week at the Statehouse.
Witt said hes looking for-
ward to the Senate Judiciary
Committees hearings.
Its not going to be fo-
cused on we have to move
this bill, and all the acrimo-
ny that goes with it, he said.
Marriage
Continued from Page 1
Greg Doering Refector-Chronicle
Abilene resident Phillip Hanson speaks to Rep. Tim Huelskamp
outside the Eisenhower Presidential Library auditorium Tues-
day.
Toxins leaking
from 2nd pipe
at ash dump
The Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. North
Carolina offcials said Tues-
day that groundwater con-
taining unsafe levels of ar-
senic apparently leaching
from a Duke Energy coal ash
dump is still pouring into the
Dan River, which is already
contaminated from a massive
Feb. 2 spill.
The state Department of
Environment and Natural
Resources ordered Duke to
stop the fow of contaminat-
ed water coming out a pipe
that runs under a huge coal
ash dump at its Eden power
plant. A nearby pipe at the
same dump collapsed with-
out warning two weeks ago,
coating the bottom of the Dan
River with toxic ash as far as
70 miles downstream.
State regulators expressed
concern fve days ago that
the second pipe could fail,
triggering a new spill. The
water coming out of that pipe
contains poisonous arsenic
at 14 times the level consid-
ered safe for human contact,
according to test results re-
leased by the state on Tues-
day.
We are ordering Duke
Energy to eliminate this un-
authorized discharge imme-
diately, said Tom Reeder,
director of the N.C. Division
of Water Resources.
Video taken last week by a
robot sent inside the 36-inch-
wide concrete pipe showed
wide gaps between seams
through which groundwater
is gushing in, likely from the
toxic dump above.
Tests on water from the
pipe before it goes under the
dump showed none of the
dangerous contamination de-
tected at the other end. The
concrete inside the pipe is
heavily stained around the
numerous leaks, suggesting
the contamination is likely
not new.
A state inspector received
the video recorded by Duke
during a Feb. 11 visit to the
site, but did not review it
until Thursday. On Friday
night, the state agency went
public with concerns about
the pipes structural integrity.
Duke spokeswoman Paige
Sheehan quickly issued a
statement, downplaying the
risk.
After reviewing the video-
tape, we determined that no
immediate action was neces-
sary, it said.
In the wake of the initial
spill, public health offcials
issued advisories telling peo-
ple to avoid contact with the
river water and not eat the
fsh.
Authorities said public
drinking water in Danville,
Va., and other communities
downstream of the Duke
plant remain safe. Heavy
metals detected in the river
at levels exceeding state and
federal safety standards
including arsenic, lead and
selenium are being suc-
cessfully fltered out of water
drawn from the river at mu-
nicipal treatment plants, they
said.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service said Tuesday a mas-
sive pile of coal ash about
75 feet long and as much as
5 feet deep has been detected
in the river by the site of the
Feb. 2 spill. Deposits vary-
ing from 5 inches deep to
less than 1 inch coated the
river bottom across the state
line into Virginia and to Kerr
Lake, a major reservoir.
Federal authorities ex-
pressed concern for what
long-term effect the contami-
nants will have on fsh, mus-
sels and other aquatic life.
Soldiers around casket sparks furor
By Associated Press
MILWAUKEE The Wisconsin Na-
tional Guard announced Tuesday that it
had suspended a member from honor
guard duties after she apparently posted
to social media a photograph of soldiers
mugging around an empty, fag-draped
casket.
The group photograph taken at a Na-
tional Guard training facility in Arkan-
sas sparked a furor on Facebook, in
military chat rooms and other social me-
dia, where people saw it as disrespectful
of veterans and those killed in action.
The National Guard said it was taking
steps to protect the soldier who posted
the photograph after she received death
threats.
The photograph originally posted on
Instagram shows about a dozen soldiers
clowning around a casket draped in a
fag. Several hug playfully. One fashes a
peace sign. Another has his back turned
and is pointing off in the distance.
The caption reads, We put the FUN
in funeral your fearless honor guard
from various states.
The photograph was posted from an
account belonging to Spc. Terry Har-
rison, of the Madison, Wis.-based 1st
Battalion, 147th Aviation Regiment, ac-
cording to the National Guard. That ac-
count has since been closed, but others
have reposted the picture and Harrisons
comments on multiple social media
sites.
Judy Vincent, of Poteau, Okla., said
she saw the picture when a friend re-
posted it on Facebook.
It was like somebody slapped me in
the face. Ive never in my life seen such
disrespect for the fallen or the families,
said Vincent, whose son died in Iraq in
2004.
Marine Cpl. Scott Vincent was killed
near Fallujah by a suicide bomber. His
mother said Vincents friends served as
his honor guard and she has no doubt
that he was treated with respect. But she
knows the photograph has raised doubts
among other families.
It raises questions in your mind,
Judy Vincent said. What did they think
of me and was my loved one treated
with disrespect?
Vincent was among the more than 900
people to post comments on the Wiscon-
sin National Guards Facebook page,
most of them asking for Harrison and
the other soldiers to be disciplined.
Harrison, a full-time member of the
National Guard, has been suspended
from Wisconsins honor guard and as-
signed to other duties while an investi-
gation is ongoing, said Maj. Paul Rick-
ert, the Wisconsin National Guards
director of public affairs.
Wisconsin offcials also have notifed
the National Guard Bureau because the
other soldiers in the photograph were
from other units, Rickert said. The Na-
tional Guard Bureau did not immedi-
ately return a message left for comment.
Attempts to reach Harrison by phone
and email were unsuccessful. The Na-
tional Guard has taken steps to protect
her after she received death threats
through social media and other means,
Rickert said.
Ukraine protesters seize Kiev post offce
The Associated Press
KIEV, Ukraine Defant
Ukrainian protesters seized
control of the capitals cen-
tral post offce Wednesday,
hurling fre bombs and rocks
and standing their ground
against offcers in riot gear
who threw stun grenades and
fred water cannon a day af-
ter clashes that left at least 25
people dead and raised fears
of civil war.
The demonstrators forced
their way into into the post of-
fce in Independences Square,
also known as the Maidan,
after a nearby building they
had previously occupied was
burned down in the previous
days clashes. Against the of-
fcial onslaught, thousands
of activists armed with fre
bombs and rocks defended
the square which has been a
bastion and symbol for the
demonstrators.
During the night, the square
was encircled by a wall
of fre from burning tires.
Smoke was still rising from
the rose above the center
of the Ukrainian capital on
Wednesday afternoon.
Ukraines top security
agency on Wednesday ac-
cused protesters of seizing
hundreds of frearms from
its offces and announced a
nation-wide anti-terrorist op-
eration after 25 people were
killed and hundreds injured
hundreds in street clashes in
the most unrest in the coun-
trys modern history.
The violence Tuesday was
the worst in nearly three
months of anti-government
protests that have para-
lyzed Ukraines capital in a
struggle over the identity of
a nation divided in loyalties
between Russia and the West.
It prompted the European
Union to threaten sanctions
against Ukrainian offcials
responsible for the violence
and triggered angry rebukes
from Moscow, which ac-
cused the West of triggering
the clashes by backing the
opposition.
Sanctions would typically
include banning leading of-
fcials from traveling to the
28-nation bloc and cru-
cially freezing their assets
there. Travel bans and assets
freezes for the powerful oli-
garchs who back President
Viktor Yanukovych could
prompt them to pressure him
to change course.
But the bad blood runs so
high that its not clear wheth-
er an unstoppable force of
confict has been unleashed:
The rising rage on both
sides has fueled fears that
the 46-million nation in the
center of Europe could be
sliding deeper into violence
that could lead to its breakup.
While most people in west-
ern regions of Ukraine resent
Yanukovych, he still enjoys
strong support in the mostly
Russian-speaking eastern
and southern regions, where
many want strong ties with
Russia.
Neither side now appears
willing to compromise, with
the opposition insisting on
Yanukovychs resignation
and early elections and the
president prepared to fght
till the end.
Radical protesters willing
to confront police with vio-
lence were largely shunned
at the start of the demonstra-
tions three months ago, but
they have become a key force
in recent weeks, with moder-
ate demonstrators bringing
them food and some even
preparing Molotov cocktails
for them. Police also have
turned increasingly brutal af-
ter law enforcement offcers
were killed.
The protests began in late
November after Yanukovych
turned away from a long-
anticipated deal with the EU
in exchange for a $15 billion
bailout from Russia. The
political maneuvering con-
tinued ever since, with both
Moscow and the West eager
to gain infuence over this
former Soviet republic.
The Kremlin said it put the
next disbursement of its bail-
out on hold amid uncertainty
over Ukraines future and
what it described as a coup
attempt.
Yanukovych on Wednesday
blamed the protesters for the
violence and said the opposi-
tion leaders crossed a line
when they called people to
arms.
The European Union ap-
pears poised to impose sanc-
tions as it called an extraordi-
nary meeting of the 28-nation
blocs foreign ministers for
Thursday.
European Commission
President Jose Manuel Bar-
roso called for targeted
measures against those re-
sponsible for violence and
use of excessive force can be
agreed ... as a matter of ur-
gency.
It is the political leader-
ship of the country that has
a responsibility to ensure
the necessary protection of
fundamental rights and free-
doms, said Barroso, who
heads the EUs executive
arm. It was with shock and
utter dismay that we have
been watching developments
over the last 24 hours in
Ukraine.
The latest bout of street vi-
olence began Tuesday when
protesters attacked police
lines and set fres outside
parliament, accusing Yanu-
kovych of ignoring their de-
mands to enact constitutional
reforms that would limit the
presidents power a key
opposition demand. Par-
liament, dominated by his
supporters, was stalling on
taking up a constitutional
reform to limit presidential
powers.
Police responded by attack-
ing the protest camp. Armed
with water cannons, stun
grenades and rubber bullets,
police dismantled some bar-
ricades and took part of the
Maidan. But the protesters
held their ground through the
night, encircling the camp
with new burning barricades
of tires, furniture and debris.
On Wednesday morning,
the center of Kiev was cor-
doned off by police, the sub-
way was shut down and most
shops on Kievs main street
were closed. But hundreds of
Ukrainians still focked to the
opposition camp, some wear-
ing balaclavas and armed
with bats, others in everyday
clothes and with makeup on,
carrying food to protesters.
A group of young men and
women poured petrol into
plastic bottles, preparing
fre bombs, while a volun-
teer walked past them dis-
tributing ham sandwiches
from a tray. Another group
of activists was busy crush-
ing the pavement into pieces
and into bags to fortify bar-
ricades.
The revolution turned into
a war with the authorities,
said Vasyl Oleksenko, 57, a
retired geologist from central
Ukraine, who said he fed the
nights violence fearing for
his life, but returned to the
square in the morning, feel-
ing ashamed. We must fght
this bloody, criminal leader-
ship. We must fght for our
country, our Ukraine.
Yanukovych was defant on
Wednesday, his tone leaving
little hope for a compromise.
I again call on the leaders
of the opposition ... to draw
a boundary between them-
selves and radical forces
which are provoking blood-
shed and clashes with the
security services, the presi-
dent said in a statement. If
they dont want to leave (the
square) they should ac-
knowledge that they are sup-
porting radicals.. He also
called a day of mourning for
the dead on Thursday.
Opinion
www.abilene-rc.com Wednesday, February 19, 2014 7
Tee Time
Tim Horan
Crafts
I
f youve visited my offce before,
you may have noticed a decora-
tive box that I have on a shelf. This
box is decorated on all sides by things
that represent me, but upon closer look,
I receive questions about the box from
visitors. I am happy to tell them, and Im
happy to tell you today.
The box is more than just pretty deco-
ration. It was done for a fnal project in
the Leadership Studies minor I received
at K-State. We were challenged to create
our Personal Leadership Statement. As I
am a crafter, I decided to go with a craft
project for my Personal Leadership State-
ment, broken up into fve parts.
The top of the box simply has my frst
name and a bear since my last name
means Bear. This tells people immedi-
ately who I am, because your name is the
primary name you are identifed and re-
membered by people, and thats the frst
thing you say about yourself when meet-
ing someone.
One side of the box is covered with
stickers of four leaf clovers and movie
theater insignia. This was put on the box
to adequately convey where I learned the
most about how to lead and my leader-
ship identity. I was in 4-H for 11 years,
and worked at the theater in college for
four. Between these two experiences,
I encountered many experiences that
shaped me as a leader.
The other side of the box is the letters
ESTJ, which are the four letters that com-
prise my Myers-Briggs Personality Type.
This is a test done to indicate how your
decisions are shaped, and I believe that
ESTJ is a 100% accurate description of
how I identify as a person and as a leader.
The back of the box has pictures of peo-
ple that motivate me. These are pictures
of my family and friends, and were put
on the box because having motivation to
lead is a key part of leadership. Everyone
is motivated in different ways, and Im
motivated by those I care about.
Finally, the front of the box has a ques-
tion mark on it. This is on the front be-
cause its what people see frst, and its
to serve as a way for you to think about
your own leadership style. Each and ev-
ery Chamber & community member has
a different leadership style, and they are
all equally important in leading the busi-
ness community. Working together with
people that have different and similar
leadership styles can be productive, and
its helpful to know how people identify
with leadership. Think of mission & vi-
sion statements all of those tie into how
that specifc company plans to lead and
grow. Leadership and business tie in to-
gether in more ways than some people
think without taking a closer look.
I challenge you to take that closer look.
I challenge you to think of your personal
leadership style. While you dont have
to do a craft project, set aside some time
to refect on how you best lead and what
motivates you do to so. You can even
share this challenge with your staff or
leadership team at your offce. You may
be surprised at what you discover!
If you ever want to see my Personal
Leadership Statement, stop by the Cham-
ber offce. If you dont walk away with
a deeper understanding of me as a lead-
er, youll at least walk away with some
chocolate that you fnd when you open up
the box!
As always, you can contact the Cham-
ber at 785-263-1770, or chamber@
abilene.net.
____________________________
Torey Berndt is the executive director
of the Abilene Area Chamber of Com-
merce.
Chamber Connection
Torey Berndt
A chance to test and taste
I
ts all about involving students and
inviting them to provide input. Ac-
cording to Kyleen Harris, Food Ser-
vice director, the Abilene High Schools
Culinary Arts class is testing new recipes
for the schools lunch program. Earlier
this semester they dished out samples of
Asian cabbage salad, whole grain corn
bread and taco soup for students to sam-
ple during lunch.
Students were then asked to com-
plete an online survey, and according to
Kyleen, We received great feedback.
As a matter of fact, the taco soup was
such a big hit that it has been added to
the lunch menu.
One of Kyleens goals this year is to get
the high school students more involved
in selecting menu items for the lunch and
breakfast programs.
I collaborated with the high school
FACS teacher, Deb Farr, she said. The
Culinary Arts class tested new recipes
for the schools lunch program as part of
their fnal grade last semester. We used
recipes from the Healthier Kansas Menu
and from the Vermonts New School
Cuisine cookbook that was provided by
KSDE Child Nutrition and Wellness.
Mrs. Farr and I selected about 16 differ-
ent recipes that included a variety of en-
tres and side dishes. The selected reci-
pes were made with ingredients that help
us meet the new federal meal standards,
such as whole grains, dark green veg-
etables like kale and legumes. We let the
students pick out 12 recipes to test. After
testing, the class selected their favorites
to be sampled by the AHS student body
during lunch. They also designed attrac-
tive posters to promote their food items
and encourage other students to sample
their food.
Kyleen is excited about the collab-
orative efforts between the School Food
Service Program and the high school and
defnitely plans to continue the food test-
ing and tasting. She hopes to eventually
set up taste testing at all the schools.
___________
Dr. Denise Guy is superintendent of
USD 435 schools.
Abilene Schools
Dr. Denise Guy
Ice,
ice,
baby
M
ost of us are comfortable with routine.
Its funny how a split second can
change things.
It was a typical Thursday morning.
Beep, beep, beep. Snooze button.
Beep, beep, beep. Snooze button.
Beep, beep, beep. Snooze button.
By then Maggie the dog was ready to go outside
so it was time to get up and face the mirror.
Soon after, I slipped into my new Bjorn shoes
and was off to work for what was going to be a
very busy day, but then most days in the newspa-
per businesses are pretty eventful.
There was a detour to Caseys for an apple frit-
ter while waiting on a train. At least I was getting
some fruit in my diet, or so was my justifcation
for eating fried bread.
I hurried through the parking lot to the back
door with my fritter in one hand and my camera
bag over my left shoulder as I glanced down at an
ice-covered alley.
My thoughts?
Id better be careful. I could sliiiii...
The melting snow had left the town covered
in icicles. The back of the Refector-Chronicle
building may have held the granddaddy of all
icicles, which had melted the previous day and
then refroze into a nice skating rink into the alley
below.
The new shoes didnt help, providing no trac-
tion whatsoever.
It all happened in slow motion.
Both feet went out from under my body in
the direction that I was heading. The lower left
shoulder took most of the blow of the fall. The
left forearm struck the bottom step of the offce
building. Trying to keep my head up was point-
less. It landed with a bang.
Goose egg!
Too hurt to even be embarrassed, I laid there
for what seemed like minutes but was probably
only several seconds. Finally, I got to my knees
to look around to see if anyone saw the fall.
There was my camera bag intact. Fortunately,
it appeared that my camera had been saved from
damage.
Back in the offce, the considerate staff was
concerned about a concussion. Rightfully so!
I have had three concussions that I can remem-
ber.
First, in junior high while riding a horse named
Kansas at a gallop through Browns Park, some-
thing spooked her. The Boy Scouts were shoot-
ing arrows and other things of that nature. Kansas
went right. I went left, falling to the ground. The
next thing I remember was riding the horse in the
front yard of my house a good two miles away
from the fall. I had no recollection of how I got
back home.
Sometimes I think about that fall and Christo-
pher Reeves who was paralyzed falling from a
horse.
The second concussion occurred during a car
accident my 8th grade year when a convertible I
was riding in overturned. The third was another
car accident in high school.
With that track record, my doctor should advise
me to stay away from cars and avoid walking on
ice.
I was lucky this time.
It did present me the opportunity to meet pro-
fessionally with one of the new doctors, Heather
Bloesser, D.O. She ran me through a series of
motor-skills tests. Diagnosis: cracked rib. The
only treatment for bruised, cracked or broken ribs
is time. I know it could have been much worse,
but it still periodically hurts like the Dickens.
And since someone pointed out that February is
International Friendship Month and the 50th an-
niversary of the Beatles American debut, I must
say I get by with a little help from my friends.
My son Ryan drove me home on Thursday. My
friend Gary Guccione then picked me up at home
and drove me to the doctors offce and back.
And the Refector-Chronicle staff did a great job
in covering events for me while I was out of com-
mission. Sister Sandy will provide a taxi service
this week much like she did when I broke my leg.
And then theres my best friend, my wife Kathy,
who spent Valentines Day and her birthday Sun-
day caring for Scrooge.
And while I am expecting a full recovery at
some point, dang that hurt!
Exporting
E
xporting goods and services is a
great way for a small business to
grow. Exporting your products
allows you to expand your market and
fnd new customers.
With over six billion people living
throughout the planet, many of whom
live in developed nations, the opportunity
to grow your business and your profts
has never been greater. Why should you
export?
Nearly 95 percent of the worlds con-
sumers live outside of the United States.
So if a U.S. business is only selling do-
mestically, its reaching only a small
share of potential customers.
Exporting enable companies to di-
versify their portfolios and to weather
changes in the domestic economy.
Exporting helps small companies
grow and become more competitive in all
their markets.
Free trade agreements have opened up
markets in Australia, Chile, Singapore,
Jordan, Israel, Canada, Mexico, and Cen-
tral America, creating more opportunities
for U.S. businesses.
Exporting not only provides an oppor-
tunity for your business to grow, it also
provides economic growth that fuels our
state and even local growth. Consider
these facts on the economic impact of ex-
portation:
About one of every fve factory jobs
or 20 percent of all jobs in Americas
manufacturing sector depend on ex-
ports. Workers in jobs supported by mer-
chandise exports typically receive wages
higher than the national average.
In the past 25-plus years, U.S. exports
increased fve-fold from $224 billion to
more than $1.3 trillion in 2008.
Many small businesses are seeing the
advantages of global trade and are be-
coming exporters themselves:
Because nearly two-thirds of small-
and medium-sized exporters only sell to
one foreign market, many of these frms
could boost exports by expanding the
number of countries they sell to.
More than two-thirds of exporters
have fewer than 20 employees.
Small- and medium-sized frms ac-
count for the vast majority of growth in
new exporters.
Small- and medium-sized companies
account for almost 97 percent of U.S. ex-
porters, but still represent only about 30
percent of the total export value of U.S.
goods.
While becoming a global exporter may
seem diffcult, there are many resources
available to help you learn more about the
potential opportunities for your products
and to guide you through the exportation
process. There is no doubt that it can be
challenging, but the rewards are nearly
endless for small businesses interested
in growing their brand and selling their
products to a wider audience.
The Kansas Department of Commerce
provides assistance to businesses that
are interested in exportation. The Inter-
national Trade Team is ready to provide
your business with customized counsel-
ing and technical assistance to grow into
new markets outside of the United States.
Consider exportation as a way to grow
your business beyond your local custom-
ers. For questions about international
trade, call 785-296-5298.
David Dillner
Abilene City Manager
Sports
8 Wednesday, February 19, 2014 www.abilene-rc.com
Sports
shorts:
Wiggins saves
No. 8 Kansas
LUBBOCK, Texas In the
epitome of crunch time,
Andrew Wiggins and Joel
Embiid seemingly swapped
roles. Trailing by one,
Wiggins came up with a
crucial block, sending the
Jayhawks back to their goal
where Embiid provided
the clutch basket. But as
No. 8 Kansas clung to a
64-63 win at Texas Tech
Tuesday night inside the
United Spirit Arena they
switched back.
Down to the last two
seconds before the upset,
Wiggins was Wiggins. He
saved a broken pass and
found the basket for the
game-winning layup. Kan-
sas picked up its 20th win
for the 25th-straight season
with just 1.7 seconds to
spare.
No. 8/8 Kansas (20-6,
11-2 Big 12) had already
wrapped up the home and
away season series with
four different conference
teams before squaring off
against Texas Tech (13-13,
5-8 Big 12) for the first
time in 2013-14. The wait
was worth it as the Tubby
Smith-led Red Raiders
showed off their much-
improved skillset, leading
all but five minutes of the
second half and forcing 13
lead changes against the
Jayhawks before the visit-
ing team sealed the win in
the last possible second,
disappointing a record-
setting student crowd.
Scores:
Basketball
Boys
Hays 68, Abilene 60
Rock Creek 77, Chapman
46
Rural Vista 56, Hartford
51
Solomon 46, Herington 15
Girls
Abilene 59, Hays 48
Rock Creek 45, Chapman
37
Rural Vista 33, Hartford
32
Herington 53, Solomon 38
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Barbieri, Funston lead
Cowgirls past Indians
By RON PRESTON
ron.preston@abilene-rc.com
HAYS The Abilene Cow-
girls were able to hold off the
charging Hays High Indians
59-48 in a non-conference
basketball game at Hays
Tuesday.
The Cowgirls led from
the start but had to contend
with the perimeter shoot-
ing of Hays. While Abilene
was able to work its offense
getting the ball inside to
Belle Barbieri or whoever
might be under the basket
the Indians were throwing
down threes to keep the
game close.
It was a good win, coach
Janelle Geist said. We let
them hang in it and that re-
ally wasnt the plan. We had
to make defensive adjust-
ments to keep them from
driving the ball and then they
began hitting threes and we
had to make adjustments to
that. It was kind of like chess
match.
Hays made eight three-
pointers in the game but the
Cowgirls defense adjusted to
the Indian attack and every
time the game got with two
or three points, Abilene an-
swered with a run of its own.
We made the adjustments
we needed, Geist said.
Then we made free throws
at the end of the game where
they needed to be made.
Barbieri had 22 points to
lead the Cowgirls and McK-
enzie Funston shot in 17.
The young Lady Indi-
ans have yet to win a game
this season but fought hard
against the Cowgirls. The
inexperience of the Indians
showed at times when they
committed multiple fouls
that sent the Cowgirls to the
free throw line.
They are super young,
Geist said. They were hit
hard by graduation. They
play hard. They defend well
and they do a good job at
what they do.
Abilene shot 23 of 32 from
the charity stripe. Barbieri
was eight of 13, Funston hit
six for six, Courtney Geist
hit fve of six and Taylor
Thompson and Jessica Hayes
connected on a pair each.
Throughout the game the
Cowgirls did what they
wanted on the offensive end,
and made the necessary ad-
justments to stop the Indians.
Abilene led 16-9 after the
frst period but only 26-23
at the break. The Cowgirls
used a strong third quarter
and spent a lot of time at the
free throw line in the fourth
to pull away from Hays.
The Cowgirls evened their
record at 8-8 and will travel
to Wamego Thursday before
hosting Clay Center Fri-
day. Both games are both
North Central Kansas league
games.
Its going to be a tough
week, Geist said. I sent
the varsity home right after
the game with instructions
to get something to eat and
drink and then to bed. Well
do the same thing Thursday
up at Wamego, as soon as
our game is over, well get
the girls on their way home
to get some rest before Fri-
days game.
Hopefully we come out
and play well at Wamego, it
will be tough, but we want
to play well and then do the
same Friday.
Summary:
AHS 16 10 14 19 - 59
HHS 9 14 10 15 - 48
Abilene (8-8) Geist 8,
Thompson 4, Anderes 2,
Barbieri 22, Funston 17,
Hayes 2, Taylor 4.
Hays (0-16) Schlaefi 7,
Wells 13, Klewenco 8, Rus-
sell 9, Dinkel 1, Schmeidler
10.
Hays outlasts Cowboys 68-60
By RON PRESTON
ron.preston@abilene-rc.com
HAYS The Abilene Cow-
boys ran up against one of
top teams in the state Tues-
day night and fell to the Hays
Indians 68-60 in a packed
gym.
Our kids played hard to-
night, coach Terry Taylor
said. We had a great effort.
Hays is 16-0 on the season
and ranked frst and second
in Class 5A in different polls.
They are one of the top
teams in 5A, Taylor said.
They are a very solid team.
They have perimeter shoot-
ing and a post man that is
very tough inside. They are
athletic, they can drive the
ball off the dribble and score
it. Its tough to defend that.
The Cowboys jumped out
to an early lead in the frst
quarter running off an 11-4
run with four minutes re-
maining in the period.
The Indians called time to
gather themselves and in the
fnal four minutes they went
on an 8-0 run and then a 6-2
run to take a 16-15 lead after
one.
They are solid. They trap
and when they drive the big
kid blocks so many shots it
is intimidating but I thought
our kids did a nice job early
in the game, Taylor said,
We were attacking the mid-
dle of their zone defense and
getting to the rim. They got
into foul trouble and they had
to switch to a man to man,
and that is something they
dont like to do. Even in the
frst half they went to man
defense.
The game went back and
forth throughout the second
quarter with the Indians tak-
ing a 33-31 advantage at the
break.
Keil Kelly got the Cow-
boys back in front with a pair
of free throws to begin the
second quarter but the Cow-
boys and the Indians would
trade baskets the next three
times up the court. While the
Cowboys were getting jump-
ers from Ryan Wilson, Eric
Harms and Kelly the Indians
knocked down three straight
three pointers to take a 25-21
lead early in the quarter.
The Indians extended the
lead out to six before Kelly
ended the quarter with a top-
of-the-key trey to pull the
Cowboys within two at quar-
ters end.
The Cowboys struggled in
the third, which allowed the
Indians to increase the lead to
fve 45-40.
We made some mental
mistakes in the third quarter
that we can correct, Taylor
said. We had some opportu-
nities to run some set plays
because of their foul trouble
but we missed some shots
inside.
Hays gained the momen-
tum early in the fnal period
and stretched the lead to as
many as 12 points before
Kelly scored 10 of his game-
high 24 points and Wilson
popped in a pair of threes to
draw the Cowboys within six
66-60 with 10 second left.
Hays connected on two free
throws as time expired and
captured its 16th victory 68-
60.
They are only averag-
ing about 60 points a game,
and we gave up 68, which I
am disappointed with, Tay-
lor said. But, on the other
hand, we scored 60 tonight
and I believe thats the frst
team all year to score 60 on
them. They have been giving
up only around 39 points per
game.
Following the non-con-
ference game the Cowboys
travel to Wamego Thursday
and then host Clay Center
Friday.
This kind of a game will
prepare us for a game against
Wamego, Clay Center or
Concordia, Taylor said.
However being on the road
with only one day off before
back-to-back games it is go-
ing to be a tough week. We
just need to have a couple of
league victories and it will be
a good week.
Summary:
AHS 15 16 9 20 - 60
HHS 16 17 12 23 - 68
Abilene (11-5) Hoek-
man 3, Kelly 24, Wilson
10, Patrick 12, Harms 6, J.
Goodwin 5.
Hays (16-0) Niernberger 3,
Nunnery 7, Riedel 6, Wind-
holz 12, Clark 14, Werth 22,
Parker 4.
Basketball roundup
Rock Creek
takes 2 from
Chapman
CHAPMAN The Chap-
man Fighting Irish playing
their second game in two days
fell to the Rock Creek Mus-
tangs 72-46 Tuesday night in
the Chapman District Gym.
The Mustangs jumped out
to 22-14 frst quarter lead and
ran over the Fighting Irish
from there.
Carson Becker led the Mus-
tangs with 22 points and Ryan
Schneider shot in 18.
Kade Stroud led the Irish
with 13 points
The story was pretty similar
in the girls game with Rock
Creek taking an early lead.
The Lady Irish did make a
strong charge at the Mustangs
in the second half to narrow
the lead. Rock Creek won 45-
37.
Jessie Heiman and Milea
Anderson led the Irish with
12 points each.
The Irish will play at Marys-
ville Friday.
Boys summary:
RC 22 18 26 6 - 72
Ch 14 11 9 12 - 46
Rock Creek Beard 11,
Goodmiller 9, Schneider 18,
Nider 4, Rogge 2, Becker 22,
Buss 2, Garcia 2.
Chapman (2-15) Winters
6, Sims 3, Blixt 8, Blatt 3,
Meuli 2, Stroud 13, Lexow 3,
Canaday 6, Hettenbach 2.
Girls summary:
RC 7 13 6 19 - 45
CHS 2 6 9 20 - 37
Rock Creek Altenhofen 9,
Boltz 6, Henry 4, Hammett 2,
Snapp 2, Johnston 3, Weers
1, Feldkamp 18.
Chapman (5-12) Lovett 2,
Hurford 6, Sutter 2, Wise 2,
Langvardt 1, Anderson 12,
Heiman 12.
Rural Vista
tops Hartford
WHITE CITY The Rural
Vista Heat used a strong sec-
ond half effort to rally from
18 points down to defeat the
Hartford Jaguars 56-51 in a
basketball game played at
White City Tuesday.
A great team win, coach
Joel Kahnt said. Coming
back from that defcit is the
mark of a true team.
Sam Morgan scored 32
points for the Heat.
Hartford took the lead early
in the game and raced to a
34 to 23 half-time lead. The
Heat gathered themselves and
caged the Jaguars in the sec-
ond half 33-17 to secure the
six-point win.
Our defense is what
changed the game, Kahnt
said. We were not very good
in the frst half, but our de-
fense in the second half was
fantastic. We took care of the
ball and made plays down the
stretch.
Sam carried us offensively
and Adam Atkins was great
on the defensive end. I could
not be more proud of a group
of young men.
In the girls game, the Heat
defeated the Jaguars 33-32
in a game the Heat led all the
way and had to hold off Hart-
ford at the very end.
Rural Vista had a halftime
lead 22-11 but faltered in the
third quarter to only score
three points to let Hartford
inch closer in the game.
We got off to a good start
by hitting some shots and
playing stingy defense and
then we kind of hit a brick
wall and held on, coach
John Keating said. We had a
tough time fnding the bucket
throughout the game and for-
tunately made just enough
shots to capture the win.
The Heat held off a fourth
quarter charge from the Jag-
uars to secure the one-point
win.
Paula Young hit some big
threes in the frst half and in
the second half after Hart-
fords frantic comeback en-
abled them to take a slim lead,
Keating said. Ace (Alexis
Campuzano) was able to get
the big bucket allowing us to
seal the win. The girls showed
a lot of courage and character
in keeping their composure
when the game was on the
line. It was a nice win.
Boys summary:
Hartford 20 14 9 8 - 51
RV 11 12 15 18 - 56
Hartford Ikered 16, Esch 9,
Fowler 18, Metcalfe 1, Rosen-
quist 3, Senn 4,
Rural Vista (14-3) Trace
Hostetter 5, A. Adkins 6, E.
Blythe 5, Egger 8, Morgan
32.
Girls summary:
Hartford 6 5 8 13 - 32
RV 12 10 3 8 - 33
Hartford S. Wilson 8,
Hinesley 5, Prather 8, De-
Mars 6, D. Wilson 2, Stuck 3.
Rural Vista (11-6) Ink 6,
Young 9, Campuzano 8,
Kahnt 5, Ash 4, Aumiller 1.
Herington,
Solomon split
SOLOMON The Solomon
Gorillas defeated the Hering-
ton Railers 46-15 Tuesday at
Solomon.
Jordan Rangel led the Goril-
las with 19 points as they took
an early lead in the game and
led 20-5 at the break.
Solomon will play at Otis-
Bison on Friday.
The Herington girls defeat-
ed the Lady Gorillas 53-38.
Jordyn Schraeder led the
Lady Railers with 16 points
and Sarah Leitz added 13.
Jaime Meaghers 13 points
led the Lady Gorillas.
Herington jumped out to
12-6 frst quarter lead that
led to 25-16 advantage at the
break. Solomon struggled in
the third quarter and Hering-
ton increased its lead to 40-22
at the end of three.
Boys summary:
HHS 4 1 6 4 - 15
SHS 10 10 18 8 - 46
Herington Granzow 4, Am-
mann 4, Becker 5, Lynn 2.
Solomon (10-7) Meagher 3,
Shirack 4, Homman 7, Fowles
2, DeMars 6, Rangel 19,
Webb 2, Garrett 3.
Girls summary:
HHS 12 13 15 13 - 53
SHS 6 10 6 16 - 38
Herington (4-10) Kremeier
7, Kickhaefer 3, Heitfield
3, Martin 8, Schneider 16,
Knopp 3, Leitz 13.
Solomon (5-12) Cross 2,
Aylward 2, Ritter 8, Ballue
9, Clark 2, Meagher 13, Hom-
man 2.
Ron Preston Refector-Chronicle
Nichole Taylor (33) and McKenzie Funston (25) trap the Lady Indians on an in bounds play in
the Cowgirls 59-48 victory Tuesday in Hays.