Anda di halaman 1dari 2

Physics 211 Due: Friday, 03/01/02

Problem Set 6

Section: ________ Name: ______________________

Please submit your homework on this sheet. If you need more space than is available, please attach additional sheets of paper. Note that this assignment includes questions and problems from chapters 5, 6, and 7. 1. Solve problem 37 in Chapter 5 of Serway/Beichner. (Part c is optional and will not be graded for credit.) (a) (b) (c) [optional]

See Solutions Manual and Study Guide (on reserve in library)


2. Solve problem 67 in Chapter 5 of Serway/Beichner. (a)

For the free-body diagrams (with somewhat abbreviated labeling) see page A.44 of the textbook. Note that there are two frictional forces drawn on the upper (5-kg) block. One is kinetic friction (by the table or floor); the other, static friction (by the upper block).
(b)

Considering the vertical forces first, the upward normal force on the lower block by the table is found to be about 70 N. The (kinetic) frictional force on the lower block by the table is therefore about N = 14 N. Given an acceleration of 3 m/s2, the net force on the upper block must be ma = 6 N; that on the lower block, 15 N. The former is equal to the magnitude of the static frictional forces between the two blocks (since the upper block has no other horizontal forces acting on it). The horizontal forces on the lower block are thus two forces to the left of magnitude 6 N and 14 N, and an unknown force to the right (F). All three must add vectorially to result in a net force of 15 N to the right. The force F (which could be normal or tension) therefore has a magnitude of about 35 N.
(c)

The static frictional force fstat on the upper block must be equal to the net force on the upper block (i.e., 6 N). Since the normal force between the two blocks is about 20 N and fstat statN, the coefficient of static friction must be at least fstat/N = 0.3.

Physics 211

Syracuse University

Spring 2002

3. Read Conceptual Example 6.1 on page 153 of Serway/Beichner. Then consider the following statement about the airplane problem on last Fridays worksheet. (Question 3 on Problem Solving Activity 6)
Since the airplane is moving in a horizontal circle, it has a centripetal acceleration. Therefore, it must also have a centripetal force directed towards the center of the circle. We should have included this centripetal force in our free-body diagram, in addition to the two other forces that we have drawn.

Explain what is incorrect about the statement.

To state that there is a centripetal force is another way of saying that there is a net force that is directed towards the center of a circular path on which the object moves. This net force is found by summing all the forces exerted on the object. (In the case of the airplane, the horizontal component of the lift accounts for the net force and the vertical component cancels the weight force.) Note that all the forces in the free-body diagram must be exerted on something by something. If we cant identify the two objects that interact, there is no force.
4. Solve problem 9 in Chapter 6 of Serway/Beichner. Note that the mass of the coin is not given. Try to solve the problem without knowing the mass of the coin, or assume a value for the mass of the coin and then explain (or show by example) that the answer does not depend on it. (a) (b)

See Solutions Manual and Study Guide (on reserve in library)


5. Answer question 4 in Chapter 7 of Serway/Beichner. (A brief explanation is sufficient.)

The kinetic energy is given by 1/2 m v2. Since the speed (or velocity) is squared and the mass is always positive, the kinetic energy of an object is always equal to or greater than zero.
6. Answer question 5 in Chapter 7 of Serway/Beichner. (a)

Since the speed is squared in the expression for kinetic energy, doubling the speed will result in four times the kinetic energy for the same object.
(b)

By the work kinetic energy theorem the net work done on a particle is equal to its change in kinetic energy. If the net work done on a particle during a certain time interval is zero, nothing can be said about the value of the kinetic energy or the speed at a single instant. However, it can be said that the change in kinetic energy during the interval must be zero. That is, the speed did not change.

Physics 211

Syracuse University

Spring 2002