Anda di halaman 1dari 24

2010-2011

Proposed by :

University year: 2011 / 2012

Plan
Introduction 1. Subject design 2. Doing research 3. Selecting information 4. Make an outline 5. Writing draw 6. Prepare the final copy Conclusion

Introduction

1. Subject design
STANDARDS AND RESOURCES OF THE INSTITUTION
a)What are the rules which, in my institution, define the implementation of a memory? b) In what areas my institution does offer resources both accessible and of good quality?

TIME AND THE MEANS TO CHOOSE

1. Subject design

The subject is of interest to the author. Sources must be accessible.

Sources must be treatable.

2. Doing research
To guide the research we should ask ourselves some questions:
What do I have to search? Where to find what Im looking for? With which I could work to begin? and remind to prepare a preliminary bibliography.

2. Doing research
Pay attention !!

limit your research time Academic writing requires academic quality resources Do not expect one, two, or even three sources to have all the information you need Perhaps there is one source for your work An academic quality sources must be well documented and include a reference list. Thinking Too Narrowly About the Topic. Always be a skeptic! Do not get into the habit of searching using the same words!

3. Selecting information

After locating potentially useful material, there are several ways to quickly determine whether or not information is useful for your project.

3. Selecting information
Reasons

to include information:

contains facts/opinions that you need contains illustrations or data you need contains an overview to establish the context of your paper was written by a well known authority or expert contains a point of view that illustrates something you are trying to establish may have a clear explanation of something

3. Selecting information

Reasons to exclude information:

it may be from a scholarly journal but be too difficult for you to understand it may be out of date it may not have the point of view you are researching it may not contain any new information.

4. Make an outline

An outline is an abbreviated picture of the parts of your project and the order in which they will come. You can think of it as a "road map" of your journey toward making a final product.

4. Make an outline
It helps you to: stay on course and not get off-track when you put your final product together. see if you have enough or too much material to support your thesis statement. figure out the order in which your subtopics will appear in your final product.

4. Make an outline
An outline should include : An introduction that should state the subject of your paper and the areas you will focus on. The main body which should be divided into main topics.
Each main topic should be divided into subtopics which support it. You should list key points you want to cover for each subtopic. You may have further details for the key points.

A conclusion should briefly sum up your main topic.

5. Writing draw
Write
Make

the first Draft

your choices regarding the content: What you want to say language: How you want to say it structure: How your paper will flow from one idea to the next Use your spell check to catch spelling, grammatical, and syntax errors

5. Writing draw
Revise

your outline and draft

Read your paper for any content errors. Double check the facts and figures. Arrange and rearrange ideas to follow your outline. Reorganize your outline if necessary, but always keep the purpose of your paper and your readers in mind.

5. Writing draw
CHECKLIST ONE:

1. Is my thesis statement concise and clear? 2. Did I follow my outline? Did I miss anything? 3. Are my arguments presented in a logical sequence? 4. Are all sources properly cited to ensure that I am not plagiarizing? 5. Have I proved my thesis with strong supporting arguments? 6. Have I made my intentions and points clear?

5. Writing draw
CHECKLIST ONE: 1. Did I begin each paragraph with a proper topic sentence? 2. Have I supported my arguments with documented proof or examples? 3. Any run-on or unfinished sentences? 4. Any unnecessary or repetitious words? 5. Varying lengths of sentences? 6. Does one paragraph or idea flow smoothly into the next? 7. Any spelling or grammatical errors? 8. Quotes accurate in source, spelling, and punctuation? 9. Are all my citations accurate and in correct format?

6. Writing the final copy


Step One: Revise as you type your rough draft
First,

work on developing body paragraphs more fully by adding your own ideas and more information from note cards you did not use on the rough draft. Second, check your paragraphs for use of research information.

6. Writing the final copy


Step One: Revise as you type your rough draft
Third,

add missing lead-ins and citations; correct errors on lead-ins and citation format. Fourth, make corrections in your paragraphs. Fifth, work on improving style.

6. Writing the final copy


Step Two: Rewrite Starting with your thesis and outline page, revise your rough copy to make a final draft. Indent clearly at the beginning of each paragraph.

6. Writing the final copy


Step Two: Rewrite Write each paragraph as a complete unit, with no gaps at the ends of sentences Beginning with the introductory paragraph, write each paragraph one after the other. Dont throw away your rough

6. Writing the final copy


Step Three: Proofread
First, ask someone to help you check for basic errors in spelling Second, prepare a cover page. This page should have a title and your name. third, turn in your finished paper to your teacher.

Conclusion

Thank you for your attention