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University of Plymouth

University of Plymouth Colleges Faculty

City College Plymouth

FdSc Tourism

STUDENT HANDBOOK

2009-10

Please note:
This handbook is for general guidance only. Content may be subject to change.

This document is available in large print and


electronic format. Please contact your
Programme Manager
Contents

Page
1. Introduction 1

2. Programme Management 1

2.1 Who’s Who 1


2.2 Contact Details 2

3. Studying at University Level 3

3.1 General Information 3


3.2 Your Approach to Studying 4
3.3 Student-centred Learning 4
3.4 Academic Teaching and Support 7
3.5 Assessment 8
3.6 Other Factors in your Learning Environment 10

4. About the Programme

4.1 Background to the Development of your Foundation Degree 14


4.2 Work-based Learning and Employability 14
4.3 Careers Education, Information and Guidance 16
4.4 Programme Content: General Expectations 16
4.5 Stage1 and Stage 2 Modules 19
4.6 Indicative Programme Assessment Schedule 19
4.7 Progression Opportunities 19

5. General College Information and Guidance 19

6. Programme Specification 20

7. UPC – The Student Portal 33

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1 Introduction

May we begin by warmly welcoming you to the Foundation Degree in Tourism. The
College is delighted that you have chosen to study with us. We are sure you are
going to have a great time here and will get a great deal from the programme.

This Student Handbook is designed specifically for the Foundation Degree you are
studying, the FdSc in Tourism. In it you will find information about:

• Who will be teaching and providing support to you

• What you will be studying

• What particular opportunities are available for:


• Work-based learning
• Professional accreditation (if relevant)
• The development of academic and employability skills
• Progression onto further study – especially honours degree routes

1 Programme Management

1.1 Who’s Who

Student support in the College is based on the ground floor in the ‘student
services’ department. You can also contact them by calling them on 01752
305803, or e-mail studentservices@cityplym.ac.uk. The Higher Education
Team (located in room K106 of the HE Centre on the first floor of the Kings
Road campus) are also available to provide support and respond to a range
of queries and/or concerns related to your time as a higher education
student.

Key staff helping you through the challenges of study at this level include:
the Programme Manager for your Foundation Degree. As part of the
Programme Management Group, s/he is responsible for the effective delivery
and promotion of the programme and providing, as required, specialist
advice to students.

Name Role Tel Fax Email


Win Programm 305332 wscutt@cityplym.ac.u
Scutt e Manager k

Other vital cogs are the Module Leaders who you can contact with queries
relating directly to their module(s).

Name Modules Tel Email


Win Scutt Tourism Studies; 305332 wscutt@cityplym.ac.uk
Work Based
Learning;

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Action Research;
Countryside and
Heritage;
Guiding through
Heritage
Linda Jordan Business Finance 305719 ljordan@cityplym.ac.uk
Tam Carson Marketing 305719 tcarson@cityplym.ac.uk
Peter Mills Business 305338 pmills@cityplym.ac.uk
Environment
Tony Hewling Personal and 305383 thewling@cityplym.ac.uk
Professional
Development
Management
Information Systems
Sarah Ogorek Travel Agency 305346 sogorek@cityplym.ac.uk
Management
Sue World Wide Travel 305346 sabercrombie@cityplym.
Abercrombie Destinations; ac.uk
Tourism Planning
and Management;
Tour Operations
Management
Demelza Research Skills 305867 dthackeray@cityplym.ac.
Thackeray uk
Chris Stafford Managing People 305332 cstafford@cityplym.ac.uk
Chloe Customer 305858 cmerriman@cityplym.ac.
Merriman Relationship uk
Management

You will also have a Personal Tutor throughout your studies – for further
details see section 3.6.5

1.2 Contact Details

1.2.1 Keeping in Contact

Staff communicate information to students in many ways:

• Email
• University of Plymouth Student Portal
• College intranet (Moodle)
• Higher Education notice board in the HE Suite (1st floor, Kings
Road)
• Google Calendar

It is in your interest to check all of these on a regular basis to


ensure you have not missed important messages.

Occasionally, you may need to see a member of academic staff. In


the first instance please try to email or telephone the relevant member

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of staff. If this isn’t possible please go to the HE Reception, 1st floor,
Kings Road.

1.1.1 Staff Details

As your Foundation degree is designed as a broad programme of


study which develops a wide range of skills, knowledge and
understanding, few, if any, staff teach exclusively to your programme.
Indeed, you will be taught by staff from different subject areas within
your College such as:

• Business
• Professional Studies
• Public Services
• Performing Arts

1 Studying at University Level

University level education (or Higher Education, as it is often referred to) may be
very different from your previous experiences of school, college or the workplace.
This section describes some of the key features of your new learning environment.
General descriptions of expectations can be found at section 4.4

1.1 General Information


1.2
The Academic Year is spread over three terms:

Autumn term 21 September 2009 – 18 December 2009


Spring term 4 January 2010 – 1 April 2010
Summer term 19 April 2010– 28 May 2010

Full-time:
Each module is taught over either one or two semesters. Semester 1 runs
from 21 September 2009 until 29 January 2010. Semester 2 runs from 1
February 2010 until 28 May 2010.

During your induction you will receive your timetable detailing when classes
take place for your programme. Classes may be timetabled anytime on
Mondays to Fridays between 9.00 and 18.00.

Your programme is made up of modules, which are simply units of study.


Modules are normally worth 20 credits. Your Foundation Degree consists of
160 Level 4 credits and 120 Level 5 credits.

You will hear reference being made to your programme of study and your
programme. These terms are interchangeable.

Please see Section 6 of this document for your Programme Structure, which
will outline the modules you will be studying, and whether they are core or
optional.

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Please note that an optional module may occasionally not be able to run
owing to insufficient numbers of students.

On the following page there are some key messages to you as a new
student. The rest of this section gives a detailed explanation of what to
expect and where you can find help as you begin your studies.

3.2 Your Approach to Studying

Probably the most significant difference between university level study and
secondary education is the amount of personal responsibility you have. This
has implications for how you approach your studies.

You will receive some ‘traditional teaching’ – when lecturers tell you what
you ‘need to know’ – but you will have to take responsibility for acquiring
all the required knowledge.

If you read nothing else in this section, please read this:

Key Messages to become a Successful Student

You must take responsibility for your own studies. We will


give you as much help and support as we can but ultimately
your success (or failure) is down to you.

Plan your time carefully. Write a personal timetable as soon


as you can.

Attend all lectures and tutorials and take notes.

Do not miss deadlines.

Read extensively around your subject. Just being familiar


with the set text books is unlikely to be enough to pass.

Seek help, if you need it, as soon as possible. If you need


specific help with your studies, speak to your lecturer or tutor or
make a personal appointment to see them. Even if your
problem has nothing to do with your programme, it may have
an effect on your ability to study. Let someone at the College
know – ignoring problems will only make things worse later on.

At this level of study there will be an expectation that you are responsible
and capable of acting on your own initiative.

This new freedom can be exciting and stimulating but it can also be worrying
or even frightening at times. You may be used to a learning or workplace
environment with more fixed hours and routine activities, so your weekly
timetable may not appear to be particularly full. For example, the contact
time that you have with lecturers will be a fraction of the hours that you
should expect to spend on the module as a whole. As an indication, the
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average amount of ‘total student effort’ expected for a 20 credit module will
be around 200 hours, but you may only be timetabled for 60 hours. You
must, therefore, learn to use your time constructively.

Your most valuable learning will be done in your own time and in your
own way.

3.3 Student-centred Learning

3.3.1 Reading

You will not complete your programme successfully if you do not


read regularly and in-depth. You will be given reading lists for each
module. You should purchase at least one recommended text for
each module. Since books are expensive, however, it may be a good
idea to pool resources by sharing with friends in a study group.

Please note that you may only be able to borrow basic texts from the
library on a short-term basis. Demand for these texts may be very
high at certain times in the year, so do not rely on them being
available.

You are strongly recommended to follow current issues relevant to


your programme in the quality press, for example, The Times,
Independent, Guardian and Telegraph. You should also make use of
subject-related journals held in the library.

Reading texts for higher education demands note-taking as well as


reading skills, as with lectures (see section 3.4.1), keep careful notes
from your reading.

To help you in your studies the College has libraries, study areas and
production facilities. At the Kings Road site there is a main library and
a smaller specialist library for those studying construction and marine
engineering. At the Goschen site there is a main library and two
further study areas. Altogether there are some 55,000 books, over
300 current journals and e-resources including electronic copies of
key textbook titles. There are 219 computers for individual study, all
with access to the internet, to the Microsoft office suite and to
specialist programs, as well as linking you to the e-resources at the
College and at the university. There is a silent study room at the
Goschen Centre and a seminar room at Kings Road, where there is
also an IT suite used exclusively by Higher Education students.

The main libraries are open for 47 hours each per term-time week and
30 hours between them in vacations. There are 176 study places at
group tables and individual study carrels and many of these have wi-fi
access.

When you start your course you will have an induction into the
facilities and resources which will be linked to the subjects you study.
There is a subject librarian specialising in each area who works with
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your lecturers to provide the materials you need. If you want particular
titles added to stock please hand your recommendations in at a
service point. There are also Study Support Assistants who will help
you with the computers and the range of software, including Web 2.0
resources.

The College also provides printing, copying and finishing facilities, at


self-service digital copiers and through the Central Printroom at Kings
Road. The Printroom also has audio-visual equipment which can be
lent to students and support is available to help you to make podcasts
and films. Throughout your studies all the staff will be pleased to help
you if you have any queries or need assistance.

As a University of Plymouth student, you have full access to the


University Portal, and through it to the University library and
information resources. You will be given induction to help you to
access this valuable source of information and there is a guide
appended to the end of this handbook to help.

3.3.2 Private Study

Your private study time is likely to be taken up by different tasks for


each module, by preparing for tutorials or undertaking some reading
of a programme text or library research. In addition, private study time
provides students with the opportunity to ensure they have understood
the subject, reflecting on any feedback on assessed work and building
up a good set of notes for revision.

3.3.3 Study Groups

In all our programmes, the College encourages students to learn skills


to enable them to work as groups and teams. These are not merely
useful during your programme. In any employment context you will
find such skills and experiences invaluable. Sometimes you will find
you are assessed on a piece of written work or presentation
completed as a group. Many students benefit significantly from
working collaboratively in study groups, to check their understanding
of difficult issues or concepts and to revise.

3.3.4 Work-Based Learning

Work-based, or professional practice, in all its aspects is fundamental


to all foundation degrees. College based learning will inform work-
based activity and work-based learning will be vital in contributing to
your understandings of theory and your success in assessment tasks.
You should be sure to keep careful records of significant experiences
in your work-placements so that you can refer to them with confidence
in discussions and assignments.

3.4 Academic Teaching and Support

3.4.1 Lectures
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Most modules have timetabled lectures. While lecturing styles may
vary, you will need to develop note-taking skills and other techniques
to help you get the most out of a lecture.

You should develop a style of note-taking that suits you. There is no


‘right method’ but certain general principles are useful:

• Your notes need to be an accurate record of the key points


• Notes should be neat and tidy and in such a form that they can be
supplemented easily
• Notes should be presented in a logical fashion and deal with the
essentials
• Make a note of questions or doubts and leave space to insert
solutions later
• Keep a clear record of references – these will need following up

In some lectures, you will be given handouts of diagrams, key


concepts or the material used to deliver the lecture in the form of
presentation slides. These are often available for reference
electronically. Reading handouts or getting copies of slides is
not a substitute for attending the lecture. You may miss vital
verbal information.

Lecturers will not give you all the information on a topic but provide a
structure from which you can work to develop your knowledge and
ideas. While a lecture introduces important concepts, you will need to
develop your understanding of these concepts by further reading,
research, discussion and working through problems in tutorials.

3.2.1 Seminars/Tutorials/Workshops

These sessions are meetings of small groups of students. Here you


will have a chance to demonstrate what you have learnt and
understood and to clarify areas you are not so sure about. Normally
you will be assigned to a group and you will have to attend a specific
timetabled slot.

A lecturer will manage the session, although the focus is on students’


contributions. Sometimes you will be given assignments beforehand,
so you can prepare materials or you might be asked to lead the
tutorial in an informal way, or give a formal presentation.

Seminars, tutorials and workshops are a crucial part of the learning


process, as you have the opportunity to analyse problems and discuss
issues in depth. You should come to these sessions prepared to
participate fully. Although you may be shy at first, you will find that as
the group gets to know each other and develop more confidence,
these discussions become one of the most valuable parts of your
learning.

3.2.2 Practicals
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N/A

3.2.3 Other Academic Support

Some modules may have relatively little formally timetabled teaching.


This is part of a deliberate strategy to help you develop and manage
your own learning. Where this is the case, there will be other
academic support such as:

• Feedback on assessed work – to help you develop your


knowledge, understanding and skills through undertaking
assessments.
• Tutorials by appointment. Teaching staff normally have ‘office
hours’ when you can book an appointment to see them.
• Information and support on Moodle
• Student Portal and email. Some staff use these to initiate
discussions and set up learning support groups for their modules.
• Learning packs. Some modules use learning packs for students to
work through in their own time. These may involve exercises to
help you develop your understanding of the materials.

3.2 Assessment

3.5.1 Your performance in a module will be assessed during the academic


year, normally through a combination of coursework and end of year
examinations. You must pass the assessments in order to be credited
with that module for your Foundation Degree. In addition, some
modules may have to be passed as pre-requisites for others taken
later in your programme. Every assessment is important.

The method of assessment varies between modules and your


lecturers will advise you of the method(s) to be used. This reflects the
need to develop a range of different knowledge, understanding and
skills.

During your programme you may experience some, or all, of the


following types of assessment:

• Coursework essay questions


• Coursework group reports
• Coursework case study problems
• Group presentations
• Small group assessed discussions
• Practicals
• Formal examinations
• In-class tests

In all cases these are chosen and designed to assess your


achievement of the particular learning outcomes for the module. You
will be given Assessment Criteria which are used to judge the extent
of your achievement.
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Please note that ALL assessment marks and results are provisional
until confirmed by the Subject Assessment Panel and verified by the
Award Assessment Board. If you do well enough, i.e. you average a
mark of over 70% over all your modules at the end of your
programme, then you will qualify for the award of a foundation degree
with distinction.

3.5.2 Procedures for dealing with late submissions and extenuating


circumstances

Your programme operates under University of Plymouth Academic


Regulations and specifically the regulations for Foundation Degrees.
To view regulations, go to http://student.plymouth.ac.uk/

3.5.3 Academic Offences

Issues of plagiarism and any form of academic dishonesty are treated


very seriously. They could result in you failing a module or even
having to leave your programme. Your study skills module will make
clear to you how these offences can occur. If you are in any doubt
about citing references, or using any other form of intellectual
property, most particularly from web based material, then please
consult your tutor.
Please see http://student.plymouth.ac.uk/ for more information

Student Handbook Page 11 of 75


3.2 Other Factors in your Learning Environment

In addition to teaching, academic support and private study there are often
factors which influence your learning environment. If you are aware of these,
you will be able to manage your studies more effectively.

3.2.1 Effective Learning

Learning refers not simply to the sum total of facts and information
you can recall at a given moment. It also relates to how you use and
apply information; and how you find, store and retrieve it. One of your
aims as a student should be to become a more effective learner.

The quality of your learning will depend on these starting points:

• Your attitudes, attendance, aims and goals


• Your dedication
• Your aptitude for the subject
• Your intelligence
• Your willingness and ability to learn
• Your use of resources – tutors, books, materials, the work
experiences built into the programme, etc – and time – your
timetabled lectures and tutorials as well as private study

To assess how well you are learning, you should frequently check
your progress. One method is to keep in touch with your tutors and
your fellow students; another is ensuring you are well organised and
up-to-date with deadlines. If at any time you experience doubt or
problems with your studies, you must take quick action to resolve
them. Do not be afraid to ask for help from academic staff.

3.2.1 Time Management

Good time management lies at the root of effective learning. You will
need to plan the use of your time carefully. You will have the
demands of your programme, learning in lectures and tutorials,
working on assessments and completing your private study to
consider.

A personal timetable can help you in assessing all your priorities:


paid work, social and family commitments, as well as your studies.
You need to be honest and realistic if you are to reach manageable
goals – do not try to achieve the impossible!

3.2.2 Working Hours and Effort

In planning your time, you will have to think realistically about the
number of hours that you need to work to be a successful student. If
you are studying full-time, we would expect that your lectures, other
timetabled sessions and private study taken together will amount to a
working week of around 37 hours, or 200 hours for each 20 credit
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module. The amount of study effort required, however, varies from
student to student. This depends on factors such as your reading
speed and ability to absorb information, your skills in planning and
writing assignments, etc. As you progress, you will discover your
strengths and weaknesses and identify which areas you need to
spend more time on.

3.2.3 Attendance

As you are responsible for your own learning, you have to take
responsibility for attending timetabled sessions. In some modules if
you do not attend consistently you may risk losing marks, either
directly or by missing an assessed presentation or group activity. You
will be expected to be available for every week of your college terms.
Please ensure that holidays are only arranged outside of term and
assessment commitments.

Students who do not attend run a very high risk of failure.

3.2.4 Your Personal Tutor

During induction, you will be allocated a Personal Tutor. Personal


Tutors are there to offer you academic and personal advice
throughout your time at the College. We have, however, found that
Personal Tutors are particularly important for students in their first
year, helping them to manage the transition from school or the
workplace to university-style life. Personal tutors also assist with
helping you to engage with important aspects of preparation for your
career and profiling your progress through the programme.

If you cannot find your Personal Tutor and need to speak to


someone urgently, ask at the HE Office.

3.2.5 Coping with Stress

Stress can be a serious problem, particularly in your first year when


you may be adjusting to a new environment, arranging
accommodation, managing your finances, living away from home and
balancing your time between study and family/work commitments.
There is, however, plenty of help available and you are encouraged to
make use of support services, such as the College Counselling
Service. Please see the details of the Counselling Service on the
Student Services section of Moodle for more information..

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3.2.6 Learning Skills

To support your transition to University level study there are a range


of different resources available. As part of your induction into Higher
Education study at City College Plymouth you will be provided with a
details of a number of useful electronic learning resources to help you
with your studies.

These include a number of study guides covering areas such as:

• Starting out in Higher Education


• Organisational skills
• Learning from Lectures and Seminars
• Effective Reading
• Note taking techniques
• Academic Writing
• Revision and Examination Techniques
• Giving Presentations

These documents will also be available in hardcopy from the Higher


Education office in K106.

If you would like further support or advice with regards to Learning


Skills please contact your tutor.

3.2.1 Student liaison, evaluation, representation and feedback

• Module staff – when you have questions or need support


associated with a module, your first move should ALWAYS be to
contact the module leader or a member of the teaching team
responsible for the particular module with which you have an
issue. This can be done in person, by ‘phone, or by email. Please
do this as soon as possible so you don’t get left behind.

• Learning Resources – if you feel that the resources you can


reasonably expect are not available – be they online, library,
physical materials etc – then report the problem as soon as
possible to the appropriate member of the academic or support
staff. If you feel the response is not adequate, contact your
Programme Manager and your student representative so that the
issue can be addressed in the Programme Committee or Student
Representative Meeting.

• Student Representatives – each programme’s cohort of students


should have one or more representatives – chosen by their fellow
students – to sit on the Programme Committee. Student
representatives are a VITAL conduit, linking staff and students so
that issues of quality of provision affecting students can be
promptly and appropriately addressed. In addition, representatives
provide feedback to the programme’s staff on innovations and can
Student Handbook Page 14 of 75
assist the programme team to develop the curriculum to meet
student needs. Students are also represented on the University of
Plymouth Colleges (UPC) Joint Board of Studies which is
responsible for all the University of Plymouth programmes
delivered at your college. Your college will have a person who
liaises with the University of Plymouth Student Union who can
advise on student representation.

• Student Perception Questionnaire (SPQ) and National Student


Survey (NSS) – the University will ask you to complete an annual
questionnaire (SPQ) specifically tailored to the needs of students
in partner colleges. You will also be asked to participate in the
National Student Survey (NSS) at the end of your programme.
Both of these provide valuable information to enable us to improve
your programme and learning experience.

3.2.1 Suggested reading for new students

• Bedford, D. and Wilson, E. (2006) Study Skills for Foundation


Degrees. Brighton: David Fulton Publishers

• Bowden, J. (2008) Writing a Report. 8th edition. Oxford: How to Books

• Burns, T. and Sinfield, S. (2008) Essential Study Skills: the Complete


Guide to Success at University. Sage Study Skills Series. London:
Sage

• Cottrell, S (2005) Critical Thinking Skills; Developing Effective


Analysis and Argument. Palgrave Study Guides. Basingstoke:
Palgrave

• Cottrell, S. (2003) Skills for Success: the Personal Development


Planning Handbook. Palgrave Study Guides. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

• Cottrell, S. (2008) The Study Skills Handbook. 3rd edition, Palgrave


Sudy Guides. Basingstoke: Palgrave

• Drew, S and Bingham, R (2004) The Student Skills Guide. 2nd edition.
Aldershot: Gower

• Greetham, B. (2008) How to Write Better Essays. Palgrave Study


Guides. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

• Murray, N (2008) Writing Up Your University Assignments and


Research Projects; a Practical Handbook. Maidenhead: Open
University Press

• Pears, R and Shields, G (2008) Cite Them Right: the Essential Guide
to Referencing and Plagiarism. 7th edition. Newcastle upon Tyne: Pear
Tree Books

Student Handbook Page 15 of 75


3 About the Programme

4.1 Background to the Development of your Foundation Degree

• A compulsory work-related learning experience has been built into all


Foundation Degree programmes.
• Studies will be supported by visits to tourism organisations and facilities

4.1 Work-based Learning and Employability

Work-based learning, in its various forms, is one of the major defining


characteristics of your Foundation degree. It plays a central role in enabling
you to apply academic study to workplace environments and problems. In its
turn, your programme of study at Level 5 should enable you to integrate
knowledge and skills developed in work-based learning into your project
work and study of taught modules. Every University of Plymouth foundation
degree has a 20 credit work place learning module that is assessed at level 4
whenever it takes place in the programme.

An employable graduate is one who is able to meet the requirements of


employers and fulfil their career aspirations at graduate level. They will be
able to apply the skills, knowledge and personal qualities developed during
their programme of study in the workplace and other contexts. An
employable graduate will need to be able to:

a. demonstrate and apply graduate attributes and skills;

b. demonstrate and apply career management skills: preparing


effectively for the recruitment and selection process, based on an
understanding of their needs and career opportunities;

c. demonstrate and apply lifelong learning skills: reflecting critically on


their academic, personal and professional development, identifying
and articulating their achievements and planning for the future;

d. demonstrate business and organisational awareness: understand


changing working practices, including self-employment, with particular
reference to the professions and sectors relating to their programme
of study;

e. demonstrate an international outlook: understanding the attributes and


breadth of outlook appropriate for working in a global economy.

Your programme has been designed to put all this in perspective, and give
you the opportunities to develop the requisite skills. Work relatedness is
integral to the modules, and many specifically offer you the opportunity to
view the world of work, even if you are studying full time. Your programme
specification details the knowledge skills and understanding will be able to
that you will have acquired should you succeed in passing the course. Your
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personal tutor will help you to complete a Professional Development Profile
to evidence this.

Skills Plus and Professional Development

For the purposes of this Handbook, Professional Development Planning


(PDP) is defined as:

“a structured and supported process undertaken by an individual to


reflect upon their own learning, performance and/or achievement
and to plan for their educational and career development”
(QAA, 2002, Policy Statement on a Progress File for Higher
Education)

We have introduced the Professional Development Planning (PDP) to aid


your academic and personal development. This is in conjunction with the
University of Plymouth and it is highly recommended that you use this
resource (see www.staff.plymouth.ac.uk/pdp/intranet.htm )
In the early stages of your programme you will be introduced to the concept
of PDP, and encouraged to develop your own profile record through a range
of experiences. A number of modules lend themselves through their
assessment mode to building a PDP. In addition, your personal tutor will
review your PDP on a regular basis and support the process.
The level of engagement and what you get out of your period of higher
education is your choice. You have responsibility for your own learning.
Taking stock of your position and setting goals in all areas of your life is a
crucial step. But in order to maximise your potential you must be clear about
how you can transfer the skills and knowledge you have acquired into other
situations. You must learn to be able to communicate your unique skills and
abilities.
The UoP online guide to Professional Development Planning is designed to
help you do just that and to look strategically at where you are and where
you want to be addressing the following areas:
✔ Key Skills - This section covers the important area of Key Skills: What
are they? Why are employers so keen on them? Do I have any? How
do I develop mine? Completing the online audit will help you to plan
how you will move your key skills forward.
✔ Background - This section allows you to record your current skills,
knowledge and competence in relation to qualifications, work-
experience, positions of responsibility and extracurricular activities.
Here is the chance to look in detail at how you have developed as a
result of all these experiences, using both your own self-reflection and
feedback from objective sources. There is also an opportunity to
pinpoint your key strengths and key areas for improvement.
✔ Learning Style - The quiz in this section helps you recognise your
learning style, a crucial step in increasing your effectiveness and
reaching your potential.

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✔ Goals - Setting clear goals for the different areas of your life can be
invaluable. This section allows you to bring into focus your aspirations
in terms of your career, your academic ambitions and your personal
goals.
✔ Planning - Having set your goals, break each one down into
manageable action points. Use this section to get a clear picture of
what you need to do and when. A financial planning tool is also
included.
✔ Opportunities - There are so many opportunities at College and in the
local area, but how do you find out about them all? This section gives
a comprehensive guide from voluntary work to round-the-world
expeditions.
✔ Progress - During your time at College make time to assess how you
are progressing towards your goals. Even if you only take a few hours
each term, it will help to keep you on target towards achieving your
goals and getting the most out of your time here. At the end of each
academic year pull together all your thoughts and reassess your
progress.
✔ Job Applications - This section contains useful tips on producing a
professional CV. By completing the main sections of this guide you
will already have done much of the hard work. It pays to keep track of
things as you go along so that you have all the information at your
fingertips when it comes to applying for your next step.
✔ Reference – This section includes a link to your Reference Summary
page. This is the only part of your file which will be held by your tutor
and will contain the information you want to be included in your
references.

4.1 Careers Education, Information and Guidance

Of course, most of your programme has been designed to help you make
progress with your career plans, and your work based learning, PDP and
other work-related activities will be important in preparing you to succeed in
your career aspirations. In addition, your programme has been designed
with the involvement of local employers. Many of them are prepared to come
to your college to give talks to students about their working environment and
the qualities that they expect from potential employees. Please make every
effort to attend such events and to profit from such employer contacts.

Many of your teaching staff will have such knowledge too and will be able to
give you helpful career advice. The College Careers Service offers
information, advice and guidance to students at all stages of their Foundation
Degree and further advice is available from the University of Plymouth
Careers Service. As a Foundation Degree graduate you will have a wide
choice of career opportunities throughout the private and public sectors, both
in the United Kingdom and abroad. The University of Plymouth enjoys a
good record for the employability of its graduates.

Student Handbook Page 18 of 75


4.2 Programme Content: General Expectations

Below there are descriptions of the general expectations of work at higher


education level. In a full time foundation degree, all your work in the first
year (Stage 1) will be at level 4 (up until 2008, this was called HE level 1 and
this description may still be seen in your programme materials). The module
that supports your work placement will also be at level 4, even if it is not
assessed until the end of your course. Any other modules done in Stage 2
(the second year of a full time course) will be at level 5 (old style HE level 2).
If you progress to an honours degree, only the level 5 modules will contribute
to your honours degree classification.

Level 4

Successful work at Level 4 will show sound knowledge of the underlying


concepts and principles of the subjects that you have studied and
you will have learned how to take different approaches to solving
problems. You will be able show that you can communicate
accurately, in written and spoken language appropriate to the work
in hand and the audience. You will have the demonstrated the
qualities needed for employment requiring the exercise of some
personal responsibility.

You will, in addition, be able to show that you can evaluate the
appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems and be
able to present, evaluate and interpret material, including
numerical data, in order to develop lines of argument and make
sound judgements in accordance with basic theories and concepts
the subjects that you have studied.

Level 5

Successful work at level 5 will show that you can apply the knowledge,
understanding and skills that your course has given you more
widely, so that you can evaluate the appropriateness of different
approaches to solving problems in some unpredictable situations.
You will be able to show the qualities necessary for employment in
situations requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and
decision-making and that you can perform effectively in your
chosen field.

You will be able to show knowledge and critical understanding of


the well-established principles of the subjects you have studied and
of the way in which those principles have developed. You will be
able to apply your knowledge, understanding and skills outside the
context in which they were first studied, including in an
employment context. You will also be able to show that you can

Student Handbook Page 19 of 75


apply the main methods of enquiry in the subjects studied and
evaluate critically the appropriateness of different approaches to
solving problems in the field of study. In particular, you will be able
to show that you have an understanding of the limits of your
knowledge, and how this can influence your thoughts and
decisions. Your standard of communication in all the accepted
forms related to your course will be good and you will be able to
communicate well to a variety of audiences. You will be able to
undertake further training, develop existing skills and acquire new
competences so that you can assume significant responsibility
within organisations. You will be able to show that you have
qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment
requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-
making.

4.3 Stage 1 and Stage 2 Modules

Please see the programme structure in section 6 and the Definitive Module
Records at the end of this document for details of the modules you will be
studying.

Student Handbook Page 20 of 75


4.4 Indicative Programme Assessment Schedule

Personal Mangmnt. T ravel Worldwide Work


week Tourism Business and Prof. Information Agency Action Tourism Based
beginning Studies Fi nance Marketing Envrnmt. Devel. Systems Managmt. Research Destins. Learning
21-Sep-2009
28-Sep-2009
5-Oct-2009 Journal
12-Oct-2009 Journal Proposal
19-Oct-2009 Journal
26-Oct-2009
2-Nov-2009
9-Nov-2009 Assign 1 Method.
16-Nov-2009
23-Nov-2009
30-Nov-2009 Report
7-Dec-2009 Data
14-Dec-2009 T est Assign.1
21-Dec-2009
28-Dec-2009
4-Jan-2010 Assign 1 in
11-Jan-2010 Revision Analysis
18-Jan-2010 Assign 1 Test
25-Jan-2010 Assign.
1-Feb-2010
8-Feb-2010 Journal
15-Feb-2010 Assig In
22-Feb-2010 Final
1-Mar-2010 Test
8-Mar-2010
15-Mar-2010 PBL Presentatio
22-Mar-2010 Seminar Assign 1
29-Mar-2010 Seminar
5-Apr-2010
12-Apr-2010
19-Apr-2010
26-Apr-2010
3-May-2010 Assign. 2 Assign 1
10-May-2010 Test Portfolios Mock Test
17-May-2010 T est
24-May-2010 Test Reflection

4.7 Progression Opportunities

Successful completion of the FdSc Tourism automatically entitles you to


progress to Stage 3 of the BSc (Hons) in Tourism Management at the
University of Plymouth.

If you progress to the final stage of a University of Plymouth programme then


your level 5 marks will be taken into account in your final degree
classification. Please note that marks from your work-based learning
module, as a level 4 module, will not contribute.

5 General College Information and Guidance

City College Plymouth is committed to an equal opportunities policy, and does not
discriminate against staff or students on the basis of sex, race, colour, nationality,
ethnic or national origins, disability or sexual preference, age or marital status.

Student Handbook Page 21 of 75


If special needs arise, you should let your Personal Tutor know immediately.
Conditions such as dyslexia must be officially assessed, and he/she can help
arrange this. Unless this is done, the College will not be able to make any special
arrangements. (The Programme Leader has a copy of the college Special Needs
policy, if you wish to refer to it at any stage).

If problems arise...

Most students gain their qualifications successfully. But if problems arise, the last
thing you want is to have an irate lecturer demanding to know what has happened
to your work! So keep the communication channels open: let your Personal Tutor
and/or Programme Leader know if you have been ill, if there has been some
domestic problem, or if you feel you are simply not on top of the work.
Confidentiality will always be respected. Alternatively, you may prefer to speak to
one of the counsellors in Learner Services.

Student Complaints

If at any stage in your studies a problem arises which you wish to complain about
please speak to your Programme Manager or Tutor. However, if you wish to
complain formally, please complete a ‘Talkback’ form (available online via Moodle
(compliments and complaints site) and from reception). Your complaint will be dealt
with fairly, sensitively and in confidence. We will acknowledge your complaint within
five working days and send you a response within ten working days. Some
complaints, especially if they are complex, may take longer. If it is going to take
longer than ten working days to deal with your complaint we will let you know and
keep you informed of progress. If you are not satisfied with the College’s response
to your complaint, the Deputy Principal will advise you on what to do next. You have
the right to expect a good service from the College.

6 Programme Specification

On the following pages you will find the specification for your programme of studies.
It is a University of Plymouth Colleges requirement that this is included in your
Student Handbook. Before reading it, please study the following notes carefully as
these will help you to understand what the programme specification is telling you.

The programme specification is an overview to the programme as a whole. It


explains what you will learn and what you will be assessed on throughout the two
stages of your Foundation Degree.

The Programme Learning Outcomes Map specifies the knowledge and skills you
will develop at each stage of your Foundation degree.

Work-based learning and employability are key features of all Foundation degrees.
You will develop a range of knowledge and skills which will be of use to current
and/or future employers.

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION FOR FOUNDATION DEGREES

Student Handbook Page 22 of 75


Awarding Institution: University of Plymouth
Teaching Institution: City College Plymouth
Accrediting Body: N/A
Final Award: FdSc
Intermediate Awards: Certificate of Higher Education (CertHE)
Programme Title: Tourism

UCAS Code: N808


JACS Code
Benchmarks Foundation Degree; Hospitality, Leisure & Tourism

Date Produced: June 2004

Date of Approval: 2004

Admissions Criteria:

Qualification(s) Required Comments


for Entry to the FdA or FdSc
Candidates must have:

Key Skills requirement/Higher Preferred:


Level Diploma Application of Number Level 2
Information Technology Level 2
Communications Level 2
and/or
GCSEs required at Grade C 4 GCSEs at grade C or above
and above preferred

Plus at least one of the following:


A Levels required: (College 60 UCAS points preferred
to insert AS/A2/UCAS Points
Tariff)
Advanced Level Diploma Equivalent of 60 UCAS points
BTEC National Pass
Certificate/Diploma
HNC/D In relevant discipline
VDA: AGNVQ, AVCE, AVS Double Award AVCE preferred
Access to HE No preference
International Baccalaureate Equivalent to 60 UCAS Points
Irish/Scottish Equivalent to 60 UCAS Points
Highers/Advanced Highers
Work Experience At least 2 years work experience
preferred

Other non-standard awards or None


experiences
APEL/APCL possibilities See Academic regulations:
http://www.plymouth.ac.uk/pages/vie
w.asp?page=11219
Interview/portfolio Applicants who do not meet the

Student Handbook Page 23 of 75


requirements standard entry requirements may be
required to attend an interview
Criminal Record Bureau No
(CRB) clearance required

Aims of the Programme:


The Foundation Degree programme aims to enable students to gain a
thorough understanding of the development of tourism and have a
critical awareness of the moral, ethical and legal issues which
underpin best practice in the tourism sector. Furthermore, it aims to
introduce a wider understanding of the roles, responsibilities,
environment and operational requirements needed for the tourism
industry. In particular, in partnership with employers in the tourism
industry, the programme aims to have both a practice-based and an
academic input. This will be achieved by developing the necessary
skills to become a competent manager while encouraging sound
levels of critical thinking through the understanding and application of
a variety of research paradigms in this area.

Programme Learning Outcomes:

This programme aims to enable the student on completion to:

1. Understand a wide range of moral, ethical and legal issues in


tourism
2. Understand and analyse management structures, operational
practices and functions in relation to tourism management.
3. Practice communication, motivation, self-management and
project management strategies and skills including research
skills, problem solving, teamwork and ICT which will help
facilitate management and organisational effectiveness within
tourism organisations.
4. Gain a reflexive experience of the working environment,
practice, problems and organisational nature of the tourism
industry, gained through work-based learning opportunities.
5. Develop a theoretical understanding of a range of research
methodologies and be able to apply them to a variety of
situations

Student Handbook Page 24 of 75


Programme Specification

A: Development of Knowledge and Learning and Teaching


Understanding Strategy/Method

• synthesise information from Primary


disparate sources • Lectures and tutorials
• interpret a particular case in • Directed independent study
the context of generalised or • Learning from work experience
abstract concepts and vice
versa Secondary
• understand the role of tourism • Case studies
in contributing to knowledge • Problem-solving exercises
• understand how tourism can
operate over a variety of
scales in space and time
NB: Benchmark References Assessment

QAA Foundation Degree benchmark Key knowledge and understanding is


assessed via a combination of
multiple choice tests, examinations,
essays, presentations and seminar
performances.

B: Cognitive and Intellectual Skills Learning and Teaching


Strategy/Method

• Plan, design and execute and Primary


report on an original tourism • Class exercises
investigation • Tutorial/seminar discussions
• Understand the contested nature • Feedback via coursework
of knowledge and identify and assessment process (essays etc)
evaluate alternative viewpoints
• Identify, formulate and resolve Secondary
problems • Policy and practice analysis in
• Assess the reliability and validity surgeries
of evidence • Computer-based practicals on
• Collate, analyse and interpret data travel agency projects
in quantitative and qualitative
forms
• Problem solving and research
skills

NB: Benchmark References Assessment

QAA Foundation Degree benchmark • Assessed discussions


• Essays/projects/dissertations
• Examinations/tests
• Coursework/groupwork on

Student Handbook Page 25 of 75


practical application questions

C: Key Transferable Skills Learning and Teaching


Strategy/Method

• Participate effectively and


supportively in groups, meeting Primary
obligations to others Library and other research exercises
• Search for, retrieve, sift and order Group work awareness and practice
information from a variety of Computer-based learning and
sources assessment
• Develop a reasoned and informed
argument Secondary
• Reflect upon their learning Class and seminar interactions and
process, evaluating personal feedback
strengths and weaknesses; and
setting appropriate targets
• Communicate effectively through
the spoken work and in a variety
of written, geographical and
graphical formats
• Develop analytical skills in
numeracy and quantification

NB: Benchmark References Assessment

QAA Foundation Degree benchmark • Coursework of all types


• Examination preparation and
completion
• Assessed discussions
• Group work assessments

Student Handbook Page 26 of 75


D: Practical Skills Learning and Teaching
Strategy/Method
• Work independently and organise
his/her own learning • Projects
• Apply concepts and principles of • Designated tasks
tourism management to new • Lectures and tutorials
issues and situations • Learning from work
• Transfer existing skills to new
contexts
• Select and apply appropriate
research and management
techniques; and interpret and
present the results in the following
contexts:
• Primary and secondary data
collection in a business
environment
• manual and computer based
analysis
NB: Benchmark References Assessment

QAA Foundation Degree benchmark • Project work


• Competence in a range of
business-related communication
techniques

Distinctive Features of the Foundation Degree


• Students will gain a critical understanding of tourism and business
management necessary to meet the changing demand of the economy
and society
• Students are taught how to apply skills to successful management in a
range of rewarding employment opportunities in the worldwide tourism
industry
• The programme emphasises personal contact between lecturers and
students in order to ensure that they achieve their full potential and gain
full understanding of applying relevant concepts and disciplines which
contribute to an understanding of the course domain
• Students are required to participate in work-based learning within local or
overseas tourism-related organisations. The College’s excellent
relationships with employers strengthen industrial placement links and
provide a wide range of career prospects for our students

Student Handbook Page 27 of 75


Brief Description of the Programme
The Foundation Degree in Tourism is designed to produce graduates who
have the skills to function and communicate in the world's fastest growing
industry. The course is designed to develop a critical understanding of
tourism and business management to meet the changing demands of society
and the economy. Students have the opportunity to gain valuable work
experience in the UK or abroad through Work-Based Learning.

Programme Structure and Pathways

Please see following page for programme structure.

Give Details of Any Exceptions to Regulations

None

Student Handbook Page 28 of 75


Programme Structure for the Foundation Degree in Tourism (full-time) 2009/2010 Course code:
UF2829

Year 1 Year 2
Module Module Title No. of Core / Module Module Title No. of Core /
Code Credits Optional Code Credits Optional
TOFD106 Personal & Professional 20 Core TOFD130 Work Based Learning 20 Core
Development
TOFD100 Tourism Studies 20 Core TOFD200 Tourism Planning and 20 Core
Management
FPC1018 Business Finance 20 Core TOFD219 Countryside and Heritage 10 Optional*
Management
FPC1022 Marketing 20 Core FPC2019 Customer Relationship 20 Optional*
Management
FPC1017 Business Environment 20 Core TOFD207 Research Skills 20 Core
TOFD109 Management Information 10 Optional* TOFD210 Tour Operations 20 Optional*
Systems Management
TOFD124 Travel Agency Management 10 Optional* TOFD215 Guiding Through Heritage 10 Optional*
TOFD128 Archaeology and Heritage 10 Optional* TOFD217 Managing People 20 Core
TOFD129 Worldwide Travel 10 Optional* PFD221 Introduction to Events 20 Optional*
Destinations Management
TOFD132 Action Research 10 Optional* PFD230 Licensed Trade 20 Optional*
Management
*40 credits of optional modules are selected in Stage 1
*60 credits of optional modules are selected in Stage 2

Work Based Learning (TOFD130)

Student Handbook Page 29


Foundation Degree Intended Certificate Level

Learning Outcomes Map


1 Graduate Attributes and Skills 2 3 4
Core Programme Intended Learning Outcomes Aim Subject Related Core
The holder of a Certificate of Higher Education will have a sound Benchmark Modules
knowledge of the basic concepts of a subject, and will have learned how to
take different approaches to solving problems. He or she will be able to
communicate accurately, and will have the qualities needed for
employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

Knowledge/ Understanding
• Demonstrate knowledge of the underlying concepts and Aims QAA TOFD 100
principles associated with tourism, and an ability to evaluate and 1; 2 Foundation FPC1018
interpret these within the context of tourism or principles of Degrees FPC1022
tourism FPC1017
• synthesise information from disparate sources Hospitality, TOFD 124
• interpret a particular case in the context of generalised or abstract Leisure and TOFD 128
concepts and vice versa Tourism TOFD 132
• understand the role of tourism in contributing to knowledge
• understand how tourism can operate over a variety of scales in
space and time

Student Handbook Page 30


Cognitive / Intellectual Skills (generic)
• Demonstrate an ability to present, evaluate, and interpret Aims QAA FPC1018
qualitative and quantitative data, to develop lines of argument 2; 3 Foundation FPC1022
and make sound judgements in accordance with basic theories Degrees FPC1017
and concepts of tourism TOFD 109
• Plan, design and execute and report on an original tourism Hospitality, TOFD 128
investigation Leisure and
• Understand the contested nature of knowledge and identify and Tourism
evaluate alternative viewpoints
• Identify, formulate and resolve problems
• Assess the reliability and validity of evidence
• Collate, analyse and interpret data in quantitative and qualitative
forms
• Problem solving and research skills

Key / Transferable Skills (generic)


• evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving Aims QAA FPC1022
problems related to the study of tourism 4 Foundation FPC1017
• communicate the results of their study/work accurately and Degrees TOFD 124
reliably, and with structured and coherent arguments
• Participate effectively and supportively in groups, meeting Hospitality,
obligations to others Leisure and
• Search for, retrieve, sift and order information from a variety of Tourism
sources
• Develop a reasoned and informed argument
• Reflect upon their learning process, evaluating personal strengths
and weaknesses; and setting appropriate targets
• Communicate effectively through the spoken work and in a
variety of written, geographical and graphical formats
• Develop analytical skills in numeracy and quantification

Student Handbook Page 31


Practical Skills (subject specific)
• Work independently and organise his/her own learning Aims QAA TOFD 130
• Apply concepts and principles of tourism management to new 4; 5 Foundation TOFD 132
issues and situations Degrees
• Transfer existing skills to new contexts
• Select and apply appropriate research and management Hospitality,
techniques; and interpret and present the results in the following Leisure and
contexts: Tourism
• Primary and secondary data collection in a business environment
• manual and computer based analysis
Employment-related skills
• Undertake new and further training and develop skills within a Aims QAA TOFD 106
structured and managed environment 3; 4 Foundation TOFD 130
• Demonstrate qualities and transferable skills necessary for Degrees
employment requiring the exercise of personal responsibility
Hospitality,
Leisure and
Tourism

Student Handbook Page 32


Foundation Degree Intended Learning Outcomes Map Intermediate level

1 Graduate Attributes and Skills 2 3 4


Core Programme Intended Learning Outcomes Aim(s) Subject Related Core
Holders of qualifications at this level will have developed a sound Benchmark Modules
understanding of the principles in their field of study, and will have
learned to apply those principles more widely. Through this, they will
have learned to evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches
to solving problems. Their studies may well have had a vocational
orientation, enabling them to perform effectively in their chosen field.
They will have the qualities necessary for employment in situations
requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making.

Knowledge/ Understanding
• knowledge and critical understanding of the well established Aims QAA TOFD 200
principles of tourism, and the way in which those principles have 1; 2; 5 Foundation TOFD 207
developed Degrees TOFD 217
• knowledge of the main methods of enquiry within tourism TOFD 210
• an understanding of the limits of their knowledge, and how this Hospitality, TOFD 215
influences analysis and interpretations based on that knowledge Leisure and
Tourism
Cognitive / Intellectual Skills (generic)
• ability to apply underlying concepts and principles outside the Aims QAA TOFD 207
context in which they were first studied 2; 3 Foundation
Degrees

Hospitality,
Leisure and
Tourism

Student Handbook Page 33


Key / Transferable Skills (generic)
• ability to evaluate critically the appropriateness of different Aims QAA TOFD 200
approaches to solving problems in tourism management 4 Foundation TOFD 207
• use a range of established techniques to initiate and undertake Degrees TOFD 215
critical analysis of information, and to propose solutions to
problems arising from that analysis Hospitality,
• effectively communicate information, arguments, and analysis, in Leisure and
a variety of forms, to specialist and non specialist audiences, and Tourism
deploy key techniques of the discipline effectively

Practical Skills (subject specific)


• ability to evaluate sustainability in a tourism context Aims QAA TOFD 200
• employ a range of customer service skills and improve technique 4; 5 Foundation TOFD 207
through reflexive practice, and through peer and customer Degrees TOFD 210
feedback TOFD 215
• identify the tourism elements appropriate for given development Hospitality,
• ability to prepare clear, specific, measured, achievable, timed Leisure and
(SMART) recommendations and strategies Tourism
• understanding human resource management and bringing the
best out of staff for their benefit and that of the organisation and
its customers

Employment-related skills
• the application of subject principles in an employment context QAA TOFD 200
• undertake further training, develop existing skills and acquire new Foundation TOFD 207
competencies that will enable them to assume significant Degrees TOFD 210
responsibilities within organisations TOFD 217
• qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment Hospitality, FPC2019
requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision Leisure and
making. Tourism

Student Handbook Page 34


7 UPC - The Student Portal

A portal is a gateway. The University of Plymouth portal is your gateway to various resources to
support your study e.g.:
• UoP Information and Library Services where you can access Metalib which will enable you
to locate a range of journals and electronic resources from the University library

• Training packages and Guidance on searching for information

The UPC student community will give you:


• General information on studying at degree level and opportunities and resources for UPC
students
http://student.plymouth.ac.uk/
This is the general link and you should sign in with your University of Plymouth Registered
Username and Password.
When you have signed in you will see a direct link to the
University of Plymouth Colleges on the right hand side
of the page

Once onto the student site it is recommended


you save it to your Favourites
You might wish to change your password to one you will
remember using the menu in the top right corner
You should keep your username and password secure.
Please let tutors or learning support staff know if you have
difficulties with logging in. Once you have logged in you will find a more detailed guide to
finding specific resources which you should open and use online. The links in this document are
live and will give you a ‘tour’ of various resources and sites.
To access library resources you need to go via Metalib. From http://student.plymouth.ac.uk/ click University
Information > Library, Media and IT (ILS) > Electronic Library > login to MetaLib using the same university
username and password. Unfortunately you will not be able to save these sites to favourites.

Need Help? Contact 01752 588588,


tracy.gilmour@plymouth.ac.uk or
julie.swain@plymouth.ac.uk

35
2009-2010
Edition
UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: FPC1018 CREDITS: 20 LEVEL: 4
MODULE TITLE: Business Finance
PRE-REQUISITE(S): None
CO-REQUISITE(S): None
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR The module introduces the student to key aspects of financial
and management accounting in order to be able to use/understand financial information for
decision making purposes.

ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%
Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked – Business
Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation - N/A
MODULE AIMS: The aim of this module is for students to gain an understanding of the
management and presentation of financial information within a business organisation. They will
learn how to interpret financial information and use basic financial tools for decision making
purposes.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
• Understand the importance of financial information and the underlying principles and
concepts within business organisations
• Analyse and evaluate financial information for a business organisation
• Prepare financial information for decision making purposes for a business organisation

INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:


Sources of finance – choosing sources and the underlying implications
Finance as a resource – flow of finance, decision making, assets and liabilities
Financial performance – financial statements, analysing performance, comparison of
statements
Financial decisions – budgeting, costing, investment and project appraisal

APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: Feb 2007


DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: Sept 2007
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY: SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION: City SITE:
College Plymouth
MODULE LEADER: Linda Jordan Term All year

36
2009-2010
Edition
Assessment Criteria (Threshold Level) :

Understand, evaluate, manage and prepare financial information for decision making
purposes for a business organisation.

Assessment Mode:

Assignments, class tests, essays, case material, multiple choice.

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

This module will be taught by lectures, workshops, self directed study.

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

Atrill and McLaney (2006) Accounting and Finance for Decision makers, FT Prentice Hall.

37
2009-2010
Edition
UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: FPC1022 CREDITS: 20 LEVEL: 4
MODULE TITLE: Marketing
PRE-REQUISITE(S): None
CO-REQUISITE(S): None
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR This module introduces students to the basic principles of
marketing and their application in a business context.
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT: (C1) COURSEWORK 100%
Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked – Business
Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation – N/A
MODULE AIMS:
For students to investigate the principles that underpin the marketing process and how they
apply in a business. It aims to provide a broad based general overview of marketing and to be
a foundation for further specialist study.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
• Understand the importance of the principles and concepts of marketing to enable
business organisations to become marketing orientated.
• Identify how marketing research and market segmentation will enable different
business organisations to develop a marketing strategy.
• Develop the marketing mix, product, price, place and promotion (4Ps) for different
business organisations.
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:
MARKETING DYNAMICS - definitions, marketing concepts and marketing process overview

SEGMENTING MARKETS - consumer and business2business (B2B)

MARKETING RESEARCH - overview of secondary and primary research methods

MARKETING MIX - product, price, place and promotion 4Ps shift to 7Ps people,
physical evidence and processes, e-marketing and international
marketing
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: February 2007
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: September 2007
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY: University of SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
Plymouth Colleges INSTITUTION: City SITE:
(UPC) College Plymouth
MODULE LEADER: Tam Carson Term* All year

38
2009-2010
Edition
Assessment Criteria (Threshold Level) :
• Understand the importance of the principles and concepts of marketing to
enable business organisations to become marketing orientated.
• Identify how marketing research and market segmentation will enable
different business organisations to develop a marketing strategy.
• Develop the marketing mix, product, price, place and promotion (4Ps) for
different business
Assessment Mode:
Coursework100%
Business studies - two studies based of real businesses designed to provide evidence of
knowledge and understanding across the range of outcomes (short reports).
Schedule of Teaching and Learning:
The module is delivered by means of weekly lectures and seminars and relevant visits.
Recommended Texts and Sources
The recommended texts for the course are:

Brassington F & Pettitts S (2006) Principles of Marketing. 4th ed. Harlow: FT/Prentice Hall
Blythe J (2005) Essentials of Marketing. 3rd ed.. Harlow: FT/Prentice Hall
Lancaster G & Withey F (2005) Marketing Fundamentals. 2nd ed. Elsevier: Butterworth
Heinemann
Smith PR & Chaffes D (2005) e Marketing excellence. 2nd ed. Elsevier: Butterworth
Heinemann
Youell R (2003) A-Z Business Book. London: Hodder & Stoughton
Times on Line www.timesonline.co.uk
Trade Magazines: The Grocer
Drapers Record

39
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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: FPC1017 CREDITS: 20 LEVEL: 4
MODULE TITLE: Business Environment
PRE-REQUISITE(S): None
CO-REQUISITE(S): None
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR The module introduces students to the national and
European business environment and considers a range of economic factors that affect decision
making in business organisations.

ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked - Business
Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation ...N/A
MODULE AIMS: The aim of this module is for students to be able to investigate issues
concerning the interaction of business organisations and the environment they face, in particular
directing focus on the economic environment in a national and European context.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
1. Understand the impact on business organisations of a range of micro and macro
economic issues
2. Discuss the impact of a range of government economic policies on organisations
3. Understand and explain the impact on UK based organisations of specific European
Union policies.

INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:

Local & National Economy – types of economic system, role of state, Government policy
Market factors – market forces, market types, organisational responses to market situation
Europe – EU institutions and decision making process, EU polices, EMU.

APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: Feb 2007


DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: Sept 2007
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY: SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION: City SITE:
College Plymouth
MODULE LEADER: Peter Mills Term* All year

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Assessment Criteria (Threshold Level) :
Explanation of relationship between market forces & retail organisational responses,
and explanation of market structures.

Discussion of impact of government policies on organisations and identification of


named policies of EU and their impact on organisations.

Explanations of: features of economic system, differing views of role of state, features
of EU, market forces, government policies, market structures

Assessment Mode:
Report – 30%
Company Study – 30%
Test – 40%

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:


This module is delivered by means of regular lectures and seminars and relevant visits

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

Sloman J (2005) The Economic Environment of Business, FT Prentice Hall

Worthington I, Britton C and Rees A (2005) Economics for Business, FT Prentice Hall

Appendix A
41
2009-2010
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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 100 CREDITS:20 LEVEL:4
MODULE TITLE: Tourism Studies
PRE-REQUISITE(S):
CO-REQUISITE(S):
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes/No (please indicate)
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
This unit is designed to provide an introduction to tourism as an area of academic and applied
study.

ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
The aim of the unit is to encourage the learner to develop an understanding of the nature and
significance of tourism, its structure and development, and the pattern of trends in tourism
activity.
ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
1. Recognise the influences of the past, current and future trends in the demand for and significance of
tourism;
2. understand the influence of geographical factors on tourism development and activity;
3. demonstrate knowledge of the structure and organisation of the tourism industry;
4. identify the interrelations that exist between the various sectors which provide services and facilities
for tourism;
5. assess the role of the tourist and describe the needs of different groups;
6. demonstrate an understanding of the economic, social and environmental impacts of tourism activity.

INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:


 Definitions and concepts of tourism
 Historical development, current and likely future trends; determinants and facilitators of tourism
 Geographical influences on tourism development
 Structure of the tourism industry: sector analysis; accommodation, transport, travel organisers,
destination organisers
 Different types, needs and expectations of tourists
 Issues raised by the demand for tourism; social, economic and environmental impacts of tourism;
sustainable tourism development
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 01-09-01
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01-09-01
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY:UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Winfrid Scutt Term* S1

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Assessment Criteria:
The student will demonstrate that they:
1. recognise the influences of the past, current and future trends in the demand for and
significance of tourism;
2. understand the influence of geographical factors on tourism development and activity;
3. understand the structure and organisation of the tourism industry;
4. can identify the interrelations that exist between the various sectors which provide
services and facilities for tourism;
5. can assess the role of the tourist and describe the needs of different groups;
6. understand the economic, social and environmental impacts of tourism activity.
Assessment Mode:
Coursework: 90% End Test: 10%
• Reflective Journal entries: 40%
• Report 20%
• Problem Based Learning seminar presentation 30%
• an end module test weighted at 10%
Schedule of Teaching and Learning:
In this unit the student will encounter a range of learning and teaching methods designed
to support both individual and group learning programmes. Lectures will provide an
introduction to major themes and concepts, which will be developed further during
seminars. Group-work will provide forum for discussion and the development of
interpersonal skills.
Recommended Texts and Sources
The recommended texts for the course are:

COOPER, C.P et al. (2008). Tourism: principles and practice. 4th edition. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall
DAVIDSON, R. (1998). Tourism in Europe. 2nd edition. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.
FAULKNER B., (2004) Tourism in the 21 century: reflections on experience. London: Thomson.
HOLLOWAY, J.C.R. (2009). The business of tourism. 8th edition. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall
KRIPPENDORF, J. (1999). The holiday makers: understanding the impact of leisure and travel. Oxford:
Butterworth Heinemann.
LAVERY, P. (2004). Travel & tourism 4th edition. Huntingdon: Elm.
PAGE, S.J.et al (2001) Tourism: A modern synthesis. London: Thomson.
LICKORISH, L.J. & JENKINS, C.L. (1997). An introduction to tourism. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann.
SHARPLEY, R. (2003). Tourism, tourists and society. Huntingdon: Elm.
SWARBROOKE, J. & HORNER, S. (1999). Consumer behaviour in tourism: an international perspective.
Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann.

Journals:
Annals of Tourism Research
Journal of Sustainable Tourism
Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing
Tourism Management

Web-based sources:
Altis: the guide to internet resources in hospitality, leisure, sport and tourism http://www.altis.ac.uk
Department for Culture, Media and Sport – tourism pages:
http://www.culture.gov.uk/about_us/tourism_and_leisure/default.aspx

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 106 CREDITS:20 LEVEL:4
MODULE TITLE: Personal and Professional Development
PRE-REQUISITE(S):
CO-REQUISITE(S):
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
This module will incorporate Personal Development Planning to enable students to identify, engage with, and reflect upon the
personal and professional skills and competences required for entry to and progression within their chosen profession.

ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
The aim of this module is to encourage students to develop personal and professional skills
directly relevant to successful academic and professional career development. The module will
also aim to instil an ethos of continuous professional development and lifelong learning as an
essential and pivotal part of professional life.
ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
1. identify the transferable skills and attributes required for academic and professional
development;
2. conduct an analysis of personal and professional skills and attributes
3. demonstrate development of the identified academic and professional skills and attributes
4. produce a Personal Development Plan which incorporates evidence of skills development
and reflection on future career planning.
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:
 Academic skills, research and referencing, information sources and retrieval, academic
communication skills
 Professional skills, sector specific skills and attributes, ICT and technical skills
 Reflexive practices, gap analysis, 180° appraisal, Johari windows
 Career Planning
 Personal Development Planning
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 30/3/06
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01-09-06
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY:UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Tony Hewling Term*S1&S2

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Assessment Criteria:

The student will produce a Personal Development Plan which will:

• identify the transferable skills and attributes required for academic and professional
development evidence of academic and professional skills development.
• demonstrate an analysis of personal and professional skills and attributes.
• demonstrate development of the identified academic and professional skills and
attributes
• incorporate evidence of skills development and reflection on future career planning

Assessment Mode:
100% Coursework

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

The module will be delivered via a combination of lectures, seminars and individual tutorial
and guest speakers where appropriate. A comprehensive package of support and learning
resources will be available to students via the VLE.

Recommended Texts and Sources

The recommended texts for the course are:

Armstrong M (1999) Managing activities. Wimbledon: CIPD

Schon D (1995) The Reflective Practitioner. Chichester: Jossey Bass

Woodruffe C (2000) Development and Assessment Centres. London: CIPD

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 130 CREDITS:20 LEVEL:4
MODULE TITLE: WORK BASED LEARNING
PRE-REQUISITE(S):None
CO-REQUISITE(S):None
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
This module enables learners to research issues relating to real working environments

ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
To enable students to identify and investigate work-related issues within a selected
organisation; operate effectively within the organisation, demonstrating and applying
appropriate attitudes, knowledge and skills; acquire work-based knowledge and develop
transferable and employability skills.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
• apply their acquired knowledge and skills in a work-related environment
• evaluate current practice in a selected area of work activity, considering the professional,
legal and ethical framework within which they are operating
• demonstrate a range of personal skills: show initiative and work independently; co-
operate and communicate effectively with others; manage their own time; work to
deadlines

INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:


Most of the theoretical background, knowledge and practical skills will be integrated into other
modules, with the specific application to WBL being emphasised in all appropriate areas of
study

APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: Feb 2007


DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: Sept 2007
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY: UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Win Scutt Term* All Year

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Assessment Criteria:

• The learner will produce a business report of 2500 words to show evidence of an
investigation into a real situation affecting a selected business which should be one
in which he/she has personal involvement through employment, placement or
assignment brief. The report will demonstrate understanding of the key issues, and
clearly link these to appropriate theory drawn from other modules. Evaluation will
identify any perceived problem areas, and suggestions made for improvement.

• A separate submission (500 words) will give the learner the opportunity to reflect on
his/her experience in the work context, identify strengths/weaknesses, and suggest
a personal action plan to address any issues of personal performance

Assessment Mode:

Coursework: 100% (80% report; 20% review/reflection)

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

The module is delivered by means of seminars and personal tutorials

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

There are no fixed recommended texts for this module as most of the background theory
will be covered in other modules. Tutors will advise on recommended reading when the
focus of each individual project is agreed.

47
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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 109 CREDITS:10 LEVEL:4
MODULE TITLE: MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
PRE-REQUISITE(S):N/A
CO-REQUISITE(S):N/A
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
To provide an appreciation and broad understanding of how management systems are used in business and an appreciation of
how system changes can be evaluated and implemented successfully. Students will develop their understanding and
capabilities for system applications with a continual 'hands on' approach.

ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
This module will introduce the main concepts and techniques used in Management Information Systems.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
• Recognise the likely human impact of IT development and demonstrate to users on how they might overcome any negative
effects on work and the environment;
• Advise an employer on how to set up a system development project or to demonstrate ‘off the shelf’ applications or
bespoke software;
• Understand the place of scientific and operational management process within management systems;
• Advise on the appropriate use of data-base techniques and security measures;
• Organise a computer operation in line with current trends with due regard to Health and Safety legislation’s;
• Competently demonstrate the professional use of a wide range of software applications.
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:

Investigate the uses & applications of IT within the travel & tourism industry

the skills associated with specific applications of IT currently used in the industry

the benefits and limitations of IT to the user and customer

the implications of the use of IT

Introduction: The meaning of MIS; the nature of control systems, Management by Objectives, Systems in support of
management decision making;
• The effect of IT systems on people; motivational, the environment, Health and Safety at Work, who is in control; where
will IT lead us in the future?;
• Software applications; Practical hands-on training in the use of word processing packages; integrated packages,
presentation of statistical information, data-base, Desktop Publishing and Graphic packages, Spreadsheets and
financial packages, Project Management Applications;
• Systems in use in business; Payroll systems, Sales and Inventory Control systems; Supplies systems; Accounting
Systems;
• Implementing Systems Improvements; A typical Management Services Department; End user computing; the software
maintenance problem;
• Choosing a package.
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 01-09-01
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01-09-01
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY:UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Russell Pitt Term* S1, S2

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Assessment Criteria:

Through their coursework and end module test, learners will demonstrate that they:
1 can recognise the likely human impact of IT development and how they might
overcome any negative effects on work and the environment;
2 can advise an employer on how to set up a system development project or to
demonstrate ‘off the shelf’ applications or bespoke software;
3 understand the place of scientific and operational management process within
management systems;
4 can advise on the appropriate use of data-base techniques and security measures;
5 can organise a computer operation in line with current trends with due regard to
Health and Safety legislation;
6 are competent in the professional use of a wide range of software applications.

Assessment Mode:
• Coursework: written report weighted at 80%– (max word count 2000)
• End test weighted at 20%

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

Lectures, group-work, computer-based learning

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

The recommended texts for the course are:

Davidson R (1998) Tourism in Europe. 2nd edition. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall

Heap N et al (1996) Information technology and society, a reader. London: Sage.

Inkpen G (1998) Information technology for travel and tourism. Harlow: Longman

O’Connor P (1999) Electronic information distribution in tourism and hospitality. Wallingford: CABI.

Werthner H & Klein S (1999) Information technology and tourism – a challenging relationship. New
York: Springer Verlag

Zorkoczy P & Heap N (1995) Information technology, an introduction. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall

Journals:
Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing
Tourism Management

Web-based sources:
EEVL the internet guide to…computing http://www.eevl.ac.uk

49
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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 124 CREDITS:10 LEVEL:4
MODULE TITLE: TRAVEL AGENCY MANAGEMENT
PRE-REQUISITE(S):N/A
CO-REQUISITE(S):N/A
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
The module will allow learners to be aware of and understand the role of the manager within a
retail travel operation, and to be able to develop the knowledge and skills required to carry out
the role effectively and professionally
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%
Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism
Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A
MODULE AIMS:
The aim of this module is to enable the learner to understand the role of the manager within a
retail travel operation, and to develop the knowledge and skills to carry out this role effectively
and professionally.
In order to make them more desirable to employers this module will expect the learners to
participate in the College Enrichment Programme to achieve one or more coaching awards.
ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
• Create an environment to meet the needs of the customer;
• Provide a range of travel services for customers;
• Explore a range of management duties involved in running a retail travel business.
(It is expected that learners will use Voyagers as a vehicle for their experience for this module)

INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:


Create an environment to meet the needs of the customer
Information needs: land, sea, air, national, international, packages, individual components, routine travel arrangements,
destinations, events, accommodation, ancillary services;
Sources of information: technology, manuals, journals, timetables, published literature, colleagues;
Customers: various types of client;
Agency: design, layout, ambience.
Provide a range of travel services for customers
Costings: routine and complex travel service arrangements;
Documentation: ticketing, booking forms, visas, passports, client records, data storage, stock control;
Complaints: procedures, advice.
Explore a range of management duties involved in running a retail travel business
Lines of communication: internal, regional, national/head office, types of retail businesses, range of services offered;
Financial control: sales/commission, turnover, ancillary profits, overheads, incentives, marketing and equipment costs;
Legal and regulatory requirements: health and safety, liability, insurance, EU regulations, personnel law, licensing
requirements, ABTA, bonding trust funds;
Marketing: strategic, tactical;
Staff: team building, rota’s, planning, job design, training development and career planning delegation;
Change; impacts of change, response to changes in the market place, growth of specialisation, impact of discounting,
technological innovation.
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 01-09-01
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01-09-01
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY:UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Sarah Ogorek Term*S1 or S2

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Assessment Criteria:

Learners will demonstrate through coursework


• Create an environment to meet the needs of the customer;
• Provide a range of travel services for customers;
• Explore a range of management duties involved in running a retail travel business.

Assessment Mode:

• Coursework: Assignment weighted at 80%, (2000 words)


• End test weighted at 20%

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

The module will allow learners to be aware of, and to understand the role of the manager within a retail travel operation,
and to be able to develop the knowledge and skills required to carry out the role effectively which will be achieved
through lectures, simulations, role play, guest lectures and use of popular TV travel programmes

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

The recommended texts for the course are:

Bray R & Raitz V (2001) Flight to the sun: the story of the holiday revolution, London: Thomson

European Tourism University Partnership (2001) Resort management in Europe: case studies & learning materials,
London, Continuum

Hall C & Page S (2000) Tourism in South and South-east Asia: issues & cases. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann

Heath E & Wall G (1992) Marketing tourism destinations. Chichester: Wiley

Hoyle B & Knowles R (1998) Modern transport geography, 2nd edition. Chichester: Wiley.

Hudson S. (2000) Snow business: a study of the international ski industry, London: Thomson

Page S. (2005), Transport and tourism. Harlow: Prentice Hall

Pender L (2001) Travel trade and transport: an introduction. London: Continuum

Journals:
Annals of Tourism Research
Journal of Sustainable Tourism
Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing
Tourism Management

Web-based sources:
Altis: the guide to internet resources in hospitality, leisure, sport and tourism http://www.altis.ac.uk

51
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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 128 CREDITS:10 LEVEL:4
MODULE TITLE: ARCHAEOLOGY AND HERITAGE
PRE-REQUISITE(S):N/A
CO-REQUISITE(S):N/A
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
This module will examine how archaeological sites are presented to the public. The main archaeological periods are outlined,
national and local bodies in archaeology will be discussed and case studies of existing sites will be examined.

ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
To enable the learner to understand the key features of each archaeological period.
To understand the problems/merits in presenting archaeological sites to the public.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
• State how/where a particular monument fits into an archaeological / chronological framework;
• Name appropriate bodies/ legislation in archaeology;
• Devise appropriate methods of interpretation/ presentation for a variety of sites.

INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:


What archaeological is/involves, with brief historical outline;
Introduction to main periods and features in British Archaeology:
• Mesolithic
• Neolithic and Bronze Age
• Iron Age
• Roman
• Medieval
• Post-medieval
• Case studies in South West England to illustrate the above

Introduction to main bodies – legislation involved in archaeology (English Heritage, Council for British Archaeology, Institute
of Field Archaeologists, National Trust, Commission for Ancient and Historic Monuments, Planning Policy Guidelines);

Interpretation/reconstruction methods – problems and applications;

Presentations – museums and modern ‘hi-tech’ theme attractions (eg Stonehenge, Avebury, Maiden Castle, Morwellham
Quay, Plymouth Dome);
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 01-09-01
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01.09-01
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY: UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Winfrid Scutt Term* S1 & S2

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Assessment Criteria:

Learners will demonstrate through a written assignment


• A knowledge of how/where a particular monument fits into an archaeological / chronological framework;
• Name appropriate bodies/ legislation in archaeology;
and through an interpretation assignment
• How to devise appropriate methods of interpretation/ presentation for a variety of sites.

Assessment Mode:

Coursework: 100%
• Assignment 2000 words weighted at 50%
• Interpretation assignment 2000 words weighted at 50%

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:


This module will use seminars, lectures and fieldtrips to develop understanding of archaeology and heritage and how it is interpreted
and presented to the public.

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

The recommended texts for the course are:

Chippindale, C. (2004) Stonehenge complete. 3rd edition London: Thames and Hudson

Fleming, A. (2007) The Dartmoor Reaves: investigating prehistoric land divisions. Windgather Press.

Gerrard, S. (1997) Dartmoor. London: Batsford/English Heritage

Grant, J, Gorin, S and Fleming, N (2002) The archaeology coursebook. London: Routledge

Greene, Kevin (2004) Archaeology: an introduction. London: Routledge

McIntosh, J. (1999) The practical archaeologist. London: Thames and Hudson

Renfrew, C. & Bahn, P. (2004) Archaeology: theories, methods and practice London: Thames and Hudson

Journals:
Antiquity
Cornish Archaeology
International Journal of Heritage Studies
Proceedings of the Devon Archaeological Society
Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society

Web-based sources:
Department for Culture,Media and Sport – heritage pages : http://www.culture.gov.uk/historic_environment

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: T0FD 129 CREDITS:10 LEVEL:4
MODULE TITLE: WORLDWIDE TRAVEL DESTINATIONS
PRE-REQUISITE(S): n/a
CO-REQUISITE(S): n/a
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
This module will introduce learners to the location of tourist attraction destinations and principle
geographic features as part of the essential selling skills needed by managers within the travel
and tourism industries
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT: (C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
The aim of this module is to introduce learners to the location of tourist attraction destinations and principle geographic features
as part of the essential selling skills needed by managers within the travel and tourism industries.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
• Examine the main tourist destinations regions of the world;
• Identify the transport network utilised by the tourist and business traveller;
• Identify the main tourist destinations, cultural and tourist centres in the UK, Europe and selected destinations in the
rest of the world;
• Investigate the impact of tourism on the natural and built environment.
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:
Examine the main tourist destinations regions of the world
Location: the major tourist destinations selected from the UK, Europe and the rest of the world;
Distribution: selection of resorts, domestic, regional and international tourism flows;
Travel barriers: political, physical, socio-cultural and socio-economic.
Identify the transport network utilised by the tourist and business traveller
Route systems: economic data and tourism statistics;
Modes of transport: needs of different client groups, suitability of different modes of transport.
Identify the main tourist destinations, cultural and tourist centres in the UK, Europe and selected destinations in the
rest of the world
Resource selection: historical, cultural, coastal, landscape, wildlife and urban resources;
Tourist generation: determinants of demand, reasons for growth, world distribution- domestic and international.
Investigate the impact of tourism on the natural and built environment
Climate: temperature, rainfall, cloud-cover , sunshine and types of ;
Landscape: geology of lakes, mountains, coastline, profile of beaches, flora and fauna, preferences of landscape,
affects of man and the need for preservation, impact of tourism on resources and local community;
Sustainability: policy, dilemma, and alternatives to mass tourism.
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 01-09-01
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01-09-01
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY:UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Sue Abercrombie Term* S2

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Assessment Criteria:

The learner will be able to:


• describe the main tourist destinations regions of the world;
• describe the transport network utilised by the tourist and business traveller;
• identify the main tourist destinations, cultural and tourist centres in the UK, Europe and selected
destinations in the rest of the world;
investigate the impact of tourism on the natural and built environment.

Assessment Mode:

Coursework: 100%
An assignments weighted at 80% and a presentation weighted at 20%

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

The module will be delivered via a combination of lectures, seminars and individual tutorial and guest
speakers where appropriate. A comprehensive package of support and learning resources will be available to
students via the UoP Portal and the College VLE.

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:
The recommended texts for the course are:

BRAY R., & V. RAITZ (2001) Flight to the Sun: The Story of the Holiday Revolution, London, Continuum

COOPER, C and BONIFACE, B (2004) Worldwide destinations. 4th rev ed. Oxford, Butterworth Heinemann

COOPER, C and BONIFACE, B (2004) Worldwide destinations casebook. Oxford, Butterworth Heinemann

EUROPEAN TOURISM (2000) Resort Management in Europe: Case studies & Learning Materials, London,
Continuum

HALL C., & S PAGE, (2000) Tourism in South and South-east Asia: Issues & Cases, England , Butterworth –
Heinemann

HEATH E & G WALL (1992) Marketing Tourism Destinations, Chichester, Wiley

HOYLE B. & R KNOWLES, (1998) Modern Transport Geography (2nd Ed.) Chichester, Wiley.

MANCINI, M (2003) Selling destinations. 4th rev ed. New York, Thomson Learning

PAGE, S (2005) Transport and tourism: global perspectives. Harlow, Prentice Hall - In stock

PENDER L, (2001) Travel Trade & Transport: An Introduction London, Continuum


(now out of print, but in College library stock)

Journals:
Annals of Tourism Research
Journal of Tourism Studies
Tourism Management
Insights: The Marketing Intelligence Service

Electronic Sources
Travelmole http://www.travelmole.com
Travelweb

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 132 CREDITS:10 LEVEL:4
MODULE TITLE: ACTION RESEARCH
PRE-REQUISITE(S):n/a
CO-REQUISITE(S):n/a
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
The module consists of a short fieldwork practice for an appropriate organisation, or an approved individual research

ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
To gain practical experience of conducting fieldwork research within an organisation or as an individual researcher

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:

• Understand the need for primary and secondary research in the leisure & tourism industry
• Demonstrate a knowledge of the range of methodologies suitable for the collection of quantitative and
qualitative data.
• Design and carry out a questionnaire
• The student will be able to write a research report based on data collected and evaluate the findings.
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:

There is no specific syllabus.


The learner will execute research in the field either individually or as part of an group.
The learners will meet for regular supervisory sessions with a member of College staff.

APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 01-09-01


DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01.09-01
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY:UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Winfrid Scutt Term*S1 or S2

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Assessment Criteria:
By reporting on an individual field study supported by data analysis, learners will demonstrate:
• an understanding the need for primary and secondary research in the leisure & tourism industry
• a knowledge of the range of methodologies suitable for the collection of quantitative and qualitative
data.
• that they can design and carry out a questionnaire
• that they can write a research report based on data collected and evaluation of the findings.

Assessment Mode:
Coursework: 100% Coursework: Individual field study supported by data analysis in the form of a formal report (2000 words)

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

Seminar, Group work, fieldwork, tutorials & presentation

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

The recommended texts for the course are:

Bell J (2005) Doing your Research Project. 5th edition Milton Keynes: OU Press

Buglear J (2000) Stats to go – A guide to statistics for hospitality, leisure & tourism. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann

Brunt P (2000) Market research in travel and tourism. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann

Finn, M. et al (2000) Tourism and leisure research methods: data collection, analysis and interpretation London:
Longman

Frechtling D C (2001) Forecasting tourism demand: methods & strategies. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann

Hinton P R (2004) Statistics explained: a guide for social science students. 2nd edition. London: Routledge

Veal A J (2005) Research methods for leisure & tourism, a practical guide. 3rd edition Harlow: FT Prentice Hall

Journals:
Annals of Tourism Research
International Journal of Tourism Research
Tourism and Hospitality Research

Web-based sources:
SOSIG: social science information gateway: http://www.sosig.ac.uk

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: PFD 221 CREDITS: 20 LEVEL: 5
MODULE TITLE: Introduction to Events Management
PRE-REQUISITE(S): Nil
CO-REQUISITE(S): Nil
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
This module will offer students the opportunity to plan, organise and manage a hospitality
related event
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:

(C1)COURSEWORK 100%
Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked
..........Hospitality....................................................
Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation ...........N/A.....................
MODULE AIMS:
To enable students to coordinate, facilitate, organise and run an appropriate hospitality event.
To market, disseminate and advertise a hospitality event. To work as part of a team in a
professional context.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
• Interact effectively by exercising personal responsibility and decision making processes
in accordance to leadership model constructs
• Develop existing skills and where necessary acquire new competences to support the
leadership and management of a hospitality event
• Effectively communicate information in a variety of forms to both specialist and non-
specialist audiences by managing appropriate interventions in relation to facilitating a
hospitality event
• Evaluate and reflect on facilitating a hospitality event.
(selected from Knowledge and Understanding; Cognitive/intellectual skills; Key/transferable
skills; Practical skills - see SEEC level descriptors)

INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:


• Advertising strategies
• Marketing concepts
• Leadership skills and qualities
• Customer care and budgeting constraints
• Business/Event plans
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL:
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION:
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY: SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION: SITE:
MODULE LEADER: F. Wilson Term* S3

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Assessment Criteria (Threshold Level) :

• Initiate, prepare, plan, organise and deliver a hospitality event (50%)


• Evaluate and critically analyse the hospitality event management process from
an individual and group stand point (20%)
• Testing of knowledge gained (30%)

Assessment Mode:
Practical (50%)
Evaluation (20%)
End Test (30%)

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

Lectures, seminars, guest speakers, visits to local hospitality providers of events.

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

Bowdin, G. A. J., McDonnell, I., Allen, J. & O’Toole, W. (2006) Events Management,
2nd ed. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinmann
Fisher, J. G. (2000) How to Run a Successful Conference, 2nd ed. London: Kogan
Page
Rogers, T. (2003) Conferences and Conventions, A Global Industry, Oxford:
Butterworth-Heinemann
Tum, J., Norton, P. & Nevan Wright, J. (2005) Management of Event Operations.
Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann
www.eventmagazine.co.uk
www.worldofevents.net
www.esc-events.co.uk

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 219 CREDITS:10 LEVEL:5
MODULE TITLE: COUNTRYSIDE & HERITAGE MANAGEMENT
PRE-REQUISITE(S): N/A
CO-REQUISITE(S): N/A
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
This module is designed to promote an awareness of the principles and practices that have developed in this rapidly expanding
area of the tourism industry. It is a broad-based unit, defining heritage in a natural, built and cultural context.
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
The aim of this module is to explore the complex issues of Heritage and Countryside Tourism Management.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
Learners will be able to:
• evaluate key issues in heritage and countryside tourism management
analyse a range if issues that link tourism development, the countryside and industrial heritage

INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:


Demand and Supply/Resource base for Heritage and Countryside Tourism (cultural, architectural, natural, rural, archaeological);
the role of private, public and voluntary sector tourism provision including social and environmental impact on rural landscapes
and communities; sustainable tourism; different concepts of Heritage and Countryside Tourism;
economic and political relationships between the heritage organisation and the local communities; Heritage and Countryside
Tourism organisations; role of public agencies ; Land Management Principles; visitor management and interpretation.

APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 01-09-01


DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01-09-01
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE: 1/12/08
FACULTY:UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Winfrid Scutt Term* S3 or S4

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Assessment Criteria:

Through assignments and


• explore dilemmas and make valuable judgements in maintaining a balance between conservation and access;
• evaluate a variety of areas including interpretation and exploitation; rural tourism; commercial pressures and the
demand for funding
• demonstrate an awareness of the links between tourism development and environment; tourism growth and its
impact on the community; analyse the increase of supply and demand in urban tourism, industrial and maritime
heritage and the integration of developments in the planning system.

Assessment Mode:

Coursework: 100%
• Assignment weighted at 80% (1500 words)
• Presentation weighted at 20%

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

Seminars, lectures, group work guest lectures

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

The recommended texts for the course are:

Brown F (2000) Tourism reassessed: blight or blessing . Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann

Butler R & S Boyd (2000) Tourism & national parks: issues & implications. Chichester: Wiley

Cooper C P et al (2004) Tourism: principles & practice. 3rd edition. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall

Frechtling D C (2001) Forecasting tourism demand: methods & strategies. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann

Leask A & Yeoman I (2002) Heritage visitor attractions: An operations management perspective. London: Cassell

Robinson M (Ed) (2000) Developments in urban & rural tourism. Tyne & Wear: Business Education

Yale P (2004) From tourist attractions to heritage tourism. 3rd edition. Huntingdon: Elm

Journals:
Annals of Tourism Research
Journal of Sustainable Tourism
Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing
Tourism Management

Web-based sources:
Department for Culture, Media and Sport – heritage pages : http://www.culture.gov.uk/historic_environment

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: FPC2019 CREDITS: 20 LEVEL: 5
MODULE TITLE: Customer Relationship Management
PRE-REQUISITE(S): None
CO-REQUISITE(S): None
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR The module examines key aspects of customer service
provision and evaluates the methods by which organisations manage both customer services
and the development of relationships.
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%
Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked – Business
Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation - N/A
MODULE AIMS: The module aims to increase knowledge and understanding of essential
aspects of customer service skills in practice and develop a critical awareness of key issues and
principles affecting organisations’ relationships with their customers in a range of business
sectors.
ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
Carry out an analysis of different types of customers and their needs showing clear
understanding of their importance to organisational survival and growth

Develop and justify customer service policies in support of strategic business objectives,
identifying possible conflict between them.

Incorporate consumer protection into customer service policies and identify any resource
implications

Demonstrate an understanding of the need for customer relationships to be developed and


managed.

Analyse the methods used by organisations to manage their relationships with customers and
evaluate their influence on the development of specific campaigns.

INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:


The needs of the internal and external customers; Consumer perceptions of service & care;
Establishing standards and assessing returns; Sales functions & selling skills; Consumer
protection; Architecture of CRM; Technical functions; Privacy and ethical concerns; Setting
frameworks for CRM; CRM influence on campaigns
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: May 2006
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: Sept 2006
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY: SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION: City SITE:
College Plymouth
MODULE LEADER: Chloe Merriman Term All year

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Assessment Criteria (Threshold Level) :

1. Assignment. Analysis and evaluation of a business’s customer service policy with


recommendations for improvement and development of customer services training guide.

2. Case studies: Analysis of mini case studies demonstrating knowledge of consumer


legislation and importance of sound company complaints policy

3. Assignment: Review of CRM techniques with recommendation for an appropriate


framework designed to assist an organisation to develop a successful campaign

Assessment Mode:
(i) Assignment: report (40%)
(ii) Case studies: report (30%)
(iii) Assignment: review (30%)

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

The module will be delivered via a combination of lectures, seminars and individual tutorial
and guest speakers where appropriate. A comprehensive package of support and learning
resources will be available to students via the VLE.

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

Cox R and Brittan Retail Management 4th edition London: Pitman


McGoldrick P (2002) Retail Marketing London : McGraw Hill

Journals
Customer Service, The Grocer, Retail Week

Electronic references
www.CRM2DAY.com
http://guide.darwinmag.com/technology/enterprise/crm/

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: PFD 230 CREDITS: 20 LEVEL:5
MODULE TITLE: LICENSED TRADE MANAGEMENT
PRE-REQUISITE(S):N/A
CO-REQUISITE(S):N/A
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
The licensed trade is an integral part of the hospitality industry and this module aims to provide
students with the operational skills and legal information necessary to manage premises that
are licensed.
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Hospitality
Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A
MODULE AIMS:
This module aims to develop the knowledge and skills required for the efficient and legal
provision of alcoholic beverages in a variety of licensed trade situations.
ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
• Define and analyse the production, characteristics and storage of alcoholic beverages
• Describe and discuss the nature, evolution, structure and status of the licensed trade in
the UK and the implications of the moral and social responsibilities of the licensee
• Discuss primary customer segments within the licensed trade industry, the
characteristics of related premises and the changing nature and consumption trends of
licensed retail business..
• Name key licensing legislation and discuss the implications of the law to a licensee.
(selected from Knowledge and Understanding; Cognitive/intellectual skills; Key/transferable
skills; Practical skills - see SEEC level descriptors)
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:
• The history, structure and status of the licensed trade.
• Primary customer segments and trends within the licensed trade industry.
• Product knowledge: The range, characteristics and consumption trends of licensed retailing
products.
• The management of alcoholic and non alcoholic beverages
• Key licensing legislation and the implications of the law for a licensee including local bye-
laws
• Cellar and Bar management and control.
Marketing, advertising and merchandising linked to profitability
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL:
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION:
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY:UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: P. Alford Term*S4

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Assessment Criteria:

Essay that demonstrates ability to evaluate the characteristics of the Licensed Trade (70%)
In class test that test knowledge across module (30%)

Assessment Mode:

Extended essay (70%)


End Test (30%)

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

A series of lectures, guest speakers, visits and seminars

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

Books
Boella, M. (2001) Licensed Premises Management : Croner’s A-Z Essentials: Croner
Bruning, T. ed (1997) The Publicans Handbook: Kogan Page
Davis, B., Lockwood, A. & Stone, S. (1998) Food and Beverage Management. London:
Butterworth-Heinemann
Julyan, B. (2001) Sales and Service for the Wine Professional, London: Butterworth-
Heinemann

Websites
SDC LIBRARY Heritage
B.I.I
Institute of Alcohol studies
HMSO – Legislation related to the Licensed Trade

Magazines
The Inn Keeper
Licensee
Caterer and Hotelkeeper
Restaurant
Hospitality

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 200 CREDITS:20 LEVEL:5
MODULE TITLE: Tourism Planning and Management
PRE-REQUISITE(S):
CO-REQUISITE(S):
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
This module will build on the key principles and concepts introduced in stage 1 modules. The module seeks to examine the
planning and management of tourism in the light of a rapidly changing environment. It will give students an understanding of the
impacts and management of sustainable tourism and will investigate current trends in international tourism.
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
This Module seeks to examine the practical application of tourism management principles, and provide students
with an understanding of planning for tourism provision. The module aims to equip potential tourism practitioners
with the skills and knowledge necessary to deal with rapidly changing tourism environments at local, national and
international levels.
ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
1. demonstrate knowledge of the institutions involved or associated with local, regional, national and international
tourism planning and development.
2. apply appropriate techniques to identify and analyse factors affecting world-wide tourism development;
3. understand the need for strategic planning for tourism growth, and of the main costs and benefits resulting from
such growth;
4. demonstrate a critical awareness and understanding of sustainability issues in global tourism and current
trends in practice;
5. evaluate different approaches to tourism planning and visitor management using selected case studies;
6. analyse the requirements necessary for the successful management of the tourism site.
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:
 Public, private and voluntary sector organisations concerned with tourism development; strategies employed;
policy-making procedures.
 Planning processes and models of tourism development
 Social, economic, political and environmental factors affecting both national and international tourism
development
 Management and control of resources and development; consequences of unplanned development; negative
impacts of tourism
 Sustainable tourism as a business concept; feasibility of sustainable growth, third world tourism
 Tour management and event planning
 Tourism planning and management case studies; local, regional, national and international examples

APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 01-09-01


DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01-09-01
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY:UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Winfrid Scutt Term* S4

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Assessment Criteria:

Learners will demonstrate through coursework and end module tests:


1 knowledge of the institutions involved or associated with local, regional, national and international tourism
planning and development.
2 that they can apply appropriate techniques to identify and analyse factors affecting world-wide tourism
development;
3 that they understand the need for strategic planning for tourism growth, and of the main costs and benefits
resulting from such growth;
4 a critical awareness and understanding of sustainability issues in global tourism and current trends in practice;
5 that they can evaluate different approaches to tourism planning and visitor management using selected case
studies;
6 analyse the requirements necessary for the successful management of the tourism site.

Assessment Mode:

Coursework: 60%:
• a written essay (max 1500 words) weighted at 20%
• report weighted at 20%
• a group oral seminar presentation and a written report (max 2000 words) weighted at 20%
End module tests (2 hours) 2 x 20%

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

A series of lectures, supported by guided reading will be used to examine concepts. Group seminars will provide an
opportunity for students to demonstrate their depth of understanding. Case studies will be used to develop the ability to
apply appropriate techniques in given situations.
Recommended Texts and Sources
The recommended texts for the course are:
Davidson R And Maitland R (1997). Tourism destinations. London: Hodder & Stoughton.

Doswell, R. (1997). Tourism: how effective management makes the difference Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann.

Frechtling D C. (2001) Forecasting tourism demand: methods & strategies. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann

Gunn, C. (2002). Tourism planning, 4th edition. Washington: Taylor & Francis.

Inskeep, E. (1994). National and regional tourism planning. London: Thomson

Pender L and Sharpley R (2004) The management of tourism. London: Sage

Robinson M (Ed.) (2000) Developments in urban and rural tourism Tyne & Wear: Business Education

Robinson M (Ed.) (2000) Environmental management and pathways to sustainable tourism. Tyne & Wear: Business
Education

Swarbrooke, J. (1999) Sustainable tourism management. Wallingford: CABI Publishing.

Swarbrooke, J. (2000). The development and management of visitor attractions. 2nd edition. Oxford: Butterworth
Heinemann

Journals:
Annals of Tourism Research
Journal of Sustainable Tourism
Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing
Tourism Management

Web-based sources:
Altis: the guide to internet resources in hospitality, leisure, sport and tourism http://www.altis.ac.uk
Department for Culture,Media and Sport – tourism pages : http://www.culture.gov.uk/tourism

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD217 CREDITS:20 LEVEL:5
MODULE TITLE: MANAGING PEOPLE
PRE-REQUISITE(S): None
CO-REQUISITE(S): None
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
This module explores aspects of the Human Resources specialist’s contribution to effective management of the
employment relationship.
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : HR

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
To clarify the contribution of effective management of human resources to achieving organisational/personal goals;
to help learners appreciate the skills and challenges of people-management; to appraise strategies for developing
flexibility and addressing such challenges, essential to organisational and personal success.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:

At the end of a module the learner will be expected to be able to:


1. link the role/skills of the manager to organisational and personal efficiency/effectiveness
in dynamic business environments
2. investigate and evaluate differing theories, approaches and strategies for initiating,
nurturing, developing and sustaining co-operative employer/employee relationships
3. consider the implications and importance of ethics in employment relationships and
research current approaches/practice

INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:


1.organisational environments
2.organisational development
3.management skills, and the employer/employee relationship
4.stress management/conflict resolution/negotiation/persuasion
5.delegation/empowerment/ownership
6.strategies for managing change/flexible working practices
7.ethics in employment relationship
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 28/2/07
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 1/9/07
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY: UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: C.E.Stafford Term* 1&2

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Assessment Criteria:
• Demonstrate knowledge of the implications for managers of maximising human capital in dynamic
work environments
• Investigate, analyse and evaluate work-based application/implementation of HR strategies and
approaches, and where appropriate recommend alternatives.

Assessment Mode:

100% coursework – 2 assignments (35% each) + 1 time-constrained assessment (30%)

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

The module is delivered by means of weekly lectures and seminars

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

Mullins, L.J. (2005) Management and Organisational Behaviour, 7th. ed. London, Pearson Education
Graham, H.T. & Bennett, R. (1998) Human Resources Management London, Financial Times/Pitman
Cole, G.A. (2002) Personnel and Human Resource Management 5th. ed. London, Continuum

Journals:
Personnel Management
Management Today etc.

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 207 CREDITS:20 LEVEL:5
MODULE TITLE: Research Skills
PRE-REQUISITE(S):N/A
CO-REQUISITE(S):N/A
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
This module enables students to identify a range of different research methods, processes and considerations which are central
in conducting a research project in their academic or professional discipline.
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
The aim of this module is to enable students to develop an understanding of, and reflect upon the nature of a research project,
the aims and applications of research, and the methods and procedures for conducting research.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
At the end of this module students will be expected to be able to:
1 Produce an appropriate research project proposal.
2 Demonstrate an understanding of the factors which are prevalent when proposing and planning a research project in
their chosen academic or professional area.
3 Evaluate a range of research methodologies and data collection techniques.
4 Reflect and provide evaluation on the process of collecting data, and or conducting research
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:
Types of research, barriers and restrictions in research, identifying research
• Literature review and existing ‘knowledge’
• Discipline specific research considerations and issues
• Ethics, reliability and validity
• Discipline specific research methods, sampling, and the research cycle
• Data analysis techniques
• Preparing a research proposal
• Conducting a research project

APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 30-03-06


DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01-09-06
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY: UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Demelza Thackeray Term* S4

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Assessment Criteria:

The student will demonstrate:


• the ability to produce an appropriate research project proposal.
• an understanding of the factors which are prevalent when proposing and planning a research project
in their chosen academic or professional area.
• the ability to evaluate a range of research methodologies and data collection techniques.
• reflection on the process of collecting data, and or conducting research

Assessment Mode:

Coursework: 100%

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

The module will be delivered via a combination of lectures, seminars and individual tutorial and guest
speakers where appropriate. A comprehensive package of support and learning resources will be available to
students via the VLE.

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:
Berg, B (2001) Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences. London: Allyn & Bacon
Blaxter, L Hughes, C and Tight, M (2001) How to Research (2nd edn.) Maidenhead: Open University Press
Bryman A and Burgess R G (1994) Analysing Qualitative Data. London: Routledge
Bryman A and Cramer D (1990) Quantitative Data Analysis for Social Scientists. London: Routledge
Dawson, C (2002) Practical Research Methods. Oxford: How To books
Gill J and Johnson P (1997) Research methods for Managers. (2nd edn.) London: Paul Chapman Publishing
Gomm, R (2004) Social Research Methodology. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
May T (2001) Social Research (3rd edn.) Milton Keynes: Open University
O’Leary Z (2004) The Essential Guide to Doing Research. London: Sage
Punch, K (2005) Social Research. London: Sage
Robson, C (1993) Real world research. Oxford: Blackwell
Ruane, J (2005) Essentials of Research Methods. Oxford: Blackwell
Walliman, N (2001) Your Research Project. London: Sage
Williams, M (2000) Science and Social Science. London: Routledge

Journals
Annals of Tourism Research
Journal of Sustainable Tourism
Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing
Tourism Management
Insights: The Marketing Intelligence Service

Web-based sources:
Altis: the guide to internet resources in hospitality, leisure, sport and tourism http://www.altis.ac.uk
SOSIG: social science information gateway: http://www.sosig.ac.uk
www.aqr.org.uk
www.jrf.org.uk
www.socialresearchmethods.net
www.socresonline.org.uk
www.soc.umn.edu

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 210 CREDITS:20 LEVEL:5
MODULE TITLE: TOUR OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
PRE-REQUISITE(S):N/A
CO-REQUISITE(S):N/A
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
The aim of this module is to develop the learners understanding of scale and scope of the tour operating
sector of the travel and tourism industry
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT:
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%
Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism
Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A
MODULE AIMS:
The aim of this module is to develop the learners understanding of scale and scope of the tour operating sector of the travel
and tourism industry, and to give them the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills associated with the basic functions
of a tour operator.
It is designed for those learners wishing to enter employment within the tour operating sector of the travel industry, as well as
those wishing to enter sectors of the industry which work closely with tour operators for example travel agents and airlines
ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:
The student will be able to: Examine the role and purpose of tour operators; Examine the scale and scope of the UK and
European tour operating industry; Understand & explain the production of a tour operator’s brochure; Identify the stages in the
compilation of a package holiday.

INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:


Examine the role and purpose of tour operators
Definitions: tour operator, package holiday, travel agent;
Development of the package holiday market: early package holidays, packages for the mass market, technological changes,
development of consumer protection;
Categories of tour operating businesses: outbound operators, domestic operators, incoming operators, specialist ops;
Trends in tour operating; recession, EU directive, biggest tour operators, business collapses, expansion of the cruise market,
changing trends in package holidays, product range, tour operators structures.
Examine the scale and scope of the UK and European tour operating industry
Scale: number of passengers carried, reasons for travel, market share, turnover, profitability, ownership, market segments,
competition;
Integration: horizontal, vertical, conglomerates;
Ancillary organisation: Association of British Travel Agents, Association of Independent Tour Operators, Federation of Tour
Operators, Passenger Shipping Association, Civil Aviation Authority, British Incoming Tour Operators Association, Passenger
Carrying Federation, Air Travel Organisers.
Understand & explain the production of a tour operator’s brochure
Planning: purpose, target market, market segmentation, legal implications, pricing;
Stages of production: creative brief, copy writing, proofing, logo’s and brands, colour proof, printing, production, distribution,
multiple editions, time scale: distribution, direct mail, travel agencies, intensive/selective distribution systems: specialist
carriers, haulier, consolidated delivery companies.
Identify the stages in the compilation of a package holiday
Stages; market research, contracting, planning and scheduling, costing, staffing, training marketing, company systems;
Contracting methods: air transport, time charter, series charter, ad hoc, split charter, seat purchase, accommodation,
allocation, as hoc, surface transport: coach, including transfer, rail, ferry, self drive, cruise;
Costs: fixed variable, mark-up, seasonal flexing, comp., forward buying, interest earning, cash flow, hedging.
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 01-09-01
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01.09-01
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY:UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Sue Abercrombie Term*S3 or S4

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Assessment Criteria:

Through the assignments and presentation the learners will demonstrate that they can:
1 examine the role and purpose of tour operators;
2 examine the scale and scope of the UK and European tour operating industry;
3 understand & explain the production of a tour operator’s brochure;
4 identify the stages in the compilation of a package holiday.

Assessment Mode:

Coursework:
• two assignments each weighted at 40% (2000 words)
• Presentation weighted at 20% (15 mins)

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:

Lectures, Tutorial, Seminars

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

The recommended texts for the course are:

Davidson, R. (1998). Tourism in Europe. 2nd edition. Harlow: Longman.

European Tourism,(2001) Resort management in Europe: case studies & learning materials, London: Thomson

Faulkner B (2004) Tourism in the 21st century: reflections on experience. London. Continuum.

Holloway J C R (2002) The business of tourism. 5th edition. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall

Hoyle B & Knowles R (1998) Modern transport geography 2nd edition. Chichester: Wiley

Krippendorf J (1999). The holiday makers: understanding the impact of leisure and travel. Oxford: Butterworth
Heinemann.

Page S.J et al (2001) Tourism: a modern synthesis. London: Thomson.

Page S (2005) Transport and tourism: global perspectives Harlow: Prentice Hall

Pender L (2001) Travel trade & transport: an introduction. London: Thomson

Swarbrooke J & Horner S (1999). Consumer behaviour in tourism: an international perspective. Oxford: Butterworth
Heinemann.

Journals:
Journal of Sustainable Tourism
Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing
Tourism Management

Web-based sources:
Altis: the guide to internet resources in hospitality, leisure, sport and tourism http://www.altis.ac.uk

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UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD
MODULE CODE: TOFD 215 CREDITS:10 LEVEL:5
MODULE TITLE: GUIDING THROUGH HERITAGE
PRE-REQUISITE(S):N/A
CO-REQUISITE(S):N/A
COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes
SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR
This module will examine the concept of and trends in cultural tourism. The learner will examine techniques of interpretation,
visitor management and promotion
ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT: (Please consult DMR guidance notes – this is an
example)
(C1)COURSEWORK 100%

Give Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked : Tourism

Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation N/A


MODULE AIMS:
The learner will examine the concept of and trends in cultural tourism. The learner will examine techniques
of interpretation, visitor management and promotion.

ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to
be able to:

On completion of the module the learner will be able to:


1. Prepare an itinerary in a professional form
2. Identify & describe the social history and culture of named areas of interest
3. Prepare interpretation and education materials
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT:

•Identifying and describing the themes in cultural tourism;


•International trends;
•Who are the eco/cultural tourists;
•Identifying and managing the resource;
•Innovation;
•Major providers;
•Interpretation and education;
•Event planning and promotion – the development of itineraries, routes and risk analysis;
•Working with other agencies in the development of tours, promotions and general marketing strategies;
•Sustainability;
•Effective planning for on-site emergencies and problems;
•Selection and training of staff;
•Resource implications;
•Balancing the books.
APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: 01.09-01
DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: 01.09-01
DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:
FACULTY:UPC SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF
INSTITUTION:CCP SITE:
MODULE LEADER: Winfrid Scutt Term* S3 or S4

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Assessment Criteria:
Through the assignments the learner will demonstrate that they can:
1 Prepare an itinerary in a professional form
2 Identify & describe the social history and culture of named areas of interest
3 Prepare interpretation and education materials

Assessment Mode:

Coursework: 100%
• Assignment – prepare an itinerary weighted at 35%
• Essay social history & culture weighted at 40% (1500 words)
• prepare interpretation materials weighted at 25%

Schedule of Teaching and Learning:


Field trips, Lectures, Seminars & Guest speakers

Recommended Texts and Sources


The recommended texts for the course are:

Brown F (2000) Tourism reassessed: blight or blessing. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann

Butler R and S Boyd (2000) Tourism and national parks: issues & implications. Chichester: Wiley

Cooper C P et al (1998) Tourism: principles & practice Harlow: FT Prentice Hall

Leask A and Yeoman I (2002) Heritage visitor attractions: An operations management perspective. London: Cassell

Robinson M (Ed) (2000) Developments in urban & rural tourism. Tyne & Wear: Business Education

Journals:
Annals of Tourism Research
Journal of Sustainable Tourism
Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing
Tourism Management

Web-based sources:
Association for Heritage Interpretation: http://www.heritage-interpretation.org.uk

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