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ANSI N41..

IEEE Std 382-1972

Draft American National Standard

IEEE Trial-Use Guide for Type Test of'

Class I Electric Valve Operators for


Nuclear Power Generating Stations
Sponsor Joint Committee on Nuclear Power Standards of the IEEE Nuclear Science Group and the Engineering Society Power IEEE

Q Copyright 1972 by

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.


No part Of thiv publicationmay b reproduced in any form. in an electronic retrieunlsystem or otherui.se. without the prior u rittet permission of the huhlisher.

Approved September 20, 1972

IE EE Standards Committee
J. Forster, Chairman B. 0. Wcinschel, Vice Chairman

S. I. Sherr, Secretary

S. J. Angello Saul Aronow Jack Avins B. B. BarroW F. K. Becker Richard Brereton W. H. Cook Louis Costrell

I 0

G. E. Hertig J. L. loepfinger W. R. Kreusi Harvey Lance B. J. Leon D. T. Michael J. D. M. Phelps R. H. Rose. Ii

S. W. Rosenthal
Gustave Shapiro R. M. Showers P. H. Smith F. G. Timmel L. van Rooji R. V. Wachter W. T. Wintringham

NOTICE OF TRIAL USE

Comments on this trial-use standard are welcomed and should be addressed to: Secretary. IEEE Standards Committee. 345 East 47th Street. New York. N.Y.
10017.

After a trial-use )erio(d of approximately one year. the Group responsible for this document vill prepare a revision and submit it-to the Standards Committee for approval as a full-status standard.

Corrected Copy, April 10, 1973 A black line () appears in the margin beside those lines that have been corrected.

Foreword
(This Foreword is not a part of IEEE Sid 382-1972, Trial-Use Guide for Type Test of Class I Electric Valve Operators for Nuclear Power Generating Stations, ANSI N41.6.)

IEEE Std 323-1971, General Guide for Qualifying Class I Electric Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations, describes the basic requirements for equipment qualification. It requires that the qualification of Class I electric equipment include the demonstration of the capability of the equipment, or the components thereof, to meet their performance specifications under normal environments and under those conditions that caused and are caused by the design basis events for the station. Some of the conditions associated with design basis events are not found in normal service. The capability of equipment under these conditions can be demonstrated by type test. Each applicant for a construction permit or an operating licenre i reouired to provide assurance that all components are adequate for their service conditions to comply with the Atomic Energy Commission's Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50). Each applicant has the responsibility to assure himself and others that this guide, if used, is pertinent to his application and that the integrated performance of his station is adequate. The IEEE will maintain this document current with the state of the technology. Comments on this document and suggestions for additional material are invited. These should be addressed to: Secretary IEEE Standards Committee Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 345 East 47 Street New York, N. Y. 10017 This document was prepared by Subcommittee 2, Equipment Qualification, of the IEEE Joint Committee on Nuclear Power Standards. At the time of approval, the members of the Subcommittee were: A. J. Simmons, Chairman L. D. Test, Vice Chairman
J. F. Bates J. T. Bauer L J. Blasiak E. M. Brown F. J. Campbell F. W. Chandler C. E. Corley W. J. Denkowski R. F. Edwards C. V. Fields R. J. Flaherty, Jr W. J. Folcy J. B. Gardner B. Gregory G. W. Hammond A. E. Hilgour

A. Kaplan, Secretary
T. H. Ling J. C. McCreary D. J. Meraner C. E. Miller W. H. Steigelmann W. G. Stiffler W. A. Szelistowski I. Villalva

The Working Group of Subcommittee 2, Equipment Qualification, of the IEEE Joint Committee on Nuclear Power Standards had the following membership: W. J. Denkowski, Chairman
A. J. Simmons W. H. Stcigelniann

W. A. Szelistowski
1. Villalva

At the time it approved this document, the IEEE Joint Committee on Nuclear Power Statidards had the following mEnibership:

T. J. Martin, Vice Chairman


R. E. Allen J. F. Bates R. G. Benham K. J. Brockwell D. F. Brosnan 0. K. Brown S. G. Caslake F. W. Chandler E. F. Chelotti C. hi. Chiappetta

J. C. Russ, Chairman
'
R. J. Cooney D. G. Fitzgerald J. M. Gallagher L. M. Johnson A. Kaplan J. L. Hoepfinger V. A. Moore M. I. Olken E. S. Patterson D. G. Pitcher R. A. Saya

J. T. Boettger, Secretary
A. J. Simmons J. H. Smith C. E. Stine H. K. Stolt D. F. Sullivan W. A. Szelistowski L. D. Test J. L. Voyles E. C. Wenzinger C. J. Wylie

'ta

Contents
SECTION PAGE

Part I: Definitions and Tests ...................... 1. Scope.................................................................................... 2. Definitions. 3. Equipment Specifications ..................... 4. Type Test Description ....... . . ........................................................ 4.1 General................................................. 4.2 Aging Simulation.. .................. 4.3 Seismic Qualification.......... ............................... . 4.4 Accident or Other Special Environment Simulation . ................................ 4.5 Measurements and Tests ........................................... 4.5.] Measurment Categories ..................................... 4.5.2 Test Sequence ................................... 4.5.2.1 Normal Condition Load Test ..................................... 4.5.2.2 Design Basis Accident Load Test ....................................... 4.5.2.3 Post Design Basis Accident Load Test .................................. 4.6 Inspection ............................. 5. Documentation .......... .............................................................. 5.1 General .................... 5.2 Type Test Data .................. ...................................... 6. Standards References.. .................. Part 11: ........................ ............. .... . .... .. Procedure for Aging Sim ulation ..................................................

7 7 7 8 8 8 8 :.. 8 8 8 .. 9 9
9

9 9 9 9 9 10 0 10 11 ............... 14

Part Ili: Design Basis Accident Environment Simulation for 1-'V11 and BWR Part IV: Design Basis Accident Environment Simulation for an HTGR ...
TABLES

Table 1 Table 2 Table 3


FIGURES

Test Conditions for Pressurized Water Reactors .12 Test Conditions for Boiling Water Reactors ..................................... Test Conditions for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors ..............

12 16 13

Fig 1 Test Chamber Profile for Accident Environment Simulation ........................ Fig 2 Temperature and Pressure History for Environment Simulation

of HTGR Containment Atmosphere Response Following a Hot Helium Blowdown Into Containment ....... ............
Fig 3 Temperature and Pressure History for Environment Simulation of HTGR Containment Atmosphere Response Following a Steam Line Rupture Inside the Containment ...........................................

................

14
.15

Draft American National Standard IEEE Trial-Use Guide for Type Test of
Class I Electric Valve Operators for

Nuclear Power Generating Stations


Part I: Definitions and Tests 1. Scope
This guide provides direction Iror establishing a type test that will yield di ata which verify that Class I electric valve opf -rators for nuclear power generating stations can meet their design basis performance requi irements. ponents that are integral to the mechanism and are required to operate and control valve action. installed life. The interval from installation to removal, during which the equipment or component thereof may be subject to design service conditions and process demands.
NOTE: A valve operator may have an installed life of 40 years with certain components (seals and lubricants) changed periodically; thus, the installed life of the components would be less than 40 years.

2.. Definitions
The definitions in this section estEiblish the meanings of words in the context of their use in this guide. class I electric equipment. The elect]hc equip ment that is essential to the safe failure or and isolation of the reactor or whose damage could result in significant release of radioactive materials. containment. That portion of the eiagineered pr safety features designed to act as-the prcpa barrier, after the reactor system pressure boundary, to prevent the release, ev,en under conditions of a reactor accident, of iinacceptable quantities of radioactive materi; al beyond a controlled zone. design basis events. Postulated even ts used in the design to establish the perforn aance requirements of the structures and sys tems. design life. The time during which satisfacr atsectory performance can be expected foi ~a sdpe.cific set of service conditions upon whi chi design margins are based. electric valve operator. An electric powered mechanism for opening and closinf g a valve, including all electric and mechan: ical corm7

operating cycle. The complete sequence of operations that occur during a response to a demand function. sample valve operator. A production valve operator type tested to obtain data that are valid over a range of sizes and for the specific services.
NOTE: All salient factors must be shown to be common to the sample valve operator and to the intended service valve operator. Commonality of factors such as materials l of construction, lubrication, mechanical stresses and clearances, manufacturing processes, and dielectric properties may be established by specification, test, or analyses.

3. Equipment Specifications
The manufacturer's equipment specifications shall include the following: (1) Valve operator performance characteristics under defined plant normal, test, design basis tis event, and post design basis event condi(2) The range of voltage, frequency, and environmental conditions, including seismic forces, under which the valve operator will provide rated mechanical force

ANSI N41.6

GUIDE FOR TYPE TEST OF CLASS I ELECTRIC VALVE NOTE: Analysis may be used to justify testing in one position to represent multiple installation positions.

(3) The mounting configuration for the valve operator (4) Preventive maintenance schedule for lubricants, seals, and other components for the installed life of the valve operators (5) The design life of the valve operator (6) Control and indicating devices contained on the valve operator

4. Type Test Description 4.1 General. The type test shall demonstrate that the performance characteristics of the valve operator adhere to the equipment specifications. One or more sample valve operators shall be constructed using normal manufacturing processes and then be subjected to the test program described herein. The test for the sample valve operator shall consist of subjecting it to the following sequence of conditions to simulate the design basis service conditions of the operator, that is, (1) aging, (2) seismic, and (3) accident or other special environment as applicable.
NOTE: Valve operators installed outside the conlainnient will not be exposed to the same environmental conditions during an accident as are those installed within the containment.

Means shall be provided for electrically energizing the valve operator, applying simulated functional loads during test, and exposing it to environmental conditions (for example, temperature, pressure, moisture, nuclear radiations, chemical solutions, jet forces, and chemical composition of the ambient) that simulate those to which the intended service valve operator is expected to be exposed during and following design basis accidents. The valve operator shall be exposed to appropriate nuclear radiation prior to or during test chamber tests. Typical procedures for accident environment simulation are suggested in Parts III and IV; however, the values of the environmental parameters presented in Parts III and IV may be different for various plant designs. 4.5 Measurements and Tests. The test measurements shall be made with equipment that provides adequate resolution for detecting meaningful changes in the parameters. The time interval between measurements shall be such as to obtain the response of each parameter. 4.5.1 Measurement Categories. The measured parameters shall be classified according to their general nature into one of five categories as follows:
Category I Environment. Tem-

;I

No maintenance shall be performed during the type test. 4.2 Aging Simulation. The aging procedure shall simulate the effects of environment (for example, temperature, humidity, nuclear radiations, and contaminants), voltage stress, and mechanical stresses and wear (starting forces, vibration, and driven load). A procedure for aging simulation is suggested in Part II. 4.3 Seismic Qualification. The valve operator shall be qualified for seismic conditions in accordance with the requirements set forth in IEEE Std 344-1971, Trial-Use Guide for Seismic Qualification of Class I Electric Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations. 4.4 Accident or Other Special Environment Simulation. The valve operator shall be mounted in a test chamber in a position and manner that simulate its installation in actual use.
8

perature, total pressure, and vapor pressure within the test chamber Category II - Power and Cycle Time. Frequency, current, voltage, power to the valve operator, time duration of the operating cycle, and simulated load Category III - Fluid Characteristics. Concentration of chemical constituents and concentration in fluids injected into the test chamber plus the flow rate of fluids injected into the test chamber Category IV - Radiological Features. Nuclear radiation data, including energy type, energy level, exposure rate, and integrated dose Category V - Electrical Resistance. Insulation resistance of the electrical components of the valve operator

OPERATORS FOR NUCLEAR POWER GENERATING STATIONS 4.5.2 Test Sequence. The test sequence. shall properly cycle all the operations associated with normal conditions, design basis accident conditions, and post- design basis accident conditions.

IEEE Sd 382-1972

4.5.2.3 Post Design BasisAccident Load


Test. The proper sequencing of this test shall be as follows: (1) After the environmental transient tests associated with the design basis accident have been completed, adjust the conditions in the test chamber so as to simulate the post design basis accident conditions as described in Parts III and IV. Record the appropriate Category I, III, and V measurements at suitable intervals. (2) Exercise the valve operator through a complete cycle and repeat at specified intervals. Record Category II measurements. (_ Establish th- *Fasiamenal conditions X ulnr-.cai'arAl repeat' the tests stipulated in (4) Irradiate the valve operator, as required, to meet the requirements of Part II to attain the total integrated dose level expected during the design basis accident. (5) Repeat step (3). 4.6 Inspection. Upon completion of the tests, the valve operator shall be dismantled and visually inspected. The condition of the windings, bearing, lubricants, auxiliary contacts. wiring, gear drive trains, drive linkages, and other related components shall be recorded.

4.5.2.1 Normal Condition Load Test.


The proper sequencing of this test shall be as follows: (1) Age the valve operator to an appropriate degree in accordance with the recommendations in Part II. Seismically qualify as specified in IEEE Std 344-1971. Establish the normal environmental conditions which exist prior to the design basis accident. Record appropriate Category I, II, and V measurements. (2) Exercise the valve operator through one,' complete operating cycle. Record appropriate Category I and II measurements. (3) After the operating cycle has been completed, record Category V measurements.

4.5.2.2 Design Basis Accident Load Test.


The proper sequencing of this test shall be as follows: (1) Irradiate the sample valve operator to at least 50 percent of the total integrated dose level expected during the period of the design basis accident.
NOTE: This irradiation may be combined with that
performed as part of the aging simulation.

Record Category IV measurements. (2) Inject fluids (for example, steam, gases, liquid jets, chemical solution sprays) into the test chamber as required to simulate the time variations of the design basis accident environmental conditions as described in Parts III and IV. Record Category I, II, and III measurements at appropriate intervals throughout this test. (3) When the environmental conditions reach peak values, exercise the valve operator through one complete operating cycle at design basis accident loading conditions. Record appropriate Category I, II, and V measurements. (4) Before the pressure within the test chamber falls below 90 percent of its peak value, exercise the valve operator through one complete cycle. Record appropriate Category I, II, and V measurements. (5) Repeat steps. (2) through (4) for the required number of environmental transients. 9

. Documentation 5.1 General. The type test documentation


shall be sufficient to verify that the equipment meets its specified performance requirements. 5.2 Type Test Data. Type test data used to demonstrate the qualifications of the equip* :e ti; be-pertinent to the application and ogla winid in an auditable form. The type test data shall include: (1) Identification of equipment (2) Equipment specifications (3) Test specification and objective (4) Test results(for each test) (a) Equipment tested (b) Test facility and instrumentation (c) Test procedure (d) Test data and accuracy (e) Inspection results

(f) Conclusions
(5) Supporting data (6) Approved signature and date

ANSI N41.6

CUIDE FOR TYPE TEST OF CLASS I ELECTRIC VALVE

6. Standards References
The following IEEE Standards were used as references in preparing this guide and are useful in the interpretation of its meaning. IEEE Std 112A-1964, Test Procedure for Polyphase Induction Motors and Generators IEEE Std 117-1956, Test Procedure for Evaluation of Systems of Insulating Materials for Random-Wound Electric Machinery

IEEE 323-1971, General Guide for Qualifying Class I Electric Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations IEEE 334-1971, Trial-Use Guide for Type Tests of Continuous-Duty Class I Motors Installed Inside the Containment of Nuclear Power Generating Stations IEEE 344-1971, Trial-Use Guide for Seismic Qualification of Class I Electric Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations

Part II: Procedure for Aging Simulation


The normal operating environment to which the valve operator is subjected during its period of installed life consists of two major parts: (1) exposure to nuclear radiations, and (2) exposure to temperature, humidity, and, in some instances, to an ambient atmosphere composition different from standard air. In addition. normal service usage and/or the performance of routine testing during its installed life produces an aging of the valve operator.
NOTE: It is recognized that limited technical information is available regarding aging of electromechanical equipment components, including the effects of simultaneous nuclear radiation, temperature, and humidity exposures. There is likewise little information on how to properly perform accelerated humidity and radiation aging.

ation (such as cobalt 60) for such time as to yield an equivalent exposure of 0.1 Mrad equivalent air dose per year for 40 years.
NOTES: () The volume occupied by the actuator shall receive an isotropic flux of gamma radiation such that if the volume contained air this radiation dose would result. (2) If nuclear rdiation exposure tests and analyses of the various materials used in the valve operator show that. at the design basis levels. both direct damage to any materials and the evolution of radiation-produced substances are negligible, then an actual radiation exposure is not necessary as part of the type test. All possible combined effects which may be produced by the nuclear radiation exposure acting in concert with other envi.onmental exposures shall be considered.

Mr

2. Exposure to Temperature and Humidity The sample valve operator shall be exposed to the equivalent of 40 years at a temperature of 1400F and 55 percent relative humidity. (See EEE Std 117 - 1956, Test Procedure for Evaluation of Systems of Insulating Materials for Random-Wound Electric Machinery.) 3. Operating Cycles The sample valve operator shall be cycled (from the full open to the full closed and back to the full open position) under a load equivalent to the driven load in the plant (or its rated load) for the anticipated number of operating cycles over a 40 year insLalled life. The test. shall ecompass a minimum of 500 operating cycles.
10

The normal operating environment and the test procedures are different in the various specific plant applications. A typical set of aging procedures is presented in the following paragraphs, but the user has the responsibility for determining that they are applicable for the plant application where the valve operator is to be used. Also, it must be recognized that the exposures to be simulated occur simultaneously during the plant in-service period, and thus some added conservatism should be used if a sequential set of aging exposures is employed. 1. Exposure to Nuclear Radiations The sample valve operator shall be uniformly exposed to a source of gamma radi-

I
OPERATORS FOR NUCLEAR POWER GENERATING STATIONS IEEE Std 382-1972

Part III: Design Basis Accident Environment Simulation, for PWR and BWR
The design basis accident environmental conditions to be simulated for a PWR (pressurized water reactor) or BWR (boiling water reactor) resulting from a postulated LOCA (loss-of-coolant accident) that are to be simulated generally consist of two major parts: (1) exposure to nuclear radiation and (2) exposure to hot gases or vapors (for example, steam) and a spray or jet of water, chemical solution, or other fluid. These environmental conditions differ riarkedly anIung different types of reactors and also vary significantly from location to location in the plant. In most locations outside the primary containment there will be no special environmental conditions resulting from a design basis event. There are other locations, such as within the reactor building in some BR plants, where there will be special environmental conditions, but these are less severe than those within the primary containment. The equipment specifications shall define the exact environment in each case. The test profiles currently prescribed to simulate the maximum environmental conditions anticipated within the primary containment in plants with PWRs and BWRs are shown in Tables 1 and 2. If it is desired to qualify equipment for in-containment service for both PWRs and BWRs, the test conditions may be chosen to encompass both test profiles. including the radiation dose and chemical spray specified for PWRs and the temperature/pressure profile specified for BWRs. As is noted, for out-of-containment service the conditions are less severe and generally not different from the normal operating conditions. In an actual loss-of-coolant accident, the radiation and steam/spray exposure occur simultaneously; however, it is acceptable to simulate them sequentially in the qualification test if it is not practicable to do so simultaneously. Since nuclear radiation is also part of the aging exposure described in Part II, it is acceptable to combine the radiation exposures into a single exposure preceding the seismic portion of the qualification test. A slightly lets conservative but accept11

able approach is to divide the total radiation 'dose into two or more parts; one conducted prior to the seismic test and the other conducted following, or alternately with, the steam/spray exposure. Although the valve operator is expected to. experience at most only one severe environmental transient as a result of a LOCA event during its installed life, it is recommended that it be exposed to at least- two steam/ chemical exposure transients in the accident environment simulation if the nuclear radiation exposure is not done coincident with the steam/chemical spray. A suggested exposure profile for the accident environment simulation for a valve operator that is to be qualified for in-containment service with either a BWR or a PWR plant follows: (1) Expose the sample valve operator to 200 Mrad equivalent air dose and record.
NOTE: If nuclear radiation exposure tests and analyses of the various materials used in the valve operator show that, at the design basis levels, both direct damage to any materials and the evolution of radiation-produced substances are negligible, then an actual radiation exposure is not necessary as part of the type test. All possible combined effects which may be produced by the nuclear radiation exposure acting in concert with other environmental exposures shall be considered.

(2) Perform the normal conditions load test (see 4.4.2.-1). (3) Perform the design basis event load test (see 4.4.2.2) as follows: (a) Inject steam and chemical spray raising the temperature within the test chamber to 2801F (1381C) (and the pressure to a minimum of 70 psig) within 10 seconds. The temperature shall then be increased to 3401F (171'C) within 5 minutes. The spray solution shall be that as given for the PWR case. (b) Operate the sample valve operator one full cycle. (c) Maintain the preceding conditions for 3 hours and operate the sample valve operator again. Then reduce the environmental conditions to the normal operating values within 2 hours.

ANSI N41.6

GUIDE FOR TYPE TEST OF CLASS I ELECTRIC VALVE

Table 1 Test Conditions for Pressurized Water Reactors (Typical Design Basis Accident Conditions)
(1) Exposure to Nuclear Radiations 4 Mrad after 1 hour 20 Mrad after 12 hours 24 Mrad after 1 day 40 Mrad after 10 days 55 Mrad after 1 month 110 Mrad after 6 months 150 Mrad after 1 year (2) Exposure to Steam and Chemicals (a) Steam Exposure

Table 2 Test Conditions for Boiling Water Reactors (Typical Design Basis Accident Conditions)
(1) Exposure to Nuclear Radiations 26 Mrad integrated over the accident (2) Exposure to Steam and Spray (a) Steam Exposure Time --en . -aVi-iWomin - Z:~m . . 4 or 3- ,. '3 to 6 h 6 h to 4 days 4 to 100 days Temperature e--. F - --Pressure psig 0 to 62 62 40 40 25 10

135 to 280
280 to 340 340 320 250 200

Time 0 to 10 s

1 l0s to 30 min
30 min to 4 days 4 days to 1 year

Temperature OF 120 to 300 300 250 200

Pressure psig 0 to 70 70 30 10

(b) Spray Exposure. Continuously spray uniformly for 24 hours with a solution of the following makeup at a rate of 0.16 (gal/min)/ft2 of area of the test sample: 0.28 molar H3BO3 (3000 ppm boron) NaOH to make a pH of 15 at 77'F (about .5S percent) Dissolve chemicals, on a one-liter basis, in the following order: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 600-ml demineralized water H3BO3 (special quality grade) NaOH (reagent grade) Na2S20s (anhydrous technical grade) Add remainder of water to volume of one liter Add NaO-1 to make a pH of 10.5 at 77%F, as required for the initial spray solution

If it is not practical to reproduce the specified pressure and temperature profiles combined, it is acceptable during the first four days to follow the temperature profile and allow the pressure to conform to saturated conditions (100 percent relative humidity). This procedure is justified by the fact that temperature is the more important parameter and increasing the pressure to maintain saturated conditions) will increase the severity of the test, it anything. (b) Spray Exposure. Spray uniformly with demineralized water during entire period. 'Conservative calculation of radiation dose to air resulting from beta and gamma radiation emitters released from the primary system.

0.064 molar Na2 S2 03

Conservative calculation of radiation dose to air resulting from beta and gamma radiation emitters released from the primary system.

(d) Repeat steps (a) through (c), except that after the sample valve operator is cycled at the end of the second 3-hour period at 340'F, reduce the temperature in the test chamber to 3201F (1600C) (and the. pressure to a minimum 40 psig) and hold it there until 6 hours after the start of the second transient. (e) Operate the sample valve operator one full cycle and then reduce the temperature in the test chamber to 2501F (1210C) (and the
12

pressure to at least 25 psig) and hold these conditions until 4 days after the start of the second transient. Operate the valve operator *onc -full cycle and then reduce the temperature to 2000F (930C) (and a pressure to a minimum 10 psig) and maintain the conditions for an additional 10 days. Operate the operator one full cycle. (4) Continue the steam/chemical exposure for an additional 16 days (200 F/10 psig) operating the operator at appropriate intervals (see Table 1).
NOTE: The additional 16 days of exposure is intended to increase the confidence of the test to an acceptable level.

The temperature profile is shown in Fig 1.

';

0
It 0

340 320

0o

0 C

4
Ol

280
L
0

z
t1I 0 CD

w a:

250
w a. w ~ w

0O

200

2:

140

30 DAYS
TI ME
w
-

Fie I Test Chamber Temperature Profile for. Accident Environment Simulation

I -

ANSI
N41.6

GUIDE FOR TYPE TEST OF CLASS I ELECTRIC VALVE

Part IV: Design Basis Accident Environment Simulation for an HTGR


The design basis accident environment to be simulated for an HTGR (high-temperature gas-cooled reactor) consists of two parts: (1) exposure to nuclear radiation and (2) exposure to either helium (or superheated steam). Fig 2 shows the anticipated temperature and pressure history of the containment atmosphere. Although the containment atmosphere temperatures and pressures following a postulated superheated steam leak are lower than the one from a h3o helium blowdo-wn (design basis accident), the possibility exists that the consequences of a superheated steam leak may present the limiting conditions for certain equipment. For this reason, Fig 3 shows the temperature and pressure history of the containment atmosphere following a postulated steam line rupture inside the containment, assuming homogeneous conditions. It is the responsibility of the equipment manufacturer to determine which of the two conditions will present the most severe environment for his equipment. For the temperature and pressure qualification test the manufacturer should then decide upon the most severe temperature and pressure conditions for the environment

Fig 2 Temperature and Pressure History for Environment Simulation of HTGR Containment Atmosphere Response Following a Hot Helium Blowdown Into Containment (To = 1200F, Po = 15.5 psia. Note: For long-term testing assume
equilibrium conditions at T = 250 F and P = 37 psia.)

750

650

62

550
LL

52

a:

450

42

_
d .El

aE
w

350

32 c

D
(I)

250

22 a

150

12

50 0 100 200 300

I~1

400 50, 9 TIME (sec)


14

600

700

1 800

2 900

OPERATORS FOR NUCLEAR POWER GENERATING STATIONS

IEEE Std 382-1972

simulation. If in doubt, consideration should be given to testing the equipment for both cases, hot helium blowdown and superheated steam lead (see Table 3). In an actual design basis accident, the-radiation and helium exposures occur simultaneously; however, it is acceptable to simulate them sequentially in the qualification test if it is not practicable to do so simultaneously. Since nuclear radiation is part of the aging exposure described in Part II, it is acceptable to combine the radiation exposures into a single exposure preceding the seismic test. Because exposure to large quantities of nuclear radiation is expected to have a weakening effect, if any, conducting the radiation ex-

posure before the hot helium exposure is expected to be more severe than conducting both exposures simultaneously. A less conservative but acceptable approach is to divide the total radiation dose into two or more parts, one conducted prior to the seismic test and the others conducted following the hot helium exposure.
NOTE: If nuclear radiation exposure tests and analyses of the various materials used in the valve operator show that, at the design basis levels, both direct damage to any materials and the evolution of radiation-produced substances are negligible, then an actual radiation exposure -is not necessary as part of the type test. All possible combined effects which may beproduced by the nuclear radiation exposure acting in concert with other environmental exposures shall be considered.

Fig 3 Temperature and Pressure History for Environment Simulation of HTGR Containment Atmosphere Response Following a Steam Line Rupture Inside the Containment (To = 1200 F, Po = 15.5 psia. Note: For long-term testing assume equilibrium conditions at T = 190 F and P = 19 psia.)
400

350

32

300
LL

27

w 250

22
.

a:
Cr S

200

17 aj
an

a.J

En U) (I)

150

100

50

12

10 20 30 40 50 60'

10

15

30

(sec)

TIME
15

(min)

Table 3 Test Conditions for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (Typical Design Basis Accident Conditions)
(1) Exposure to Nuclear Radiations 2.0 x 10' rad* after 1 hour 8.0 x 104 rad after I day
9.0 x 10' rad after 1 year

(2) Exposure to Steam and Gases (a) Hot Helium Exposure. See Fig 1. NOTE: Long-term containment equilibrium condition after 30 min: temperature 2500F, pressure = 37.0 psia. (b) Superheated Steam Exposure. See Fig 2. NOTE: Long-term containment equilibrium condition after 30 min: temperature 1900F, pressure = 19 psia. 'Conservative calculation of radiation dose to air resulting from beta and gamma radiation emitters released from the primary system.

16