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Euripides, Hippolytus 88 again Author(s): M. L. West Source: The Classical Review <a href=, New Series, Vol. 16, No. 3 (Dec. , 1966) , pp . 274-275 Published b y : Cambrid g e Universit y Press on behalf of The Classical Association Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/709972 . Accessed: 22/03/2011 09:34 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates y our acce p tance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use. Please contact the p ublisher re g ardin g an y further use of this work. Publisher contact information may be obtained at . http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=cup . . Each copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printed page of such transmission. JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. Cambridge University Press and The Classical Association are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The Classical Review. http://www.jstor.org " id="pdf-obj-0-2" src="pdf-obj-0-2.jpg">
Euripides, Hippolytus 88 again Author(s): M. L. West Source: The Classical Review <a href=, New Series, Vol. 16, No. 3 (Dec. , 1966) , pp . 274-275 Published b y : Cambrid g e Universit y Press on behalf of The Classical Association Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/709972 . Accessed: 22/03/2011 09:34 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates y our acce p tance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use. Please contact the p ublisher re g ardin g an y further use of this work. Publisher contact information may be obtained at . http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=cup . . Each copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printed page of such transmission. JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. Cambridge University Press and The Classical Association are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The Classical Review. http://www.jstor.org " id="pdf-obj-0-4" src="pdf-obj-0-4.jpg">

Euripides, Hippolytus 88 again Author(s): M. L. West Source: The Classical Review, New Series, Vol. 16, No. 3 (Dec., 1966), pp. 274-275 Published by: Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Classical Association

Accessed: 22/03/2011 09:34

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Euripides, Hippolytus 88 again Author(s): M. L. West Source: The Classical Review <a href=, New Series, Vol. 16, No. 3 (Dec. , 1966) , pp . 274-275 Published b y : Cambrid g e Universit y Press on behalf of The Classical Association Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/709972 . Accessed: 22/03/2011 09:34 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates y our acce p tance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use. Please contact the p ublisher re g ardin g an y further use of this work. Publisher contact information may be obtained at . http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=cup . . Each copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printed page of such transmission. JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. Cambridge University Press and The Classical Association are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The Classical Review. http://www.jstor.org " id="pdf-obj-0-67" src="pdf-obj-0-67.jpg">

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274

THE

CLASSICAL

REVIEW

 

CATCHING

WORMS

P. Oxy. 2530

Iliad xix. 26-30

'Callimachus,

Hecale?'

lyyEtvwveaL,

OvAa•.•.Lf.

EIlosl

dELKtrWoLt

[

[

3LVEKpdV-

'

Xpd'a lTCvra

avr'al.

yEatov. E[

U 0V7iler[it

'oV,

TEKvovILflT[

tEK3' alTov7rEcOaaL-Ka-ra 3%

3'

E.TL.e-ra

OExfEoT

OEW EELSTpyvpoimEa

bPEufluL

/t

LEpA'vWV.

TEKVOV,L7u T-rt -raV-ra /Epa

Wrj

p

vv

r

7rELp'cW

rpc

&XAaAKEt-v

a'ypLta oAt.

 

UniversityCollege, Oxford

M.

L. WEST

SOPHOCLES,

 

ANTIGONE

io8,

208,

 

223

IN C.R. lxxix (1965), 259, Professor H.

Lloyd-Jones has replied to my notes on the

Antigone

in

C.R.

lxxix

(1965),

5-6.

I very

much regret having overlooked his defence

of

dwro'pcp

(io8),

involving an entirely

different

interpretation from mine, in C. Q. li

(I957),

12-

5.

But I must protest

against

his suggestion that

I

was not

aware that

Dain retains rtL0V at 208, and that Jebb

and Dain keep

raxovg

at 223. I made it quite

plain that

I was arguing

in the one case

specifically

in

the

against Jebb and Pearson, and

other against Pearson; for example,

surely my statement that 'Pearson (O.C.T.)

follows some of the older editors in rejecting

raxovg'

My

aim

implied that other editors retain it.

was to give support

to those (Dain,

Masqueray,

Campbell

and

Abbott,

and

others)

who feel

that

in these places the

unanimous authority ofthe manuscripts should

not be defied. Lloyd-Jones's readiness to brush

aside the awkward fact that the

manuscripts

all have T/Lt7Vat 208 may indicate that my

defence of the reading was not without

justification.

MARTIN F. SMITH

UniversityCollege of North

Wales, Bangor

EURIPIDES,

HIPPOLYTUS

88 AGAIN

avaC-Osobvsyap 3Sawrdra7a

'Lord-for

KaAEv Xpecwv.

gods are our masters fitly called.'

IN C.R. lxxix [1965], 56, I propounded

my

interpretation of this line rather laconically,

thinking

To

that its

rightness

would be obvious.

some of my acquaintances it has been,

but to others, including Mr. J. Glucker (C.R.

lxxx [1966],

17),

it has not,

and

I must try

again.

'Outside

only

as

an

noted that its

addressing

ditional

me

large

Glucker

with

does, is

that

him

poetry,'

I

appellation

said,

'JvaC survived

and I

of deities';

use by Hippolytus'

Hippolytus

usage

of

was

'a

To

poetry'.

numbers of

poetic

simply

an

servant in

normal tra-

cite

against

examples,

I

as

agree

irrelevant.

accustomed

audience

would normally

The fact

not think twice about them.

remains that outside poetry it was

an appellation of deities; so that it was open to

an intellectual poet at any moment to pause

and

put

a new, meaningful

poeticism.

interpretation

on the familiar

I maintain that

because it is only

this is what Euripides did,

on this

interpretation that the line says any-

thing sensible.

  • I rejected Barrett's interpretation; Glucker

simply

refers us back to it. Barrett's ex-

planation is certainly subtle, but it convinces

me no more now than at first. He

the servant

dressing him

'pointedly

with

so that

he

can

says

that

refrains from ad-

Sia~'rora,

of

the customary

insist that this humblest

addresses is the

privilege

of the

gods'. Why

'with

is it the humblest of addresses ? Because

the

UEaw'rora

humility

find this

to

gods

worshipper

of slave

proclaims his

as that

towards master'. I

applied

the master-slave

contradictory. If Secr7o'-dq

in

order to

suggest

is

relationship, it cannot at the same time be

inappropriate

ship on

the

to the master-slave relation-

ground that it is only fit for the

gods. The verse belongs to a type for which there

are

parallels.

The

speaker

may

begins with an

ordinary,

exclamation which

and

why

he

in itself be

then, in an aside, suddenly explains

it is

particularly appropriate-not

alternative.

has rejected a possible

why

 

THE

CLASSICAL

REVIEW

275

Euripides does something very similar in

A diligent combing of Tragedy might

add

Helen 560 :

to these examples. They confirm that

in

a

'

OC0o-0-Es ydp KaG TTytyvdL Kew ?AovUS.

line beginning

So does Sophocles in Electra 1361 (Electra

to the old servant):

xatp' c

rdarEp-wrarepaydp dEaopav 80Kic.

avae-Osob; ydp ...

,

OEov'oshould be the explanation of dvae.

UniversityCollege, Oxford

M.

L. WEST

EURIPIDES,

HYPSIPYLE Fr. I. i. 5 (Bond,p. 25)

PAGE (G.L.P.,

p.

c~. atapiaao~b.V

rEcT

ao[k'q,

qlrL~

7ro' v.

83) translates: 'How en-

Ar,

R), Lys. 572 'g 6vd'rro&( '

'

Dobree, 'T

viable

your

mother, whoever she was!' So

c0

R), Diphilus

fr. I 14 K

C

aKdipov bpdo'vqa

read

perhaps ~Ks) for W3. Cf. Eur. Ion 308 aob

('

el -rt;

c

aov VTrv •'KOtEKavcoAp•wa,

7rptawd•Ato
C

/

KEWVOLfporv

.

( LgaKcpLog/ &'rrtg a' Jwv'aa

.

.,

Soph.

Ar.

(CO

Fr. 837P J

Ach. 254 f.

(cs Gaisford, W Stob. mss.), etc.

Trinity Hall, Cambridge COLIN AUSTIN

P. OXY.

2329, 3-4

-dya0n& rv'[x],-

viv KGapoSdppv p' d [AolEv-]

said not 'I am going to neglect

things here',

rvy 4v0av'a yap rapap4EAacLv

ItOL

80Koi.

but

'I am going

to neglect

things here for a

THAT is the text printed

C. H. Roberts;

but

by the first editor,

on

79 of

in his note

while'.

Sense and palaeography would both be

p.

Part XXII of the Oxyrhynchus series, he

says,

When

'pEX[ or

I

(slightly

the

inspected

less likely)

manuscript

e?E?['.

in

the

satisfied

Compare

by

the

supplement

pLX[pp&rwnd.

Moschion

Samia 319f.,

where

speaks as follows:

Ashmolean in

company with Dr. John Rea,

irpoactE

4

vvd 0[ar]

p. Se aae[Ta&

we both agreed

that the chi was virtually

o0;TO

KCarapEELv

S

Gse

8qacr7aL

certain; only

the top left-hand part of the

letter is preserved, but that closely resembles

the corresponding part

of the two chis in 1. I.

opXp

tAAw~

T,rwVd, Set ydpJO'8, O'rav 80oK7L,

7rE[L]ai07aooU' avTWON.'

Further, the speaker of 1. 4 must surely have

Christ Church, Oxford

HUGH

LLOYD-JONES

tO

KLtOJV

IW

AOo•

PROFESSOR

H.

LLOYD-JONES'S

learned note

(iii.

i o.

2

[Plutarch] =

Diels,

Doxographi

on

AtOog

(C.R.

lxxix [I965],

piece

246 f.)

of doxo-

has made me reconsidera

iroAl'r•&

Graeci, p.

376)

we read

Kiovt 7i ev yY

7rpoa0epi

Alcp

Ava&4.Lav3pog

the

corresponding

graphy

have

on Anaximander which seems to

given rise to rather laboured explana-

passage in

Hippolytus

Haer. i.

6.

3 (Diels,

84'

Dox. Graec., p. 559)

runs as follows:

r

tion

or

unnecessarily complicated

(i.e.

aXqca

airhq

i~ypov

(libri; C. H. Kahn; yvpov

improbable) conjecture.

While

in

Aftius

ci.

Roeper;

edd.) arpoyy'Aov Xiovr AIOC)

x Koerte

rightly

followed Wilamowitz

The

attempt

of A.

Barigazzi

in Athenaeum

in deleting

follows

the

which in

the papyrus

of

expedient

of the

KaraTvELwv. Sudhaus's

pov

transposing8E'arEaL to the beginning

line in order to

keep pov,

adoptedby

edition of

out

by

which has been

ChristinaDedoussi in her recent

the play (Athens,

the

impossibly

late

1965), is ruled

position pov

would then have in the sentence.

xxxiv (1956),

340 f.

to argue that

lines 9,

the

this fragment

worth

from

Mus.

the

may

may come from

making;

the

  • c (1957),

supplements

be right, but they

the Georgos was not

profited

Rhein.

and 24

first editor

neither have I much

Stark in

io,

treatment by R.

29 f.

In

printed

by

should not be in the text.