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Lesson Plan #3: Integrating Language Arts & Social Studies

Grade: Kindergarten Social Studies Strand: History


Submitted By: Kellie Thompson
EDEL 453: Teaching Elementary School Social Science Nevada State College Spring 2014 Instructor: Karen Powell

Lesson Plan #3 -History


Summary of the Lesson Plan:

submitted by: Kellie Thompson

This social studies lesson teaches students how to make and taste butter, as well as demonstrate the amount of manual labor necessary in the past to produce this food. The lesson uses the book, Integrating Language Arts and Social Studies, Strategy 16, Incorporating Historical Reenactment (p. 112-117). B. Basic Information: Grade Level: Kindergarten Time to Complete this Lesson: 50 minutes Groupings: Whole classroom discussion, small group activity, and individual assessment

C. Materials: Integrating Language Arts and Social Studies book, Strategy 16, Incorporating Historical Reenactment, (p. 112-117) Paper and pencils Small clear jars with lids, one per group Heavy whipping cream (approximately 8 oz. per four groups) Worksheet, Figure 16.1 (P. 116) What Will Happen? for each student Teachers Aide and three parent volunteers Bread, plastic knives, and napkin D. Objectives: o NV State Social Studies Standards o E. Vocabulary Task - a piece of work to be done Churn to move or stir quickly; a container that helps make cream into butter. Separate two things move apart Importance Something of meaning H1. K.1- Discuss the importance of working together to complete tasks. I can work together with my classmates to finish a task. Student-Friendly Standards

Nevada State College

EDEL 453 - Spring 2014

Karen Powell- Instructor

page 2

Lesson Plan #3 -History


F. Procedure:

submitted by: Kellie Thompson

1. Discuss how butter was made in the past with a churn as a whole group. Go over the worksheet and instruct students to begin drawing the answer to the first question on their own paper. 2. Divide into groups of 4. Give each group a jar with some heavy whipping cream and close lid. One student at a time will shake or churn the jar. 3. Pass the jar around to each student. 4. Watch for thickening and a lump of butter to form. Spread the butter on the bread for students to taste. 5. Complete the worksheet individually. Parent volunteers and teachers aide will help the students write if needed, and help clean up. G. Assessment: What will you use to measure student understanding? All sections of the worksheet are complete and correct, and the students observation of cream turning into butter. Explain how you will know students understand the concepts from the lesson. Students must be able to answer the questions on the worksheet and work together in their groups to produce butter. H. Closure: A discussion about how we worked together to complete a task and review how butter was churned in the past.

I.

Reflection: 1. Which part of the lesson do you think will be the easiest for you to teach? I believe teaching the process of making butter, the shaking and churning of heavy cream, will be easiest to teach. 2. Which part will be most challenging for you to teach? I believe the most challenging part to teach will be to keep the students shaking and churning the cream long enough to create butter. 3. How will you follow up or extend this lesson? I can follow-up this lesson by discussing how butter is made today. 4. What can you do for students who dont grasp the concepts? I would repeat the explanation and help them complete the worksheet. 5. Which part of the lesson, if any, do you think might need to change? I dont think any part of the lesson needs to be changed.

Nevada State College

EDEL 453 - Spring 2014

Karen Powell- Instructor

page 3

Lesson Plan #3 -History

submitted by: Kellie Thompson

6. When you were writing this lesson plan, what was the most difficult part? The most difficult part was selecting a strategy and a standard that complement each other. 7. Explain the strategy from Integrating Language Arts & Social Studies that you included in this lesson plan. The strategy used in this lesson was Strategy 16, Incorporating Historical Reenactment. We can learn about history through reconstructing what it may have been like in the past. This type of activity actively engages students to work together and demonstrates a time period in history.

Nevada State College

EDEL 453 - Spring 2014

Karen Powell- Instructor

page 4