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Dear Dr. Latulippe, I have the information you requested about Hurricane Walker.

As you know, a hurricanes vector field can be modeled by F(x,y)=


( ) ( )

. What you may not know is that q

represents the strength of the sink towards the origin and k is the strength of the vortex flow around the origin. In this case X and Y are the distance from the origin in kilometers. To address the first question you had regarding the change of the value for k, I have three graphs for you to look at.

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This first graph is Hurricane Walker, where k=2pi q=2pi

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Here we have a graph where k=50pi q=2pi. As you can see the vortex flow is much stronger.

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Here we have a graph where k=pi q=2pi. So conversely, the vortex flow is weaker with k being smaller. So an increase in the value k represents an increase in vortex flow around the origin.

Now to address your second question regarding how a change in the value for q will affect the suction; I also provided three graphs for you to look at.

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In this case, we again have the graph of Hurricane Walker to use as a jumping point; k=2pi q=2pi.

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Here we have a increase in q to show a powerful sink flow where k=2pi q=5pi. As you can see, an increase in q equates as an increase in the suction.

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I also included a graph where q has been drastically increased. As you can see, when k=2pi q=50pi, the suction is so powerful, it also seems as if the air is no longer circling around but merely just heading towards the center. Now to answer your questions about escaping from Hurricane Walker: to find the amount of work the hurricane will do on the van Hurricane Machine, we simply need to integrate the following: ( )

However we will have to do this once for each piece of the piecewise function. There are basically two possible paths we can take from our monitoring position 2 kilometers due east of the eye. The first path is by going along the path until we reach a location 4 kilometers due south of the eye and then continue on a path straight southeastward about 5 kilometers to the safe zone we built. Well in this case we have to parameterize y=f(x) to get a function r(t). In this instance, x=t and y=t . Thus , , . Thus we get the integral: ( ) =
( ) ( )

=-2.26394

But that is only part of the work done; the part that is done on the first piece. The second part of the work done is found by parameterizing again, this time finding r(t)=<t,-tand r t ,-1>. Thus we get the integral: =-0.438327 So the total work done to the van is -2.70227 along this piece wise path.

Along the second path, however, there is less work done. Now that you have seen how to derive these equations, I am going to skip directly to the equations we found, and what the work done by the hurricane along each path is as well as the total work done by the hurricane along the piecewise path.

=-1.5708 =-0.693197 =0.34134

So the total work done is -1.922. Now normally you would think that the second path would be the better one, and it would be, except the second path is off-road and I doubt the vans ability to handle the rough terrain. Also, I believe there may be a hill in that area that I cant take in account for. And finally to address your last question: if the hurricane vector field is conservative. To find this out we take and and
(

see if they are equal. We ended up finding


)

to equal

to equal

. These are not equal, so the vector field is not conservative.

This means that there is a curl, and thus a upward or downward pull caused by the hurricane. This makes sense since hurricanes can pick things off the ground and throw them for miles.

Signed X.