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3STEPS

FOR A SUCCESSFUL
PROJECT REALISATION
BIOMASS LOGISTIC & TRADE CENTRES
Main authors
Thomas Loibnegger, Christian Metschina
Lk-Stmk Styrian Chamber of Agriculture and Forestry
www.lk-stmk.at
Co-authors
Valter Francescato, Eliseo Antonini
AIEL Italian Agriforestry Energy Association
www.aiel.cia.it
Nike Krajnc, Tine Premrl
SFI, Slovenian Forestry Institute
www.gozdis.si
Christian Schnedl
WVB-Stmk GmbH, Styrian Forest Owners Association
www.waldverband-stmk.at
Gianfranco Nocentini
ARSIA, Tuscany Regional Agency for Agriculture and Forestry
www.arsia.toscana.it
Stefano Stranieri
GAL GAS, Local Action Group of Garfagnana-Lucca
www.assogaltoscana.it
Kajetan Koscik, Piort Gradziuk
POLBIOM, Polish Biomass Association
www.polbiom.pl
Supported by
EIE/07/054/2007
www.biomasstradecentres.eu
Photos
Lk-Stmk, AIEL, SFI
Publisher
AIEL Italian Agriforestry Energy Association
Agripolis - Viale dellUniversit 14
I-35020 Legnaro (Padova) - Italy
www.aiel.cia.it
Graphic design
Marco Dalla Vedova - Espodesign - Piazzola sul Brenta (PD)
Print
Litocenter Srl - Piazzola sul Brenta (PD)
Copyright 2010 by Authors | No part of this work may be reproduced by print, photocopy or any other means without
the permission in writing from the main authors. | The sole responsibility for the content of this publication lies with the
authors. It does not represent the opinion of the European Communities. The European Commission is not responsible.
Foreword 4
Step1
Definition of Criterias for a BL&TC 6
1.1 Project idea 6
1.2. Project requirements 7
1.3 Project implementation 11
Step2
Preparation of a feasibility study 12
2.1 Technical/market feasibility study 13
2.2 Preliminary cost estimation 14
Step3
Evaluation of the feasibility study 18
3.1 Preparation of report for investors 18
3.2 Long-term market trends 19
Good practice examples 21
Table of Contents
One of the biggest challenges on national and international level will
be the providing of an environmentally friendly energy supply which
also supports local areas. The European Union has accepted this chal-
lenge and made precise steps forward with the implementation of the
European Climate- and Energy Package. European Member Countries
have to present this year (2010) their national Action Plans, in where
they have to explain how to reach their targets. The national action plans
show that a further development in the use of biomass and the promo-
tion of all other renewable energy sources will be essential to achieve
the targets.
From the perspective of experts, the greatest success can be realized
until 2020 through a restructuring of a CO
2
-neutral heating supply.
Therefore the promotion of biomass heating plants (e.g. single, micro or
district heating systems) is noticed in all energy strategies. The realisa-
tion of such heating systems implies one assumption that the fuel will
be provided all-the-year in an adequate amount and quality. Compared
to the market of fossil fuels, the market of wood fuels is often an informal
market in which offer and demand dont match easily each other. With
the aim to create a more transparent market for wood fuels, the project
Biomass Trade & Logistic Centre has been launched.
A BL&TC is a regional service station for top-quality wood fuels, which is
run by a group of local farmers and/or forest entrepreneurs. The market-
ing of fuels through the biomass centre creates added value both for the
involving farmers and customers, who benefit from the bundled, high-
quality local supply of wood fuels. Products range is further enhanced
by comprehensive services, such as the delivery of fuel or competent
advice on all questions relating to proper use of wood fuels. Through a
spread network of biomass centres, customers can be sure that supplies
for their heating systems are guaranteed over long term. For this reason,
private households and businesses can choose this cost-effective and
environmentally-friendly heating system in good conscience.
Forewords
4
5
The energy supply of tomorrow will be based also on a regional provid-
ing model. For that reason several approaches have to be prepared on
that level. The project Regional Biomass Trade Centres shows one of
essential approaches for a quick switch from fossil fuels towards renew-
able energy sources on a sustainable way. The idea of the project accepts
the challenge of the energy supply of the future: That the energy, respec-
tively the fuel is available all the time and environmentally friendly, is
gently to the nature and economical and it is provided by local produc-
ers independent from international oil- and gas industries. The Biomass
Trade Centre creates for customers, for its owners and for the whole
region an eminent added value. The project also contributes to a crucial
boost of the creation of numerous new green jobs and the long term
securing of existing jobs in up- and downstream sectors.
This guideline has been designed to assist forestry and agricultural
market players in carrying out a new Biomass Logistic & Trade Centre
(BL&TC). This guideline provides the main factors to be considered in
building up a new BL&TC. The main aim is to provide to market players a
technical and financial support in setting up and building-up efficiently
such productive and trading biomass infrastructure. Only an optimized
project can make sure a long-term renewable raw material supply, which
strengthens consumers trust in wood as a source of fuel.
For a successful project realization three steps are required:
1. Definition of criterias for a Biomass Trade & Logistic Centre
2. Preparation of a technical, market and financial feasibility study
3. Evaluation of the feasibility study report
The guide will be supported by a technical and market feasibility study
template and an Excel tool for preparing a technical feasibility study.
These documents are provided as a downloadable file on the project
homepage www.biomasstradecentres.eu.
BL&TC Waldstein (Styria - Austria)
6
1.1 Project idea
The central idea of the Biomass Trade & Logistic Centre (BL&TC) concept
consists in the construction of a collective rural marketing channel for
wood fuels and energy services throughout the European Union countries.
Biomass centres will market all kinds of biomass fuels supplied by farmers.
The main products are wood fuels: split logs and chips. In addition, it may
be possible to supplement this by trading wood pellets. Other biomass
fuels such as whole plant pellets or grass pellets, which are pelletised
either directly in the field or at the biomass centre, could also be incorpo-
rated into the range of selling products. As a second string to their bow, it
is intended that these regional biomass centres should also act as energy
service providers wherever possible and become involved in wood energy
contracting projects and biomass heating plants. Particularly, this should
be the case in those communities where so far no other rural groups have
started to run projects of this nature.
Main aims of BL&TC

Setting up regional supply centres (BL&TC) in the EU countries offering


fuel wood, forest wood chips, other biomass fuels and energy services;

Marketing under a standardised word/image mark that should evoke


associations such as safety, security, reliability, regional value, quality,
etc. in the customers mind;

Safeguarding the security of supply;

Obvious, visible presentation as a provider of biomass of all kinds;

Guaranteeing consistent quality standards (fuel quality, provision of


services);

Promotion of services such as fuel delivery, involvement in wood


energy contracting projects, expert advice on the subject of heating
with wood.
STEP1
Definition of Criterias for a BL&TC
7
1.2. Project requirements
Equipment
The minimum equipment for a BL&TC is as follows: a storage building, a
minimum storage area for energy wood, a paved handling area, docu-
mented proof of regular moisture measurements to ensure the fuel qual-
ity, advertising road signals and information panels. A calibrated weigh-
bridge should be available for calculating the available amount of fuel. The
weighbridge is also important to determine the energy value (e.g. water
content) of the fuels.
Raw materials
Raw material must be collected from the region and consists only of
virgin wood originated from forest and plantation and by-products of
wood processing industries. Wood biomass origin should be tracked and
reported when selling wood biomass to end users. The required raw mate-
rials should be available in the region to maintain the project idea of a
regional and sustainable energy supply. Before starting with the planning
of a BL&TC it is requested to check the real, not only theoretical, availability
of raw materials.
Products
As a minimum, the range of products offered by the biomass centre must
include energy wood, wood chips and split logs. The product-range can
be added through pure vegetable oil, pellets and other alternative agrarian
fuel products such as Miscanthus and poplar pellets/briquettes, and cere-
als/straw pellets.
BL&TC Plstal (Styria - Austria)
8
Quality control
Strict quality criteria must be adhered in order to guarantee the quality
of the products and services supplied. A BT&LC is responsible to oper-
ate under high-principled national (NORM, DIN) and European (CEN TC
335) quality standards. For the costumer must be clearly evident how the
quality criteria will be guaranteed.
Further information about quality requirements and reference standards
are available in the WOOD FUELS HANDBOOK (download under: www.
biomasstradecentres.eu).
Costumer-friendly services
Consumers have to get in touch with the ideas in the field of energy
supply. For this reason that they will no longer have it that convenient
as they had it with oil and gas. Fossil energy sources such as oil and gas
have offered to consumers up to now an unknown level of convenience.
Considering the changing conditions in the fuel market, the customer is
looking for new, equally convenient options. A biomass centre must be a
new option for the consumers, as it offers a bundled package of environ-
mentally-friendly quality fuels available from a central location. Besides,
BL&TC represents a regional reference trade centres for private house-
holds, other customers
of the biomass centres
include businesses,
housing associations,
local authorities and
public utilities as well
as the operators of
heating stations local
and district heating
plants and biomass
CHP plants.
Convenient wood chip supply with a wood pump
9
No matter where they are purchasing fuel from, a biomass centre
has the following advantages for costumers:
Easy and convenient buying

Efficient and transparent range of biomass fuels (like in a supermarket)


I can see what Im buying

Customer-friendly opening times especially Friday afternoon and


Saturday

Increased convenience through additional services (processing, deliv-


ery, advice, etc.)

Ordering service (also via email and webpage)

Service and information point for potential customers

Public price list for available fuels and other specific conditions (if they
exists) for selling and/or buying biomass
Security of supply

Available all year round

Continuous supply

Crisis-proof
Local quality provides security when buying

Guaranteed quality standards



Local products from the region the producer has a name

Clear product distinction to foreign wood
Price stability and transparency

Cost-efficient fuel

Stable price development creates trust

Transparent prices clear comparability with other energy sources


Sale of wood logs in cartons
10
Additional customer service with a regional (central) range of wood fuels
will make it possible to supply customers quickly and efficiently. Through a
comprehensive network of biomass centres, customers can be certain that
the supply of fuels for their heating systems is guaranteed over long-term.
Continuity and sustainability are significant advantages of wood fuels.
The biomass centre as a point of sale has to maintain a customer and serv-
ices as central approach. Accordingly, consistent opening times must be
publicised and adhered too.
Woodchips dryer by BL&TC Roland Mair (Bolzano - Italy)
www.hackschnitzel-mair.com
11
1.3 Project implementation
The implementation can occur in various ways and finally depends on the
national framework conditions. The first BL&TC project was implemented
in Styria/Austria. That is the reason why the implementation is illustrated
by Styrian model. Over 13 Styrian forest farmers successfully took up the
challenge of collectively processing and marketing wood fuels. In the future
several biomass centres in different EU states will supply the European pop-
ulation all year round with high-quality fuel. Besides private households, the
biomass centres can have also other customers like the operators of local
and district heating plants. The EU-project Biomass Trade Centres is promot-
ing the establishment of further biomass centres with the aim of ensuring
that supply becomes Europe-wide.
Before starting with the planning of a Biomass Trade & Logistic Centre it is
important to answer the following questions:
Where is the raw material from?

Is there potential in the region?

Where is biomass coming from? (forests, plantation, wood processing


industries) spatial distribution or locations

Who and how many are the suppliers?

Where are the suppliers located?


Who are the customers?

Are there potential customers in the region?

Are there biomass district heating plants, CHP- plants based on biomass?

Private households, business enterprises


What are the competing sectors?

Fossil fuels

Heat pumps

Solar power

Wooden panel producers


BL&TC Roland Mair in Deutschnofen (Bolzano - Italy)
12
A Feasibility Study is the analysis of a problem to determine if it can be
solved effectively. The results determine whether the solution should be
implemented. This activity takes place during the project initiation phase
and is made before significant expenses are engaged.
The following feasibility study evaluates and analyses the potential impact
and problems of the planned BL&TC to answer one main question: Will the
project work successfully? To grapple with the project framework condi-
tions is one of the first steps in the project planning phase (e.g. market-
ability of wood fuels in the region). Future challenges and actual problems
must be analysed to determine if they can be solved effectively. The evalu-
ation of the feasibility study determines whether the BL&TC can be oper-
ated in a sustainable economical and environmental way. The results are
the main basis of decision-making for BL&TC-operators, investors and raw-
material suppliers (e.g. farmers, forest owners, farm cooperatives). Before
starting with the planning
of a BL&TC it is crucial
to identify how, where,
and to whom the BL&TC
intend to sell a service
or product. The operator
also need to assess his
competition and figure
out the investment nec-
essary to start the busi-
ness and keep it running
until it is established.
The BL&TC feasibility study consists of:
1. Technical/market feasibility study
2. Economical analysis and costs estimation
3. A final report for the investors
STEP2
Preparation of a feasibility study
Costumer-friendly chips-pump
13
2.1 Technical-market feasibility study
The technical and market feasibility study assesses the details of how the
BL&TC will produce, store and deliver its products and services (e.g. materials,
transportation, technology/equipment needed) and describes the planned
legal and corporate structure of the business. The study includes also a
description of the current and future raw material market. Based on the low
bulk density wood logs and wood chips are not suitable for long transport
distances. Therefore it is necessary to gather data about the regional raw
material supply and the potential raw material suppliers (e.g. farmers, forest
owners, farm cooperatives). At once the study analyses the potential and
future costumer market as well as costumers requirements (e.g. hard or soft
log wood, wood chips, pellets, delivery, energy contracting, heat delivery,
agricultural pellets/chips). The study is an excellent tool for trouble-shoot-
ing and long-term planning. It serves as a flow chart how the products and
services evolve and reach in a physical way the market. The activity takes
place during the project initiation
phase and is made before signifi-
cant expenses are engaged. This
part of feasibility study consists of:

analysis of biomass potentials in


the region,

identification of potential suppli-


ers of biomass,

identification of potential cus-


tomers,

analysis of availability of machin-


ery (wood chippers, wood split-
ters) and services (for example:
for transport of wood fuels) in the
region.
BL&TC Plstal (Styria - Austria)
1) ProjecL ObjecLive:
Please indicate the projects objectives. Note that the sole purpose of the M 122/3 Biomass programme is to promote
the supply of biomass.
2) ProjecL OperaLor:
Describe the nature of the project operator/funding applicant (operator of an agricultural/forestry enterprise, other
funding applicant, association of forest owners, agricultural association). In the case of a consortium, please indicate
the structure and composition of the organisation (name, address, registration number and forest area owned by the
members, distribution of shares among the individual members).
3) ProjecL LocaLion:
3.1) Location
Describe the spatial location of the planned project (exact address if available).
3.2) GeneraI Description of Location and quipment
Describe the locations transport infrastructure, the size of the plot, the ownership structure, the existing buildings and
mechanical equipment as well as any existing permits and approvals.
Production of biomass wood chips for small-scale plants (G30) and district heating plants (G50); split log
production from hardwood.
Address: Biomassehof Plstal GmbH, Bretstein 10, A-8763 Bretstein, Austria.
Reg. No.: FN 294231
Area: 2,000 hectares
Shares: 13 participants with equal shares (1/13)
South-west of the village of St. Oswald-Mderbrugg
Storage areas, storage building and handling area: Gewerbeparkstrae 1, A-8763 Mderbrugg
Access: approx. 100 m from the LB 114 road (western access to the site)
Plot size: 10,000 m2 (owner: Biomassehof Plstal GmbH)
Storage building, office and sanitary facilities
Drying
Permits: Building permit
To determine the BL&TC feasibility
use the template downloadable
www.biomasstradecentres.eu
14
2.2 Preliminary cost estimation
Based upon the technical and market feasibility study a preliminary cost esti-
mation should be developed that includes all project expenditures and rev-
enues. If the planned revenues out value the costs, then the decision is made
to design and implement the BL&TC. An operator of a BL&TC must accurately
balance the cost versus benefits before taking an action. It is important to
identify cost and benefit factors which can be categorized as follows:

Capital-related costs (e.g. repayment of a credit, amortization)

Maintenance costs (e.g. purchase of biofuels, electricity costs)

Consumption-related costs (e.g. fuel costs, electricity costs, charges for


transport, biomass processing and handling costs)

Operational costs (e.g. personnel costs, insurance, costs of premises)


The Excel-Tool Financial
Calculation Sheet: Supply,
Transport, Storage and
Drying of Biomass serves
as a first calculation of
the profitably and cal-
culated the probable
revenue, expense, profit,
cash flow and before-tax
return on investment.
Downloadable
biomasstradecentres.eu
BL&TC Allgu eG Kempten (Bayern-Germany)
15
Instructions for the Financial Calculation Sheet
Fill out the green fields in the Tech. & Fin. datasheet which includes all
relevant financial data. The database refers to the results of the technical
and market feasibility study. For a rigorous basis of decision-making it is
critical that the technical and financial data correspond. The input mask is
subdivided into four parts (ensure that the entered data are replicable):
A) Expenditure
A1 Purchase of biomass raw materials
A2 Transport of biomass raw materials
A3 Biomass processing and handling at the biomass plant
by service providers
A4 Biomass delivery to customers by service providers
A5 Additional operational and consumption-related costs
B) Revenue
B1 Revenue from biomass sales
B2 Other revenues (e.g. through provision of services)
C) Total project cost
D) Project financing
The sheet Dynamic FS already delivers first results about the economic
viability of the planned project. The calculation of the economic viability is
based on a cash flow calculation (measure of a companys financial health).
Cash flow is the movement of cash into or out of a business, project, or
financial product (equals cash receipts minus cash payments). It is usually
measured during a specified, finite period of time, tipically on year. This cal-
culation tool works with the so called discounted cash flow (DCF) method
which is a style of calculation that links streams of future money flows to
lump sum amounts. If the value displays in fact of the DCF analysis that it
is higher than the current cost of the investment, the opportunity may be
a good one. Discounted cash flow calculations have a range of practical
applications, and are commonly used by economists, accountants, actuar-
ies, engineers, business valuators, finance professionals.
BL&TC Allgu eG Kempten (Bayern-Germany)
16
The cash flow delivers two main results for the BTC operator (colour-coded
box). A project should be realized if:

the internal interest rate (IRR) is greater than interest rate on external
capital

cash flows are greater than annuities


The sheet DCCF (Discounted Cumulative Cash Flow) illustrates the eco-
nomic viability as a chart. The development of discounted cumulative cash
flow (blue line) shows the year from which the project is economically.
The sooner a project comes in the positive area, the better it is. Therefore a
BL&TC should not be realised if the DCCF is higher than 12 years.
- 1.500.000
- 1.200.000
- 900.000
- 600.000
- 300.000
0
300.000
600.000
900.000
1.200.000
1.500.000
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Year
N
P
V

-
N
e
t

P
r
e
s
e
n
t

V
a
l
u
e

(
)
Discounted cash flow
BL&TC Plstal (Styria - Austria)
17
The parameters for service life can be adapted to the respective national
demands in the sheet Utilisation and Maintenance (e.g. service life for
storage building). In the original version of the financial technical sheet are
deposited parameters according to the VDI 2067. The VDI 2067 is a techni-
cal set of regulations to the cost calculation. Besides, the VDI 2067 gives
moreover the uniform frame:

How long are the single plant components usable?

How high are the costs for servicing, maintenance and repair?

Which costs should be included in the comparison?


All this correlated calculation sheets allows either to the potential investor
analyst and/or decision makers to vary the main business variables (mod-
elling uncertainty) and to perform the so called sensitivity analysis (SA);
its a way to change in different way (up and down) parameters (like quan-
titative and related prices) to determinate the effects of such changes.
The sheet VDI2067 gives an overview about the total costs per year.
This analyse of costs should be shortly presented and explained in a spe-
cial chapter in feasibility study showing the potential investors all positive
and possible negative sides of planned investments.
18
3.1 Preparation of report for investors
The output of the feasibility study is a report, detailing the evaluation
criteria, the study findings, and the recommendations. This report allows
making better decisions for operators and investors. Therefore, it is critical
that the technical and financial data in your final study reconcile.
The feasibility study report must provide a complete summary of the results
of the feasibility studies and establishes the business case for investment
of state resources in a project by setting out the reasons for undertaking
the project and analyzing its costs and benefits. Documentation must
contain at least the following information:

A description of the problem or opportunity the project is intended to


address

The project objectives, i.e., the significant results that must be achieved
for an alternative to be an effective response to the problem or oppor-
tunity being addressed

A discussion and economic analysis of each of the alternatives consid-


ered in the feasibility study that meets the established objectives and
functional requirements, and the reasons for rejecting the alternatives
that were not selected

A complete description of the information technology capabilities and


the conditions that must exist in order to satisfy each defined objective

An economic analysis of the life time running costs and benefits of the
project and the costs and benefits of the current method of operation
during the life cycle of the project

The source of funding for the project

A detailed project schedule showing key milestones during the


projects life
STEP3
Evaluation of the feasibility study
19
3.2 Long-term market trends
In addition to the known of climate and environmental aspects, other
factors that favour the upturn of the BL&TC concept is the current trend
towards domestic heating systems and the increase in the regions local
and district heating systems. On average, each European household
spends 1,500 - 2,000 per year on imported oil and gas and this trend
is increasing. In the most recent past, the global financial crisis has con-
tributed to a significant decline in the cost of fossil fuels albeit only over
the short term. Where in 2007 the price of a litre of heating oil had already
exceeded one Euro, in 2009 it had dropped to only 60 cents. However, if
we look at the bigger picture, it seems clear that, whether we like it or not,
the time of cheap oil and gas has come to an end. A relieving of the ten-
sion in the financial markets will also lead to a recovery in prices for fossil
fuels. The majority of our fossil fuels come from crisis-wracked countries
that are unable to guarantee Europe a long-term, secure energy supply
(e.g. gas crisis of 2009). With modern, highly efficient biomass heating sys-
tems it could be possible, in the near future, to cover the vast majority of
our heating needs. In contrast to fossil fuels, wood as an energy source is
climate-friendly, sustainable and guarantees regional value creation, which
is particularly important in times of financial and economic negative pres-
sure. Regional energy sources Are fuels of the region for the region.
Wood is a biogenic energy source that is available in sufficient quantities
more wood is regrown than is needed. In addition to forests, agricultural
cropland and grassland is available, which in the medium term could be
used for fuel production. The higher the proportion that can be covered
through domestic production, the less dependent our energy supply will
be on foreign countries. In the past, energy wood products were only
marketed with difficulty, although there is a great deal of interest on the
part of forest owners in supplying these products provided that the
20
economic conditions are right. Biomass is a booming market. There is only
limited additional capacity for producing wood fuels and forest wood
chips among individual foresters. Anticipated bottlenecks in the supply of
wood fuels and forest wood chips would have a negative impact on the
entire forestry and timber industry. Providing many small to medium-sized
and even larger heating systems with biomass fuels that fulfil uniformly
defined quality standards is the overriding aim. These quality requirements
can only be achieved through a central supply system, i.e. via BL&TC that
are subject to constant quality control. In this way, new possibilities for
income generation will be created in the rural environment, new sales
opportunities offered to forest owners, and a more efficient processing of
wood as a fuel and an increase in added value will be achieved.
21
The Styrian Biomass Logistic
& Trade Centres model
The Styrian model of Biomass Logistic & Trade Centres foresees that
every operating group has to be a farmers association with at least ten
forest owners, and the minimum storage quantity in any biomass centre
must be 500 solid cubic metres of energy wood or the energy equiva-
lent of one million kilowatt hours of primary energy. The fact that the
operating group must consist of local farmers guarantees that the entire
added value remains in the region, which is not the case with the multi-
national oil and gas suppliers. Central idea consists in the security of the
biomass supply and construction of a collective rural marketing channel
for biomass fuels and energy services (e.g. wood energy contracting). As
a minimum, the range of products must include fire wood, wood chips
and split logs from regional forests. The import or raw materials is not
allowed.
An informative umbrella brand is used for the Styria-wide standardised
marketing of wood as a fuel. The pro-
tected Biomassehof (biomass cen-
tre) mark belonging to the Styrian
Forest Owners Cooperative provides all biomass centres in Styria with a
uniform, coordinated image. This collective identifying mark guarantees
the customer a secure fuel supply of regional origin and the highest
quality. Each biomass centre is committed to complying with strict qual-
ity criteria, and this is checked on an ongoing basis.
A number of new biomass centres are expected to open over the next
few years, which means that in the long term an uninterrupted supply
of fuel will be guaranteed throughout Styria. In terms of raw material
procurement (supply of wood) as well as raw material provision (cus-
tomer delivery), the catchments area of a biomass centre covers around
30 kilometres, ensuring quick and efficient local supply. This is the only
Good practice examples
22
way in which the intrinsic idea of a regional supply can be sustainable
maintained. A detailed marketing concept is drawn up for each regional
biomass centre, as the detailed plan must be tailored to the respective
region. However, in terms of the basics, the marketing plan is the same
throughout whole region guarantees a uniform market appearance,
which enhances the centres recognition value among customers. The
Styrian Forest Owners Cooperative and the forestry department of the
Styrian Chamber of Agriculture and Forestry are responsible for the over-
all marketing. This means that synergies can be exploited to benefit the
biomass centres.
BL&TC Pstal Hartbergerland Leoben
In operation since 2008 2009 2010
Investment 0.6 M 0.37 M 0.4 M
Number of new job 2 1 1
Membership
and forest area
13 members
3,000 hectares
22 members
20,000 hectares
400 members
13,000 hectars
Wood fuels
14,000 bulk m
3

chips
800 stacked m
3

of fire wood
3,750 bulk m
3

chips
1,420 stacked m
3

of fire wood
15,000 bulk m3
chips
400 stacked m3
of fire wood
Heating
oil replaced
1.2 million litres 0.55 million litres 1.2 million litres
GHG saved 3,200 t CO
2
eq. 1,439 t CO
2
eq. 3,208 t CO
2
eq.
Target customers
Public
and private
customers
Public
and private
customers
Public
and private
customers
Services
Delivery and
blow in
Delivery and
blow in
Delivery and
blow in
Fuels invoiced by
Bulk and stacked
cubic metres
Weight and
water content
Weight and
water content
BL&TC in operation in Austria supported with BTC project WPs
BL&TC Hartbergerland (Styria - Austria)
23
BL&TC St. Lamprecht Hochschwab Sd Frstenfeld
In operation since 2010 2010 2010
Investment 0.35 M 0.24 M 0.24 M
Number of new job 1 1 2
Membership
and forest area
15 members
45,000 hectares
27 members
1,600 hectares
10 members
2,000 hectars
Wood fuels
12,000 bulk m
3

chips
200 stacked m
3

of fire wood
5,000 bulk m
3

chips
100 stacked m
3

of fire wood
7,000 bulk m3
chips
400 stacked m3
of fire wood
Heating
oil replaced
0.94 million litres 0.39 million litres 0.6 million litres
GHG saved 2,509 t CO
2
eq. 1,053 t CO
2
eq. 1,600 t CO
2
eq.
Target customers
Public
and private
customers
Public
and private
customers
Public
and private
customers
Services
Delivery and
blow in
Delivery and
blow in
Delivery and
blow in
Fuels invoiced by
Weight and
water content
Weight and
water content
Weight and
water content
BL&TC in operation in Austria supported with BTC project WPs
The long-term vision consists in the biomass centres throughout Styria
positioning themselves as reliable suppliers of quality fuels and local
heating. In future, the biomass centre will act as a central partner in
forest and agricultural biomass matters for the rural population. Local
information events, open days and an internet presence via the www.
biomassehof-stmk.at website will ensure the best possible communica-
tion with customers in the region.
24
BL&TC in progress in Italy
Thanks to project technical support and related international knowledge transfer,
a new BL&TC entered in operation in Lasnigo-Como (Italy) in October 2010 man-
aged by the farm entrepreneur CipCalor. The Italian partnership (AIEL, ARSIA,
GAL GAS) has supported technically other five BL&TC (Veneto and Tuscany),
which are expected to enter in operation in the short run (2011-2012).
BL&TC in Veneto supported with BTC project WPs
BL&TC
F.lli Corazzola
Valdastico
Vicenza
segheriecorazzola.com
De Luca Sas
Cappella Maggiore
Treviso
deluca-woodenergy.it
Ecodolomiti srl
Trichiana
Belluno
ecodolomiti.com
In operation since
In the phase of
project
In the phase of
project
In the phase of
project
Investment 0.22 M 0.6 M
7 M
(including 1 MW
e

CHP plant)
Number of new job 1 1 3
Membership
and forest area
1 member
with 4 skilled
employees;
approx. 80 Ha/y
forest
1 member
with 2 skilled
employees;
approx. 90 Ha/y
forest
3 members
with 4 skilled
employees;
approx. 250 Ha/y
forest
Wood fuels
4,000 t wood
chips M25
1,900 t
wood chips M30
2,500 t fire
wood M20
250 t pellets
50 t briquettes
12,000 t
wood chips M40
(CHP 1 MW
e
)
7,500 t wood
chips M25
Heating
oil replaced
1.2 million litres 1.4 million litres 5.0 million litres
GHG saved 2,760 t/y CO
2
eq. 3,100 t/y CO
2
eq. 14,000 t/y CO
2
eq.
Target customers
Private and pub-
lic heating plants
and CHP
Private and pub-
lic heating plants
and CHP
Private and pub-
lic heating plants
and CHP
Services
Delivery and
pick-up
Delivery and
pick-up
Delivery and
pick-up
Fuels invoiced by
Volume and
energy content
(/MWh)
Volume and
energy content
(/MWh)
Volume and
energy content
(/MWh)
BL&TC
Provincia di Pistoia
e Coop. Bosco Domani
San Marcello Pistoiese
Pistoia
Comunit Montana
Garfagnana
Camporgiano
Lucca
In operation since In the phase of project In the phase of project
Investment 0.24 M 0.10 M
Number of new job 1 1
Membership
and forest area
Cooperative of forest
entrepreneurs
(10 members);
approx. 50 Ha/y forest
Mountain community
of Garfagnana;
approx. 20 Ha/y forest
Wood fuels 3,150 t wood chips M30 1,000 t wood chips M30
Heating
oil replaced
0.86 million litres 0.27 million litres
GHG saved 2,000 t/y CO
2
eq. 640 t/y CO
2
eq.
Target customers
Private and public heating
plants and CHP
Public heating plants and
CHP
Services Delivery and pick-up Delivery and pick-up
Fuels invoiced by
Volume and energy
content (/MWh)
Volume and energy
content (/MWh)
BL&TC in Toscana supported with BTC project WPs
BL&TC Lasnigo - Como
In operation since October 2010
Investment 1.8 M (including 70 kW
e
CHP plant)
Number of new job 2
Membership and forest area
1 member with 6 skilled employees
approx. 80 Ha/y forest
Wood fuels
3,600 t wood chips M25 (potential 10,000 t/y)
600 t fire wood M20 (potential 2,000 t/y)
Heating oil replaced 1.25 million litres (potential 3.6 Ml/y)
GHG saved 3,100 t/y CO
2
eq. (potential 8,600 t/y)
Target costumers
Private and public heating plants and CHP,
wood-energy contracting
Services Delivery and pick-up, energy contracting
Fuels invoiced by
Weight and water content (= energy content)
reference standards EN 14961
BL&TC CipCalor in operation in Lombardia since october 2010
BL&TC CipCalor (Como - Italy)
25
26
BL&TC in progress in Slovenia
Thanks to project activities related knowledge transfer and inves-
tors entrepreneurship courage there are initiatives developing also in
Slovenia.
We indentify quite a number of wood fuel producers in Catalogue of
regional wood fuels producers (available on project web site). Due
to the abundance and small size of production we estimate that we
missed small size fire wood producers while we can say that list of
wood chips producers, at least those one with medium or high power
size chippers reflect the real situation in Slovenia. During the project
Biomastradecenters we supported the idea of development of a mod-
ern BLTC in small town Domale / Lukovica. Mainly because of social
and economical barriers the idea didnt come to life, but we helped
some other BL&TCs projects with professional advice (workshops) and
promotion of best practice examples (study tours). We can hardly say
that they are comparative with best practice examples from Austria
Biomassehofe trade mark. The main difference is that BLTC presented
here were not established by farmer cooperatives but they were estab-
lished as private initiative of forest owners or farmers, looking for new
sources of income. But any way we identify reasons which are slowing
up their development, which can be presented as legal barriers. Further
on we would like to expose only that ones which were establish in the
frame of project activities and they are on the good way to become
best practice examples in Slovenia. We estimate that these first BL&TCs
will have a significant influence of further development of BL&TC and
on Slovenian woodfuels market.
BL&TC Nazarje (Slovenia)
BL&TC
Biomasa d.o.o.
Nazarje
www.biomasa.si
BIOFIT d.o.o.
Visoko
www.bio-fit.net
In operation since 2008 2008
Investment n.a. 0.5 M
Number of new job 2-3 2
Membership
and forest area
1 member, company 1 member
Wood fuels 95,000 bulk m
3
30,000 bulk m
3
Heating
oil replaced
6.0 million litres 1.9 million litres
GHG saved 14,000 t/y CO
2
eq. 4,400 t/y CO
2
eq.
Target customers
District heating systems
and larger individuals,
owners of their boilers
Cogenerations on green
wood chips, individual
users
Services
Delivery, energy contracting,
chipping service, Froling
boilers representative
Delivery, chipping
Fuels invoiced by Volume Volume
BL&TC
Anton Kolar
Oplotnica
Mirko Kovai
Trebnje
In operation since In the phase of project 2008
Investment n.a. 0.35 M
Number of new job 1 3
Membership
and forest area
1 member and investor
+ 3 contractors for wood
biomass
1 member, family farm
90 ha of forest
Wood fuels 3,000 bulk m
3
1,000-1,500 bulk m
3
Heating
oil replaced
0.2 million litres 0.1 million litres
GHG saved 440 t/y CO
2
eq. 220 t/y CO
2
eq.
Target customers
District heating system
and individual system
District heating system, indi-
vidual system, large users
Services
Delivery, energy contracting,
chipping
Delivery, energy contracting,
chipping
Fuels invoiced by Volume Volume
27
MAIN PROJECT DELIVERABLES
available on www.biomasstradecentres.eu
HANDBOOKS / WOOD FUELS
BOOKLETS / ENERGY CROPS IN ARABLE LANDS
DIRECTORIES / WOOD FUELS PRODUCERS
BIOMASSTRADECENTRES.EU
EN IT AT SL PL
EN IT SL PL
ENERGY CROPS
IN ARABLE LANDS B
O
O
K
L
E
T
LEGNA E ClPPATO
PRODUZlONE 1 REQUl5lTl QUALlTATlVl 1 COMPRAVENDlTA
M
A
N
U
A
L
E
P
R
A
T
lC
O
WOOD FUEL5 HANDBOOK
PRODUCTl ON 1 QUALl TY REQUl REMENT5 1 TRADl NG
COLTURE ENERGETICHE
PER I TERRENI AGRICOLI
PRODUZIONE E USOENERGETICODELLE BIOMASSE PRODOTTE
DA SIEPI, ARBORETI, CEDUI A CORTA ROTAZIONE E MISCANTO
B
O
O
K
L
E
T
FIREWOOD
WOOD CHIPS
PELLETS
REGIONAL WOODFUELS PRODUCERS DIRECTORY
LEGNA
CIPPATO
PELLET
PRODUTTORI E DISTRIBUTORI PROFESSIONALI
A
I
E
L
A
O
T
EN IT AT SL PL