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Try this iron-rich Trail Mix!

Ingredients
cup butter or margarine
1 tsp salt
4 tsp Worcestershire sauce
2 2/3 cup Cheerios
2 2/3 cup Rice Chex
2 2/3 cup Wheat Chex
1 cup peanuts (caution with children
< 4 years, or with peanut allergy)
1 cup pretzels
1 cup raisins

Directions
1. Melt margarine in pan
2. Stir in salt and Worcestershire sauce
3. Add cereal, nuts, raisins, and pretzels
4. Bake for 1 hour at 250 stirring occasionally



Choose these foods for lots of iron!

Iron Foods
IRON FOR
STRONG BLOOD
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Schenectady County WIC Program
650 Franklin Street
Suite 200
Schenectady NY 12305
www.cceschenectady.org

Breakfast
WIC cereal with
fruit and milk,
orange juice,
toast
Snack
Crackers with
peanut butter,
fruit
Lunch
Soft tacos with
meat, lettuce,
tomato, cheese,
and beans
Snack Tuna sandwich
Dinner
Chicken with rice,
broccoli and
carrots, fruit, and
milk


What is a normal iron value?
Hemoglobin (Hgb) Values
11.5 and higher for children
12.0 and higher for pregnant,
breastfeeding and post-partum
women
My Hemoglobin Value _________



Eating iron foods
can help you and
your family stay
healthy and feel
good!

Sample Menu







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provider and employer.



You and Your Family Need Iron!
6 Months: Start baby cereal with
iron and mashed fruits and
vegetables. Keep feeding your baby
the cereal until at least one year old.
You can mix it with other cereals,
fruits, or juices if your baby gets tired
of it.

7 to 9 Months: Start baby meats,
mashed beans, or tofu. If you use
baby meats buy the plain meats
instead of meats mixed with
vegetables, rice, or noodles. You can
also cook ground meat and mash it for
your baby. Give your baby a vitamin C
fruit, vegetables, or fruit juice at least
once a day.
Children and Adults
Eat 2 to 3 foods that are
high in iron every day.

Eat vitamin C foods when you eat
your iron foods.
Drink milk, juice, or water with meals.
Coffee and tea can make you take in
less iron from the food you eat. If
you drink coffee or tea, drink
them between meals.
*If you are pregnant, be sure to
take your prenatal vitamins. They
have extra iron. If you have low
iron, ask your doctor about taking
iron pills*

Iron Tips
helps your body use iron. Eat a
vitamin C food when you eat iron foods, or
cook them together. Examples:
Orange juice with iron-fortified
cereal
Bean burrito with salsa
Whole grain bread with peanut
butter
Some high vitamin C foods are:
All WIC Juices
Broccoli and Bell Peppers
Strawberries and Oranges
Some Other Ideas
Cook foods in cast iron skillets, pots,
or pans (heavy black ones)
If you take both iron and calcium
supplements, do not take them at the same
time. By taking them a few hours apart,
your body will absorb more of both.
Eat iron-enriched rice. Dont rinse before
cooking.



Why do I need iron?
You need iron to keep your blood
strong. If your blood is low in iron,
you have anemia. Anemia can make
you or your child:
look pale, feel tired and
weak, act cranky
eat poorly
not grow well
get sick more
easily, get infections and
headaches
have trouble learning, and
do poorly in school or work
If you are pregnant, your baby could
be born too soon or too small.

How can I get enough iron
for myself and family?


Iron is a mineral found in some foods.
Eating foods that are high in iron can
help keep you and your family healthy
and feeling good!
Babies
Birth: Breastfeed your baby. If you
give your baby formula, always use
formula with iron. Wait until about
one year to give your baby cows milk.

Dairy Products
A child that consumes a large amount
of dairy products, including milk,
cheese, and yogurt may be at
increased risk of becoming iron
deficient. If your child is four
years old or younger, limit their
milk intake to 16-20 ounces
per day.