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Course: Advanced Placement European History

School: Summit International Preparatory, Arlington, Texas 76011


Instructor: Terrence Sowers
Year: 2013 2014

Course Description: AP European History is a two semester course that is designed to be the equivalent of a
college survey course on the history of modern Europe. This course covers European history from the
Renaissance to the present. This span of history is explored along three themes: intellectual and cultural
history, political and diplomatic history, and social and economic history. Instructional approaches used to
examine these themes include the following: lecture, seminar, informal discussion, debate, research,
independent reading of relevant literature, viewing of documentary films, and individual or group projects.
Students are expected to read a considerable amount of text, literature, and supplementary sources.
Students will learn to analyze historical documents and to express their analysis of events in writing. Major
assessments are in the form of tests that consist of objective and essay questions, as well as projects and
papers. Data Based Questions will be an integral part of the course. For each segment of study, students will
write at least one Data Based Question or Thematic Essay. This course will follow the International
Baccalaureate expectation. The unit objections are formatted to ask the overall Big Questions that students
will be expected to answer at the conclusion of each segment. A total of 20 DBQs will be used throughout
the year 1 for each segment of study (listed in this syllabus).

Primary Textbook: A History of Western Society Tenth Edition
McKay, Hill, Buckler, Crowston, Weisner-Hanks, and Perry
Bedford Saint Martins (bedfordsaintmartins.com/mckaywest.)
2011 Publication

Secondary Novels: Henry V by William Shakespeare
The Prince by Machiavelli
Robin Hood by James Clarke Holt
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

Suggested Grading: 40% Major Tests
DBQ and FRQ Essays

30% Daily Reading Quizzes
Maps Quizzes and Academic Vocabulary Quizzes
Key Date Quizzes

20% Projects
Book Reviews
Museum Visit

10% Inner / Outer Circle Participation
Socratic Seminar Participation

Academic Vocabulary: Each unit will include a set of Key Words that the students are expected to recognize,
define, and explain as related to the time period. The Key Words will include events, people, movements,
philosophies, and any number of relevant terminologies that would frequently be used in textbooks and
research material. The academic vocabulary will provide the student and teacher with a common vocabulary
to be used in discussion, seminar, essays, and data based questions.

Themes of Instruction: The 4 major units will include 20 segments of instruction that will correlate with the
Summit International Preparatory International Baccalaureate school calendar. Themes of instruction will
include the following:

4 Units / 20 Themes or Segments

The Black Plague and the Later Middle Ages 1300 1450 Unit 1
The Plague (History Channel) (2005)
The Age of the Renaissance 1350 1550 Unit 1
Henry V by William Shakespeare
Religious Wars 1500 1600 Unit 1
Joan of Arc (History Channel) (1999)
European Exploration & Conquest 1450 1650 Unit 1
Absolutism and Constitutionalism 1589 1725 Unit 1
The Scientific Revolution and The Enlightenment 1540 1789 Unit 2
The Expansion of Europe 1650 1800 Unit 2
The Changing Life of the People 1700 1800 Unit 2
The Prince by Machavelli
Politics 1775 1815 Unit 2
Energy & The Industrial Revolution 1780 1850 Unit 2
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Semester Exam
Romanticism, Liberalism, Nationalism, and Socialism 1815 1850 Unit 3
Urban Society 1840 1900 Unit 3
The Age of Nationalism 1850 1914 Unit 3
The West & The World 1815 1914 Unit 3
World War I 1914 1919 Unit 3
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
The Age of Anxiety 1900 1940 Unit 3
Dictatorships and World War II 1919 1945 Unit 4
A New World Order (History Channel Documentary)
Cold War 1945 1965 Unit 4
Postwar Order 1960 1991 Unit 4
Europe and the World of Globalization 1990 2014 Unit 4
Semester Exam

There are 4 units in the course each unit will encompass a 9-week quarter to align with the Summit
International Preparatory school calendar. The units for each semester are divided into segments. Each
segment has a set of Big Questions to follow the International Baccalaureate model of effective instruction.
The Big Questions are essentially the objectives for each segment. These are the objectives that I expect the
students to master. At the end of each segment, students will have an objective test; however, they will also
have a set of essay questions that specifically align to the Big Questions and a DBQ that will be calculated as
a separate test score.

Example: If the Big Question is -- what impact did the new ways of thinking have on political developments
and monarchial absolutism? The end of segment test would have the essay: With a short answer response
formatted with complete sentences and a short paragraph of approximately 300 words, discuss the impact
the new ways of thinking has had on political developments and monarchial absolutism between 1540 and
1789.

UNIT 1 (August 6 October 23)

Segment 1

Bubonic Plague & the Later Middle Ages 1300 1450 The Big Questions

What were the demographic, economic, and social consequences of climate change during the
14
th
century?
How did the spread of the plague shape European society in the 14
th
and 15
th
century?
What were the causes of the 100 Years War and how did the war affect European politics,
economics, and cultural life.
What challenges faced by the Christian church in the 14
th
century, and how did church leaders,
intellectuals, and ordinary people respond?
How did economic and social tensions contribute to revolts, crime, violence, and a growing
sense of ethnic and national distinctions in Europe 1300 1450?

Key Terms -- Bubonic Plague & the Later Middle Ages

Great Famine
Black Death
Flagellants
Agincourt
Representative assemblies
Babylonian Captivity
Great Schism
Conciliarists
Confraternities
Jacquerie
English Peasants revolt
Statute of Kilkenny

Film The Plague (History Channel) (2005)

DBQ 1 - Long Distance Trade in Late Medieval Europe 1300 1450

Historical Background: Advances in ship design and navigation enabled year-round long distance trade,
expanding medieval trade networks. While it became easier to exchange food and other highly valued goods
among countries, ships moved between ports bearing more sinister passengers as well rats carrying the
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plague. International trade gave rise to complex political dynamics between countries and provided the
impetus for the discovery of new trade routes and distant lands with untapped resources.

Analyze the extent and effects of long distance trade in late medieval Europe.

*13 Documents to be attached

Segment 2

The Renaissance 1350 1550 The Big Questions

What economic and political developments in Italy provided the setting for the Renaissance?
What were the key ideas of the Renaissance, and how were they different for men and women
and for southern and northern Europeans?
How did changes in art reflect new Renaissance ideals?
What were the key social hierarchies in Renaissance Europe, and how did ideas about hierarchy
shape peoples lives?
How did the nation-states of Western Europe evolve in this Renaissance period?


Key Terms The Renaissance

Renaissance
patronage
communes
popolo
signori
courts
humanism
virtu
Christian humanists
debate about women
New Christians

DBQ 2 Perspectives of Renaissance Writers 1350 1550

Historical Background: The Renaissance was characterized by self-conscious awareness among
fourteenth and fifteenth century Italians that they were living in a new era. The realization that
something new and unique was happening first came to men of letters. The Renaissance also
manifested itself in a new attitude toward men, women, and the world.

Identify and analyze various perspectives of Renaissance writers.

*10 Documents to be attached

Segment 3
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Religious Wars 1500 1600 The Big Questions

What were the central ideas of the reformers, and why were they appealing to different social
groups?
How did the political situation in Germany shape the course of the Reformation?
How did Protestant ideas and institutions spread beyond German-speaking lands?
How did the Catholic Church respond to the new religious situation?
What were the causes and consequences of religious violence, including riots, wars, and witch-
hunts?

Key Terms Religious Wars

Anticiercalism
pluralism
indulgence
Protestant
Spanish Armada
The Institutes of the Christian Religion
predestination
Holy Office
Jesuits
Huguenots
politiques
Edict of Nantes
Union of Utrecht

DBQ 3 Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church 1500 1600

Historical Background: At the beginning of the sixteenth century there was just one type of Christian
church in Western Europe, but by the end of the century there were many. The dramatic shift in the
religious landscape of Europe was tumultuous, with many factions political and religious leaders,
radical thinkers, and humanists, to name a few in ever-changing states of conflict. The rapid spread of
the Reformation was fueled in part by the decentralization of the Holy Roman Empire. As reformers
encouraged laypeople to seek a more direct relationship with God, the church and state developed new
ways to gain funds and power, leading to riots, civil wars, and international conflicts.

Discuss the extent to which the religious schism during the sixteenth century was symptomatic of
political, social, and economic problems.

*10 Documents to be attached

Segment 4

European Exploration and Conquest 1450 1650 The Big Questions

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What was the Afro-Eurasian trading world before Columbus?
How and why did Europeans undertake ambitious voyages of expansion?
What was the impact of European conquest on the peoples and ecologies of the New World?
How was the era of global contact shaped by new commodities, commercial empires, and
forced migrations?
How did new ideas about race and the works of Montaigne and Shakespeare reflect the
encounter with new peoples and places?

Key Terms European Exploration and Conquest

conquistador
caravel
Ptolemys Geography
Treaty of Tordesillas
Mexica Empire
Inca Empire
viceroyalties
encomienda system
Columbian exchange

DBQ 4 Attitudes and Responses to European Exploration and Conquest 1450 1650

Historical Background: Overseas expansion broadened the geographical horizons of Europeans and
brought them into confrontations with ancient civilizations in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. These
confrontations led first to conquest, then to exploitation, and finally to profound social changes in both
Europe and the conquered territories.

Identify and analyze motives, attitudes, and consequences of the European age of exploration and
conquest.

*10 Documents to be attached

Segment 5

Absolutism and Constitutionalism 1589 1725 The Big Questions

What were the common crises and achievements of seventeenth-century European states?
What factors led to the rise of the French absolutist state under Louis XIV, and why did
absolutist Spain experience decline in the same period?
How did the rulers of Austria and Prussia transform their nations into powerful absolutist
monarchies?
What were the distinctive features of Russian and Ottoman absolutism?
How and why did the constitutional state triumph in the Dutch Republic and England?
What was the baroque style in art and music, and where was it popular?

Key Terms Absolutism and Constitutionalism
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Peace of Westphalia
Fronde
mercantilism
Peace of Utrecht
junkers
boyars
cossacks
sultan
janissary corps
millet system
constitutionalism
Puritans
Protectorate
Test Act
stadholder

DBQ 5 Absolutism 1589 - 1725

Historical Background: Absolutist governments were viewed by some as a solution to the upheaval of
the Reformation and the subsequent rapid growth and change in seventeenth-century Europe. Absolute
monarchs ruled over the centralized bureaucracies that oversaw armies, trade, and agriculture. They
negotiated with other rulers to help maintain peace in the age of crisis. This new political system was
adopted by governments in France, Spain, Prussia, Austria, and Russia. They were viewed by their
subjects as the literal embodiment of a government that used suppression and the claim of God-given
authority to carry out its abuses.

Analyze the extent to which rulers and their subjects viewed the proper role of an absolute monarch
differently.

*11 Documents to be attached

UNIT 2 (October 24 December 19)

Segment 6

Scientific Revolution and The Enlightenment 1540 1789 The Big Questions

What was revolutionary in the new attitudes toward the natural world?
How did the new worldview affect the way people thought about society and human relations?
What impact did the new ways of thinking have on political developments and monarchial
absolutism?

Key Terms Scientific Revolution and The Enlightenment

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natural philosophy
Copernican hypothesis
experimental method
law of inertia
law of universal gravitation
empiricism
Cartesian dualism
Enlightenment
rationalism
philosophes
reading revolution
salons
rococo
public sphere
enlightened absolutism
caneralism
Haskalah

DBQ 6 The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment 1540 1789

Historical Background: As the study of nature supplanted religious precedence in certain philosophical
circles, the discoveries of the seventeenth-century scientific revolution fueled the Enlightenment
movement of the eighteenth century, greatly advancing debates about concepts of human capacity,
innate human rights, and the value of each individual. The spread of new ideas was facilitated by an
explosive growth in book consumption, but the new natural philosophy had its own dark side. In their
attempts to reconcile current social dilemmas through scientific inquiry, some wielded this new science
to explain their own superiority and to rationalize attitudes such as racism and male chauvinism.

Describe and analyze how the new worldviews of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries affected
the way enlightened Europeans thought about society and human relations.

*10 documents to be attached

Segment 7

The Expansion of Europe 1650 1800 The Big Questions

What important developments led to the agricultural revolution, and how did these changes
affect peasants?
Why did the European population rise dramatically in the eighteenth century?
How and why did rural industry intensify in the eighteenth century?
What were guilds, and why did they become controversial in the eighteenth century?
How did colonial markets boost Europes economic and social development and what conflicts
and adversity did world trade entail?

Key Terms The Expansion of Europe
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agricultural revolution
enclosure
proletarianization
cottage industry
putting-out system
industrious revolution
guild system
economic liberalism
Navigation Acts
Treaty of Paris
debt peonage
Atlantic slave trade

DBQ 7 European Expansion and the Changing Life of the People 1650 1800

Historical Background: While the innovations of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions improved
and dramatically sped the production of food and goods, they upended the economic system that had
been in place since the Middle Ages and changed the face of home and work for many. People moved
away from their families to find employment, learned new skills, and struggled to reshape the social
structures of their communities. The positive economic growth was measurable in many ways, less
easily quantifiable was the cost paid in workers mental and physical well-being.

Examine the extent to which fundamental changes in the European economy during the eighteenth and
early nineteenth centuries affected the standards of living of both the urban and rural working classes .

*10 documents to be attached

Segment 8

The Changing Life of the People 1700 1800 The Big Questions

What changes occurred in marriage and the family in the course of the eighteenth century?
What was life like for the children, and how did attitudes toward childhood evolve?
How did increasing literacy and new patterns of consumption affect peoples lives?
What were the patterns of popular religion, and how did they interact with the worldview of the
educated public and their Enlightenment ideals?
How did the practice of medicine evolve in the eighteenth century?

Film Oliver Twist (1948)

Novel Hard Times by Charles Dickens

Students will begin reading Hard Times by Charles Dickens. This will be independent reading
outside of class; however, the students will have a reading schedule and SAT appropriate
exercises connected to excerpts taken from the novel. Applied Practice will provide
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commercially produced material to be used in class as related to this novel. The students will
read outside of class and have 2 full weeks to complete the book. An essay will be assigned and
written in class this will be a formal assessment.

Key Terms The Changing life of the People

community controls
illegitimacy explosion
wet-nursing
blood sports
carnival
just price
consumer revolution
Pietism
Methodists
jansenism

DBQ 8 Eighteenth Century Medical Practices 1700 1800

Historical Background: Although sickness, pain, and diseaseintractable challenges built into human
conditionpermeated the European experience in the eighteenth century, medical science played a
very small part in improving the health of most people. Yet the Enlightenments growing focus on
discovering the laws of nature and on human problems did give rise to a great deal of research and
experimentation.

Identify and analyze various practices used in the eighteenth century to care for the sick.

*10 documents to be attached

Segment 9

Politics & The French Revolution 1775 1815 The Big Questions

What social, political, and economic factors formed the background to the French Revolution
How did the events of 1789 result in a constitutional monarchy in France, and how did the new
constitution affect the various members of French society at home and in the colony of Saint-
Domingue?
How and why did the Revolution take a radical turn at home and in the colonies?
Why did Napoleon Bonaparte assume control of France, and what factors led to his downfall?
How did the new republic of Haiti gain independence from France?

Film Les Miserables (2012)

Key Terms -- Politics & The French Revolution

estates
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Estates General
National Assembly
Great Fear
constitutional monarchy
Jacobin club
Girondists
the Mountain
sans-culottes
Reign of Terror
dechristianization
Thermidorian reaction
Napoleonic Code
Grand Empire
Continental System

DBQ 9 The French Revolution 1775 1815

Historical Background: In 1789 the National Assembly formed during Louis XVIs Estates General and
spurred to action the aggrieved third estate of Paris, who literally stormed the Bastille and rose in
revolution against a king floundering in debt. The Assembly abolished the French nobility, shook up the
guild system, overhauled political boundaries, and established a national church. The revolution rippled
outward geographically and socially, extending to the French peasantry and the women of Paris, with
both positive and negative results, and inspired multiple revolts abroad.

Describe and analyze how the ideas and objectives of the men and women who participated in the
French Revolution changed over time.

*11 documents to be attached


Segment 10

Energy and the Industrial Revolution 1775 1815 The Big Questions

What were the origins of the Industrial Revolution in Britain, and how did it develop between
1780 and 1850?
How after 1815 did continental countries respond to the challenge of industrializations?
How did the Industrial Revolution affect people of all social classes, and what measures were
taken to improve the conditions of workers?

Key Terms Energy and the Industrial Revolution

Industrial Revolution
spinning jenny
water frame
steam engines
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Rocket
Crystal Palace
iron law of wages
tariff protection
economic nationalism
class-consciousness
Factory Act
separate spheres
Mines Act of 1842
Combination Acts

DBQ 10 - Women in the Industrial Revolution 1780 1850

Historical Background: The Industrial revolution began in Great Britain in the 1780s and created a rapid
domino effect that forever changed the face of industry, from agricultural production, to textile
manufacture, to the ever-faster methods by which goods and people were able to be moved. The
resulting changes in the nature of work had a direct impact on families and on women in particular. As
industrialized nations became wealthier, womens roles in the family and the workforce were
increasingly stratified.

Discuss how the profound social changes introduced by the Industrial Revolution affected women
working in the factories. To what extent did womens experiences reflect continuities with traditional
working-class ways of life?

*10 documents to be attached

Unit 3 (January 7 March 6)

Segment 11

Romanticism, Liberalism, Nationalism, and Socialism 1815 1850 The Big Questions

How did the victorious allies fashion a general peace settlement, and how did Metternich
uphold a conservative European order?
What were the basic tenets of liberalism, nationalism, and socialism, and what were most
attracted to these ideologies?
What were the characteristics of the romantic-movement, and who were some of the great
romantic artists?
How after 1815 did liberal, national, and socialist forces challenge conservatism in Greece, Great
Britain, and France?
Why in 1848 did revolution triumph briefly throughout most of Europe, and why did it fail
almost completely?

Key Terms - Romanticism, Liberalism, Nationalism, and Socialism

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Congress of Vienna
dual revolution
Holy Alliance
Carlsbad Decrees
liberalism
laissez faire
nationalism
socialism
bourgeoisie
proletariat
romanticism
Corn Laws
Battle of Peterloo
Reform Bill of 1832
Great Famine

DBQ 11 The Romantic Movement 1815 1850

Historical Background: Romanticism swept the literary and artistic scenes of Europe starting around
1750. Considered a response, both conscious and subliminal, to the Enlightenment emphasis on
rationality, order, and restraint, the Romantic Movement encompassed the works of famously emotive
and individualistic poets, artists, and musicians.

Analyze the characteristics of the Romantic Movement.

*11 documents to be attached

Segment 12

Urban Society 1840 1900 The Big Questions

What was life like in the cities, and how did urban life change in the nineteenth century?
What did the emergence of urban industrial society mean for the rich and poor and those in
between?
How did the working-class and middle-class families change as they coped with the challenges
and the opportunities of the developing urban civilization?
What major changes in science and thought reflected and influenced the new urban society?

Key Terms Urban Society

Utilitarianism
germ theory
labor aristocracy
sweated industries
thermodynamics
second industrial revolution
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evolution
Social Darwinists
realism

DBQ 12 Science and Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century 1840 1900

Historical Background: Inspired by the incredible technical advances of the Industrial Revolution,
nineteenth-century scientists sought new scientific explanations and technologies, often in the name of
social reform. Charles Lyell and Charles Darwin presented astonishing theories in geology and biology,
respectively, just two of the many scientists who did groundbreaking work in this period; the new field
of social science sprang forth from the increased availability of statistics. Each field of inquiry informed
the others and had far reaching applications in the new urban society of the nineteenth century.

To what extent did major changes in science and thought reflect the new urban society of the
nineteenth century?

Segment 13

The Age of Nationalism and New Imperialism 1850 1914 The Big Questions

How did Napoleon III seek to reconcile popular and conservative forces in an authoritarian
nation-state?
How did the process of unification in Italy and Germany create conservative nation-states?
In what ways did the United States experience nation building?
What steps did Russia and the Ottoman Turks takes toward modernization, and how successful
were they?
Why after 1871 did ordinary citizens feel a growing loyalty to their governments?
Why did the socialist movement grow, and how revolutionary was it?

Key Terms The Age of Nationalism and New Imperialism

Red Shirts
Homestead Act
modernization
Bloody Sunday
October Manifesto
Duma
Tanzimat
Young Turks
Reichstag
Kulturkampf
Dreyfus affair
Peoples Budget
Zionism
Revisionism

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DBQ 13 The Age of Nationalism 1850 1914

Historical Background: A powerful force since the French Revolution, the concept of nationalism made
few inroads politically, failing most spectacularly during the nationalistic revolutions of 1848 in France,
Austria, and Prussia. But after 1850 European society became increasingly nationalistic, and by 1914
nationalism had become the dominant faith in Europe and the United States. By translating cultural
unity into a political identity, nationalists empowered citizens with a greater sense of belonging,
whereas before they had been fragmented by social strata, war, and other internal divisions.

Analyze the growth of Nationalism in Europe from 1850 1914.

*11 documents to be attached

Segment 14

The West & The World 1815 1914 The Big Questions

What were some of the global experiences of European industrialization between 1815 and
1914?
How was massive migration an integral part of Western expansion?
How and why after 1875 did European nations rush to build political empires in Africa and Asia?
What was the general pattern of non-western responses to Western expansion, and how did
India, Japan, and China meet the imperialist challenge?

Key Terms The West & The World

Third World
opium trade
gunboat diplomacy
great migration
great white walls
new imperialism
Afrikaners
Berlin conference
White mans burden
Great Rebellion
Meiji Restoration
hundred days of reform

DBQ 14 The West and the World 1815 1914

Historical Background: Driven by the pressures of population, the trade economy, and a nationalistic
quest for empire, Europeans set their sights on the natural resources of their neighboring continents.
The colonized peoples of Asia and Africa responded to the often hostile invasions of their home
countries with arguments ranging from cautious optimism to violent outrage.

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Identify and analyze the variety of responses that the colonized peoples advocated toward the
European colonizers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

*10 documents to be attached

Segment 15

War and Revolution 1914 1919 World War I The Big Questions

What caused the First World War and, and why did it have significant popular support?
How did the First World War change the nature of modern warfare?
What was the impact of total war on civilian populations?
What led to the Russian Revolution, and what was its outcome?
How did the allies fashion a peace settlement, and why was it successful?

Novel All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

Students will have this novel assigned as outside reading and will conclude with an AP appropriate
essay. Applied Practice will provide commercially produced multiple choice questions appropriate for a
variety of selections and excerpts taken from the novel. The multiple choice questions will be formatted
to reflect the AP Literature exam and the SAT examination.

Key Terms War and Revolution World War I

Triple Alliance
Triple Entente
Schieffen Plan
total war
trench warfare
February Revolution
Petrograd Soviet
Bolsheviks
Treaty of Brest-Litovsk
war communion
Treaty of Versailles
Fourteen Points
League of Nations
national self-determination
war guilt clause
Balfour Declaration

DBQ 15 World War I and the Home front 1914 - 1919

Historical Background: The four years of total war that constituted World War I (1914 1919)
changed the lives not only of those men who fought as soldiers, but of the people who remained at
home. Women and other noncombatants tried to maintain structure within their everyday lives while
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grappling to understand their countries positions and enduring their own mental and physical
challenges. Stretching food and materials to provide both for the people at home and for the troops,
citizens on the home front witnessed the devastation of war from a wholly unique perspective.

Describe and analyze the effects of the Great War on the European home fronts during the course of
the war.

*10 documents to be attached

Segment 16

Post World War I, 1920s, Age of Anxiety, and the Depression Era 1919 1940 The Big Questions

In what ways did new and sometimes radically experimental ideas in philosophy, religion,
physics, psychology, and literature reflect the general crisis in Western thought?
How did modernism revolutionize architecture, painting, and music?
How did emerging consumer society and mass culture of the interwar years change the
everyday lives of ordinary men and women?
How did the democratic leaders of the 1920s deal with deep-seated instability and try to
establish real peace and prosperity?
What caused The Great Depression, and how did the Western democracies respond to this
challenge?

Key Terms -- Post World War I, 1920s, Age of Anxiety, and the Depression

logical positivism
existentialism
theory of special relativity
id, ego, and superego
stream of consciousness technique
modernism
functionalism
Bauhaus
Dadaism
new woman
Dawes Plan
Great Depression
Popular Front

DBQ 16 Age of Anxiety 1900 - 1940

Historical Background: The disillusionment that many felt in the wake of World War I manifested itself
in new philosophies that emphasized the unconscious mind and the existentialist nature of the
individual, and new artistic and literary styles that experimented with structure and chaos. These trends
in intellectual thought were accompanied by equally unsettling advances in physics that postulated that
the universe was infinite and composed of a subatomic world. While some sought understanding in the
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new sciences or a shared experience through art, others turned back to religion and faith for
reassurance

Discuss how European culture after World War II challenged the assumption of the prewar, nineteenth-
century European culture.

*9 documents to be attached

Unit 4 (March 7 May 16)

Segment 17

Dictatorships and World War II 1919 1945 The Big Questions

How did radical totalitarian dictatorship differ from conservative authoritarianism, and in what
ways were communism and fascism totalitarian systems?
How did Stalin and the Communist Party build a modern totalitarian state in the Soviet Union?
How did Mussolinis dictatorship come to power and govern in Italy?
How did Hitler gain power, what policies did totalitarian Nazi Germany pursue, and why did they
lead to World War II?
How did Germany and Japan create enormous empires, and how were they defeated by the
Allies?

Key Terms Dictatorships and World War II

totalitarianism
fascism
eugenics
five-year plan
New Economic Policy
Collectivization of agriculture
kulaks
Black Shirts
Lateran Agreement
National Socialism
Enabling Acts
appeasement
New Order
Holocaust

DBQ 17 Dictatorships and the Second World War 1919 - 1945

Historical Background: Taking stock of the collateral damage of the First World War, many citizens
believed that their prewar enthusiasm for a government for the people and by the people had propelled
them on a disastrous path. Additionally, during the total war people became accustomed to having
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their individual rights suppressed for a greater good. No longer trusting the democratic collective to
make wise decisions, they hoped that alternative models of government such as communism and
fascism would provide salvation and direction. Out of these conditions grew widespread acceptance of
radical totalitarian dictatorships, with the most brutal regimes flourishing in Hitlers Germany,
Mussolinis Italy, and Stalins Soviet Union.

Identify the key concepts that motivated authoritarian governments and rulers in the interwar years
(1919 -1939), and explain why those concepts were so appealing.

*10 documents to be attached

Segment 18

The Cold War 1945 1965 The Big Questions

How did the events at the close of World War II contribute to the emergence of the Cold War,
and how did the U.S. Soviet rivalry affect life in Europe?
Why did western Europe recover so successfully, and what were the sources of postwar
stability?
What was the pattern of postwar rebuilding and development in the Soviet Union and
communist Eastern Europe?
What circumstances led to the postwar colonial independence movement, and how did the Cold
War influence the process?
How did large-scale changes in social structures and relations contribute to European stability
on both sides of the iron curtain?

Key Terms The Cold War

displaced persons
Truman Doctrine
Marshall Plan
Council for Mutual Economic Assistance
NATO
Common Market
de-Stalinization
decolonization
nonalignment
guest worker programs
postcolonial migration

DBQ 18 Views Regarding Decolonization 1945 - 1965

Historical Background: On the eve of World War II, France controlled a colonial empire second in size
only to that of Britain. The empire was more than twenty times as large as the home country, and it
contained one and a half times as many inhabitants. By 1962, only scattered remnants were left. The
French had fought to prevent the loss of their colonies, and the process of decolonization in the French
Word Wall
List 18
empire, especially in Algeria, was violent and brutal. Algeria, invaded by the French in 1830, was the
jewel of Frances empire. By 1954 Algerias population included over a million settlers of European
origin. The Algerians fought a war for independence against France from 1954 to 1962; they gained their
independence on March 19, 1962, with the signing of the Evian Accords.

Identify and analyze the various views regarding the decolonization of Algeria from France in the middle
of the twentieth century.

*12 documents to be attached

Segment 19

Challenging the Postwar Order feminist, environmentalist, separatists, and the end of communism
1960 1991 The Big Questions

How did social and political changes in the 1960s contribute to growing criticism of the postwar
consensus that had emerged in the 1950s?
How did economic decline in the 1970s contribute to fundamental social and political change in
the 1980s in Western Europe and North America?
What internal and external factors weakened communist power in the East Bloc, and how did
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev try to reform the system from above?
Why did anticommunist revolutions sweep through Eastern Europe in 1989, and what were the
immediate consequences?

Key terms 1960 1991

dtente
New Left
Breznev Doctrine
OPEC
stagflation
postindustrial society
really existing socialism
Solidarity
perestroika
glasnost
shock therapy

DBQ 19 Communism and Eastern Europe 1960 - 1991

Historical Background: Between the 1961 erection of the Berlin Wall and the 1989 revolutions that
abolished Communist rule throughout the Soviet Union, the relationship between citizens of states in
the Eastern bloc and their Communist governments underwent a radical shift. Short-lived economic
upswings were supplanted by greater underlying trade and industry problems and, really existing
socialism in the East Bloc became unsustainable, oppressive, and unfair. Small working-class groups in
Word Wall
List 19
Czechoslovakia and Poland gained tremendous popular support for their callas to reform the
government.

To what extent did criticisms of communism by citizens of the eastern European socialist states change
over time?

*12 documents to be attached

Segment 20

Europe in the Age of Globalization 1990 Present The Big Questions

How did Russia and the former East Bloc countries meet the challenges of post-communist
reconstruction and political and economic reform?
What are the defining features of globalization, and how did changing structures transform
European societies?
How did population decline and large scale immigration lead to demographic changes in
contemporary Europe, and what were the main results of growing ethnic-diversity?
What key problems faced European societies in the twenty-first century, and how did European
states and peoples deal with these critical issues?

Key Terms 1990 Present

Ostaigie
ethnic cleansing
Kosovo Liberation Army
globalization
European Union
Maastricht Treaty
World Trade Organization
nongovernmental organizations
diasporas
multiculturalism
war on terror
global warming

DBQ 20 Western Europeans Relations with Muslims and the Islamic World 1991 - Present

Historical Background: The plight of Eastern European Muslims was brought to world attention during
the 1991 2001 civil war in Yugoslavia, where they were victims of ethnic cleansing. The European
response was initially slow, but NATO ultimately intervened and brought peace to the region. Though
Islam has grown to be the largest minority religion in Europe, religious extremism, lack of cultural
understanding, and the economic fears associated with a rapidly growing immigrant population have all
contributed to a complex and hard-to-navigate relationship between western Europeans and Muslims.
Word Wall
List 20
Tensions between these groups grew after the al-Queda attacks in New York and Washington D.C. on
September 11, 2001, and subsequent terrorist attacks in England and Spain. Cultural and religious
differences continue to raise questions about what it means to be European in todays globalized world.

Analyze the relations between western Europeans and Muslims in the late twentieth and early twenty-
first centuries.

*11 documents to be attached

Writing Opportunities

Quizzes are designed to engage students in critical thinking and offer an analytical approach to
assess student progress. Quizzes are typically 5 short answer questions or a quick-write in their
essay/writing journals. Quizzes occur approximately once a week. An example of a quick-write is:
From our discussion yesterday, which were the two most important causes of New Imperialism;
defend your choices.

Thematic (Free-Response) Essays allow students to analyze prompts, marshal evidence, propose an
argument while writing a cogent essay in response to a wide variety of prompts. Essays are assigned
approximately every 3 weeks. Examples of FRQ essays include: To what extent were the revolutions
of 1820-1848 a response to nationalism and / or liberalism? and To what extent was the work of the
artists and writers of the Renaissance a reflection of Renaissance ideals?.

Document-Based Questions are designed to allow the student to analyze documents (primary &
secondary) and construct an essay using skills such as analysis of different points of view and bias. I
will assign both teacher-generated and released AP DBQs at the conclusion of each segment of
instruction they are listed in this syllabus. Students write the DBQ essays in timed, in-class formats
(both during the regular school day and during evening sessions) and as homework. An example of a
sample DBQ would be -- Analyze the extent and effects of long distance trade in late medieval
Europe. There will be 11 documents from the A History of Western Society text to go with the DBQ.

20 Data Based Questions

DBQ 1 - Long Distance Trade in Late Medieval Europe 1300 1450

Historical Background: Advances in ship design and navigation enabled year-round long distance trade,
expanding medieval trade networks. While it became easier to exchange food and other highly valued
goods among countries, ships moved between ports bearing more sinister passengers as well rats
carrying the plague. International trade gave rise to complex political dynamics between countries and
provided the impetus for the discovery of new trade routes and distant lands with untapped resources.

Analyze the extent and effects of long distance trade in late medieval Europe.

*13 Documents to be attached

DBQ 2 Perspectives of Renaissance Writers 1350 1550

Historical Background: The Renaissance was characterized by self-conscious awareness among
fourteenth and fifteenth century Italians that they were living in a new era. The realization that
something new and unique was happening first came to men of letters. The Renaissance also
manifested itself in a new attitude toward men, women, and the world.

Identify and analyze various perspectives of Renaissance writers.

*10 Documents to be attached

DBQ 3 Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church 1500 1600

Historical Background: At the beginning of the sixteenth century there was just one type of Christian
church in Western Europe, but by the end of the century there were many. The dramatic shift in the
religious landscape of Europe was tumultuous, with many factions political and religious leaders,
radical thinkers, and humanists, to name a few in ever-changing states of conflict. The rapid spread of
the Reformation was fueled in part by the decentralization of the Holy Roman Empire. As reformers
encouraged laypeople to seek a more direct relationship with God, the church and state developed new
ways to gain funds and power, leading to riots, civil wars, and international conflicts.

Discuss the extent to which the religious schism during the sixteenth century was symptomatic of
political, social, and economic problems.

*10 Documents to be attached

DBQ 4 Attitudes and Responses to European Exploration and Conquest 1450 1650

Historical Background: Overseas expansion broadened the geographical horizons of Europeans and
brought them into confrontations with ancient civilizations in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. These
confrontations led first to conquest, then to exploitation, and finally to profound social changes in both
Europe and the conquered territories.

Identify and analyze motives, attitudes, and consequences of the European age of exploration and
conquest.

*10 Documents to be attached

DBQ 5 Absolutism 1589 - 1725

Historical Background: Absolutist governments were viewed by some as a solution to the upheaval of
the Reformation and the subsequent rapid growth and change in seventeenth-century Europe. Absolute
monarchs ruled over the centralized bureaucracies that oversaw armies, trade, and agriculture. They
negotiated with other rulers to help maintain peace in the age of crisis. This new political system was
adopted by governments in France, Spain, Prussia, Austria, and Russia. They were viewed by their
subjects as the literal embodiment of a government that used suppression and the claim of God-given
authority to carry out its abuses.

Analyze the extent to which rulers and their subjects viewed the proper role of an absolute monarch
differently.

*11 Documents to be attached

DBQ 6 The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment 1540 1789

Historical Background: As the study of nature supplanted religious precedence in certain philosophical
circles, the discoveries of the seventeenth-century scientific revolution fueled the Enlightenment
movement of the eighteenth century, greatly advancing debates about concepts of human capacity,
innate human rights, and the value of each individual. The spread of new ideas was facilitated by an
explosive growth in book consumption, but the new natural philosophy had its own dark side. In their
attempts to reconcile current social dilemmas through scientific inquiry, some wielded this new science
to explain their own superiority and to rationalize attitudes such as racism and male chauvinism.

Describe and analyze how the new worldviews of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries affected
the way enlightened Europeans thought about society and human relations.

*10 documents to be attached

DBQ 7 European Expansion and the Changing Life of the People 1650 1800

Historical Background: While the innovations of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions improved
and dramatically sped the production of food and goods, they upended the economic system that had
been in place since the Middle Ages and changed the face of home and work for many. People moved
away from their families to find employment, learned new skills, and struggled to reshape the social
structures of their communities. The positive economic growth was measurable in many ways, less
easily quantifiable was the cost paid in workers mental and physical well-being.

Examine the extent to which fundamental changes in the European economy during the eighteenth and
early nineteenth centuries affected the standards of living of both the urban and rural working classes .

*10 documents to be attached

DBQ 8 Eighteenth Century Medical Practices 1700 1800

Historical Background: Although sickness, pain, and diseaseintractable challenges built into human
conditionpermeated the European experience in the eighteenth century, medical science played a
very small part in improving the health of most people. Yet the Enlightenments growing focus on
discovering the laws of nature and on human problems did give rise to a great deal of research and
experimentation.

Identify and analyze various practices used in the eighteenth century to care for the sick.

*10 documents to be attached

DBQ 9 The French Revolution 1775 1815

Historical Background: In 1789 the National Assembly formed during Louis XVIs Estates General and
spurred to action the aggrieved third estate of Paris, who literally stormed the Bastille and rose in
revolution against a king floundering in debt. The Assembly abolished the French nobility, shook up the
guild system, overhauled political boundaries, and established a national church. The revolution rippled
outward geographically and socially, extending to the French peasantry and the women of Paris, with
both positive and negative results, and inspired multiple revolts abroad.

Describe and analyze how the ideas and objectives of the men and women who participated in the
French Revolution changed over time.

*11 documents to be attached

DBQ 10 - Women in the Industrial Revolution 1780 1850

Historical Background: The Industrial revolution began in Great Britain in the 1780s and created a rapid
domino effect that forever changed the face of industry, from agricultural production, to textile
manufacture, to the ever-faster methods by which goods and people were able to be moved. The
resulting changes in the nature of work had a direct impact on families and on women in particular. As
industrialized nations became wealthier, womens roles in the family and the workforce were
increasingly stratified.

Discuss how the profound social changes introduced by the Industrial Revolution affected women
working in the factories. To what extent did womens experiences reflect continuities with traditional
working-class ways of life?

*10 documents to be attached

DBQ 11 The Romantic Movement 1815 1850

Historical Background: Romanticism swept the literary and artistic scenes of Europe starting around
1750. Considered a response, both conscious and subliminal, to the Enlightenment emphasis on
rationality, order, and restraint, the Romantic Movement encompassed the works of famously emotive
and individualistic poets, artists, and musicians.

Analyze the characteristics of the Romantic Movement.

*11 documents to be attached

DBQ 12 Science and Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century 1840 1900

Historical Background: Inspired by the incredible technical advances of the Industrial Revolution,
nineteenth-century scientists sought new scientific explanations and technologies, often in the name of
social reform. Charles Lyell and Charles Darwin presented astonishing theories in geology and biology,
respectively, just two of the many scientists who did groundbreaking work in this period; the new field
of social science sprang forth from the increased availability of statistics. Each field of inquiry informed
the others and had far reaching applications in the new urban society of the nineteenth century.

To what extent did major changes in science and thought reflect the new urban society of the
nineteenth century?

*11 documents to be attached

DBQ 13 The Age of Nationalism 1850 1914

Historical Background: A powerful force since the French Revolution, the concept of nationalism made
few inroads politically, failing most spectacularly during the nationalistic revolutions of 1848 in France,
Austria, and Prussia. But after 1850 European society became increasingly nationalistic, and by 1914
nationalism had become the dominant faith in Europe and the United States. By translating cultural
unity into a political identity, nationalists empowered citizens with a greater sense of belonging,
whereas before they had been fragmented by social strata, war, and other internal divisions.

Analyze the growth of Nationalism in Europe from 1850 1914.

*11 documents to be attached

DBQ 14 The West and the World 1815 1914

Historical Background: Driven by the pressures of population, the trade economy, and a nationalistic
quest for empire, Europeans set their sights on the natural resources of their neighboring continents.
The colonized peoples of Asia and Africa responded to the often hostile invasions of their home
countries with arguments ranging from cautious optimism to violent outrage.

Identify and analyze the variety of responses that the colonized peoples advocated toward the
European colonizers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

*10 documents to be attached

DBQ 15 World War I and the Home front 1914 - 1919

Historical Background: The four years of total war that constituted World War I (1914 1919)
changed the lives not only of those men who fought as soldiers, but of the people who remained at
home. Women and other noncombatants tried to maintain structure within their everyday lives while
grappling to understand their countries positions and enduring their own mental and physical
challenges. Stretching food and materials to provide both for the people at home and for the troops,
citizens on the home front witnessed the devastation of war from a wholly unique perspective.

Describe and analyze the effects of the Great War on the European home fronts during the course of
the war.

*10 documents to be attached

DBQ 16 Age of Anxiety 1900 - 1940

Historical Background: The disillusionment that many felt in the wake of World War I manifested itself
in new philosophies that emphasized the unconscious mind and the existentialist nature of the
individual, and new artistic and literary styles that experimented with structure and chaos. These trends
in intellectual thought were accompanied by equally unsettling advances in physics that postulated that
the universe was infinite and composed of a subatomic world. While some sought understanding in the
new sciences or a shared experience through art, others turned back to religion and faith for
reassurance

Discuss how European culture after World War II challenged the assumption of the prewar, nineteenth-
century European culture.

*9 documents to be attached

DBQ 17 Dictatorships and the Second World War 1919 - 1945

Historical Background: Taking stock of the collateral damage of the First World War, many citizens
believed that their prewar enthusiasm for a government for the people and by the people had propelled
them on a disastrous path. Additionally, during the total war people became accustomed to having
their individual rights suppressed for a greater good. No longer trusting the democratic collective to
make wise decisions, they hoped that alternative models of government such as communism and
fascism would provide salvation and direction. Out of these conditions grew widespread acceptance of
radical totalitarian dictatorships, with the most brutal regimes flourishing in Hitlers Germany,
Mussolinis Italy, and Stalins Soviet Union.

Identify the key concepts that motivated authoritarian governments and rulers in the interwar years
(1919 -1939), and explain why those concepts were so appealing.

*10 documents to be attached

DBQ 18 Views Regarding Decolonization 1945 - 1965

Historical Background: On the eve of World War II, France controlled a colonial empire second in size
only to that of Britain. The empire was more than twenty times as large as the home country, and it
contained one and a half times as many inhabitants. By 1962, only scattered remnants were left. The
French had fought to prevent the loss of their colonies, and the process of decolonization in the French
empire, especially in Algeria, was violent and brutal. Algeria, invaded by the French in 1830, was the
jewel of Frances empire. By 1954 Algerias population included over a million settlers of European
origin. The Algerians fought a war for independence against France from 1954 to 1962; they gained their
independence on March 19, 1962, with the signing of the Evian Accords.

Identify and analyze the various views regarding the decolonization of Algeria from France in the middle
of the twentieth century.

*12 documents to be attached

DBQ 19 Communism and Eastern Europe 1960 - 1991

Historical Background: Between the 1961 erection of the Berlin Wall and the 1989 revolutions that
abolished Communist rule throughout the Soviet Union, the relationship between citizens of states in
the Eastern bloc and their Communist governments underwent a radical shift. Short-lived economic
upswings were supplanted by greater underlying trade and industry problems and, really existing
socialism in the East Bloc became unsustainable, oppressive, and unfair. Small working-class groups in
Czechoslovakia and Poland gained tremendous popular support for their callas to reform the
government.

To what extent did criticisms of communism by citizens of the eastern European socialist states change
over time?

*12 documents to be attached

DBQ 20 Western Europeans Relations with Muslims and the Islamic World 1991 - Present

Historical Background: The plight of Eastern European Muslims was brought to world attention during
the 1991 2001 civil war in Yugoslavia, where they were victims of ethnic cleansing. The European
response was initially slow, but NATO ultimately intervened and brought peace to the region. Though
Islam has grown to be the largest minority religion in Europe, religious extremism, lack of cultural
understanding, and the economic fears associated with a rapidly growing immigrant population have all
contributed to a complex and hard-to-navigate relationship between western Europeans and Muslims.
Tensions between these groups grew after the al-Queda attacks in New York and Washington D.C. on
September 11, 2001, and subsequent terrorist attacks in England and Spain. Cultural and religious
differences continue to raise questions about what it means to be European in todays globalized world.

Analyze the relations between western Europeans and Muslims in the late twentieth and early twenty-
first centuries.

*11 documents to be attached

Alphabetical Glossary of Academic Vocabulary

The following list of academic vocabulary words, phrases, items, acts, decrees, and philosophies will be
introduced, defined, and placed in context throughout the year. I have attempted to create 20 word wall
lists that should encompass most of the items listed below; however, there may be some that appear in
one list but not the other in any case the following list will be introduced, defined, and placed in
context within the academic year August 2 to May 16. The AP European History Test should be the 2
nd

or 3
rd
week of May, which would allow us ample time to get through the entire syllabus.

Afrikaners Agincourt agricultural revolution anticlericalism
appeasement Atlantic slave trade Babylonian Captivity Balfour Declaration
Battle of Peterloo Bauhaus Berlin Conference Black Death
Black Shirts blood sports Bloody Sunday Bolsheviks
Bourgeoise boyars Brezhnev Doctrine canmeralism
caravel Carlsbad Decrees carnival Cartesian dualism
Christian Democrats Christian humanists class-consciousness Columbian exchange
Combination Acts Common Market communes community schools
concillarists confraternities Congress of Vienna conquistador
constitutionalism constitutional
monarchy
consumer revolution Continental System
Copernican hypothesis Corn Laws Cossacks cottage industry
(Comecon) courts Crystal Palace Dadaism
Dawes Plan debate about women debt peonage dechristianization
decolonization de-Stalinization detente diasporas
displaced persons Dreyfus affair dual revolution Duma
economic liberalism economic nationalism Edict of Nantes empiricism
Enabling Act enclosure encomienda system English Peasants Revolt
enlightened absolutism Enlightenment estates Estates General
ethnic cleansing eugenics European union (EU) evolution
existentialism experimental method Factory Act of 1833 fascism
February Revolution five-year plan flagellants Fourteen Points
Fronde functionalism germ theory glasnost
globalization global warming Grand Empire Great Depression
Great Famine Great Fear great migration Great Rebellion
Great Schism great white walls guest worler programs guild system
gunboat diplomacy Haskalah Holocaust Holy Alliance
Holy Office Homestead Act Huguenots humanism
hundred days of reform id, ego, and superego illegitimacy explosion Inca Empire
indulgence Industrial Revolution industrious revolution The Institutes of the
Religion
iron law of wages Jacobin club Jacquerie janissary corps
Jansenism Jesuits Junkers just price
Kosovo Liberation Army
(KLA)
kulaks Kulturkampf labor aristocracy
laissez faire Lateran Agreement law of inertia law of universal
gravitation
League of Nations liberalism logical positivism Luddites
Maastricht Treaty Marshall Plan Meiji Restoration mercantilism
Methodist Mexica Empire millet system Mines Act of 1842
modernism modernization The Mountain multiculturalism
Napoleonic Code National Assembly nationalism National self-
determination
National Socialism NATO natural philosophy Navigation Acts
neoliberalism New Christians New Economic Policy new imperialism
New Left New Order new woman nonalignment
nongovernmental
organizations (NGOs)
October Manifesto OPEC opium trade
Ostalgie patronage Peace of Utrecht Peace of Westphalia
Peoples Budget perestroika Petrograd Soviet philosophes
Pietism pluralism politiques popolo
Popular Front postcolonial migration postindustrial society predestination
proletarianization proletariat Protectorate Protestant
Ptolemys Geography public sphere Puritans putting-out system
rationalism reading revolution realism really existing socialism
Red Shirts Reform Bill of 1832 Reichstag Reign of Terror
Renaissance representative
assemblies
republicanism Rocket
rococo romanticism salons sans-culottes
Schlieffen Plan second industrial
revolution
second revolution separate spheres
shock therapy signori Social Darwinists socialism
Solidarity Spanish Armada spinning jenny stadholder
stagflation Statue of Kilkenny steam engines stream of
consciousness
technique
sultan sweated industries Tanzimat Test Act
theory of special
relativity
Thermodynamics Third World totalitarianism
total war Treaty of Brest-Litovsk Treaty of Paris Treaty of Tordesillas
Treaty of Versailles trench warfare Triple Alliance Triple Entente
Truman Doctrine Union of Utrecht utilitarianism viceroyalties
virtu war on communism war guilt clause war on terror
Warsaw Pact water frame wet nursing white mans burden
World Trade
Organization (WTO)
Young Turks Zionism

Assessments:
Unit Exams assess the students knowledge of the current unit. Each exam includes multiple-choice
questions and an essay.
Europe Map quizzes will be given at the beginning of the year and prior to the national AP exam,
assessing the students knowledge of the current map of Europe. Each exam will be offered in a variety
of formats.
Significant Date quizzes will be given at the end of the first semester and prior to the national AP exam,
assessing the students ability to link major dates in European history to surrounding events / people /
ideologies / developments. Each quiz will be offered in a variety of formats.
Academic Vocabulary quizzes will be given at the end of each segment of instruction and prior to the
national AP exam, assessing the students ability to link major people, places, and things in European
history to surrounding events / people / ideologies / developments. Each quiz will be offered in either a
short definition of term format, or matching.
First Semester Exam is given at the end of the first semester and contains approximately 100
cumulative, multiple-choice questions for immediate input into the current semester grade.
Second Semester Exam will be a mock AP European History exam that I will create from released AP
Exam multiple-choice questions and DBQ and FRQ materials (consisting of 80 multiple-choice questions,
1 DBQ, and 2 Free-Response essays), giving it in an atmosphere that will prepare students for the actual
exam. The students will be expected to use the skills (analysis, critical thinking, interpreting /
understanding primary / secondary documents, writing, etc.) necessary to do well on the AP European
History Exam. I will give the mock 2 weeks before the national AP Exam; it is an excellent gauge for my
students on what they should re-review before the national exam. This mock exam can be used in lieu of
the 2
nd
semester exam.
An Art Museum Field Experience will be required. Students will go to the Kimball Art Museum in Fort
Worth, Texas on their own, or with their teacher on a Saturday before the Holiday Break in December.
The Kimball Art Museum has paintings, sculpture, pottery, and other forms of European art that clearly
show how the history of Europe influenced the artists. Some artists represented include, but are not
limited to, Michelangelo, Cezanne, Van Gogh, Monet, and Caillebotte.

Outside Reading Book Analysis each student will be required to read one pre-approved book outside
of class and compose an analysis using a teacher generated analysis outline or form in the first semester.

Outside Reading Book Review each student will be required to read one pre-approved book outside
of class and compose a book review using a teacher generated format in the second semester.

Extra Credit Any homework, essay, or project submitted more than 24 hours prior to the due date will
receive 25 extra credit points for that assignment, essay, or project.

Art Students will be asked to select a piece of art that is characteristic to a specific time period. The art
will be displayed on the Smart Board as a visual while the student gives background information as it
relates to the artist, the influence of European history on the art, and the thematic elements found
within the piece of art that is relevant. Specific pieces of art and the influences that contributed to our
appreciation of such pice will be shared in the form of a presentation. This will be a project grade 3 to
4 students will be selected to find relevant art for each chapter and / or time period.

Reading Schedule and Test Dates

1
st
Semester 2nd Semester
Chapter 12 Chapter 22
Chapter 13 Chapter 23
Chapter 14 Chapter 24
Chapter 15 Chapter 25
Chapter 16 Chapter 26
Chapter 17 Chapter 27
Chapter 18 Chapter 28
Chapter 19 Chapter 29
Chapter 20 Chapter 30
Chapter 21 Chapter 31

Semester 1 Exam Semester 2 Mock AP Exam

Each Chapter Test will always include 3 items:

1. The Big Questions these must be answered with complete sentences and short paragraphs.
2. Academic Vocabulary the bold faced words in the chapter must be defined or matched with an
appropriate definition.
3. A DBQ each chapter has a DBQ they are included with this syllabus. I will provide the documents
on the day of the tes; however, they may be in the book but that is ok, as all writing will be done in
class with the clock ticking.
4. Maps will sometimes be included with questions to see if you can comprehend visual information in
the form of a map, graph, or chart.