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Publisher Randy Shulman Editorial MAY 15, 2014 editor-in-Chief Volume 21 / Issue 3 Randy Shulman Art
 

Publisher

Randy Shulman

Editorial

MAY 15, 2014

 
 

editor-in-Chief

 

Volume 21 / Issue 3

 

Randy Shulman

Art direCtor

 

Todd Franson

 

MAnAging editor

 

NEWS

6

Equality HEads soutH

 

Will O’Bryan

Justin Snow

 

PolitiCAl editor

 
 

Justin Snow

8

tHE FourtH CirCuit statEs

stAff Writer

Ground GamE

John Riley

John Riley

 

Contributing editors

 

Rhuaridh Marr, Doug Rule

 

SCENE

12

Glaa awards

senior PhotogrAPher

 

Ward Morrison

 

Ward Morrison

Contributing PhotogrAPhers

BUSINESS

14

man oF tHE momEnt

Christopher Cunetto, Julian Vankim

 

John F. Stanton

 

Contributing illustrAtors

 

Scott G. Brooks, Christopher Cunetto

 

15

Community CalEndar

 

Contributing Writers

 

Daniel Burnett, Christian Gerard,

 

SCENE

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youtH PridE day

Brandon Harrison, Chris Heller, Troy Petenbrink, Richard Rosendall, Kate Wingfield

 

Ward Morrison

 

editor eMeritus

 
 

Sean Bugg

FEATURE

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tHE 2014 nExt GEnEration awards

WebMAster

Will O’Bryan, John Riley, Doug Rule

David Uy

MultiMediA

and Justin Snow Photography by Julian Vankim

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God and monstErs

 

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PETS

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Cover PhotogrAPhy

 

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Julian Vankim

 

NIGHTLIFE

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Poliglot: Hagel open to reviewing trans ban News: Capital Pride announces 2014 Heroes

Equality Heads South

Legal challenges and organizational advocacy make the Bible Belt the new front line for LGBT efforts

by Justin Snow

M arriage equality

arrived in the american

South shortly after 10 a.m.

on Saturday. that was

when Kristin Seaton, 27, and Jennifer rambo, 26, became the first same-sex couple to be legally married in arkansas after a judge found the state’s same-sex marriage ban unconstitutional one day prior. the Carroll County Courthouse in eureka Springs was the only one open Saturday, May 10, and issued 15 marriag- es licenses to same-sex couples that day. On Monday, hundreds more same-sex couples lined up outside the little rock Courthouse as Pulaski County, the state’s most populous county, began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples, according to the associated Press. arkansas attorney general Dustin McDaniel, a Democrat, has said he will appeal the decision, despite his support for same-sex marriage. and while the state has asked the arkansas Supreme Court to put same-sex marriages on hold as the case is appealed – a course of action that has been taken in similar cases in utah and Michigan – the legal- ization of same-sex marriage in arkan- sas marks a watershed moment for the marriage-equality movement. the South has long been considered the final frontier for lgBt rights, as states in every other region of the coun- try have moved on same-sex marriages, gay adoption and workplace protections. and while federal judges have struck down same-sex marriage bans in Virgin- ia, texas and elsewhere, marriage licens- es have not been issued to same-sex couples while those cases are appealed. But when Pulaski County Circuit Court Judge Christopher Piazza declined to

BBC wOrlD SerViCe / fliCKr
BBC wOrlD SerViCe / fliCKr

stay his decision last week finding a 1997 state law and a constitutional amend- ment approved by voters in 2004 defin- ing marriage as between a man and a woman in violation of the u.S. Constitu- tion, it marked the arrival of marriage equality in the Bible Belt. “with nearly 70 marriage cases now making their way through the courts, and five federal appellate courts now hearing arguments and soon to rule, [the] decision out of arkansas underscores that all of america is ready for the freedom to marry,” said evan wolfson, founder and president of freedom to Marry, in a statement. arkansas is one of three states being targeted by a multi-million dollar effort to bring lgBt-equality to the South. announced by the Human rights Cam- paign last month, Project One america will spend $8.5 million over the next three years in arkansas, Mississippi and alabama, and devote a staff of 20 people to those three states. each of those states

Arkansas Capitol dome

has a same-sex marriage ban enshrined in its constitution, and each lacks nondis- crimination protections for lgBt people at the state or local level in employment, housing or public accommodations. “right now, this country is deeply divided into two americas — one where lgBt equality is nearly a reality and the other where lgBt people lack the most fundamental measures of equal citizen- ship,” HrC President Chad griffin, who is a native of arkansas, said in a state- ment. “Project One america is an unpar- alleled effort to close that gap, and it opens up a bold, new chapter in the lgBt civil rights movement of this generation. in this grand struggle for equality, we can’t write off anyone, anywhere.” the campaign will cater to Southern culture, with a focus on changing hearts and minds, advancing enduring legal protections and building more inclusive institutions for lgBt people “from the church pew to the workplace.” according

METROWEEKLY.cOM MAY 15, 2014

LGBTNews

to HrC, the campaign is the largest ever orchestrated to bring lgBt equality to the american South. “the opportunities for progress couldn’t be clearer, and the need couldn’t be greater,” said Brad Clark, who will lead the campaign and comes equipped with a background of successfully work- ing on lgBt issues in Colorado and iowa. “Mississippi has the single highest percentage of gay and lesbian couples raising children of any state in the coun- try, for instance, but these parents are making do without essential legal protec- tions or inclusion in their community.” the effort by HrC complements work being done by other organizations and donors. in february, freedom to Marry announced the launch of Southerners for the freedom to Marry – a $1 million cam- paign to build support for same-sex mar- riage across the South. teaming up with lgBt groups in georgia, alabama, flor- ida, louisiana, texas, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Kentucky and tennessee, the coalition seeks to give voice to marriage-equality supporters, including clergy and conser- vatives. Moreover, gill action’s Political Outgiving 5.0 conference, an invitation- only conference targeting major lgBt-

rights donors held earlier this month, focused on “building the road to equality in the heartland.” as resources and dollars pour into the South, with lawsuits challenging same- sex marriage bans filed in every Southern state, advocates have no illusions about the challenges ahead. Church attendance is at its highest rates in the nation in some Southern states and republicans dominate state legislatures. even Demo- crats aren’t always allies to the cause, nor vulnerable because of their opposition to lgBt rights. Despite his party’s national platform, Democratic South Carolina gubernatorial candidate and state Sen. Vincent Sheheen is opposed to same-sex marriage. Nevertheless, he has received support from the Democratic gover- nors association and likely 2016 presi- dential candidate Maryland gov. Martin O’Malley, who signed marriage-equality legislation into law. “we’re not undertaking this work because it will lead to quick, easy or sweeping vi ctories,” s tated g riffin. “we’re doing it because it is difficult. folks in these three states shouldn’t have to wait a single day longer for one, fully equal, america.” last month, Mississippi lawmak-

ers approved a “religious freedom bill” that opponents warn could lead to state- sanctioned lgBt discrimination. the bill was similar to one vetoed by arizona republican gov. Jan Brewer in febru- ary. while such setbacks are anticipated, there remain reasons to be hopeful. a Washington Post/aBC News poll released in March found 50 percent of Southern- ers support same-sex marriage, with 42 percent opposed, compared to a national average of 59 percent in favor and 34 percent opposed. Southerners’ views on these issues are moving, albeit at a slower rate than other regions of the country. in his ruling last week, arkansas Judge Piazza took note of the 1967 u.S. Supreme Court case that declared bans on interracial marriage unconstitutional, Loving v. Virginia, as he struck down a present-day ban prohibiting loving cou- ples from marrying. “it has been over forty years since Mildred loving was given the right to marry the person of her choice. the hatred and fears have long since vanished and she and her husband lived full lives together; so it will be for the same-sex couples,” Piazza wrote. “it is time to let that beacon of freedom shine brighter on all our brothers and sisters. we will be stronger for it.” l

The Fourth Circuit States’ Ground Game

Beyond the courtroom, LGBT residents and allies strive to win over “hearts and minds” on marriage equality

by John riley

t He HeaDS Of fOur State- wide lgBt-rights organiza- tions that could be affected by a ruling in the Virginia case

of Bostic v. Schaefer, in which oral argu- ments are being heard by the u.S. Court of appeals for the fourth Circuit, held a

lina equality; and Kay flaminio, executive

director of fairness west Virginia, ex-

pressed their hopes that the fourth Cir- cuit would rule in a way that either over- turns bans on same-sex marriage or paves the way for future cases that could result in such actions. when the Bostic case was first ar- gued in the eastern District of Virginia in february, u.S. District Judge arenda l. wright allen ruled that Virginia’s Mar-

conference call Monday outlining how hsall-Newman amendment, a constitu-

they are preparing to deal with a ruling that could overturn existing prohibitions on same-sex marriage. James Parrish, executive director of equality Virginia; Chris Sgro, executive director of equality North Carolina; ryan wilson, executive director of South Caro -

tional amendment banning the recogni- tion of any form of same-sex relationship in the commonwealth, was unconstitu- tional. advocates of marriage equality are cautiously optimistic that the fourth Cir- cuit will uphold allen’s ruling. “with Bostic v. Schaefer being heard

before the fourth Circuit Court of ap- peals, Virginia and other Southern states have never been closer to gaining mar- riage equality for lesbian and gay couples,” Parrish said. “the most recent polls in Virginia show that a majority of Virgin- ians are in favor of the freedom to marry, and with the majority of our courts strik- ing down marriage bans in states across the country, we are hopeful that trend will continue with the fourth Circuit’s ruling.” asked about possible rulings that could be issued by the fourth Circuit, Sgro said that equality North Carolina has been talking with legal experts to try and prepare for a wide variety of rulings that might impact North Carolina. Sgro said any impact would depend on the size and scope of the ruling, which could range from overturning all marriage bans in states under the jurisdiction of the fourth Circuit, to providing legal prec- edent for states such as North Carolina to mount their own challenges to their mar- riage bans. flaminio said her organization was “looking closely ” at the Bostic case’s prog- ress, but also noted that, unlike the other three states, west Virginia has no consti-

LGBTNews

COurteSy Of equality VirgiNia
COurteSy Of equality VirgiNia

Jen shearin, Julie naff and their children

tutional amendment banning same-sex marriage, thereby requiring a separate lawsuit specifically aimed at overturning west Virginia’s statutory ban. flaminio also acknowledged that marriage equal- ity only enjoys support from about a third of the state’s population. as a result, fair- ness west Virginia has focused the bulk of its efforts on passing nondiscrimina- tion protections for lgBt individuals, which enjoy support from 68 percent of west Virginians. “Our position is that if lgBt couples are allowed to get married in west Vir- ginia…then they will need to be protect- ed from discrimination in employment, housing and accommodations,” flaminio said. while equality Virginia and allied pro-lgBt groups, including People of faith for equality in Virginia (POfeV), organized demonstrations outside of the Court of appeals on tuesday, May 13, to mark the first day of oral arguments in

Bostic, the state organizations have been holding their own events to drum up sup - port for marriage equality. with the assis- tance of their local state lgBt organiza- tions, same-sex couples and their allies in Virginia, South Carolina and west Vir- ginia are hosting “CookOuts for equal- ity,” social events to honor those married same-sex couples whose relationships are not legally recognized. Parrish not- ed that the events are not fundraisers, as some critics have suggested, but are rather aimed at “changing hearts and minds” on the issue of marriage equality by bringing attention to same-sex couples and their families. in Virginia, several couples who host- ed cookouts last year are doing so again. But against the backdrop of the Bostic case this year, some have hope that this will be the last year such events are nec- essary. according to equality Virginia, about 50 couples throughout the com- monwealth are participating.

LGBT News COurteSy Of equality VirgiNia Jen shearin, Julie naff and their children tutional amendment banning

Jen Shearin and Julie Naff, of annan- dale, plan to host an event, as they did in 2013. last year they held a pool party and barbecue in June for family and friends, and took donations for equality Virginia. this year, the couple has invited neigh- bors and local politicians, including Vir- ginia congressional candidates, to a May

  • 18 party.

Shearin says Virginia’s prohibition on recognizing their marriage has resulted in challenges that opposite-sex married couples don’t face. for instance, when the couple wanted to adopt their two sons, now 2 and 4, they had to temporarily rent out their house and Virginia and establish residency in the District of Columbia to ensure they would be able to legally adopt both children and be listed as the parents

on their birth certificates. even though the family moved back to Virginia after the adoptions were final- ized, Shearin says she and Naff have en- countered difficulties when filing taxes, as Virginia requires them to file as single

individuals, whereas the federal govern- ment, as well as the District of Columbia and Delaware, where they own proper- ties, allow them to file as married. “to quote our accountants in D.C., we are their ‘most complex clients,’” says Shearin. Peter goldin, a richmond resident and board chair of equality Virginia, hosted a cookout with his husband, Brian Hollis, last year. this year, his reston, Va., parents, are holding their own May

  • 17 cookout. the hosts are expecting fam-

ily, friends, neighbors, at least one other equality Virginia board member, the gay Men’s Chorus of washington, and three local politicians – Sen. Janet Howell (D - arlington, fairfax counties), Del. Ken Plum (D -fairfax Co.) and Del. Mark Sick- les (D-fairfax Co.) – to attend. goldin says he and Hollis have also encountered obstacles from Virginia’s re- fusal to recognize their marriage. when Hollis had to go to the hospital for a se- vere migraine headache, for example, goldin was not allowed to speak for him because he was not considered Hollis’s spouse. Virginia’s prohibition on same- sex marriage, goldin says, “handicaps” the couple in many different ways. “i think people don’t realize what a struggle it is, because a lot of their rights and privileges are taken for granted,” goldin says. “Most people know the sur- face issue. But few people understand just what that means or how deep the limitations are.” l

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COurteSy Merrill lyNCH

Business Chamber Connections LGBT
Business Chamber
Connections
LGBT

Man of the Moment

Chamber honoree Moran shares some perspective on the LGBT community and financial security

by John f. Stanton

O n april 25, the Capital area gay and lesbian Chamber of Commerce (aka the Cham- ber) held its annual awards

dinner and gala at washington’s presti- gious Mayflower renaissance Hotel. the dinner showcases lgBt business lead- ers throughout the washington region, paying special tribute to those whose contributions to the local community made a particularly positive impact. among the outstanding members of the community honored at the gala was william J. Moran Jr., CrPC, senior vice president and wealth management advi- sor for global financial services firm Mer- rill lynch & Co. Moran received the Chamber’s Business leadership award for his work as a leader in the lgBt community. “this is a great honor,” said Moran, who indicated that the award was a pleasant surprise. “i’m very fortunate to be the face of a great firm like Merrill lynch. i want to acknowledge the many people making our quality service to the community happen.” a longtime sponsor of Chamber events and activities, Moran feels that it’s important for business leaders such as himself to have “skin in the game” when it comes to being a visible member of the community, contributing time, money, or other resources. He is an ardent sup- porter of the mission of the Chamber as it presents an opportunity for leaders to get together to discuss the needs of the lgBt community and work to provide solutions to any problems.

“involvement is important in all com-

munities, but especially in ours,” he said.

“it gives us the opportunity to come together when we see a particular need or area in which we can improve. the lgBt community tends to be a little more philanthropic than many other groups.” Moran said anyone can find a par- ticular passion to which they can apply their own special talents. Moran’s own memberships have included terms on the boards of food & friends and the gay Men’s Chorus of washington, D.C. Moran began his career with Merrill lynch in 1986 in New york, moving to washington in 1990. as the leader of Mer- rill lynch’s gay and lesbian financial Services team, he is actively engaged with members of the lgBt community devel- oping investment strategies designed to meet their own distinctive needs and provide financially secure futures. “Merrill lynch is a highly gay-friendly company. it was one of the first wall Street firms to offer domestic-partner benefits, and has been very supportive of the lgBt community for many years,” he said. Speaking of the need for long-term financial planning, Moran indicated that one area where many people fall short is in not taking the time to sit down and actually do it. “Many people spend more time plan- ning a two-week vacation to europe than they do organizing their finances,” he observed. “Putting off creating a finan- cial strategy is not a good idea. Planning should start as soon as possible. a savvy investor should enlist the services of a competent financial planner, along with an attorney and a tax professional, to

COurteSy Merrill lyNCH Business Chamber Connections LGBT Man of the Moment Chamber honoree Moran shares some

Moran

design a plan for financial security.” “all the horses should be pulling the sleigh in the same direction. that’s why it’s important to have a team that is focused on your needs and that can work together.”

For further information on William Moran and the services he provides, please visit

http://bit.ly/R8ulvP.

The Chamber Means Business. For more information visit caglcc.org or facebook. com/CAGLCC. On Twitter, follow @ DCLGBTBIZ

John F. Stanton, a CAGLCC member, is the president of SRP & Associates Inc., a strategic marketing and public relations firm in Northern Virginia. l

LGBTCommunityCalendar

Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative social events to volunteer opportunities. Event information should be sent by email to calendar@MetroWeekly.com. Deadline for inclusion is noon of the Friday before Thursday’s publication. Questions about the calendar may be directed to the Metro Weekly office at 202-638-6830 or the calendar email address.

LGBT CommunityCalendar Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative
LGBT CommunityCalendar Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative

thurSday, May 15

WeeklY events

MetroheAlth Center offers free, rapid HIV testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,

Suite 700. 202-638-0750.

dC lAMbdA squAres gay and lesbian square- dancing group features mainstream through advanced square dancing at the National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, 7-9:30 p.m. Casual dress. 301-257-0517, dclambdasquares.org.

The dulles triAngles Northern Virginia social group meets for happy hour at Sheraton in Reston, 11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-floor bar, 7-9 p.m. All welcome. dullestriangles.com.

hiv testing at Whitman-Walker Health. The Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call 202-745- 7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.

identity offers free and confidential HIV testing in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411. Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments other hours, call Gaithersburg, 301-300-9978, or Takoma Park,

301-422-2398.

WoMen’s leAdershiP institute for young

LBTQ women, 13-21, interested in leadership development. 5-6:30 p.m. SMYAL Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.

us helPing us hosts a Narcotics Anonymous Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW. The group is independent of UHU. 202-446-1100.

Friday, May 16

Next Generation Leadership Foundation holds

next generAtion AWArds reCePtion.

6:30-8:30 p.m. Beacon Bar & Grill, 1615 Rhode Island Ave. NW. $20. nglf.org.

D.C.-area organizers/Kimpton Hotels host A

night out for the trevor ProJeCt

fundraiser. 7-9:30 p.m. Hotel Palomar, 2121 P St. NW. $100 advance, $125 door. Limited $75 youth tickets. thetrevorproject.org.

sCAndAls rugby screens The Rugby Player

documentary of Mark Bingham, Alice Hoagland. 7

and 9 p.m. Navy Memorial, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. $15, ow.ly/vBbHm. dcscandals.org.

WeeklY events

bet MishPAChAh, founded by members of the GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat services followed by “oneg” social hour. 8-9:30 p.m. Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th St. NW. betmish.org.

gAy distriCt holds facilitated discussion for GBTQ men, 18-35, first and third Fridays. 8:30 p.m. The DC Center, 1318 U St. NW. 202-682-2245, gaydistrict.org.

hiv testing at Whitman-Walker Health, Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 202-745-7000, whitman-walker.org.

ProJeCt striPes hosts LGBT-affirming social group for ages 11-24. 4-6 p.m. 1419 Columbia Road NW. Tamara, 202-319-0422, layc-dc.org.

sMyAl’s reC night provides a social

atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth, featuring dance parties, vogue nights, movies and games. catherine.chu@smyal.org.

Saturday, May 17

Annual CAPitAl trAnsPride celebration, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW. $10 donation, includes lunch. Register at capitalpride.org/transpride.

ChrysAlis arts & culture group and Adventuring outdoors group co-sponsor tour of July 1864 Confederate Raid on Washington sites. Bring beverages, lunch, sunscreen, bug spray, about $8/

fees. Carpool 9 a.m., Grosvenor-Strathmore Metro.

Craig, 202-462-0535. adventuring.org.

Adventuring outdoors group bikes intermediate-to-advanced 47 roundtrip miles, Columbia Island Marina to Fort Washington. Bring helmet, beverages, lunch, $2 fee. Start 9 a.m. from marina, GW Parkway southbound. Jerry, 703-920-

6871. adventuring.org.

burgundy CresCent gay volunteer

organization helps with National Park Service planting at Tidal Basin, and with Lost Dog & Cat Foundation at Falls Church PetSmart. burgundycrescent.org.

WeeklY events

AndroMedA trAnsCulturAl heAlth

offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services (by appointment). 202-291-4707 or andromedatransculturalhealth.org.

brAziliAn glbt grouP, including others

interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For location/ time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.

  • dC AquAtiCs Club (DCAC) practice session at

Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St. NW. 8-9:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.

  • dC front runners running/walking/social

club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and supportive environment, socializing afterward.

Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk; or

  • 10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.

dignity northern virginiA sponsors Mass

for LGBT community, family and friends. 6:30 p.m.,

Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606 Seminary Road, Alexandria. All welcome. dignitynova.org.

  • dC sentinels basketball team meets at Turkey

Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave. NE, 2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or straight.

teamdcbasketball.org.

Sunday, May 18

WeeklY events

LGBT-inclusive All souls MeMoriAl

ePisCoPAl ChurCh celebrates Low Mass at 8:30 a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300 Cathedral Ave. NW. 202-232-4244, allsoulsdc.org.

dignity WAshington offers Roman Catholic Mass for the LGBT community. 6 p.m., St. Margaret’s Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW. All welcome. Sign interpreted. dignitynova.org.

friends Meeting of WAshington meets for

worship, 10:30 a.m., 2111 Florida Ave. NW, Quaker House Living Room (next to Meeting House on

Decatur Place), 2nd floor. Special welcome to

lesbians and gays. Handicapped accessible from Phelps Place gate. Hearing assistance. quakersdc.org.

institute for sPirituAl develoPMent,

God-centered new age church & learning center. Sunday Services and Workshops event. 5419 Sherier Place NW. isd-dc.org.

lutherAn ChurCh of reforMAtion invites

all to Sunday worship at 8:30 or 11 a.m. Childcare is available at both services. Welcoming LGBT people for

  • 25 years. 212 East Capitol St. NE. reformationdc.org

MetroPolitAn CoMMunity ChurCh of

northern virginiA services at 11 a.m., led by Rev. Onetta Brooks. Children’s Sunday School, 11 a.m. 10383 Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-691-0930, mccnova.com.

riverside bAPtist ChurCh, a Christ-centered,

interracial, welcoming-and-affirming church, offers service at 10 a.m. 680 I St. SW. 202-554-4330, riverside-dc.org.

unitAriAn ChurCh of Arlington , an LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation, offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow
unitAriAn ChurCh of Arlington , an LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation, offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow

unitAriAn ChurCh of Arlington, an

LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation, offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow UU Ministry. 4444 Arlington Blvd. uucava.org.

universAlist nAtionAl MeMoriAl

ChurCh, a welcoming and inclusive church. GLBT Interweave social/service group meets monthly. Services at 11 a.m., Romanesque sanctuary. 1810 16th St. NW. 202-387-3411, universalist.org.

Monday, May 19

Volunteer meeting for 8th Annual dC lAtino Pride. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Empoderate Youth Center,

  • 3055 Mount Pleasant St. NW. RSVP: Jesus Chavez,

jchavez@latinoglbthistory.org, 202-670-5547.

unitAriAn ChurCh of Arlington , an LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation, offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow

WeeklY events

dC sCAndAls rugby holds practice, 6:30- 8:30 p.m. Garrison Elementary, 1200 S St. NW. dcscandals.wordpress.com.

novAsAlud offers free HIV testing. 5-7 p.m. 2049 N. 15th St., Suite 200, Arlington. Appointments:

703-789-4467.

The DC Center hosts Coffee droP-in for the senior lgbt CoMMunity. 10 a.m.-noon. 2000

14th St. NW. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.

kAring With individuAlity (k.i.) serviCes,

  • 3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV

testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.

unitAriAn ChurCh of Arlington , an LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation, offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow

WAshington Wetskins Water Polo Team

practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic swimming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299- 0504, secretary@wetskins.org, wetskins.org.

Whitman-Walker Health hiv/Aids suPPort grouP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets 7

unitAriAn ChurCh of Arlington , an LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation, offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow
unitAriAn ChurCh of Arlington , an LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation, offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow
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p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671, hivsupport@whitman-walker.org. tueSday , May 20 WeeklY events AsiAns And friends weekly dinner

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tueSday, May 20

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AsiAns And friends weekly dinner in Dupont/Logan Circle area, 6:30 p.m. afwash@aol.com, afwashington.net.

the gAy Men’s heAlth CollAborAtive offers free HIV/STI screening

every 2nd and 4th Tuesday. 5-6:30 p.m. Rainbow Tuesday LGBT Clinic, Alexandria Health Department, 4480 King St. 703-321-2511, james.leslie@inova.org.

hiv testing at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.: Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an appointment call 202-745-7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.

the hiv Working grouP of the dC Center hosts “Packing Party,”

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suPPort grouP for lgbtq youth ages 13-21 meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-6:30 p.m. Cathy Chu, 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.

us helPing us hosts a support group for black gay men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW. 202-446-1100.

WedneSday, May 21

the toM dAvoren soCiAl bridge Club meets for Social Bridge. No

reservation or partner needed. All welcome. 7:30 p.m. Dignity Center, 721 8th St. SE. 301-345-1571.

p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671, hivsupport@whitman-walker.org. tueSday , May 20 WeeklY events AsiAns And friends weekly dinner

CAPitAl Pride 2014 heroes gAlA. 7-10 p.m. Artisphere, 1101 Wilson Blvd., Arlington. $60. capitalpride.org/heroes.

WeeklY events

novAsAlud offers free HIV testing. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 2049 N. 15th St., Suite 200, Arlington. Appointments: 703-789-4467.

Ad lib, a group for freestyle conversation, meets about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647 20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.

hiv testing at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.: Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 202-745-7000, whitman-walker.org.

PriMe tiMers of dC, social club for mature gay men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m., Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637 17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316. l

p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671, hivsupport@whitman-walker.org. tueSday , May 20 WeeklY events AsiAns And friends weekly dinner
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  • 2014 NExT

The

GENERATION

Awards

Honoring Sarah McBride, Hassan Naveed, Desiree Raught and Carl Streed Jr.

By Will O’Bryan, John Riley, Doug Rule and Justin Snow Photography by Julian Vankim

W iTh SPRing finAlly hAVing TAken hOlD in The nATiOn’S cAPiTAl, iT’S A wonderful time to celebrate growth and potential. you’d be hard-pressed to find four individuals to better embody that sort of hope and optimism than the four being recognized as the next generation leadership foundation’s 2014 honorees. These four amazing young people are Sarah McBride, hassan naveed, Desiree

Raught and carl Streed Jr. All younger than 30, each has already accomplished much. keeping in the nature of the award, each is expected to do so much more. These stars have only begun their ascension. The season’s themes of transformation and growth are also reflected in the award itself. When the first cohort of young, lgBT leaders was honored, in 2009, the Metro Weekly next generation Awards were an expression of the magazine alone. now in their sixth year, the awards are the jewels in the next generation leadership foundation’s crown. While Metro Weekly remains an enthusiastic supporter of the annual awards, they now belong to this new foundation, launched in 2013 by Metro Weekly’s former co-publisher and editor-in-chief, Sean Bugg. As the president and executive director of this new foundation, Bugg has made a full-time commitment to supporting lgBT leaders at the start of their careers. now, beyond the annual awards, nglf will be hosting 20 young people for a mid-June week in Washington. These dynamic youths will be given access to the halls of power on capitol hill, meet lgBT leaders in areas of commerce and community, and enjoy an unprecedented opportunity to engage with one another as they begin to stitch together those professional networks that will intersect their lives for decades to come. They will be the cohort to launch this “leadership camp,” set to be an annual offering. in the meantime, the following profiles will provide at least a bit of insight into four promising lgBT leaders you’ll want to keep an eye on as they journey forward toward a brighter future for the whole of the community.

The sixth annual Next Generation Awards, presented by Metro Weekly, will be held Friday, May 16, at Beacon Bar & Grill, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are available for a $20 tax-deductible donation at NGLF.org.

Sarah

McBride

The next generation Awards 2014

S araH MCBriDe alwayS KNew SHe waS

different.

“i’ve known that i’m transgender as long

as i can remember,” she says. growing up as

the youngest child with two older brothers in

wilmington, Del., McBride says it wasn’t until

when she was about 8 years old that a poorly

came out to her family on Christmas Day in 2011. “their response to my coming out was surprise, confusion, sadness –

but at the same time love and support and embrace,” McBride

says. “for parents and friends it feels like this person you know

is dying. But they came very quickly to see that they weren’t los-

ing a son, they were gaining a daughter and that i was still very

much the person i had always been. that quickly sunk in. and

executed transgender storyline in a ’90s sitcom put a name on what made her so. “i remember asking my mom what transgender meant,” McBride says. “and i remember asking her, ‘is this possible that someone is born a boy and can change to be a woman?’ and i remember my mom saying yes, and explaining what transgender meant. it was the first time in my life that i knew there were other people like me. it was the first time in my life that i knew there was something i could do about it. in that same moment of incredible hope of what could be, there was also an incredible amount of sadness and fear with what the future had in store. i remember looking at my mom and thinking, ‘Oh, my god, i’m going to have to tell you this someday. you’re going to be very upset and this is going to be really disappointing for everyone. But i’m going to have to tell everyone this.’” although in that moment McBride came to better under- stand herself, her life as a precocious political activist pushed her deeper into the closet. when she was just 13 she began vol- unteering for various Democratic candidates in the first State, including campaigns for attorney general Beau Biden and gov. Jack Markell. “i was having this success as a political activist in our state’s Democratic Party, and that seemed like such a privi- lege and such an opportunity that i didn’t want to give up my male privilege,” she says. “i thought that if i gave that up i would destroy all these professional aspirations that i had, dreams of working in politics in Delaware.” But in the fall of 2011, life became unbearable for McBride. a junior at american university, known as tim, McBride was elected student body president. McBride made gender-neutral housing a priority of her presidency, with a campaign entitled “live true to you.” the issue became one of the drivers of her coming to terms with her identity. Sitting in the office of the director of the university’s housing and dining programs, he asked McBride a simple question: “why are you doing this?” “there were three answers, and i only gave two,” McBride says. “One was it’s the right thing to do for students. the next was i have always been passionate about lgBt issues, my oldest brother is gay and these issues mean a lot to me. and then the third was that i’m transgender. … it was the first time i gave an answer that was just glaringly incomplete. that was a watershed moment for me, being confronted so starkly with where i was and where i wanted to be and who i actually was.” after confiding in a friend whose positive reaction McBride credits with giving her the confidence to push forward, McBride

they’ve been fabulous.” after telling other family and friends, including Delaware gov. Jack Markell, over a fourth-month period, McBride was con- templating how to come out to the broader american university community. Not wanting the second half of her term as president to be overshadowed by her transitioning, she waited until it was nearly finished. She decided on a facebook note, and within an hour the editor of the student newspaper walked into her office. He wanted to know two things. Should the paper be using her new name, Sarah, and female pronouns? “absolutely.” and would she consider condensing her facebook post as an op/ed for the next day’s issue? “i remember walking into the student newspaper office after i’d posted this online, so word had already gotten out. i remem- ber everyone just sort of staring at me. No one knew what to do as i walked back into the editor’s office to condense my face- book post. But when i came out of there everyone had big smiles on their faces and people gave me hugs,” she recalls. “it really was nothing but love and support.” in a time that has seen high-profile journalists like Katie Couric and Piers Morgan face criticism for how they’ve con- ducted interviews with transgender celebrities, McBride says the students at The Eagle acted exactly “how we want the media to be when covering trans issues.” the publication of McBride’s coming-out story also thrust her into the spotlight, gaining head- lines in national publications and a speaking spot, along with her brother, at the HrC National Dinner last October. She went on to internships at the gay & lesbian Victory fund and the white House, where she became one of the first out transgender interns. She also served on the board of equality Delaware and helped pass same-sex marriage legislation and gender-identity protections during the same year. Now 23, McBride works on lgBt issues for the Center for american Progress. McBride says she is unsure what the future holds for her, but politics seems like a safe bet. She still considers Delaware home and loves talking to people about the issues. as she witnessed firsthand during her work with equality Delaware lobbying state lawmakers, putting a face to an issue goes a long way to helping people do the right thing. “i enjoy telling my story, talking about transgender issues, transgender identities in a way where people can read them and relate to those stories,” she says. “if it can make people view transgender people as people first, then i think that’s a mission accomplished.” — Justin Snow

Hassan

Naveed

The next generation Awards 2014

H aSSaN NaVeeD HaS alwayS BeeN ON tHe

go, whether in terms of geography or activism.

Since graduating high school, the Califor-

nia native has done stints as a community or-

ganizer and radio reporter in Santa Barbara,

as a labor and political organizer in Oakland

and San francisco, and with a D.C. public re-

“to see even my own family members and friends who were impacted by – we can call it discrimination – verbal attacks on

folks, all the way to the fact that someone was pulled out of a cab

in New york City and beaten up, a family friend, really made me

see this issue as something i wanted to work on across lines, on

lgBt issues, across lines of color,” Naveed continues. “and it ’s

something i grew passionate about. when i came to D.C., i knew

lations firm focused on civil rights. this summer, he leaves D.C. to pursue a master’s degree in public administration at New york university’s wagner graduate School of Public Service. Naveed has also made a name for himself locally with his involvement in gays and lesbians Opposing Violence (glOV), a program of the DC Center for the lgBt Community, which works to respond to and prevent hate crimes, particularly against members of the lgBt community. and last year, he was honored by Capital Pride with the engendered Spirit award for his glOV advocacy on behalf of the transgender community. “glOV has a community partner in New york City, the an- ti-Violence Project, that we’ve engaged with. they’ve said, ‘Oh, you’re coming to New york City? we’d like to get you on some volunteer projects,’” he jokes. “i can’t sit still.” Naveed’s involvement with glOV goes back to 2010 and his first weeks after making the move from the west Coast. He met the DC Center ’s executive Director David Mariner, who then introduced him to several local activists. Soon after, Naveed joined glOV, later becoming the group’s secretary and then one of its co -chairs. He’s also a board member with D.C.’s Casa ruby, which provides services to members of the city ’s transgender and immigrant communities. “Drawing back on my life, i had two of my really close friends who were victims of hate crimes in college,” the 28-year-old says when asked of why he chose to join glOV. “to see how the in- cidents impacted their lives, and to realize the lack of resources that were available to them, in that space, as being folks who were lgBt and also from communities of color, really made me realize that hate exists in all forms – whether it ’s discrimination or something that is violent. and from then on, i made a com- mitment to mitigate that hate to the best of my ability, not just for the lgBt community, but all communities that are under- represented.” Closer to home, Naveed and his family have been targets of hateful comments or other forms of bigotry, particularly right after 9/11. “i was leaving a grocery store. a lady pulled me aside, grabbed me and began yelling at me,” he recounts. “She kept going at me, saying, ‘you Muslims come into this country….’ it wasn’t violence, but the impact that it had on me psychologically really made me feel like ‘what did i do wrong? i did nothing wrong.’”

i wanted to do something along the lines of antiviolence work.” During Naveed’s tenure at glOV, the organization undertook several initiatives, including attempts to better track violent inci- dents where anti-lgBt bias may have played a role, and improv- ing relations between the lgBt community and the Metropoli- tan Police Department (MPD). glOV also recently launched a hotline with Helping individual People Survive (HiPS) to con- nect victims of violence to support services. “My primary goal in glOV was to make it an organization that people can look to for assistance, and also as an advocacy unit for all those communities in the city,” he says. earlier this year, glOV and six other community partners – the DC Center, Casa ruby, rainbow response, the gay and lesbian activists alliance (glaa), the DC trans Coalition and HiPS – joined to draft a response to a report issued by the anti- Defamation league’s Hate Crimes assessment task force that examined the relationship between MPD and the lgBt commu- nity. the task force had intervened to serve as a mediator at the request of MPD Chief Cathy lanier following years of strained relations between the police and the lgBt community. Naveed counts the task force and its recommendations, the majority of which were agreed to by both the community groups and lanier, as a major accomplishment for the organization, but also as a potential building block for his successors. “we’re finally engaging with the Police Department for the first time, directly, ever, and really building a plan that ’s going to improve relations,” he promises. “we’re definitely in a forward trajectory. it ’s going to get better.” Naveed is also quick to offer praise to fellow D.C. activists, particularly Jeri Hughes, Casa ruby’s ruby Corado, Jason terry of the DC trans Coalition, and his glOV peers for their contri- butions to the antiviolence movement. and he hopes to even- tually return to the District, which he now sees as his adopted hometown. “i might be physically gone from D.C., but i love this city a lot,” he says. “and, damn it, i’ve put my heart and soul into this city. i’ve poured myself dry. and i will be working on that plan with MPD in the years to come, because it ’s something that ’s been truly a passion of mine. So i will be involved in D.C. in some capacity, even though it will be different from the way it was be- fore.” – John Riley

Desiree

Raught

The next generation Awards 2014

I

t’S NOt eVery Day yOu Hear great tHiNgS about D.C. Public Schools. But it’s not every day you hear from Desiree raught. “there’s so much good going on in D.C. Public Schools that people don’t realize,” says raught. a 10th grade english teacher at D.C.’s McKinley tech High School, raught cites the school system’s general “com-

raught has been a champion of education basically since she started school. “growing up i just had a really unstable family and home life,” she shares. Her mother went to jail when she was in sixth grade and her father kicked her out of the family trailer in 10th grade, so she moved among relatives’ homes, and even spent much of high school living with friends. But unlike many others in such a demoralized, nomadic state, raught never

mitment to reform, to new initiatives and to innovative think- ing.” But she’s most heartened by the significant strides made on behalf of DCPS’s lgBt students. “if you’re lgBt in our community,” raught asserts, “D.C. is the most welcoming place i’ve ever known.” and the welcoming environment for gays at DCPS is largely the result of advocacy by raught. Several years ago, raught worked with the District’s Office of youth engagement to develop an official plan to create a safe and inclusive school community. She describes this as “a 12-page document that outlines all the reform and all the support structures that DCPS is putting in place across schools all over the District to sup- port [gay-Straight alliances], to support lgBt students.” Since then, the gay-Straight alliance (gSa) that raught started at McKinley at the behest of one of her students has grown from having four members to 80 – well over 10 percent of the student body, with most identifying as straight allies. raught has also invited representatives from lgBt organizations to speak to her students as part of her work as McKinley’s lgBt liaison. Nearly 20 schools within DCPS now have such lgBt liaisons, who work with fellow teachers and administrators to “create a culture of acceptance.” “i didn’t have the best high school experience,” says raught, who grew up in richmond. “i want to do what i can to make sure that every child i teach learns what he or she needs to learn, and that nothing gets in the way of that.” it’s precisely because of her leadership role in helping better D.C. Public Schools by fostering a safer, more inclusive environment, particularly for lgBt students, that raught is being recognized with a 2014 Next generation award. “that someone considers me a leader of the next generation, it makes me kind of shy,” the 28-year-old raught says. “i think it’s a true testament as to just how lucky i am to be able to say that i’m an lgBt educator, … one with great support from my school leaders [and] from central office. … i think it means so much in terms of where our community is going and where our nation is heading, especially when you talk about the education field.”

considered dropping out of school. “School was the one thing that i could count on to always be there,” she explains. “it’s the place where i got most of my positive reinforcement. where, if i ever were to hear anything positive about myself, it was usually from my teachers.” “that’s a large part of why i do what i do, because the school system was there for me growing up,” she continues. Still, raught, who is happily partnered and living in D.C., has never really considered teaching in her native Virginia. “i love Virginia, i love the beautiful state that it is,” she says. But with- out marriage equality and with few supportive lgBt policies in schools, she adds, “i couldn’t teach in a place that wouldn’t accept me and my students.” She certainly doesn’t have to worry about that at McKinley. in her classroom raught has a “Born this way” flag – “My students know that i’m obsessed with lady gaga” – on the wall behind what she calls her gSa resource Station, a “safe space” for students to study or read books donated by lgBt organiza- tions. McKinley also now has an lgBt resource Center in its library – as raught says, “with lgBt-friendly books! where else can you get that in a public school? it’s not happening all over the place.” High school can be a particular kind of hell for students and teachers alike, and DCPS has long been beset with challenges. “i’ve been teaching for seven years, and it is easy to get discour- aged,” raught concedes, though she’s quick to add she has no intention of quitting, either teaching or DCPS. Because, ulti- mately, she continues to see more hope than discouragement. for example, while DCPS is generally still struggling to boost overall student academic achievement, raught’s students have been making significant progress on standardized tests. though it’s impossible to attribute such success to any one factor alone, a warmer, more collegial classroom must play at least some part. “fostering a safe, inclusive space where students are cel- ebrated and where they feel safe to be who the are,” as raught puts it, “encourages them to ask questions, to let their guard down and to really learn.” – Doug Rule

Carl

Streed Jr.

The next generation Awards 2014

S CaNNiNg Dr. Carl StreeD Jr.’S réSu- mé is a bit like looking at lake Michigan, on whose shores his illinois hometown sits. Both are vast, impressive and life- sustaining. But before the 28-year-old was at his current post, practicing medicine at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Cen-

dedicated, so accomplished and so caring. as Streed sets his mind to the coming years of his career, the lgBt community may be collectively confident that he’ll make great strides in bringing some cultural competency to the field. “i still hate doctors, we’re the worst,” he deadpans, though remembering some genuinely dismissive treatment he once received from a doctor who seemingly equated gay

ter, he was a boy on a bridge. a boy who brought himself to that bridge to jump. “fifteen years ago in summer, i was hanging off the edge of a bridge thinking when i would let go, because i had a very difficult time growing up at that point,” Streed shared with an audience on Hopkins medical campus in april 2013 as part of the Stoop Storytelling Series. “it was around that time that

with HiV. “i’m still frustrated with the care i received, but i have become a little bit more sympathetic to recognizing a pattern and immediately jumping to a diagnosis. i don’t think it’s right, but i see that as something that kind of happens in training. i come up against resistance like, ‘we treat everybody the same.’ But our cultural competency is lacking when we jump to assumptions, jump to diagno-

  • i recognized that i was gay, was homosexual. i grew up in a town called Zion, which was very religious .... “So, 15 years ago, i was hanging off a bridge. i didn’t know

ses. Overall, i’d give us a grade of passing. … it’s hard to improve, but we’re improving. i think the amount of insti- tutional inertia within the medical community is enormous.

where to go at that point. to this day, i still can’t figure out what possessed me to actually crawl back over the railing. But

the inertia is ridiculous.” in the meantime, Streed still has his daily responsibilities,

  • i did. and i came up with a very solid plan of how to get out of my town: i’m going to do very good in school. i’m going to get into a really good college, and then i’m never going to look back.” two out of three ain’t bad. Streed did very well in school, got into the university of Chicago, then the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. But he does look back. indeed, he returns to Zion regularly, where his parents are fully aware and accepting of his sexual orien- tation and of his fiancé, Chad. “He called my fiancé his other son,” Streed says of Carl Sr., who goes by the name “Butch,” is a Vietnam veteran, was in a motorcycle gang and worked as a lumberjack. “it’s full acceptance. it’s a complete 180 from anything he was or any- thing i expected. My mom was always very quietly accepting.

managed down to the minute with the help of google Cal- endar. Perhaps not a medical prognosis, but Creed guesses that if that online organizer were to cease, he would die. in all seriousness, though, death is a regular part of Streed’s job. “Day to day changes from week to week, but i’m pres- ently working in the medical intensive care unit,” he explains. “every so often i need to pronounce someone dead. i did that yesterday. it’s reassuring that i still get choked up having to tell the family about that. i dread the day i ever become so callous that i don’t care when somebody passes.” Helping stave off callousness is the aforementioned Chad, whom he met during a brief night out in Chicago, stopping at Sidetrack – where he once worked as security – for a drink. as Streed recalls, Chad wooed him with discussion of the affordable Care act. and while they’ve not yet set the date,

  • i didn’t have to convince her.” it would be hard for Streed’s parents not to be proud of their son, the doctor. returning to that résumé, it’s replete with honors. there’s the mention of Streed as an honoree at the white House Celebration of the Next generation of lgBt leaders. Or the James Slayton leadership National award for leadership excellence from the american Medi- cal Student association. and so on. there’s plenty for his par- ents to be proud of. actually, there’s so much that an entire community can take pride in one of its members being so

the couple, both coming from two-child homes, have already discussed children and seem to have settled on someday adopting two. as for that child hanging from bridge, contemplating an end to it all, one wonders what message the 28-year-old Dr. Streed might have for him and other young people struggling. “i’d say, ‘Don’t let them win. Don’t let the people bringing you down succeed. Just by moving forward, you’re already doing a lot more than they have.’ it gets better – as long as you keep working hard.” – Will O’Bryan

The next generation Awards 2014

 

Selection

Panel

Hilary B. Rosen

Managing Director

SKDKnickerbocker

The Next Generation Awardees are chosen from a pool of community nominations by a panel of Washington-area LGBT leaders from the worlds of arts, activism, business and politics. The 2014 Next Generation Selection Panel members are:

The next generation Awards 2014 Selection Panel Hilary B. Rosen Managing Director SKDKnickerbocker The Next Generation
The next generation Awards 2014 Selection Panel Hilary B. Rosen Managing Director SKDKnickerbocker The Next Generation
The next generation Awards 2014 Selection Panel Hilary B. Rosen Managing Director SKDKnickerbocker The Next Generation
The next generation Awards 2014 Selection Panel Hilary B. Rosen Managing Director SKDKnickerbocker The Next Generation

Earl D. Fowlkes Jr.

President/CeO Center for Black equity inc.

as president and CeO of the CBe, fowlkes oversees the only black lgBt international organization in the world, with organizational and individual membership in Canada, the u.K., ghana, uganda, guyana, Suriname, Jamaica, trinidad, Bar- bados, Kenya, South africa, Brazil and Zimbabwe. He also serves on seven nonprofit boards of directors and as chair of the D.C. Mayor’s glBt advisory Committee.

Dan Hewitt

Vice President Media relations and event Management entertainment Software association (eSa)

at the eSa, Dan Hewitt serves as an on-the-record spokesman in top-tier print and electronic media. Since he began at the eSa in 2004, he has been responsible for devel- oping and executing communica- tions strategies that educate key audiences about the industry, its goals, and its consumers.

Hoai B. Huynh

Principal for international Development energy, environment and transportation group iCf international

at iCf international, Hoai B. Huynh oversees programs and strategies in the developing-country context. He has worked extensively in developing countries, particu- larly working with uSaiD, world Bank, and other clients and partners on climate change, environmental, water and energy programs.

Hilary B. rosen is a well-known washington strategist who effec- tively navigates the intersection of communications, media, and politics. Her name has appeared regularly on influential year-end power lists including Entertainment Weekly’s “annual Power list,” The Hollywood Reporter’s “Power 50 women,” and National Journal’s “washington’s Powerful insiders.”

Ernesto Santalla

founder/President Studio Santalla inc. Board Chair/President Capital area gay and lesbian Chamber of Commerce

Born in Cuba, ernesto Santal- la has been in washington since 1984 when he received a degree in architecture from Cornell uni- versity. His Studio Santalla special- izes in architectural design and is the parent company for graphic SS, ernesto Santalla Photography and

ernesto Santalla Home. l

(Pictured l-r) fowlkes, rosen, hewitt and santalla

The next generation Awards 2014 Selection Panel Hilary B. Rosen Managing Director SKDKnickerbocker The Next Generation
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COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S MAY 15 - 22, 2014 God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the
COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S MAY 15 - 22, 2014 God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the
COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S MAY 15 - 22, 2014 God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the
COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S MAY 15 - 22, 2014 God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the
COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S MAY 15 - 22, 2014 God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the
COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S MAY 15 - 22, 2014 God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the
COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S MAY 15 - 22, 2014 God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the
COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S MAY 15 - 22, 2014 God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the
COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S MAY 15 - 22, 2014 God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the
COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S MAY 15 - 22, 2014 God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the
COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S MAY 15 - 22, 2014 God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the

COurteSy Of warNer BrO.S

MAY 15 - 22, 2014

God and Monsters Godzilla redefi nes the blockbuster as art-house cinema w HeN, iN 1954, gODZilla

God and Monsters

Godzilla redefi nes the blockbuster as art-house cinema

w HeN, iN 1954, gODZilla firSt StOMPeD ONtO tHe SCeNe (aND iNtO Our HeartS), it waS as a harbinger of absolute mayhem, a dinosaur-like creature born out of nuclear weapons testing that apparently had a violent aversion to Japanese architecture. the fi lm became instantly iconic for both its cautionary

message and rampant destruction. Over the years — and many sequels later — godzilla transformed into a kind of hero, a savior who protected Japan (while still harboring a resentment toward its buildings) from other, more fearsome creatures. the reboot of Godzilla (HHHHH), helmed by newcomer gareth edwards, plays off the monster’s heritage as a ... well, god. godzilla’s the “alpha-predator,” the tip-top of the food chain. He’s the world’s protector designate. the fi lm is haunting and beautiful and strange, not at all what you expect from a typical summer blockbuster. it strives to be more than the sum of its relentlessly movie-homaging parts. But therein lies the problem — Godzilla might be a little too art-house for its own good. yes, there are profoundly stupid moments — particularly a convenient “needle in a haystack” moment in Honolulu — and the script frequently borders on the eye-rolling. “the arrogance of man is thinking nature is in our control and not the other way around,” says one character before proclaiming, like a wwe ringmaster, “let tHeM figHt!” the warring parties are, of course, godzilla and a Massive unidentifi ed terrestrial Organism, or MutO, in this case a ferocious, eMP-producing monstrosity that looks as though the Predator had mated with the Chrysler Building eagles. godzilla, happily, looks (and sounds) just like the old godzilla — without the man in the rubber suit aspect. (the effects are, in fact, breathtaking. See it in 3D, as edwards has a real gift for using 3D as a visual enhancer.) and the cast is relatively high-end: Bryan Cranston, Juliette Binoche, Ken watanabe, David Strathairn, aaron taylor-Johnson (Kick- Ass), further reinforcing the movie’s art-house allure. for a summer action blockbuster, Godzilla is oddly lacking in excitement for much of its two-hour running time. More than once, it leaves you impatient and bored, as edwards revs up some good old-fashioned monster mashing and then abruptly cuts to the aftermath. it’s like having sex withheld. yet the paucity of traditional destruction sequences turns out to be a shrewd move, as we’re more than ready for it by the time the magnifi cent climax rolls around. Call it Godzilla Interruptus. — Randy Shulman

Godzilla is rated PG-13 and opens Friday at area theaters.

METROWEEKLY.cOM MAY 15, 2014
Doing It Together Robyn and Royksopp now collaborate as if they were one band t Here

Doing It Together

Robyn and Royksopp now collaborate as if they were one band

t Here iS a little Sex refereNCe eVeN tO uS aBOut tHe lyric,” says torbjorn Brundtland of royksopp. the moody Norwegian electronic duo’s latest collaboration with Swedish pop star robyn is a

forthcoming eP named after its first single, Do It Again. But in case you’re won-

dering, the three artists, including royksopp’s Svein Berge, are not having sex. “i think if we were having sex we wouldn’t have written songs about it,” robyn teases. “we would just sit and youtube it, volleys back Brundtland in a recent joint phone interview, which then provokes robyn to add the kicker, “put it out and make a new career.” instead, the three have decided to continue with their proven successful careers in pop music — and both robyn and royksopp are working on new material separately. But collaboratively, they’ve decided to approach new work as if they were one band. Previously, the two acts had simply collabo- rated on tracks for each other’s albums: “the girl and the robot,” credited as “royksopp featuring robyn” and included on the duo’s 2009 album Junior; and “None of Dem,” credited as “robyn featuring royksopp” and included on robyn’s 2010 Body Talk. they were going to continue that one-off style of col- laboration, but realized what they had started writing would work better as its own project. “for us,” robyn says, “it’s really just been about wanting to make more music together, because we really enjoyed this from when we started out. and then from that we became friends. we’ve toured a lot together. it feels very naturally to us.” robyn + royksopp will tour this summer, including a stop at wolf trap on thursday, aug. 21. “it will be a show in three stages,” says Brundtland, explaining that it’s not just your typical concert with two headliners per- forming separate acts back-to-back. “we will perform some things that are exclusively royskopp, and some things that are exclusively robyn, and then it will come together as a [robyn + royksopp] collaboration on stage, to be the climax of the show.” — Doug rule

Robyn + Royksopp perform Thursday, Aug. 21, at 8 p.m., at the Filene Center at Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $30 to $55. Call 202-877-WOLFTRAP or visit wolftrap.org. Do it again drops Tuesday, May 27.

Compiled by doug rule

SPotLiGht

Chris botti

The Washington Performing Arts Society presents another concert by Grammy award-winning jazz/ pop trumpeter Botti, the best-selling American jazz instrumental artist, acclaimed for collaborations with Sting, Burt Bacharach and the Boston Pops Orchestra. Thursday, May 22, at 8 p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $25 to $85. Call 202-833-9800 or visit kennedy-center.org or wpas.org.

John WAters

The famous Baltimore filmmaker returns for another night of his “This Filthy World” standup, which explores his origins and influences as the king of trash culture and his experiences along the way of becoming a success in the mainstream. Friday, May 16, at 7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria. Tickets are $45. Call 703-549-7500 or visit birchmere.com.

kyle AbrAhAM/AbrAhAM.in.Motion

The distinguished black, gay choreographer Kyle Abraham returns for an annual show presented by Dance Place, this time with Live! The Realest MC, a new darkly humorous ensemble work investigating gender roles in the black community, the quest for acceptance in the world of hip-hop celebrity and our overall emotionless “emoticon culture” — all by setting the characters of Pinocchio in an industrial dystopia. Abraham, according to Out Magazine, “the best and brightest creative talent to emerge in New York City in the age of Obama.” Saturday, May 17, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, May 18, at 4 p.m. Ira Aldridge Theater at Howard University, 2455 6th St. NW. Tickets are $30. Call 202-269-1600 or visit danceplace.org.

lAurA benAnti With gAy Men’s Chorus of WAshington

Laura Benanti felt like “a 45-year-old gay man in a little girl’s body” growing up in northern New Jersey passionate about show tunes and standards. This weekend the Tony-winning Broadway star (Gypsy, Into The Woods, The Sound of Music) performs with the Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington in a special Kennedy Center concert, A Gay Man’s Guide to Broadway. “Since I am an honorary 45-year-old gay man,” she jokes to Metro Weekly, “who better than me to accompany them?” In fact, just 34 years old, Benanti’s ties to the chorus extend beyond mere song and dance. “My late uncle Bob was one of the original members of the chorus,” she explains, “and the last time I sang with them [a decade ago] he was alive. So it’s a very meaningful event to me. I love these guys.” Sunday, May 18, at 4 p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $25 to $78. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org or gmcw.org.

lorde, nAs At PreAkness infieldfest

Before the 139th running of the Preakness Stakes comes performances, organized by IMP Productions, headlined by Lorde and rapper Nas. Also on the bill: Glenn Morrison, Frank Walker, Switchfoot, Eli Young Band, Sundy Best and Go Go Gadjet. Saturday, May 17. Starting at 8 a.m. — yes, that’s a.m. Pimlico Race Course, 5201 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. Tickets are $60 to $100. Call 877-206-8042, ext. 300, or visit preakness.com.

FiLM

Chef

Writer/director Jon Favreau plays a chef who leaves his job at a prominent restaurant in L.A. to launch a food truck with Sofia Vergara and John

Leguizamo in the comedy Chef, which also features Bobby Cannavale, Scarlett Johansson, Oliver Platt and Robert Downey Jr. Opens Friday, May 16. Landmark’s Bethesda Row Cinema, 7235 Woodmont Ave. Call 301- 652-7273 or visit landmarktheatres.com.

StaGe

A MidsuMMer night’s riot

Keegan Theatre, in repertory with Things You Shouldn’t Say Past Midnight (see separate entry), presents the world premiere of Rosemary Jenkinson’s latest one-man tour-de-force, this time a biting comedy about a poor Irishman who dreams of becoming a professional golfer — and practices amid the nighttime fights between Protestant and Catholic youth that still plague Belfast every summer. Just as with Jenkinson’s one-man-plays Basra Boy and Cuchullain, Keegan taps Abigail Isaac to direct Joss Sticklin. Opens Friday, May 16, at 8 p.m. To June 5. Andrew Keegan Theatre (formerly Church Street Theater), 1742 Church St. NW. Tickets are $30. Call 703-892-0202 or visit keegantheatre.com.

henry iv PArts i And ii

HHHHH

The Shakespeare Theatre Company presents Henry IV Parts 1 and Part II in repertory, meaning the plays can be seen on separate nights but still in order — a unique opportunity to follow not only Henry’s history, but also the way in which Shakespeare darkly and interestingly evolves his characters. Edward Gero as Henry IV, Stacy Keach as Falstaff and Matthew Amendt as Hal carry both plays, and even with a big cast (in which many play multiple roles across the two productions) and despite an overarching plot that the uninitiated may find obtuse, most will find the drama unfolding among the three men eminently

accessible. Especially so, given the strong vision of director Michael Kahn. Tightly sprung, perfectly pitched and paced, Kahn’s productions are the bloody steaks and tannic reds of the theater: rich, gratifying and offering an energy that endures long after the evening has ended. In rep to June 8. Sidney Harman Hall, Harman Center for the Arts, 610 F St. NW. Tickets are $20 to $110 for one play, with discounts

available for combined purchase. Call 202-547-1122

or visit shakespearetheatre.org. (Kate Wingfield)

living out

Abel Lopez directs a GALA Hispanic Theatre production of Lisa Loomer’s funny, touching play Living Out, performed in its original English, with Spanish surtitles. The show explores the relationship between a lawyer and her Salvadoran nanny, both mothers struggling to make better lives for their children – and struggling to deal with their differences wrought by race, class and immigration status. Closes this Sunday, May 18. GALA Theatre at Tivoli Square, 3333 14th St. NW. Tickets are $38 to $42. Call 202-234-7174 or visit galatheatre.org.

sMokey Joe’s CAfÉ

One of the earliest and longest-running revues in Broadway history, Smokey Joe’s Café focuses on the rock and R&B tunes written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, from “Hound Dog” to “Stand By Me.” Randy Johnson returns to Arena Stage after One Night with Janis Joplin to direct a new take on the show, beefed up with a more urban feel and more relationships — and of course the local vocal firepower of Helen Hayes Award winners E. Faye Butler and Nova Y. Payton. “They’re really so impeccable that rehearsal is a joy,” Tony-winning LGBT pop singer-songwriter Levi Kreis tells Metro Weekly, adding that during rehearsals, “I literally am giggling like a child, because I can’t believe what’s coming out of their faces!” To June 8. The Mead Center for American

Theater, 1101 6th St. SW. Tickets are $75 to $120. Call 202-488-3300 or visit arenastage.org.

the rulebreAker reP:

bloody Poetry, ChArM

Taffety Punk Theater Company, whose tagline is “We Will Rock You” and styles itself as a sort of theatrical rock band, presents two plays in repertory that focus on 19th century literary giants: Howard Brenton’s Bloody Poetry, about the meeting two centuries ago between Percy Shelley and Lord Byron and their respective lovers — who are also half-sisters — Mary Shelley and Claire Clairmont; and Kathleen Cahill’s Charm, about Margaret Fuller, a writer who wrote what’s considered the first major feminist work in the U.S. and in the process upended the male- dominated literary world. To May 31. Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 7th St. SE. Tickets are $15. Call 202-547-6839 or visit chaw.org or taffetypunk.com.

the thousAndth night

MetroStage offers Carol Wolf’s unconventional spin on the Arabian Nights in repertory with another show performed by a solitary actor, Glen Berger’s Underneath The Lintel (see separate listing). Marcus Kyd stars as Guy de Bonheur in this comedic drama set in occupied France in 1943, about a French actor accused of subversive behavior who tries to redeem himself. Closes this Sunday, May 18. MetroStage, 1201 North Royal St., Alexandria. Tickets are $50, or $88 for both shows. Call 800-494-8497 or visit metrostage.org.

the tWo gentleMen of veronA

HHHHH

The actor-driven Fiasco Theater has been celebrated in its home base of New York for its inventive, stripped-down way of reimagining and re-telling Shakespeare, particularly the Bard’s weaker plays.

Leguizamo in the comedy Chef , which also features Bobby Cannavale, Scarlett Johansson, Oliver Platt and
Leguizamo in the comedy Chef , which also features Bobby Cannavale, Scarlett Johansson, Oliver Platt and

igOr DMitry

The Whole Package Studio Theatre offers Mike Bartlett’s play poking at sex, identity y Ou wON’t
The
Whole Package
Studio Theatre offers Mike Bartlett’s play poking at sex, identity
y Ou wON’t aCtually See COCK ONStage OVer at StuDiO
theatre.
“No, there are no physical roosters in the play,” Studio’s David Muse
confirms, “but the metaphor of cockfighting was a big inspiration.” in fact, Brit-
ish playwright Mike Bartlett pokes a little fun with the various meanings of the
word “cock” in his play of that name – to also include the British term “cock-
up,” or, as Muse puts it, “something that’s gotten all screwed up.”
the play also pokes at labels of sexual orientation. “[it] wrestles with some
controversies around the notion of bisexuality,” says Muse, focusing on a man,
John “trying to figure out who he is” after he falls in love with a woman – while
he’s on a break from a seven-year relationship with another man. “He’s really
caught between these two futures that he can imagine for himself, and he’s
paralyzed,” Muse says. “Sometimes you feel frustrated with him, sometimes
you identify with him, because that’s a very recognizable struggle.
first staged in london in 2009, Muse has long wanted to direct Cock, which
is staged in such a way as to be reminiscent of a cockfighting arena – with four
actors standing in as roosters, and no furniture, props or scenery to speak of.
“it’s trying to investigate how competitive people can get when it comes to sex
and love,” Muse says. “it does it with just a great showman’s pleasure of what
theater can do and how fun it could be.”
Muse, who has been Studio’s artistic director for four years, first introduced
D.C. to the work of Bartlett with last year’s short, sharp, black comedy Contrac-
tions. He promises much more Bartlett to come.
“it’s difficult to overstate what a big deal Mike Bartlett is in the world of
u.K. theater,” Muse says. “He’s really at the vanguard of a group of particu-
larly talented young playwrights that have burst onto the scene in the last five
years.” – Doug Rule
Cock runs to June 22 at Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. NW.
Call 202-332-3300 or visit studiotheatre.org.

the Cast of Cock: (l-r) liesel Allen yeager, ben Cole, scott Parkinson, and bruce dow

The focus is on the acting, not the staging. As co-directors of a new production of The Two Gentlemen of Verona at Folger Theatre, Jessie Austrian and Ben Steinfeld managed to cast a team of actors with great comic timing and sensibility — who also have an abundance of good looks and charisma, such that you’re willing to suspend disbelief and escape reality, taking an improbable journey with them far more willingly and for much longer of time than makes sense. Because, ultimately, you can try hard to understand or even justify The Two Gentlemen of Verona — through contemporary allusions or modern sensibilities about love and friendship. But to inverse and twist a famous mathematical metaphor, you just can’t circle this broken square. It’s pretty much a dog of a play. To May 28. Folger Theatre, 201 East Capitol St. SE. Tickets are $40 to $72. Call 202-544-7077 or visit folger.edu. (Doug Rule)

things you shouldn’t sAy PAst Midnight

Staged in repertory with A Midsummer Night’s Riot (see separate entry), Keegan Theatre presents Peter Ackerman’s loud, boisterous screwball bedroom comedy following three pairs of lovers trying to enjoy a night of romance but getting tripped up by racial slurs and meddling strangers – to say nothing of a lack of communication and honesty. Colin Smith directs Caroline Wolfson, Allison Corke, Michael Innocenti, Peter Finnegan, Kevin Hasser and Timothy Hayes Lynch in this production of a play that Entertainment Weekly called “a boisterously naughty romp.” To June 7. Andrew Keegan Theatre (formerly Church Street Theater), 1742 Church St. NW. Tickets are $30. Call 703-892-0202 or visit keegantheatre.com.

three Men in A boAt

Movement-focused stage company Synetic Theater is best known for its wordless “Silent Shakespeare” series, but its plays are not always text-less. Case in point: Three Men in A Boat (to say nothing of the dog), a new play by renowned area theater director Derek Goldman based on Jerome K. Jerome’s century-old travelogue about three young men suffering from a severe case of “overwork.” These three musketeers set out on a boating trip with a dutiful terrier, finding misadventures along the way. Tim Getman, Tom Story, Rob Jansen and Alex Mills star in this production featuring original choreography by Synetic’s Irina Tsikurishvili. To June 8. Theater at Crystal City, 1800 South Bell St., Arlington. Tickets are $45 to $55. Call 800-494-8497 or visit synetictheater.org.

MuSiC

10,000 MAniACs

In a couple months, Natalie Merchant will perform at Lincoln Theatre. But next weekend the alt- rock band that gave her her start appears at the Birchmere, on tour fronted by Jenn Grinels. The band tours in support of last year’s Music from the Motion Picture, the group’s first new studio set in 14 years, which featured vocalist Mary Ramsey. Friday, May 23, at 7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria. Tickets are $39.50. Call 703-549-7500 or visit birchmere.com.

Arturo sAndovAl

A protégé of the legendary jazz master Dizzy Gillespie, the Cuban-born Sandoval was granted political asylum in the U.S. decades ago. He’s revered as one of the world’s best jazz trumpeters and flugelhorn players, as well as a renowned pianist and composer. Friday, May 16, through Sunday, May 18, at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Blues Alley, 1073 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Tickets are $45, plus $10 minimum purchase. Call 202-337-4141 or visit bluesalley.com.

METROWEEKLY.cOM MAY 15, 2014 39
METROWEEKLY.cOM MAY 15, 2014 39
METROWEEKLY.cOM MAY 15, 2014 39
METROWEEKLY.cOM MAY 15, 2014 39

MargOt SCHulMaN

Drag Becomes Him

Rick Hammerly doesn’t ham it up in The Threepenny Opera

B ea artHur PlayeD tHe rOle Of luCy BrOwN iN tHe 1954 Off-

Broadway production of The Threepenny Opera.

“if Bea arthur could do it, then i figured i could fudge my way through

it,” says rick Hammerly, who dons tight-fitting clothes and properly placed pad- ding to portray the female role in Signature theatre’s new production of the Kurt weill-Bertolt Brecht musical. Hammerly, who won a Helen Hayes award a decade ago playing the title role in Signature’s Hedwig and the Angry Inch, beat out a pool of real women to land the role. “felicia Curry and i were called in for the same role — this was so bizarre!” he marvels. “either you want a little short black woman, or you want an old white guy.” Of course, Hammerly, in his 40s, isn’t exactly old. and he’s playing the role pretty legit. “i’m not playing it, wink-wink, a guy in drag,” he explains. “if i play it for laughs, i don’t get as many.” Hamming it up just doesn’t provoke laughter here as it would elsewhere. “trust me, if it were a Charles Busch show,” he says, “i would be all over the place. But it really has to be contained in order to work for this.” in addition to his longstanding acting work, Hammerly is increasingly busy with freelance directing work, such as assisting on Driving Miss Daisy this fall at ford’s theatre. He’s also gaining increasing recognition for his fledgling theater company factory 449, a collective of fellow stage veterans he assembled five years ago as an avenue to do edgier work. “i sat down the other night to watch some tV,” he says, “and i had to turn it off because i felt guilty, because there was other stuff i needed to do.” Hammerly doesn’t even have idle time in The Threepenny Opera. He plays a minor male role in the first act before spending roughly 50 minutes applying makeup for his second act entrance as lucy. He also has to insert the padding to round out lucy’s look. “this is the first costume where someone’s built me an ass,” he says. “i’ve needed one for years!” — Doug Rule

the threepenny Opera runs to June 9 at Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington. Tickets are $40 to $95. Call 703-820-9771 or visit signature-theatre.org.

bAltiMore syMPhony orChestrA

Jack Everly leads the BSO and a cast of singers in a SuperPops program titled “All That Jazz: A Symphonic Celebration of Kander and Ebb,” featuring showstoppers from Cabaret, Chicago, New York, New York, Kiss of the Spider Woman. Thursday, May 15, at 8 p.m. Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda. Also Friday, May 16, and Saturday, May 17, at 8 p.m.; and Sunday, May 18, at 3 p.m. Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St., Baltimore. Tickets are $29 to $84. Call 410-783-8000 or visit bsomusic.org.

boheMiAn CAverns JAzz orChestrA

Every Monday night the 17-piece jazz orchestra performs a variety of music from the big band repertoire — including pieces by Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Billy Strayhorn and Maria Schneider, plus originals from band members — at its namesake venue. Founded by baritone saxophonist Brad Linde and club owner Omrao Brown, features some of D.C.’s best jazz musicians, including Linde and trumpeter Joe Herrera, who co-direct. Performances at 8 and 10 p.m. every Monday night. Bohemian Caverns, 2001 11th St. NW. Tickets are $10. Call 202- 299-0800 or visit bohemiancaverns.com.

greAt noise enseMble

Since composer and conductor Armando Bayolo founded it in 2005, the Great Noise Ensemble has become one of the most important and adventurous ensembles in D.C. focused on contemporary classical music. The group finishes its season at the Atlas Performing Arts Center with a program of works by American composers of diverse backgrounds who make rhythmic music inspired by science, math, the natural environment or dance: Viet Cuong, Kirsten Volness, Andy Akilho, Roger Zare, Roberto Sierra and Mason Bates. Friday, May 23, at 8 p.m. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $28.50 in advance or $31.50 day of. Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org or greatnoiseensemble.com.

MAry lou WilliAMs WoMen in JAzz festivAl

The 19th edition of the Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Festival, named after the late legendary jazz pianist/composer, features two evenings of performances by some of contemporary jazz’s leading women, including lesbian singer-songwriter Toshi Reagon, drummer Allison Miller, clarinetist and saxophone player Anat Cohen and Rene Marie, who will perform selections from her tribute set Evil Little Me: A Tribute to Eartha Kitt. Friday, May 23, and Saturday, May 24, at 7 p.m. Kennedy Center Terrace Theater. Tickets are $38 for each night’s performance. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy- center.org.

nAtionAl PhilhArMoniC

Piotr Gajewski leads the philharmonic and violinist Sarah Chang in a performance of Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons. Also on the bill is Strauss’s Metamorphosen, written in the closing days of World War II as an elegy for the destruction of Munich. Saturday, May 17, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, May 18, at 3 p.m. Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda. Tickets are $29 to $70. Call 301-581-5100 or visit strathmore.org.

PAndA beAr

Known as a founding member in the Baltimore- originating experimental electronic band Animal Collective, Panda Bear, nee Noah Benjamin Lennox, tours in support of the forthcoming set Panda Bear Meets the Grim Reaper. Friday, May 16. Doors at 8 p.m. Nightclub 9:30, 815 V St. NW. Tickets are $25. Call 202-265-0930 or visit 930.com. Also visit 930. com/friends to sign up for the club’s Friends With Benefits rewards program offering exclusive deals and discounts on tickets, drinks and merchandise. l

HalfPOiNt

pets

by Zack rosen

Walking as One

HalfPOiNt pets by Zack rosen Walking as One The Brighter Days dog-walking collective marries good service

The Brighter Days dog-walking collective marries good service with progressive ideals

HalfPOiNt pets by Zack rosen Walking as One The Brighter Days dog-walking collective marries good service

N eit H er SNO w, NO r rai N , NO r M u DD y paws stays whit Mclure from swift completion of her appointed rounds. while few people live and die by their snail mail these days, anyone with a

dog will sooner or later require a reliable dog walker. Mclure is a member of the forward-thinking Brighter Days Collective, which is just as passionate about economic equality as it is the welfare of its clawed clients. “the business was started to create alternatives to the typical

top-down business model,” says Mclure, who splits ownership of the company, nearly a decade old, with each of her co-work- ers. “the 10 of us function as a collective. each of us manage our own routes. we split up the business’s administrative tasks, like taxes and advertising, as a collective. Our hiring process is a col- lective: we get together and [interview] the person as a group. it’s important that we have chemistry.” as the so-called “freelance economy” fills in the gap left by disappearing, traditional, full-time jobs, the freelancers them- selves are too often clobbered under the interests and abuses of corporate employers who see cheap labor in the place of people. Our most vulnerable generation is often vaunted for their great creative prowess, but 70,000 instagram followers won’t get you a seat on the Circulator without a dollar. Brighter Days, then, merits coverage for providing a fair sal- ary and generous benefits to a group of young washingtonians with a bevy of extra-office creative and community initiatives. Mclure also works for Beet Street gardens, which builds community plots throughout Northeast D.C., and likes to indulge

her twin passions for cooking and drawing when not at work. the other Brighter Days members have similarly packed résumés, which is why they get by with a little help from each other. each is given six weeks of paid vacation a year and the assurance that their fellow walkers will fill in for each other when needed. “a lot of us come from backgrounds of having other activi- ties – bands, jobs, creative ventures. [Our structure allows us] to offer people gainful and dignified employment and contribute to the community, to do the things they’re passionate about support themselves. what’s really cool about this model is that it works.” if you’re already itching to pull a lester Burnham at your accounting firm, it won’t help you to hear that Brighter Days has offered its employee/owners transgender-inclusive health care options since before the signing of the affordable Care act. they are environmentally minded, too, using bikes or shoes to get from neighborhood to neighborhood. they regularly donate money to small, local organizations such as HiPS (Help- ing individual People Survive) and radix farms, which subsi- dizes CSa (Community Supported agriculture) boxes for quali- fying low-income households. “we prefer to donate to organizations that are smaller so that the money will actually help them more,” explains Mclure. “we’ve also created a training manual for other people to set up a [collective business.] they can see what pieces of our model might help them, see there’s autonomy and space within a col- lective model for people to speak up and have a say in what’s beneficial to themselves and everyone else.” Of course, no mission statement is a replacement for know- ing one’s way around an extendo-leash. the louisville, Ky.-born

Mclure is a familiar, St. francis-like presence in adams Morgan for her beaming smile and enduring unflappability at the center of an ever-growing hurricane of leashed, happy dogs. the tight-knit nature and self-managed routes of Brighter Days means that, with the exception of vacation days, the same dog or puppy will get the same walker every day. this kind of trust and comfort goes a long way toward keeping Bowser happy, healthy and trainable. Daily human or canine social contact is a necessity for dogs, and that interaction becomes much less stressful for them when constantly accompanied by a familiar, friendly face. the good people of Brighter Days are united by business, but were gath- ered by shared passion. “a lot of us grew up with animals,” shares Mclure. “that’s what really drew me to the business. i’ve had a lot of puppies join my route and it’s really fascinating to see this pet develop and to have a hand in it being a friendly, fun companion for people to have in their homes and share their lives with.” Brighter Days offers packages for walking one or two dogs. the standard “visit” is 30 minutes, which includes a walk of 20-to-25 minutes. Dog-sitting packages include three-to-four walks per day, plus meals and meds, with overnight and non- overnight supervision options. Cat feedings are free after a cus- tomer has already paid for dog sitting, and other cat services and sitting arrangements are available. for more exotic companions, the ever-amenable folks at Brighter Days offer “get in touch with us, and we’ll see what we can do.”

For more information about Brighter Days, visit brighterdayscol- lective.com. l

her twin passions for cooking and drawing when not at work. the other Brighter Days members
her twin passions for cooking and drawing when not at work. the other Brighter Days members
her twin passions for cooking and drawing when not at work. the other Brighter Days members
her twin passions for cooking and drawing when not at work. the other Brighter Days members
her twin passions for cooking and drawing when not at work. the other Brighter Days members
Upload yours at MetroWeekly.com/pets Pet Pix Nubian Airick Jackson’s 7-year-old Yorkshire terrier “When my husky passed
Upload yours at MetroWeekly.com/pets
Upload yours at MetroWeekly.com/pets

Pet

Pet Pix

Pix

Nubian

Airick Jackson’s 7-year-old Yorkshire terrier

“When my husky passed away, I was in search for a new pet love. I

found a breeder that was located in Mineral, Va! I drove the longest

drive to find my best friend ever. Nubian was quiet next to all his

brothers and sisters. While everyone yapped away, Nubian just laid

there, quiet. That made me decide to give him love as if he was my son.

Since then he has been the happiest dog and won’t leave my side.”

Upload yours at MetroWeekly.com/pets Pet Pix Nubian Airick Jackson’s 7-year-old Yorkshire terrier “When my husky passed
Upload yours at MetroWeekly.com/pets Pet Pix Nubian Airick Jackson’s 7-year-old Yorkshire terrier “When my husky passed
Upload yours at MetroWeekly.com/pets Pet Pix Nubian Airick Jackson’s 7-year-old Yorkshire terrier “When my husky passed
Upload yours at MetroWeekly.com/pets Pet Pix Nubian Airick Jackson’s 7-year-old Yorkshire terrier “When my husky passed
METROWEEKLY.c METROWEEKLY.cOMOM MAY 15, 2014 MAY 15, 2014 43 43
METROWEEKLY.c
METROWEEKLY.cOMOM
MAY 15, 2014
MAY 15, 2014
43
43

t

night

life

listings

Thurs., 05.15.14
Thurs., 05.15.14

9

1/2

Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any

drink, 5-9pm • Multiple TVs showing movies, shows, sports • Expanded craft beer selection • No cover

Annie’s/Annie’s

UpstAirs

4@4 Happy Hour,

4pm-7pm • $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella Artois, $4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis

Freddie’s BeAch BAr

Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke, 9pm

Green LAntern

Shirtless Men Drink Free,

10-11pm

 

Jr.’s

$3 Rail Vodka Highballs, $2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to close • Top Pop Night

neLLie’s sports BAr

Beat The Clock Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of Beer $15 • Drag Bingo

nUmBer nine

Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any

drink, 5-9pm • No Cover

ZieGFeLd’s/secrets

All male, nude dancers • Shirtless Thursday • DJ Tim E in Secrets • 9pm • Cover 21+

 

Fri., 05.16.14

9

1/2

Open at 5pm • Happy

Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,

5-9pm • Friday Night Videos with resident

t night life listings Thurs., 05.15.14 9 1/2 Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
t night life listings Thurs., 05.15.14 9 1/2 Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,

METROWEEKLY.cOM

45

t

t COVERBOY bartenders EditiOn Interview by John Riley // Photography by Julian Vankim D eSPITe WorkINg

COVERBOY

bartenders

EditiOn

Interview by John Riley

//

Photography by Julian Vankim

t COVERBOY bartenders EditiOn Interview by John Riley // Photography by Julian Vankim D eSPITe WorkINg
  • D eSPITe WorkINg IN aN INDuSTry WHere beINg outgoing is crucial to earning big tips, Maryland native shannon insists she struggles at times with shyness.

easygoing, generous and friendly, but also “unfiltered” and “brutally honest,” by her own admission, this bartender at The bank Shot bar & grill in Laurel, Md., offers a sympathetic ear to her customers, dispensing comfort and advice to the sad, and flashes of her sarcastic sense of humor to the more lighthearted. a former basketball player in high school and during her years at Coppin State university, Shannon likes to go to the gym to stay fit, watch movies and read. She’d like to travel more, particularly to big cities like New york, and one day hopes to open and manage a bar of her own.

What’s on your nightstand? My cellphone, my wallet. a sculpture with a face with a hand underneath it, blowing a kiss. I think that’s cool. Some books. right now I’m reading Machiavelli’s The Prince.

What’s in the nightstand drawer?

Tums, for after a long night of drinking. gum. a flashlight. Nothing crazy. I

keep it simple.

DJ Shea Van Horn • VJ • Expanded craft beer selection • No cover

Annie’s

4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •

$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella Artois, $4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis • Upstairs open

5-11pm

dc BeAr crUe

Jr.’s

nUmBer nine

Half-price burgers and

@Town • Bear Happy

Buy 1, Get 1,

Open 5pm • Happy Hour:

fries

Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,

11pm-midnight • Happy

2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm

$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •

Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5

• No Cover

toWn

Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted by Charger Stone • No

Coronas, $8 Vodka Red Bulls, 9pm-close

phAse 1

Drag Show starts at 10:30pm • Hosted by

cover before 9:30pm • 21+

DJ Styalo • Dancing •

Lena Lett and featuring

neLLie’s sports BAr

$5 cover

Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-

Freddie’s BeAch BAr

DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,

Lee, Jessica Spaulding

Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •

Dancing • Beat The Clock

pW’s sports BAr

Deverreoux and Banaka •

Karaoke, 9pm

Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •

9855 Washington Blvd. N Laurel, Md.

Doors open at 10pm • For those 21 and over, $5 from

Buckets of Beer $15

301-498-4840

10-11pm and $10 after

Drag Show in lounge •

11pm • For those 18-20,

$10 all night • 18+ ZieGFeLd’s/secrets All male, nude dancers • Ladies of Illusion with host
$10 all night • 18+
ZieGFeLd’s/secrets
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+
sAT., 05.17.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
t COVERBOY bartenders EditiOn Interview by John Riley // Photography by Julian Vankim D eSPITe WorkINg
METROWEEKLY.cOM MAY 15, 2014 47
METROWEEKLY.cOM
MAY 15, 2014
47

What’s your favorite movie of all time? Pretty Woman. It’s a great movie. I like the ending, where he comes back and rescues her.

What are your three favorite TV shows of all time? Roseanne, Scandal and Sex in the City.

if you could have one superpower, what would it be and why?

To be able to read minds. I’m curious about what

people are thinking when they stare off into the distance.

Pick 3 people, living or dead, who you would like to spend the day with, and what would you do?

Madonna, Pink and my mom. We would just hang out, drinking and listening to great music.

so which sex and the City character does each one play in this scenario?

Madonna would be Samantha. I would be a healthy mix of all of them. I don’t think any one of us would be Charlotte or Miranda – too tame.

5-9pm • $5 Absolut &

phAse 1

Tito’s, $3 Miller Lite after

Dancing, 9pm-close

9pm • Expanded craft beer selection • No cover

pW’s sports BAr

Freddie’s BeAch BAr

9855 Washington Blvd. N Laurel, Md.

Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm

301-498-4840

• Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke and/or live entertainment, 9pm

Karaoke in the lounge • Charity Bingo with Cash Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every Month

Jr.’s

$4 Coors, $5 Vodka

neLLie’s

toWn

highballs, $7 Vodka Red Bulls

Ben DeLaCreme from RuPaul’s Drag Race • Dirty Pop with DJ Drew G • Drag Show starts

Guest DJs • Zing Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer, House Rail Drinks and Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm • Buckets of Beer, $15

at 10:30pm • DJ Wess • Hosted by Lena Lett and featuring Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica Spaulding Deverreoux

nUmBer nine

and Banaka • $8 from 10-11pm and $12 after

Doors 5pm • Happy Hour:

11pm • 21+

2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm

• No Cover

What’s your favorite movie of all time? Pretty Woman. It’s a great movie. I like the

You’re stranded on a desert island with one person. Who do you pick?

I’m going to go back to my girl Madonna. I’d definitely be entertained. She’s a genius, so I’d learn a lot. and I’d definitely be in shape.

What’s your greatest fear?

Spiders.

roller coasters: wooden or steel?

Neither. I hate roller coasters. I used to like them

define good in bed.

aggressive, fearless.

Can men fake it? should they?

I’m sure they can. It doesn’t apply to me – I’m a

What annoys you?

as a kid, but the older I’ve gotten, they freak me out.

gold-star lesbian. Should they? I have before, so sure.

Ignorant people.

 

What turns you on?

Name two people you don’t ever want to

What pleases you?

Confident people.

picture having sex.

good friends, good people. one thing about my

Julia Child and any man.

friends is we always have each other’s backs. We

What turns you off?

know when there’s a friend emergency. I can’t

a nasty disposition.

What’s your favorite late-night eats?

say anything negative about my close friends.

What’s your idea of a romantic getaway?

Pizza. With cheese, mushrooms and green peppers.

What’s the worst thing a friend could do to you?

Lie. Lying is a betrayal. If you give it to me

straight, you’ll get more respect from me.

Who is your greatest influence or hero?

My mom and dad. They’ll have been married 37 years on June 3. They know how to have a good time and enjoy each other’s company. They’re hardworking, successful people.

ZieGFeLd’s/secrets Jr.’s All nude male dancers, 9pm • Ladies of Illusion with host Ella Fitzgerald, 9pm
ZieGFeLd’s/secrets
Jr.’s
All nude male dancers,
9pm • Ladies of Illusion
with host Ella Fitzgerald,
9pm • DJ Steve
Henderson in Secrets • DJ
Spyke in Ziegfelds • Doors
8pm • Cover • 21+
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all flavors), all
day and night
neLLie’s
suN., 05.18.14
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
cover
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
nUmBer nine
Freddie’s BeAch BAr
Champagne Brunch
Buffet, 10am-3pm •
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Drag Show hosted by
Destiny B. Childs featuring
performances by a rotating
cast, 9pm • No cover •
Karaoke follows show
Pop Goes the World with
Wes Della Volla at 9:30
pm • Happy Hour: 2 for
1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
ZieGFeLd’s/secrets
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • Doors
8pm • Cover 21+

bright lights, big city. a night in New york. Loud

music, being around people having a good time. being able to get lost in the situation.

What’s the strangest place you’ve ever had sex?

Do I really have to tell you that? My mom’s not

What’s the best tip you ever got?

The best experience I had behind the bar was when this couple came in, spent two to three hours drinking and stiffed me. Some random guy noticed how they were treating me, went to the aTM, withdrew $100 and gave it to me.

going to be reading this, I hope. The bathroom at the supermarket. Mind you, I was 19.

When you go to a bar, what do you order?

MoN., 05.19.14
MoN., 05.19.14

9 1/2

Open at 5pm • Happy

Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,

5-9pm • Multiple TVs showing movies, shows, sports • Expanded craft beer selection • No cover

Annie’s

4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •

$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella Artois, $4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis

Freddie’s

Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke, 9pm

Jr.’s

Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm

• Showtunes Songs & Singalongs, 9pm-close • DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts

neLLie’s sports BAr

Beat The Clock Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of Beer $15 • Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm

nUmBer nine

Open 5pm • Happy Hour:

2

for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm

• No Cover

pW’s sports BAr

9855 Washington Blvd. N Laurel, Md.

301-498-4840

Buzztime Trivia competition • 75 cents off bottles and drafts

 

Tues., 05.20.14

9

1/2

Open at 5pm • Happy

Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,

5-9pm • Multiple TVs showing movies, shows,

You’re stranded on a desert island with one person. Who do you pick? I’m going to
a shot of Fireball and a Woodchuck hard cider. sports • Expanded craft beer selection •
a shot of Fireball and a Woodchuck hard cider.
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
nUmBer nine
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
Annie’s
• No Cover
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
pW’s sports BAr
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Freddie’s BeAch BAr
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
Wed., 05.21.14
Jr.’s
9
1/2
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
• DJ Wes Della Volla •
2-for-1, all day and night
Habibi: A Gay Middle
Eastern Party, 9pm • Open
at 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
neLLie’s sports BAr
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Karaoke
• Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
You’re stranded on a desert island with one person. Who do you pick? I’m going to
You’re stranded on a desert island with one person. Who do you pick? I’m going to
You’re stranded on a desert island with one person. Who do you pick? I’m going to

What’s your favorite cocktail to make?

Margaritas. I always squeeze fresh limes, and I add a little bit of orange juice. a little extra tequila never hurt.

if you could change one thing about your body, what would it be?

The scar on my nose.

What’s your theme song?

“Jump” by Madonna.

You become master of the world. What’s your first act?

I would demand that people be kind to one another.

What are you most grateful for?

My family.

What would you die for?

Truth.

What’s your motto? “Live and let live.” l

Annie’s

neLLie’s sports BAr

Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4

Beat The Clock Happy

Stella Artois, $4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis

Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) • Half-Price Burger Night • Buckets of Beer $15 •

Freddie’s BeAch BAr

SmartAss Trivia, 8pm

Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Drag

nUmBer nine

Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,

Open 5pm • Happy Hour:

10pm

2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm

• No Cover

Green LAntern

Happy Hour Prices,

pW’s sports BAr

4pm-Close

9855 Washington Blvd. N Laurel, Md.

Jr.’s

301-498-4840

Trivia with MC Jay Ray, 8pm • The Queen,

Free Pool • 75 cents off Bottles and Drafts

10-11pm • $2 JR’s Drafts & $4 Vodka ($2 with

ZieGFeLd’s/secrets

College I.D./JR’s Team Shirt)

All male, nude dancers • New Meat Wednesday DJ Don T • 9pm • Cover

21+ l

What’s your favorite cocktail to make? Margaritas. I always squeeze fresh limes, and I add a
METROWEEKLY.cOM MAY 15, 2014 51
METROWEEKLY.cOM MAY 15, 2014 51
METROWEEKLY.cOM MAY 15, 2014 51
scene duplex diner Thursday, May 8 scan this tag with your smartphone for bonus scene pics
scene
duplex diner
Thursday, May 8
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
PHotoGraPHy By
CHristoPHEr CunEtto
52
SEE MORE phOTOS fROM ThiS EvEnT aT WWW.METROWEEKLY.cOM/ScEnE

CLubLife

By ZAck rosen

JiJi lee

DeLaCreme Rises

S

Drag Race star benDeLaCreme prepares to light up Town

CLubLife By ZAck rosen JiJi lee DeLaCreme Rises S Drag Race star benDeLaCreme prepares to light

A FTer eLIMINaTIoN, there was definitely an outpouring,” says

fan-favorite ben DeLaCreme of her elimination from this season’s RuPaul’s Drag Race. “I have heard several sources say my elimination was one of the more controversial.” you may not be able to watch her on the show, but this Saturday, D.C.- area residents can see her perform in person at Town.

Not being in america’s living rooms every week has actually made the Seattle resident’s star burn brighter. “We film over the summer, so I’ve had months to come to terms with this,” says DeLaCreme. “but having people freak out has been this amazing reflection of vindication. There’s part of me that feels like this reaction is everything

I could’ve hoped for. What I wanted from this experience was to show my work to people and have them want more.” The enthusiastic show- queen has not totally planned out his set list yet, but confirms it will likely include new music from a live show that debuts in New york May 21, and describes the experience of reconciling his male persona, ben, with its now

famous feminine side. While that challenge has been personal, DeLaCreme also enjoys challenging her audience’s notions of gender and performance. She combines her art Institute of Chicago degree with her years in Seattle’s punky, intellectual burlesque scene to create a queen with some unexpected substance. “She’s goofy and bubbly and upbeat, but that’s the sugar that makes the medicine go down. I developed this [act] ready for a mass market. The public at large is a little less progressive than many drag queens, but drag is such a shiny, pretty thing that people want to reach out and touch it. That forces them to come in contact with things like gender transgression and questions of what gender even means.” as DeLaCreme’s career continues to motor on after Drag Race, it is clear that there is one challenge DeLaCreme won’t be missing — that of a stern, in-person reading by ruPaul herself. “She has this insane kind of power and aura about her that feels godly in an ancient greek way, like she could use it for good or evil. She’s not a force of good or evil, she’s just a force.”

BenDeLaCreme performs Saturday, May 17, at Town Danceboutique, 2009 8th St. NW. Doors open at 10 p.m. Cover charge is $8 before 11 p.m., $12 after. 21 and older. For more information, call 202-234- TOWN or visit towndc.com. l

let me tell you something, if we were playing the Vikings right now, i’d probably

let me tell you something, if we were playing the Vikings right now, i’d probably have three sacks the first game. Since february and my big announcement, this has been a whole [lot of] speculation of the first openly gay football player, but you know what? it’s not about that.

it’s about playing football.”

MiChAel sAM, speaking to press after becoming the first out gay player to be drafted to the National Football League. He will play for the St. Louis Rams.

(eSPN)

i’m sorry but that

Michael Sam is no bueno

for doing that on national tv. … Man u got little kids lookin at the draft. i can’t believe eSPN even allowed that to happen.

derriCk WArd, former NFL running back, commenting on Twitter about Sam’s reaction to learning he’d been drafted. After receiving the call, Sam kissed his boyfriend, Vito Cammisano, which was televised.

(twitter/eSPN)

this is dedicated to everyone who believes in a future of peace and freedom.

we are unity and we are unstoppable.”

ConChitA Wurst, the gender-non-conforming Austrian winner of the Eurovision 2014 song contest, upon sealing the top spot May 10 in Copenhagen. (The Daily Mail, u.K.)

i am just in shock, i think. you go from being so private and hidden to such a public display of commitment.

it’s just so nice.”

susAn bArr, of Dallas, who married Shelly Butler, in Little Rock, Ark., May 12, following a circuit court judge’s ruling that the state’s marriage ban was unconstitutional. With about 200 couples marrying Monday, Barr and Butler, who arrived late Sunday night from Texas, were allowed to move to the head of the line in light of Barr’s muscular dystrophy, for which she requires a wheelchair. (USA Today)

anytime the phone rings, we get nervous.

this is not just some traffic case, this is about our lives.

we’re not getting any younger. But we try not to think about the lawsuit all the time; it can’t be the focus of our lives.

tiM bostiC, of Bostic v. rainey, the case challenging Virginia’s marriage ban, arguments for which were heard Monday in Richmond in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Bostic, who is 48, has been with his partner, Tony London, 54, for nearly 25. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)