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Money Factory

Grade 6

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Web image retrieved from http://blog.ponoko.com/2010/06/07/way-off-topic-ten-countries-with- awesome-currency-design/

! ! ! ! ! ! Jillian Webberson !
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Jillian Webberson
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Introductory Information:

Title: Money Factory Grade 6 Class Size: Approximately 24 Length of class: 50 minutes In this lesson, students will examine the images and design conventions that are characteristic in currency design. They will think about money from an aesthetic perspective. After discussing the requirements of a good bill and how designs are used to represent a countries culture, students will design their own currency.

 
 

STAGE 1: DESIRED RESULTS

 
 
  • A. ENDURING UNDERSTANDING:

 
 

Art making can communicate commonalities among cultures. Currency design is a form of art. We can learn about a culture by studying its currency.

 
 
  • B. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

 
 

How does art reflect, as well as shape, culture? What can we learn from studying the design of money? What can works of art on currency tell us about a society, culture, era or community? What is the reasoning behind why certain symbols are chosen for certain forms of currency?

 
 
  • C. STATE STANDARDS ADDRESSED:

 
 

PreK–12 STANDARD 4 Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of creating and exhibiting artwork: drafts, critique, self-assessment, refinement, and exhibit preparation. PreK–12 STANDARD 6 Purposes and Meanings in the Arts: Students will describe the purposes for which works of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture were and are created, and, when appropriate, interpret their meanings. PreK–12 STANDARD 10 Interdisciplinary Connections: Students will apply their knowledge of the arts to the study of English language arts, foreign languages, health, history and social science, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering.

 
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LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
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The students will discuss why money was created and why it is used. The students will examine the American dollar bill. The students will watch and interpret the Field Trip to the Money Factory video in order to learn about how American currency is actually designed and created. The students will compare and contrast currency from different cultures. The students will think about their values (what is important to them). The students will sketch out their ideas. The students will design their own currency with symbols based on their values. The students will reveal cross cultural as well as self knowledge through their creations. The students will be able to share their designed currency with the class.

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STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE

 
 
  • A. PERFORMANCE TASK OR FINAL PRODUCT: Each student’s currency will be unique to his or her own values and/or culture. The final product will be their own designed currency. Students will begin with sketches that will further develop into a drawn and colored paper bill/dollar/note. The currency will be drawn and colored with pencil, colored pencils, sharpies, watercolor, etc. The designed currency will include symbols based on their own personal values and/or an important culture(s), as well as include the essential elements of currency (name of place, amount of money both numeric and written out, valued symbols, serial number, background design, border, and so on).

 
 
  • B. CONTINUUM OF ASSESSMENTS: Performance tasks and teacher assessment tools that will serve as evidence of student learning will include:

Students participating in class discussions prior to actual art activity. The teacher will review students’ preliminary sketches and concept ideas. Students being closely observed by the teacher along the way. Students fill out a self assessment worksheet as well as provide a written statement about their currency including descriptions of symbols in their design. Students take part in a group critique and sharing exercise. Documentation of student work to be posted on art class blog.

 
 
  • C. CRITERIA:

 
 

Did the student discuss why money was created and why it is used? Did the student examine the American dollar bill? Did the student actively participate in introductory activity? Did the student compare and contrast currency from different cultures? Did the student reflect on their personal values? Did the student design their own currency with symbols based on their values? Did the student include all the components of currency design (as required by the project)? Did the student reveal cross cultural and self knowledge through their creations? Did the student share their currency with the class?

 
! ! ! Web image retrieved from http://www.incredibleart.org/lessons/middle/images/Heather- Money.jpg ! ! ! ! STAGE 3: LEARNING
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Web image retrieved from http://www.incredibleart.org/lessons/middle/images/Heather-
Money.jpg
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STAGE 3: LEARNING PLAN
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MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
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• White drawing paper (cut to size of dollar or note, approximate)
• Scissors
• Pencils
• Erasers
• Sharpies
• Markers
• Colored pencils
• Watercolors
• Brushes
• Containers of water
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B.
VOCABULARY WITH DEFINITIONS:
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Money - something generally accepted as a medium of exchange, a measure of value, or a means of payment

Currency - the money that a country uses : a specific kind of money Design - the arrangement of elements or details in a product or work of art : a decorative pattern Engrave - to form by incision (as on wood or metal) Symbol - an action, object, event, etc., that expresses or represents a particular idea or quality Unity - the state of being in full agreement : a way of combining the parts in a work of art or literature so that they seem to belong together Value - the amount of money that something is worth : the price or cost of something Layout - the plan or design or arrangement of something laid out Serial number - a number that is put on a product and that is used to identify it Euro - single currency of 16 countries of the European Union Pound - the basic monetary unit of the United Kingdom, Sudan, Syria, Lebanon, and Egypt Kroner - the basic monetary unit of Denmark and Norway Peso - the basic monetary unit of Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Philippines, and Uruguay Dollar - a basic unit of money in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries that is equal to 100 cents Riyal - the basic monetary unit of Qatar and Saudi Arabia

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! ! ! Web image retrieved from http://www.incredibleart.org/lessons/middle/images/Heather- Money2.jpg
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Web image retrieved from http://www.incredibleart.org/lessons/middle/images/Heather-
Money2.jpg
  • C. VISUAL IMAGE RESOURCES:

 
 

Money brought in from countries around the world Field trip to the money factory [Web]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?

v=-IBHbe-t-X4

 

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  • D. TEXT, MEDIA AND WEB RESOURCES:

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Cribb, J. (1990). Eyewitness books: money. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. Friedberg, A., Friedberg, I., & Bowers, Q. D. (2006). A guide book of united states paper money. Atlanta, GA: Whitman Publishing. Furgang, K. (2013). Everything money. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic. The dollar bill deconstructed. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://visual.ly/dollar-bill- deconstructed Middle school lesson plan: Make every cent count!. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://

Young, R. (1998). Money. Minneapolis, MN: Carolrhoda Books Inc.

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  • E. TEACHER INSTRUCTION:

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The teacher will introduce the American dollar bill. The teacher will ask “why do we need money?”

The teacher will deconstruct the dollar (conceptually, not literally). The teacher will pass around dollars for students to examine. The teacher will ask what students see. The teacher will show the different parts that comprise the American dollar. The teacher will show The Money Factory video clip. The teacher will introduce the term currency. The teacher will show visuals and pass around currency from other countries. The teacher will facilitate a discussion about currency around the world. The teacher will discuss similarities and differences between currency (using series of images as examples). The teacher will explain what symbols and designs are important to currency design. The teacher will ask the students to think about what they value. The teacher will display a few money books for students to use as inspiration and resource. The teacher will say “today we are going to design our own currency!” and further explain how. The teacher will explain the steps: 1 - Brainstorm ideas through discussion and presentation, 2- Draw sketches of ideas, 3 - Draw final draft using best sketch using pencil, 4 - Add markers, sharpies, colored pencils, watercolors, 5 - Make sure to include currency’ essential parts (these will be listed out also) The teacher will display steps, clear and easy for all students to see and refer to if necessary. Pictures with each written step is extremely helpful. The teacher will hand out proper materials to students. Additional materials will be given to those students who need them to create more comfortably. Also, large grasp tools can be added to pencils, for example, for those with physical disabilities. The teacher will offer alternatives for differentiation. This can include personally approaching a student and showing a few options like color, utensil, material, idea, symbol, etc. Then, the student can point to or nod at the one they want. The teacher will have aid to assist if that is a possibility. The aid will actually help create the art project after student’s choices of materials and ideas are determined. The teacher will walk around and check in on students. The teacher will repeat instructions throughout class period. The teacher will also allow for students to work in a different location if it enables better learning and productivity. The teacher will wrap up the project with a group discussion. The teacher will have the students share their currency with the rest of the class. The teacher will display the currency together collectively.

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  • F. LEARNING ACTIVITY: Students will participate in a discussion about money. Students will discuss it’s uses.

Students will examine the American Dollar bill. Students will deconstruct the dollar (conceptually, not literally). Students will watch and discuss the video Field Trip to the Money Factory. Students will discuss currency from different countries. Students will take a close look at actual currency that the teacher passes around the class. Students will compare and contrast currency design. Students will think about their own values and what is important to them both culturally and personally.

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Students will turn these values into visual symbols. Students will begin to design their own currency. Students will sketch out their ideas. Students will choose the best sketch. Students will be given easy to follow and very clear directions. Students will be able to see steps posted on the board. These steps will be accompanied with images for those who learn better this way. Students will be given a piece of white drawing paper the size of a dollar and pencils. Students will draw their currency design. Students will use colored pencils, markers, sharpies, watercolors and/or whatever materials they feel most comfortable using.

Students will include all of the essential parts of the dollar, bill or note. Those are number value (both numerically and written out), name of currency, country, signature, symbols, important phrase or short quote, serial number, and background design and border. Students will write a statement about their artwork including descriptions of symbols in their design. Students when finished will come together as a group and share their currency. Students will talk about their own art but also those of fellow classmates. Students will clean up their workspace, returning materials to proper containers and locations. Students will be able to admire work after it is presented together. Students will be able to view artwork on a (possible) class blog. Students will have a new concept of currency as art, the commonalities and differences across cultures, and what goes into the design.

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Benchmark created by Jillian Webberson. 2013.