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Providence Talks!



Family Orientation Outline
Welcome to Providence Talks (parent handout)
Benefits of Providence Talks (parent handout)
Language Development Chart (parent handout)
Introduction Video
LENA Sample Reports
Information & Informed Consent Form
Recording Recognition Chart (parent handout)
Week 1: Measure Words & Turns/Track Your Childs Progress
Curriculum
Lesson Plan
Time of Day Activity & Notes
Your LENA recording day step by step for Parents (parent handout)
DLP Device & Frequently Asked Questions
How to get a good recording (parent handout)
Material List
Recording Plan (parent handout)
Recording Worksheet (parent handout)
LENA Snapshot (English & Spanish)
Week 2: Describe what you and your child are Seeing, Hearing, Feeling & Doing
Curriculum
Lesson Plan
Time of Day Activity & Notes
Using Descriptive Words for the Things Your Child is Seeing, Hearing, Feeling, and Doing
Books About Feelings (parent handout)
Emotions
Developmental Milestones (parent handout)
Week 3: Responding to Your Childs Lead
Curriculum
Lesson Plan
Time of Day Activity & Notes
Activity Sheet how to make your own toys (parent handout)
Recipe Book (parent handout)

Table of Contents







Providence Talks!



TV time and young children (parent handout)
Week 4: Reading with Your Child Every Day
Curriculum
Lesson Plan
Time of Day Activity & Notes
Tips for Parents: Choosing Books for Infants & Toddlers (parent handout)
Book List by Age
Book List-Stories in Spanish
Week 5: Repeating & Adding to Your Childs Vocabulary
Curriculum
Lesson Plan
Time of Day Activity & Notes
List of Common Words (parent handout)
Week 6: Using Songs, Rhymes & Finger plays
Curriculum
Lesson Plan
Time of Day Activity & Notes
Song Book (parent handout)
Finger play book (parent handout)
Materials to Make Instruments (parent handout)
Week 7: Asking Open-ended Questions
Curriculum
Lesson Plan
Time of Day Activity & Notes
How to Use Open Ended Questions (parent handout)
Week 8: Daily Play
Curriculum
Lesson Plan
Time of Day Activity & Notes
Importance of Play (parent handout)
Benefits of Play (parent handout)
Packet of Activities and Games to play (parent handout)
Toy Safety Tips (parent handout)








Providence Talks!



Monthly Curriculums
Month 1
Month 2
Month 3
Month 4
Month 5
Month 6
Importance of Pretend Play and Items to Use for Pretend Play
Month 7
Month 8
ADDENDUM: Professional Tools
How to use LENA explaining to parents
LENA DLP Guide
Developmental Milestones
Areas of Concerns
ASQ
MacArthur Bates
Language Development Chart











Providence Talks!




Family Orientation Outline
Topic RIELDS Activities Materials/Resources
1. Explain the Purpose of
Providence Talks.

2. What are the Benefits of
Providence Talks?

3. Explain the Importance of
Language Development.

4. Show Introduction Video with
parent testimonials.

5. Review LENA Sample Reports.

6. Review Information &
Informed Consent Form.

7. Review Recording Recognition
Chart.
LD 1a Language Development-
Receptive Language

LD 2a Language Development-
Expressive Language
N/A

1. Welcome Letter parent handout

2. Benefits of Providence Talks parent
handout

3. Language Development Chart parent
handout

4. Show Introduction Video with parent
testimonials

5. LENA Sample Reports

6. Information & Informed Consent form

7. Recording Recognition Chart- parent
handout






Family Orientation Outline







Providence Talks!



Topic Details and Handouts RI ELDC Standards Timing Notes
Purpose and Benefits of
Providence Talks.
















Introduction Video.








Importance of Language
Development.




Thank family for the opportunity to
tell them about the Providence
Talks initiative.
Today I am here to provide an
outline of the Providence Talks
initiative that highlights how
important language is for childrens
development, especially during the
first three years.
Providence Talks is an initiative
envisioned by the Mayor of
Providence. (use the Welcome
Letter Handout and Benefits of
Providence Talks handout to
reference during conversation.
Provide handouts to
parent/caregiver).

This is a brief video to provide you
with more information about the
things weve talked about so far
(show Introduction by Dr. Todd
Risley video) Make a point or two
about the video after viewing and
ask if there are any follow-up
questions.

Providing a language rich
environment is so important in your
childs first three years. Lots of
parents will ask why it is important
especially if their baby is a
newborn. Research has proven a




























LD 1a Language Development-
Receptive Language

LD 2a Language Development-
Expressive Language
10 minutes


















10 minutes








10 minutes













Providence Talks!




















Review of LENA Sample
Reports.









Information and Informed
Consent Form.




new born knows the sound of his
mothers voice one day after birth
and a six month old recognizes her
name. So talking, talking, talking is
the best way to bathe your child in
language!
Ask the parent/caregiver some
open ended questions to engage
the parent in the conversation. For
example, What are some ways you
use language with your baby during
the day? How does your baby
respond?Discuss the Language
Development Chart parent
handout.


Each week you will receive a
report that will provide you with
valuable information about your
childs exposure to language. (Use
sample report and explain each
area being measured) The report
acts as a guideline to allow you to
continue to do what you are doing
and to recognize opportunities to
increase exposure to language

Now that weve gone through this
orientation, is this something you
would still like to participate in?
Review the consent with parent. Be
sure to highlight the
confidentiality/privacy aspect of



























10 minutes










6 minutes












Providence Talks!







Recording Recognition
Chart.









Visit Note.



the DLP and use of data.



Provide the 8 Tips to Increased
Words & Turns chart. The tips on
the chart are helpful reminders
about the ways to increase your
childs language. We will be
covering each tip throughout the
eight week. Each week we will
recognize successful recordings
with a sticker and provide you with
a book to enjoy with your child.




5 minutes










5 minutes













Providence Talks!







Providence Talks
Welcome! Providence Talks is a new, early childhood literacy initiative
envisioned by Providence Mayor Angel Taveras and funded by the Bloomberg
Philanthropies. Providence Talks is designed to assist families and caretakers in
developing the vocabulary and language skills of their young children. This
unique approach combines digital recordings, in-home coaching and other
enrichment activities designed to increase and strengthen a childs language
learning.

We are very excited to have you and your child take part in this exciting new
program! Providence Talks is an innovative language enhancement program that
will build your childs language development and skills and prepare them for
success in Kindergarten and beyond. Please feel free to contact me with any
questions or concerns that you may have. We are available to answer your
questions at any time. Thank you for participating in Providence Talks, we look
forward to working with you and your child.

Sincerely,

Office (401) xxx-xxxx
Cell (401) xxx-xx
E-mail xxx@xxxxxxxxxxx.org









Providence Talks!



Providence Talks es una nueva intervencin infantil temprana diseada para ayudar a su hijo a tener xito en kindergarten y ms all. Fue
desarrollado por el alcalde de Providence ngel Taveras y est siendo probado en Meeting Street ahora.

Por qu es importante?

Investigaciones demuestran que los nios estn expuestos a diferentes cantidades de charlas y conversaciones de adultos. Los nios que
escuchan ms palabras a menudo estn mejor preparados para el xito acadmico. Providence Talks quiere dar a el primer maestro de su hijo -
USTED! - las herramientas necesarias para asegurarse de que el vocabulario de su nio se desarrolle a un ritmo adecuado.

Quin puede participar?

Providence Talks est empezando en una fase "piloto " en este momento. Las familias que ya estn inscritas en Early Head Start en Meeting
Street son elegibles para participar.

Cmo funciona el programa?

Las familias que participen en Providence Talks continuaran recibiendo visitas semanales de su trabajador social de Early Head Start. Cada dos
semanas el foco de la visita ser en el desarrollo del lenguaje. Durante estas visitas, su familia recibir un libro para nios gratis y entrenamiento
especial sobre cmo mejorar el vocabulario de su hijo y ayudar a prepararlos para la escuela.

Durante cada visita que se enfoque en el lenguaje, su familia tambin recibir un "podmetro de palabras digital. Este cuenta el nmero de
palabras e interacciones conversacionales que su nio se involucra durante un da normal. Usted va hacer una grabacin con el " podmetro de
palabra" aproximadamente cada dos semanas. Nadie escucha la grabacin digital en el " podmetro de palabra. " Su grabacin se borra
automticamente despus de que es procesada.

Su trabajador social de Early Head Start traer una impresin personalizada con tablas y grficos que muestran el nmero de palabras e
interacciones conversacionales que su hijo experimente. Usted no tendr que adivinar cuntas palabras su hijo esta escuchando - usted sabr
con informes personalizados a travs del tiempo.

A quin contacto si deseo obtener ms informacin?

Providence Talks podra ser una gran oportunidad para usted y su nio! Para aprender ms del programa, como funciona y cmo participar,
comunquese con su trabajador social de Early Head Start. Usted tambin puede llamar Stephanie Taveras at (401) 345-1932.
INSERT ENG. Benefit of Providence Talks







Providence Talks!




6 Months
Vocalization with intonation
Responds to his/her name
Responds to human voices without visual cues by turning his/her head and eyes
Responds appropriately to friendly and angry tines

12 Months
Uses one or more words with meaning.
Understands simple instructions, especially if vocal or physical cues are given.
Practices inflection.
Is aware of the social value of speech.

18 Months
Has vocabulary of approximately 5-20 words.
Vocabulary made up chiefly of nouns.
Some echolalia (repeating a word or phrase over and over).
Much jargon with emotional content.
Is able to follow simple commands

24 Months
Can name a number of objects common to his/her surroundings.
Is able to use at least two prepositions, usually chosen from the following: in, on, under.
Combines words into a short sentence-largely noun-verb combinations (mean) length of sentences is given as 1.2 words.
Approximately 2/3 of what child says should be intelligible.
Vocabulary of approximately 150-300 words.
Rhythm and fluency often poor.
Volume and pitch of voice not yet well-controlled.
Can use two pronouns correctly: I, me, you (although me and I are often confused).
My and mine are beginning to emerge.
Responds to such commands as show me your eyes (nose, mouth, hair).
Language Development Charts
Talks







Providence Talks!




36 Months
Use pronouns I, you, me correctly.
Is using some plurals and past tenses.
Knows at least three prepositions, usually in, on, under.
Knows chief parts of body and should be able to indicate these if not name.
Handles three word sentences easily.
Has in the neighborhood of 900-1000 words.
About 90% of what child says should be intelligible.
Verbs begin to predominate.
Understands most simple questions dealing with his/her environment and activities.
Relates his/her experiences so that they can be followed with reason.
Able to reason out such questions as what must you do when you are sleepy, hungry, cool, or thirsty?
Should be able to give his/her sex, name and age.
Should not be expected to answer all questions even though he/she understands what is expected.

4 years
Knows names of familiar animals.
Can use at least four prepositions or can demonstrate his/her understanding of their meaning when given commands.
Names common objects in picture books or magazines.
Knows one or more colors.
Can repeat 4 digits when they are given slowly.
Can usually repeat words of four syllables.
Demonstrates understanding of over and under.
Has most vowels and diphthongs and the consonants p, b, m, w, n well established.
Often indulges in make-believe.
Extensive verbalization as he/she carries out activities.
Understands such concepts as longer, larger, when a contrast is presented.
Readily follows simple commands even though the stimulus objects are not in sight.
Much repetition of words, phrases, syllables, and even sounds.

5 Years







Providence Talks!



Can use many descriptive words spontaneously-both adjectives and adverbs.
Knows common opposites: big-little, hard-soft, heave-light, etc.
Has number concepts of 4 or more. Can count to ten.
Speech should be completely intelligible, in spite of articulation problems.
Should have all vowels and the consonants, m, p, b, h, w, k, g, t, d, n, ng, y (yellow).
Should be able to repeat sentences as long as nine words.
Should be able to define common objects in terms of use (hat, shoe, chair).
Should be able to follow three commands given without interruptions.
Should know his/her age.
Should have simple time concepts: morning, afternoon, night, day, later, after, while.
Tomorrow, yesterday, today.
Should be using fairly long sentences and should use some compound and some complex sentences.
Speech on the whole should be grammatically correct.

6 Years
In addition to the above consonants these should be mastered: f, v, sh, zh, th,1.
He/she should have concepts of 7.
Speech should be completely intelligible and socially useful.
Should be able to tell a rather connected story about a picture, seeing relationships.
Between objects and happenings.

Permission Pending Child Development Institute
















Providence Talks!








http://youtu.be/9__TsnYxi4k http://youtu.be/7zMkSNzqrqM http://youtu.be/59KZPCjxJtY
Lindsay Rodriguez, M.Ed., CED Lisa G. Lopez, M.A., LSLS Cert-AVT Parent testimonials from Smarter, Happier, Baby Program
Parent Advisor Parent Infant Program Director Boulder, Colorado
Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children
San Antonio, Texas San Antonio, Texas


http://youtu.be/_M4XvkFznjo
Parent testimonials from Smarter, Happier, Baby Program
Boulder, Colorado



Introduction Videos Talks







Providence Talks!



INFORMATION & INFORMED CONSENT FORM
Providence Talks is a new, early childhood literacy initiative envisioned by Providence Mayor Angel Taveras and funded by the Bloomberg Philanthropies.
Providence Talks is designed to assist families and caretakers in developing the vocabulary and language skills of their young children. Providence Talks
consists of a combination of digital recordings, in-home coaching and other enrichment activities. It is important that you read this document carefully
before deciding whether to participate. Your participation is strictly voluntary.

Providence Talks involves the use of technology (Technology) developed by the LENA Research Foundation, a charitable organization located in
Boulder, Colorado (LENA), together with a curriculum (Curriculum).

Please read this document carefully before deciding whether to participate. If, after reading this Information and Consent Form, you have any questions
or concerns about your participation in Providence Talks, please do not sign this document. Instead, please contact your Family Educator:
_______________________ at ____________________________ or by phone at (401) xxx-xxxx.

PURPOSE
The purpose of Providence Talks and the use of the Technology and Curriculum in combination is to improve your childs language development
and help you prepare your child for lifelong educational success and opportunity.

WHAT IS REQUIRED OF YOU
You and your familys participation in Providence Talks is strictly voluntary. You may end your participation in Providence Talks at any time.

If you decide to participate in Providence Talks, you will be asked to do the following:
1. Assessments. Each month we will complete certain assessments with you regarding your childs development and language skills.
2. Recordings. You will be asked to complete recordings, during which time your child will wear clothing, (typically a vest or t-shirt,) that contains a
recording device called a DLP, which stands for digital language processor. You simply (1) turn on the DLP at the beginning of the day, (2) put the
DLP in the clothing your child will wear, and (3) leave it on for the entire day. Please speak to your home visitor if you have any additional
questions regarding the DLP. The DLP will record everything your child says and the sounds around him/her throughout the day for 16 hours. If
your child goes to sleep before 16 hours have been recorded, you will simply let the DLP run until it shuts off. Your Family Educator will provide







Providence Talks!



everything you need to record, including one DLP, clothing, and instructions. You may keep all materials except the DLP, which we ask that you
return at the end of your participation in Providence Talks.

Since the purpose of the recording sessions is to collect speech samples from your childs typical day, you should proceed with your normal daily
routines or scheduled activities. You should remove the clothing containing the DLP during naps, sleep periods or baths, but keep the clothing near
your child to continue recording your childs language environment. Participation involves completing a minimum of 15 recordings within a 12-
month period. You will record every other week for the first four months, and then once per month for the final eight months.

After each recording, your Family Educator will retrieve the DLP from you for processing. Your Family Educator and/or their team will transfer the
recording to a computer where it will be processed. As part of the processing, the recording shall be permanently deleted from the DLP. No record
of the audio will be saved. Instead, a processed computer file containing only statistical information including counts of words and conversational
turns will be saved. No one will ever listen to your recording.

3. Home Visitation Sessions. You will be asked to participate in approximately 16 home visitation sessions over a one-year period, bi-weekly
during the first four months and then monthly thereafter. You will be expected to complete 16 day long recordings (8 bi-weekly recordings during
the first four months and 8 monthly recordings thereafter). Each session will take about an hour. At the home visitation sessions, your Family
Educator will discuss the importance of the early language environment for your childs development, review the Providence Talks reports on
words and conversational turns, and learn strategies for increasing talk and interaction through the Curriculum. We will also be completing
assessments with you and your child. At each session you will also be given one childrens book for every usable, daylong recording you complete
(up to a total of 16 books).

4. Parent Meetings. You may be asked to optionally attend group meetings with other parents who are participating in Providence Talks. These
meetings will occur intermittently, and will provide an opportunity for parents to share experiences and ideas for improving both the language
development of their child and Providence Talks.

5. Program Discontinuation. The Providence Talks initiative runs for one-year; therefore, it is important that parents complete all the
recordings, participate in the assessments and follow the Curriculum. If you are unable to complete the scheduled recordings, participate in the
assessments or implement the strategies taught as part of the Curriculum then your participation may be discontinued. If this happens, you will
be asked to return the DLP immediately; however, any clothing and books that have been provided to you through Providence Talks are yours to
keep.







Providence Talks!



CONFIDENTIALITY AND USE OF THE DATA
Any information and data obtained in connection with this project that can be identified with you or your child will be kept confidential from
anyone other than xxxxxxxxx, LENA and the City of Providence. xxxxxxxx, LENA and the City of Providence will comply with all local, state, and
federal laws regarding confidentiality.

The digital recording within the DLP is compressed, so unlike mobile phones or other audio recorders it cannot be directly listened to. If you were
to misplace the DLP after a recording has been made prior to processing and deletion of the audio, it is possible, though very unlikely, that a third
party could access your recording. In order to do this, a third party would need to have access to other LENA software along with the knowledge
of how to use it.

Reports and results from Providence Talks will be presented at conferences, public meetings and/or published in articles; however, neither your
name nor the name of your child, or any other unique identifying information about you or your family will ever be disclosed without your
express consent.

CONSENT
You consent that your child and those around your child will be digitally recorded for the duration of the time that your child is wearing the DLP.

You acknowledge and consent that xxxxxxxxxxxxx, LENA, the City of Providence and their employees and/or affiliated researchers and professionals
may have access to the DLP recordings and their statistical data. Every effort will be made to ensure that no third party has access to the DLP or any
of the data contained on it other than xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, LENA and the City of Providence without your consent.

By participating in Providence Talks, you agree to take any and all precautions against the involuntary recording of non-consenting adults. You are
responsible to inform other family members and any other third party that you may encounter, while your child is wearing the DLP, that the DLP is
recording and making a digital record of the sounds of your child and those around your child.

COMPENSATION
You will receive 2 free items of clothing (either a vest or a T-shirt).
You will receive up to 16 home visits by Meeting Street.
You will receive up to 16 childrens books; one book for each usable daylong recording you complete.







Providence Talks!



At the completion of the one-year period, you will be required to return the DLP to Meeting Street. If your participation is discontinued prior to
one-year, you will be required to return the DLP immediately.

OWNERSHIP OF DATA
xxxxxxx and LENA shall jointly own all data collected through your participation in Providence Talks and agree to use it solely for the purpose of
program improvement, education and research to improve the language environment and ability of children. Upon request, xxxxxxx and/or LENA
may make aggregated non-individually identified data available to the City of Providence for the purpose of program design and evaluation.

POTENTIAL RISKS AND DISCOMFORTS
There is a very slight risk of bruising should your child fall directly on the DLP recorder.
The primary discomfort will be in collecting the day long recording itself, which requires that your child wear the LENA clothing with the DLP
recording device.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS
It is possible that participating in this program will help enhance your childs language environment. It is possible that an enhanced language
environment will benefit your childs language development and their social and emotional development. It is possible that the data collected in
this program will help us learn more about child language development and the language environment of young children, and improve Providence
Talks and other programs benefiting children and their families that will help prepare children for future success.

PARTICIPATION AND WITHDRAWAL
You can choose whether you and your child will participate in Providence Talks. Even if you volunteer to participate, you and your child may
withdraw at any time. You may refuse to answer any questions you do not want to answer.

xxxxxxx may decide not to include you and your child in Providence Talks or to discontinue your participation if you are unable to complete the procedures
outlined above. As an example, we may decide not to include you and your child for failure to complete recordings or inability to implement the strategies
taught through the Curriculum.

PARTICIPANTS RIGHTS
If you have any questions or concerns about your participation in Providence Talks, please contact xxxxxxxxxxx, the Providence Talks coordinator at
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, Providence, RI 02905; Telephone 401-xxx-xxxx.
Any new findings that may influence participants willingness to continue participation will be provided to the participants as they become available.







Providence Talks!



The Providence Talks initiative described above has been explained to me and I believe that I understand the purpose, procedures and my rights.
My questions about Providence Talks have been answered to my satisfaction, and I agree, on behalf of myself and my child to participate subject to
the conditions described above. I agree, on behalf of myself and my child, that xxxxxxx and LENA will have ownership of any data collected. This
Information and Informed Consent form constitutes the entire agreement between me and my child, and xxxxxxxxxxx, LENA and the City of
Providence.

AUTHORIZATION AND RELEASE



By signing below, I and my child do not give up any of our legal rights as participants in Providence Talks.


First Middle Last

Name of Participant (Please print your childs name)


First Middle Last

Name of Parent or Legal Guardian (Please print your name)

________________________________________
Signature of Parent or Legal Guardian Date









Providence Talks!




Recording Recognition Stickers







Providence Talks!




CURRICULUM MAP
Topic RIELDS Activities Materials/Resources
1. Model How to use LENA Device
and Clothing.
2. Make a plan what days are
you recording? When will the
device be picked up?
3. Administer the LENA Snapshot.
4. Administer ASQ3 and ASQSE if
it has not been done in the last
3 months.
5. Review Time of Day Activity &
Notes Sheet and the purpose of
Using It.
6. Daily Note.
SE 1a Social Emotional-
Relationships with Others
SS 1a Social Studies- Self,
Family, and Community

1. Model how to use the
device and clothing.
2. Plan together what the
recording sessions will
look like.
3. Explain the LENA
Snapshot.
4. Use ASQ tools to get a
benchmark.
5. N/A
6. N/A
1a. How to use LENA staff guide
1b. Your LENA Recording Day parent handout
1c. How to Get a Good Recording parent handout
1d. Materials List staff guide
1e. DLP FAQ parent handout
2. Recording Plan worksheet
3. LENA Snapshot
4. ASQ3 and ASQSE tools- check to make sure you have
the appropriate age of the child.
5a. Daily Activity Sheet blank parent handout
5b. Daily Activity Sheet sample parent handout
6. Note from Visit


Week 1: Measure Words & Turns/Track Your Childs Progress







Providence Talks!



LESSON PLAN
OBJECTIVE: Parent/Caregiver will
Learn to use the LENA device, determine recording day and tips for getting a good recording.
Learn to use the recording plan worksheet.
Provide parent report for developmental screenings.
Discuss routines and the importance of consistency.

Topic Details and Handouts RI ELDC Timing Notes
Using the LENA Device
and Clothing.


















Prior to visit:
Review the How to Use LENA: Explaining
to Parents staff guide and familiarize
yourself with the 5 steps to review with
family.
Review the LENA DLP Guide to
familiarize yourself with the screen
displays on the DLP.

Today we are going to learn to use the
LENA Digital Language Processor or DLP
so you can begin to record language use
and conversation exchanges between
you and your child.
Demonstrate the use of device as
indicated in your staff guide. Use the
Your LENA Recording Day: Step-by-Step
Instructions parent handout during
demonstration.
In order to ensure a good recording on




















Prior to visit








10 minutes












Week 1: Lesson Plan







Providence Talks!











Recording Plan
Worksheet.












Administer LENA
Snapshot .







your DLP, Id like to review some tips.
Utilize How to Get A Good Recording
handout to review tips with
parent/caregiver.
Provide the DLP FAQ handout to family.
Let family know they can also call you if
they are having trouble using the device.

Fill out the Recording Plan worksheet
with parent/guardian. The purpose of
the plan is to determine consistency of
recordings. Determine with family the
best day of the week and the time they
will begin recording. Ask the family who
will be there. This is important because
the recordings should be made with a
consistent adult. The section for Concern
& Things to Consider is for the family or
provider to jot down questions,
suggestions or considerations to be
aware of from the recording day.

Today I have two screenings that will
provide a baseline of your childs
development. As we advance through
the program we will be able to measure
your childs progress by administering
the screenings every few months. The
first screening, the LENA Snapshot
consists of a series of questions for you
to answer, yes or not yet. Dont worry if







































5 minutes













15 minutes















Providence Talks!









ASQ-3 & ASQ- SE
Only administer if the
child does not have a
recent (within 3 months)
screening, on file.













Time of Day Activity &
Notes.





you answer not yet several times in a
row. Those may be skills that your child
wouldnt be expected to know. We will
stop when we receive Not Yet 5 times in
a row.

Prior to visit determine if the child has a
recent screening on file. If not, select the
age appropriate screening to bring on
visit.

The next screening is the Ages & Stages
or ASQ. These screenings will provide us
with information about your childs
overall development in other areas of
development beside language. These
include gross and fine motor skills,
thinking skills, language, social emotional
and adaptive (self-help) skills
If the ASQ was previously completed,
review the results and talk with
parent/caregiver about any changes they
have noticed since the last screening.

Daily routines are an important learning
tool for your childs development. When
the day is predictable (meals, nap time,
play, bath time) children learn about
their world because of the repetition or
pattern routines provide. The repetition
helps children develop secure
























SE 1a Social
Emotional-
Relationships
with Others
SS 1a Social
Studies- Self,
Family, and






15 minutes

















5 minutes













Providence Talks!























Visit Note.

relationships as they explore and engage
in word and turns! Other benefits of
having routines are they allow your baby
to develop self-control and the ability to
cope with transitions. Routines provide
numerous learning opportunities for
your child and an added benefit is that
routines lessen childrens confusion
about what is happening and decreases
parent frustration. We will talk more
about routines next week.
(If the family does not have a consistent
routine discuss how establishing a
routine might help with some of the
challenges they may experience
throughout the day and perhaps
beginning with 2 to 3 things they can
commit to on a regular basis. Be sure to
follow up and add new routines to their
schedule).
During the next 2 weeks, think about
your routine as you go through the day.
Think about what is working well and
perhaps, something you might want to
change. Next week we will fill out the
Time of Day Activity & Notes form.

Community






















5 minutes










Providence Talks!





Time of Day Activity Notes

















Time of Day Activity & Notes
How to Use LENA: Explaining to Parents
Below is a sample script you can use to practice explaining to parents how theyll get good recordings.
Parent role, please interject questions as they come to your mind! We can collect and answer those
questions together as a group.

Intro Hi, [Name]! I wanted to thank you again for participating in our Providence Talks pilot
program!
Today Im going to show you how to use this Digital Language Processor, or DLP, that will
record how many words and conversations your child hears.
[Pull out How to Record Parents document as a guide]
The DLP only has two buttons:
The top button is the Power button. Youll turn the DLP on.
The bottom button is the Rec (Recording) button. Youll press this in the morning,
right after [childs name] wakes up.
Its important that you leave the DLP off until the morning youre ready to record. We want to
get one full day of words so well get the best information we can.
The steps are really easy: Turn it on, Press record, Put it on, Leave it on!
Step 1 The first thing youll do is Turn it on, press record.
To turn on the DLP, press and hold the Power button for approximately 4 seconds.
The screen will say Sleeping. This means the DLP is empty and ready to record.
Next, press and hold the Rec button for around 4 seconds, until the screen says Recording.
As you can see in this box, its really important that the screen says Recording before we move
to Step 2.
Step 2 Now that the DLP says Recording we can put it in the pocket of the LENA clothing.
Please make sure it goes in elephant first, with the screen facing you as you slip it into the
pocket.
Push both snaps to close the pocket.
Step 3 This is an easy one: Put it on [childs name].
You can slip the vest right over his or her pajamas or clothes.


Copyright 2014 LENA Research Foundation
Step 4 Leave it on!
You can just leave the DLP on the child and let it run all day.
To get a good recording please leave the DLP in the vests pocket and the vest on the child
except for when the child is sleeping or bathing.
In either of those cases please keep the DLP in the pocket and keep the vest dry and nearby.
The reason for this is we want to give you credit every time your or your child talks!
Step 5 The end of the day is bedtime!
You can take the vest off and place it near the child while he/she sleeps or is getting ready to
go to sleep.
End Thats it!
Do you have any questions, or is there anything I can explain better?

Note: Please refer to LENA DLP Guide document for explanation of other screens your parents may see.







Providence Talks!




Providence Talks involves the use of small recording technology (DLP) developed by the LENA Research Foundation, a charitable organization located in
Boulder, Colorado. The approach of the DLP device combined with the enhanced language curriculum and robust parent coaching make Providence
Talks an innovative model to developing language in young children.

Q. I pressed the top button on the LENA DLP and now the screen says Sleeping. Is this okay?
A. Yes, this is fine! To begin recording, press and hold the REC button until the screen says Recording (about 4 seconds). Let go of the button when
the screen says Recording.

Q. I turned on my LENA DLP and forgot to press the REC button right away. The LENA DLP has shut off. How do I turn it back on?
A. 1) Press the top button for about 4 seconds, until the screen says Sleeping.
2) Press and hold the REC button (for about 4 seconds) until the screen says Recording. Let go of the button when the screen says Recording.

Q. Im ready to put the LENA DLP in the LENA Clothing but it says Paused instead of Recording. What should I do?
A. It is very important that the screen says Recording before you put it in the LENA Clothing. If it says Paused, press the REC button until the screen
says Recording (about 4 seconds).

Q. When the LENA DLP turned off after 16 hours, the screen said Memory Full, but now the screen is blank. Is this okay?
A. Yes! The screen automatically goes blank 15 minutes after the recording is complete.






The LENA Device (DLP) & Frequently Asked Questions








Providence Talks!






LENA Digital Language Processor (DLP)

2 Vests

Binder (consent, activity log, contact information)

Hourly Activity Log
Material List








Providence Talks!



Recording Plan
Childs Name______________________________ Date________________________
Week Number Day of the week Time Who will be there? Suggestions/concerns
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8


LENADevelopmentalSnapshot
for
Instrucons:
TheSnapshotwillbecompletedduringaoneononeinterviewwiththeparent.

Beginbyaskingtheparenttoesmatehowmanyminutestheyreadwiththeirchildeachday.Becausebookread
ingisassociatedwithacceleratedlanguageandcognivedevelopment,specicallyaskingthisquesoneachmonth
willreinforceitsimportancefortheparentandprovidevaluableinformaonabouttheirprogressintheprogram.

Parentindicateschildconsistentlydemonstratestheskillorbehavior.
Parentindicateschildhasconsistentlydemonstratedtheskillinthepastandhasmovedontootherskills.
NOTE:Donotcheckyesunlesschildhasdemonstratedthebehaviormorethanonce.
Checknotyetif:
Parentindicateschildhasnotyetconsistentlydemonstratedtheskillorbehavior.
Remember!Youmuststartwithqueson#1.Telltheparentthattherstseveralquesonsaremost
appropriateforinfants/toddlers.Iftheirchildisolderandtheyhavedemonstratedtheskillwhentheywerea
baby,pleasecheckyesforthatitem.
Checkyesif:
Beginwiththerstquesonandprogressthrougheachoneunlparentanswersnotyetforvequesonsinarow.
Atthatpointyoucanstopllingoutthequesonnaire.
Copyright LENA Research Foundaon 2014
Describethequesonnairetotheparentbysaying:

I'm going to ask you some quesons about your child's language skills.

Please think about whether your child consistently does each behavior. By "consistently" I am
asking whether your child has shown the behavior more than once in the past. If so, you can
just say yes, and if not, you can say not yet.

Some of the quesons we will start with are for very young children. If your child has shown
these skills already and has moved on to other skills, you can just say yes for that item.

We will stop aer 5 not yet responses in a row.


LENAMobile
DevelopmentalSnapshot
ChildsName:
ChildID:
TodaysDate:
Pleasereadtheaachedinstruconsheetbeforellingoutthequesonnaire.
Stopwhenyou
answernotyet5
mesinarow
1.Whenyoutalktoyourchild,doeshe/shelookinthedireconofyourvoice?
Forexample:Doesyourchildturnhis/herheadand/ormovehis/hereyestolookatyou?
YesNotYet

2.Doesyourchildvocalizeormakesoundsinresponsetoyoursmileorvoice?

YesNotYet

3.Doesyourchildhavedierentcriestoindicatedierentneeds?
Forexample:Doesyourchildshungrycrysounddierentfromthecryhe/shemakeswhenred?
YesNotYet

4.Doesyourchildexpresspleasureordispleasurebyusingsoundsotherthancryingorlaughing?
Forexample:Doesyourchildmakehappysoundsorsoundsoffrustraon?
YesNotYet

5.Doesyourchildbringtoysorobjectstohis/hermouth?
Forexample:Doesyourchildmouthobjectsorplaceobjectsinhis/hermouth?
YesNotYet

6.Doesyourchildlaugh?

YesNotYet

7.Doesyourchildengageinvocalplaybyproducingawidevarietyofsounds?
Forexample:Doesyourchildproducesoundsthatrangefromveryhighpitch(squeals)toverylowpitch
(growls)anddoeshe/sheproduceraspberriesbypunglipsghtlytogetherandblowingairtoproducea
vibrangplaylikesound?
YesNotYet

8.Doesyourchildproducetwoormorevowelsounds,suchas/ah/or/ooh/?

YesNotYet

9.Doesyourchildrecognizehis/hername(ornickname)?
Forexample:Whenyousayyourchildsname(ornickname)doesitinterrupthis/heracvitysuchthat
he/shestopsandlookstowardyou?
YesNotYet

10.Doesyourchildshoutorusevocalizaons/makesoundstogetyouraenon?

YesNotYet

11.Doesyourchildimitatesoundsyouorothersmake?

YesNotYet

12.Doesyourchildrepeattwosimilarsoundstogether(notnecessarilyreferringtoaspecicobjectorperson)?
Forexample:Doesyourchildsaythingslikebababaordadada?
YesNotYet

13.Whenyousaythingstoyourchildsuchaswantup?orbyebyedoesyourchildrespondbyliinghis/her
armsorwaving?
YesNotYet

14.Doesyourchildputdierentsoundstogether?
Forexample:Doesyourchildsaythingssuchasbahdah,ahbeetahorahmeega?
YesNotYet

15.Doesyourchildvocalizewhilegesturingtoletyouknowwhathe/shewants?
Forexample:Doesyourchildpointormoontowardadesiredobjectwhilevocalizing?
YesNotYet

16.Doesyourchildsayanywordsbesidesmamaordada?
Forexample:Awordcanbeanaemptatarealwordsuchasbaforballorwawaforwater.
YesNotYet

Copyright LENA Research Foundaon 2014 Page1
Howmanyminutesperdaydoyoureadwithyourchild?
minutes
DevelopmentalSnapshot
17.Doesyourchildgiveyouanobjectwhenyouaskforit?
Forexample:IfyousayGivemeyourshoesorGivemetheball,doesyouchildrespondcorrectly?
YesNotYet

18.Doesyourchildfollowsimple1stepdirecons?
Forexample:IfyousayGogetyourshoesorPutyourtoyonthebed,willyouchildrespondcorrectly?
YesNotYet

19.Whenyounamedierentobjects,doesyourchildpointtothem?
Forexample:IfyousayWhereistheball?orSeethetruck?,willyourchildpointtothecorrectobject?
YesNotYet

20.Canyoutellbythewayyourchildsvoicesoundsthathe/sheisaskingaqueson?
Forexample:Whenyourchildisbabblingbutyoucantmakeoutthewords,canyouslltellthathe/sheis
tryingtoaskaquesonbyariseinpitchattheendofthebabbles?
YesNotYet

21.Doesyourchildidenfybasicbodypartsonhimself/herself?
Forexample:Canyourchildpointtohis/hernose,eyes,mouth,toes,andhair?
YesNotYet

22.Doesyourchildsayatleast10meaningfulwordsthatyouconsistentlyrecognize?
Thewordsdontnecessarilyhavetobepronouncedperfectly.Forexample:Ifyourchildconsistentlyuses
baforbole,thiscountsasaword.
YesNotYet

23.Doesyourchildpointtoobjectsnamedinbooks?
Forexample:IfyousaysomethinglikeShowmethecat,doesyourchildpointtothecorrectpicture?
YesNotYet

24.Doesyourchildspontaneouslyrepeatwordsthathe/shehasheardinconversaon?

YesNotYet

25.Doesyourchildfollow2stepdirecons?
Forexample:IfyousaysomethinglikeGogetyourshoesandputthemonthetableorGogetyourcoat
andgiveittoyourgrandma,willhe/sherespondcorrectly?
YesNotYet

26.Doesyourchildunderstandthemeaningofatleastfouraconwordswithouttheuseofgestures?
Forexample:Ifyousayjumporthrowwithoutdemonstrangtheacon,willhe/sherespondcorrectly?
YesNotYet

27.Doesyourchildunderstandwhat,where,andwhoquesons? YesNotYet
28.Doesyourchildnamefamiliarobjectsinaroom?

YesNotYet

29.Whenyoupointtopicturesinabook,doesyourchildnamethem? YesNotYet
30.Doesyourchildunderstandlocaonwordssuchasin,on,andout?

YesNotYet

31.Doesyourchildcombinetwoormorewordstogethertoformsimplephrases?
Forexample:Doesyourchildsaythingslikewantballormommysit?
YesNotYet

32.Doesyourchildhaveatleasta50wordspokenvocabulary? YesNotYet

33.Doesyourchildunderstandtheconceptofone?
Forexample:Ifyoupointtoagroupofblocksandaskyourchildtohandyouone,willyouchildrespond
correctly?
YesNotYet

34.Doesyourchildfollow3stepdireconswithoutgengdistracted?
Forexample:IfyousaysomethinglikeGotoyourroom,getyourbearandbringittome,willyourchild
respondcorrectly?
YesNotYet

Copyright LENA Research Foundaon 2014 Page2
DevelopmentalSnapshot
35.DoesyourchildsayI,me,andyou?

YesNotYet

36.Doesyourchildunderstandcolorwords?
Forexample:IfyousaysomethinglikePointtotheredone,willhe/shecorrectlyidenfytheobject?
YesNotYet

37.Isyourchildstarngtousesizeconcepts?
Forexample:Doesyouchildsaythingslikebigandlile?
YesNotYet

38.Isyourchildusingsentencesthatarefourwordsinlength?
YesNotYet

39.Isyourchildaddingstowordstoindicatemorethanone?
Forexample:Doesyourchildsaycatsformorethanonecat,orspoonsformorethanonespoon?
YesNotYet

40.Canyourchildtellyouwhattodowithsimpleobjects?
Forexample:IfyousaysomethinglikeHereisatoothbrush,whatdowedowithatoothbrush?,will
he/shetellyouwhatitisusedfor?
YesNotYet

41.Isyourchildaddingingtotheendofverbstoindicateongoingacon?
Forexample:Doesyourchildusewordslikeeang,jumping,andrunning?
YesNotYet

42.Doesyourchildusethewordsa,an,andthe?
Forexample:Doesyourchildsaythingslikeabed,anapple,andtheball?
YesNotYet

43.Canyourchildnamecommonshapessuchasacircle,triangle,square,andstar? YesNotYet
44.Doesyourchildunderstandconceptslikeleast,most,andrst? YesNotYet

45.Doesyourchildunderstandconceptsliketall,short,andlong? YesNotYet
46.Doesyourchildusethepluralpronounswe,they,them,andus?

YesNotYet

47.Isyouchildaddingedtotheendofverbstoindicateanaconthathappenedinthepast?
Forexample:Doesyourchildsaythingslikejumpedorplayed?
YesNotYet
48.Doesyourchildspontaneouslyproducesentencesthatare10ormorewordsinlength?

YesNotYet

49.Canyourchildnameitemsthatbelongtoacommoncategory?
Forexample:IfyousaysomethinglikeTellmethreefruitsyoulikeorTellmethenamesofthree
animals,willyourchildrespondcorrectly?
YesNotYet

50.Canyourchildretellastoryoreventwithabeginning,middle,andendwithoutusingpictures?
Forexample:Doesyourchildtellacompletestory(beginning,middleandend)soyouunderstandthestory
andwhatyouchildisexpressing/explaining?
YesNotYet

51.Ifyounameanobject,canyourchilddescribetwothingsabouttheobject?
Forexample:IfyousayTellmetwothingsaboutabike,willyourchildrespondcorrectly?
YesNotYet

52.Doesyourchildaskyouaboutthemeaningsofwordsandthenusethewordinasentence?

YesNotYet

Copyright LENA Research Foundaon 2014 Page3
Perl lingsco infanl LENA Research Foundaon
para
Instrucciones:

ElPerllingscoinfanlsecompletarduranteunaentrevistaconunpadredefamilia.

Comienceporpedirqueelpadreesmecuantosminutossueleleerconsuniocadada.Elleerconlosniosse
asociaconaceleracioneseneldesarrollocognivoylingisco,alhacerestapreguntacadames,selereforzar
suimportanciaparaelpadreyademsproporcionarinformacinvaliosasobresuprogresoenelprograma.
Elpadreindicaquesuhijo/ademuestraconstantementelahabilidadoelcomportamiento.
Elpadreindicaquesuhijo/ayahademostradoconstantementelahabilidadenelpasadoyyaha
adoptadoenotrashabilidades.
NOTA:Nomarquesamenosquesuhijo/ahayademostradoelcomportamientomsdeunavez.
Marquenotodavasi:
Elpadreindicaquesuhijo/atodavanodemuestraconstantementelahabilidadoelcomportamiento.
Recuerde! Debe empezar con la pregunta 1. Las primeras preguntas son ms adecuadas para
bebs o nios muy pequeos. Si el padre ene un hijo/a mayor y su hijo/a ha demostrado la ha-
bilidad cuando era beb, marque s en esa parte.
Marquesencasodeque:
Empiececonlaprimerapreguntayavanceacadaunadelassiguienteshastael padre le conteste no todava a
cinco preguntas consecuvas.Enestepuntopuededejardecontestarelcuesonario.
Copyright LENA Research Foundaon 2014
LENAMobile
Describa el cuestionario al padre diciendo lo siguiente:

Voyahacerlealgunaspreguntasacercadelashabilidadesdelenguajedesuhijo.

Porfavorpienseenquesisuhijohacecadacomportamientoregularmente.Porregularmente
quierosabersisuhijohamostradoelcomportamientomsdeunavezenelpasado.Siesas,
puededecirqueS,ysino,puededecirqueNotodava.

Algunasdelaspreguntasconquevamosaempezarsonparaniosmuypequeos.Sisuhijoyaha
demostradoestashabilidadesyyavaadoptandootrasmsavanzadas,sepuededecirqueSpara
esapregunta.

Nospararemosdespusde5respuestasdeNotodavaenla.
Perl lingsco infanl LENA Research Foundaon
Nombredenio: ID:
Fechadehoy:
Por favor, lea la hoja de instrucciones adjunta antes de completar el cuesonario .
Pare cuando responde
No todava a 5 pregun-
tas consecuvas
1. Cuando habla con su hijo/a, mira l/ella en la direccin de su voz?
Por ejemplo: Gira la cabeza su hijo/a o mueve los ojos para buscarlo a usted?
S No todava

2. Vocaliza o hace sonidos su hijo/a en respuesta a su sonrisa o voz? S No todava

3. Tiene su hijo/a disntos llantos para indicar diferentes necesidades?
Por ejemplo, llora de hambre de manera diferente de cuando llora de cansancio?
S No todava

4. Expresa su hijo/a placer o desagrado usando sonidos aparte de llorar o rerse?
Por ejemplo - Hace sonidos felices o sonidos de frustracin?
S No todava

5. Se acerca su hijo/a a la boca juguetes u objetos?
Por ejemplo - Hace sonidos felices o sonidos de frustracin?
S No todava

6. Se re su hijo/a?

S No todava

7. Se dedica su hijo/a a juegos vocales produciendo una amplia variedad de sonidos?
Por ejemplo: Produce sonidos que varan de muy altos (chillidos) a muy bajos (gruidos) y hace trompetas poniendo
los labios juntos y soplando para producir un sonido juguetn de vibracin?
S No todava

8. Produce su hijo/a dos o ms sonidos de vocales, como /ah/ o /ooh/?

S No todava

9. Reconoce su hijo/a su propio nombre (o apodo)?
Por ejemplo: Cuando le dice el nombre (o apodo), interrumpe lo que est haciendo, se detiene y mira hacia usted?
S No todava

10. Grita su hijo/a o usa vocalizaciones/hace sonidos para llamarle la atencin?

S No todava

11. Imita su hijo/a los sonidos que hacen usted o los dems?

S No todava

12. Repite su hijo/a dos sonidos similares juntos (no necesariamente refirindose a un objeto o persona especfico)?
Por ejemplo: Dice cosas como bababa o dadada?
S No todava

13. Cuando dice usted cosas a su hijo/a como arriba? o chao, responde levantando los brazos o haciendo seas? S No todava
14. Junta su hijo/a disntos sonidos?
Por ejemplo: Dice cosas como bah-dah, ah-bi-tah o ah-mi-ga?
S No todava

15. Vocaliza su hijo/a al gescular para indicarle lo que quiere?
Por ejemplo: Apunta o se mueve hacia un objeto deseado al vocalizar?
S No todava
16. Dice alguna palabra aparte de mama o papa?
Por ejemplo: Una palabra puede ser un intento de decir una palabra real como bibi para biberon o allo para caballo.
S No todava

Copyright LENA Research Foundaon 2014 Pag. 1
Cuntos minutos por da lee libros con su nio? minutos
Perl lingsco infanl LENA Research Foundaon
17. Le da su hijo/a un objeto cuando usted se lo pide?
Por ejemplo: Si le dice Dame tus zapatos o Dame la pelota, responde correctamente?
S No todava

18. Sigue su hijo/a instrucciones simples de 1 paso?
Por ejemplo: Si le dice traigame tus zapatos o pon tu juguete en la cama, responde correctamente?
S No todava

19. Al nombrarle disntos objetos, apunta su hijo/a a ellos?
Por ejemplo: Si le dice, Dnde est la pelota? o Ves el camin?, apunta al objeto correcto?
S No todava

20. Puede darse cuenta por la manera en que suena la voz de su hijo/a de que est haciendo una pregunta?
Por ejemplo: Cuando su hijo balbucea pero usted no puede disnguir las palabras, puede igualmente darse
cuenta de que est tratando de hacer una pregunta subiendo el tono al nal de los balbuceos?
S No todava

21. Idenca su hijo/a las partes bsicas de su propio cuerpo?
Por ejemplo: Puede apuntar a su nariz, ojos, boca, dedos de los pies y pelo?
S No todava

22. Dice su hijo/a al menos 10 palabras signicavas que usted reconozca siempre?
Las palabras no enen que ser pronunciadas necesariamente perfectas. Por ejemplo, si dice bibi para
biberon, esto cuenta como palabra.
S No todava

23 Apunta su hijo/a a objetos nombrados en libros?
Por ejemplo: Si le dice algo como Mustrame al gato, apunta a la imagen correcta?
S No todava

24. Repite su hijo/a espontneamente las palabras que ha odo en conversaciones?

S No todava

25. Sigue su hijo/a instrucciones simples de 2 pasos?
Por ejemplo: Si le dice algo como busca tus zapatos y ponlos sobre la mesa, o anda a buscar tu abrigo y
dselo a la abuela, responde correctamente?
S No todava

26. Enende su hijo/a el signicado de al menos cuatro palabras de accin sin usar gestos?
Por ejemplo: Si le dice algo como salta o lanza sin demostrar cmo se hace, responde correctamente?
S No todava

27. Enende su hijo/a las preguntas con qu, dnde y quin? S No todava
28. Nombra su hijo/a objetos conocidos que haya en un cuarto?

S No todava

29. Al apuntar a imgenes en un libro, los nombra su hijo/a? S No todava
30. Enende su hijo/a palabras de lugar como en, arriba y abajo?

S No todava

31. Combina su hijo/a dos o ms palabras juntas para formar frases simples?
Por ejemplo: Dice cosas como quiero pelota o mam ven?
S No todava

32. Tiene su hijo/a al menos 50 palabras de vocabulario hablado?
S No todava

33. Enende su hijo/a el concepto de uno?
Por ejemplo: Si apunta a un grupo de cubos y le pide a su hijo/a que le pase uno, responde correctamente?

S No todava
34. Sigue su hijo/a instrucciones simples de 3 pasos sin distraerse?
Por ejemplo: Si le dice algo como anda a tu cuarto, busca tu osito y tremelo, responde correctamente?
S No todava

Copyright LENA Research Foundaon 2014 Pag. 2
Perl lingsco infanl LENA Research Foundaon
35. Dice su hijo/a Mo y T?

S No todava

36. Enende su hijo/a las palabras de los colores?
Por ejemplo: Si le dice apunta al rojo, idenca correctamente el objeto?
S No todava

37. Est empezando su hijo/a a usar conceptos de tamao?
Por ejemplo: Dice cosas como grande o chico?
S No todava

38. Est su hijo/a usando frases de 4 palabras de largo? S No todava

39. Agrega su hijo/a una s a las palabras para indicar ms de uno?
Por ejemplo: Dice gatos si hay ms de un gato, o cucharas si hay ms de una cuchara?
S No todava

40. Puede su hijo/a decirle qu hacer con objetos simples?
Por ejemplo: Si le dice Aqu hay un cepillo de dientes, qu se hace con un cepillo de dientes?, le contesta
para qu sirve?
S No todava

41. Est su hijo/a agregando -ando/endo al nal de los verbos para indicar una accin actual?
Por ejemplo: Usa palabras como comiendo, saltando y corriendo?
S No todava

42. Usa su hijo/a las palabras el, la, los, y las?
Por ejemplo: Dice cosas como el gato, la manzana, el osito y la pelota?
S No todava

43. Puede su hijo/a nombrar formas comunes como: crculo, tringulo, cuadrado y estrella? S No todava
44. Enende conceptos como menos, ms y primero?
S No todava

45. Enende conceptos como alto, bajo y largo? S No todava
46. Usa su hijo/a pronombres plurales como Nosotros, Ellos, Les y Nos?

S No todava

47. Est su hijo/a agregando -, -, - al nal de los verbos para indicar una accin del pasado?
Por ejemplo: Dice cosas como salt o jugu o com?
S No todava
48. Produce su hijo/a frases espontneamente que enen 10 o ms palabras de largo?

S No todava

49. Puede su hijo nombrar elementos que pertenezcan a una categora en comn?
Por ejemplo: Si le dice algo como dime 3 frutas que te gusten, o dime 3 cosas que llaves, responde cor-
rectamente?
S No todava

50. Puede su hijo/a contarle un cuento o algo que haya pasado con principio y n, sin usar imgenes?
Por ejemplo: Cuenta un cuento completo (con principio y n) de modo que se enenda el cuento y lo que su
hijo/a est expresando o explicando?
S No todava

51. Si nombra usted un objeto, puede su hijo/a describir 2 cosas acerca del objeto?
Por ejemplo: Si le dice dime 2 cosas sobre una bicicleta, responder correctamente?
S No todava
52. Pregunta su hijo/a por los signicados de las palabras y luego las usa en una frase?

S No todava

Copyright LENA Research Foundaon 2014 Pag. 3







Providence Talks!



Recording Worksheet

Time of Day Activity Notes
7:00 Get up
7:15 Eat breakfast
7:45 Get dressed /Brush teeth
8:00 Play
8:30 Bring brother to school
9:00 Nap
11:00 Get up
11:15 Eat lunch
11:45 Play
1:00 Nap
2:45 Pick brother up at school
3:15 Eat snack
3:30 Play
6:00 Eat dinner
6:45 Take a bath
7:00 Read books
7:30 Bedtime
Week 2: Describe What You And Your Child Are
Seeing, Hearing, Feeling, And Doing







Providence Talks!



CURRICULUM MAP
Topic RIELDS Activities Materials/Resources
1. Review Recording Report
from first recording.

2. Discuss the Importance of a
Childs Daily Routine and
Emotions.

3. How to Use Descriptive
Words for the Things Your
Child is Seeing, Hearing,
Feeling, and Doing.

4. Do Emotions Activity and
model how to read a Book
About Emotions.

5. Review results of the ASQ3
and ASQSE with the family.

6. Note from visit.
SE 1 Social Emotional- Relationships
with Others
SE 2 Social Emotional-Sense of Self
SE 3 Social Emotional- Self
Regulation
LD 1 Language Development-
Receptive Language
SS 1 Social Studies- Self, Family, and
Community

1. N/A.

2. Look over schedule of day
and point out language
opportunities.

3. N/A.

4a. Model reading a book
about emotions.

4b. Make a book with the
family.

5. Explain what the scores
mean on the ASQ3 and
ASQSE.

6. N/A.

1. LENA recording reports

2. Daily schedule review schedule parent
has made for child

3. List of books about emotions parent
handout
4a. Book to model

4b. Pictures of babys emotions, glue,
scissors, and paper to make a book

5. Handout of developmental milestones
and areas of concern parent handout

6. Note from visit
Bring book to visit:
0-1 How Does Baby Feel?
1-2 Happy Hippo Angry Duck
2-3 Pigeon Has Feeling Too











Providence Talks!



LESSON PLAN
OBJECTIVE: Parent/Caregiver will
1. Review and Analyze their 1
st
Recording Report form.
2. Document their Time of Day Activity form.
3. Recognize the importance of using descriptive words with their child.
4. Understand the results of developmental screening. (ASQ-3 &ASQ-SE)

Topic Details and Handouts RIELDS Timing Notes
Review Recording Report
from 1
st
visit.













Importance of a Daily
Routine, continued form
week 1.







Familiarize yourself with the Recording Report
and identify areas that will serve as a
conversation starter with family.

Provide parent/caregiver with Recording
Report. Today I have your first Recording
Report for us to review. To engage
parent/caregiver in the process of the review,
it is best to ask open ended questions. For
example, Is there anything that stands out to
you at first glance? Are there any areas that
concern you? If so, how do you think you could
improve? What areas do you feel most
confident about?

Last week we talked about routines and its
benefits to your child and family. Now that
youve had some time to think about how the
structure of your day is working for you, Id
like us to document your routine on the Time
of Day Activity& Notes form.
Inform families that as needs change and
children grow routines can change.


























Prior to visit


10 minutes











10 minutes











Week 2: Lesson Plan







Providence Talks!



Use Descriptive Words for
the Things Your Child is
Seeing, Hearing, and
Feeling and Doing.


Emotions Activity.



























Refer to the Using Descriptive Words for the
Things Your Child is Seeing, Hearing, Feeling,
and Doing staff tool for ideas for activity based
on the childs age. Use modeling, coaching,
observation and participation based on
parent/caregiver level of comfort.

For children younger than two years, use the
How Does Baby Feel? book by Karen Katz..

Young Infants-Point to and name items in the
book. For example, Theres the babys mouth
and here is your mouth. Baby is happy! (gently
tickle baby) You are happy!

Older Infants- Let the child explore the book.
Ask them to find things. Point to things and
label for child. Expand on childs gestures,
vocalizations or words. Ask simple questions to
help develop receptive language. For example,
The baby is yawning isnt he? Can you yawn
like the baby in the story?

o For two year olds (Items needed: Emotions
handout, construction paper, glue stick, hole
puncher, yarn)
Take out Emotions handout. Talk about
the children in the pictures. Respond to
verbal and nonverbal cues. Ask questions
Why is the girl sad? (Follow the
parents lead)
Help child cut the pictures out.
Let child use glue stick to paste pictures
LD Language
Delopment-Receptive
Language

SS 1 Social Studies-
Self, Family, and
Community

SE 1a Social Emotional-
Relationships with
Others

SE 2a Social Emotional
Sense of Self

SE 3a Social Emotional-
Self Regulation

LD Language
Delopment-Receptive
Language












10 minutes







15 minutes
































Providence Talks!




ASQ-3 & ASQ-SE results.








Visit Note.
on pieces of construction paper to make a
book about emotions.

o When reviewing results highlight the childs
strengths. Let parent/caregiver know that the
ASQ allows us to monitor developmental
milestones and provide support for areas that
may need more practice. Describe each area in
terms of cutoff (above cutoff, below cutoff).
Refer to the ASQ-3 Users Guide for guidelines
for communicating results if needed.

Visit Note
Give book to family:
0-1 How Does Baby Feel?
1-2 Happy Hippo Angry Duck
2-3 The Pigeon Has Feelings Too


10 minutes









5 minutes








Providence Talks!








Time of Day Activity Notes

















Time of Day Activity & Notes







Providence Talks!



Using Descriptive Words for the Things Your Child is Seeing, Hearing, Feeling, and Doing

Young Infants
o As your baby coos he/she is telling you something. Engage in a conversation. Youre so excited. I love your big smile! Kick, kick, and kick your feet.
o Narrate for baby, use facial expressions to encourage infant responses.
(Point out examples when you have seen the parent use descriptive language when responding to their baby)
o Mobile Infants, 6-12 months
Take a word walk. Carry the baby around the room or outside and point and name objects of interest to the baby. Respond to childs sounds or
approximations.
Use turn taking games such as sharing a toy back and forth.
Peek-a-boo games or mirror play.
(Use simple, grammatically correct sentences. Talk about feelings, behaviors, the activity and objects for language expansion.)
o Toddlers 13-18 months
o Use the pictures to establish turns by narrating and describing what the child is pointing to What do you see? Yes, you see a blue car. Ask
questions, Where is the mommy going? If the child has no words, answer the question for him/her, The mommy is going to the store. Respond to
approximations and single words by recognizing their word by using grammatically correct words. For example, the child responds with ba,ba you
will expand by saying , The mommy is going bye, bye. She is going to the store.
o Play telephone. Use a toy phone to talk. Engage the child by narrating, expanding on their responses, and taking turns. Children with intricate
inflections in babbling should be responded to as if you understand their language to encourage the babbling to continue.
o Toddlers 18-24 months
o Play with puzzles. Engage in conversation about where pieces go, what is on the puzzle pieces, colors and shapes, and count pieces. Hide a piece
and reply to childs response (words or actions) when he/she notices the piece is missing. This activity also works on developing fine motor skills!
o Sing songs that describe body parts and feelings such as If Your Happy and You Know It (make up versus using other feelings) , I Look in the Mirror,
Head and Shoulders, Knees and Toes.
o 24-36 months
o Tea Party. Use childs dolls or stuffed animals, cups, plates, utensils, etc. to have a tea party. Engage in conversation about what the toys will eat, and
how they feel what they are doing. Expand on the childs language. Respond to actions or directions the child gives.
o I Spy. Identify object in the room and say to child I spy with my eye a ______. Let the child spy something for you to find. Talk about the objects and
its attributes. You can also do a game of, I hear with my ear _____.








Providence Talks!



Books About Feelings and Emotions
Exploring Feelings

Title Author Age Range
Baby Faces Margaret Miller Birth to 2 years
Oh, David!: A Diaper David Book David Shannon Birth to 2 years
Oops!: A Diaper David Book David Shannon Birth to 2 years
If You're Happy And You Know It: My First Taggies Book Ken Geist, Ed. Birth to 2 years
I Am Happy: A Touch and Feel Book of Feelings Steve Light Birth to 3 years
My Many Colored Days Board Book Dr. Seuss Birth to 5 years
The Feelings Book Todd Parr Birth to 5 years
Lots of Feelings Shelly Rotner 18 months to 3 years
Grumpy Bird Jeremy Tankard 18 months to 3 years
When I Am/Cuando Estoy Gladys Rosa-Mendoza 18 months to 3 years
Taking a Bath With the Dog and Other Things That Make Me Happy Scott Menchin 18 months to 5 years
The Way I Feel Janan Cain 2 to 6 years
Today I Feel Silly: And Other Moods That Make My Day Jamie Lee Curtis 2 to 6 years
How Are You Peeling? Foods With Moods Saxton Freymann 3 to 6 years
Feelings Aliki 3 to 8 years
Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day Judith Viorst 4 to 8 years
I Like Myself Karen Beaumont 3 to 6 years
I'm Gonna Like Me: Letting Off a Little Self-Esteem Jamie Lee Curtis 3 to 8 years












Providence Talks!



Coping With Feelings of Anger
Title Author Age Range
Words Are Not For Hurting Elizabeth Verdickem 18 months to 5 years
Hands Are Not For Hitting Martine Agassi 18 months to 5 years
Teeth Are Not for Biting Elizabeth Verdickem 18 months to 5 years
No Matter What Debi Gliori 2 to 5 years
Finn Throws a Fit David Elliott 2 to 5 years
Mouse Was Mad Linda Urban 2 to 5 years
Llama Llama Mad at Mama Anna Dewdney 2 to 5 years
When I Feel Angry Cornelia Maude Spelman 2 to 5 years
Alicia Has a Bad Day Lisa Jahn-Clough 3 to 6 years
Chocolate-Covered-Cookie Tantrum Deborah Blumenthal 3 to 6 years
Mean Soup Betsy Everitt 3 to 6 years
When Sophie Gets Angry Really, Really Angry Molly Bang 3 to 6 years
Sometimes Im Bombaloo Rachel Vail 3 to 6 years

Separation
Title Author Age Range
Owl Babies Martin Waddell 6 months to 18 months
Have You Seen My Duckling? 12 months to 3 years
When Mama Comes Home Tonight Eileen Spinelli 18 months to 3 years
I Love You All Day Long Francesca Rusackas 18 months to 3 years
Are You My Mother? P. D. Eastman 18 months to 4 years
Whose Mouse Are You? Robert Kraus 2 to 4 years
Dont Go! Jane Breskin Yolen 3 to 5 years
The Kissing Hand Audrey Penn 3 to 8 years
Thunder Storms
The Storm Book Charlotte Zolotow 3 to 6 years
Thunder Cake Patricia Polacco 4 to 6 years
Thunder and Lightning: Theyre Not So Frightening 4 to 8 years
Dark







Providence Talks!




Self-Control
Title Author Age Range
No No Yes Yes Linda Patricellei Birth to 3 years
Quiet Loud Linda Patricellei Birth to 3 years
No, David! David Shannon 18 months to 5 years
Dont Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus Mo Willems 18 months to 5 years
Please, Baby, Please Spike Lee and Tonya Lewis Lee 18 months to 3 years
It's Hard to Be Five: Learning How to Work My Control Panel Jamie Lee Curtis 5 to 8 years

FEARS: Friendship Troubles
Title Author Age Range
Gossie and Gertie Olivier Dunrea 12 months to 3 years
Sheila Raes Peppermint Stick Kevin Henkes 18 months to 3 years
My Friend and I Lisa Jahn-Clough 2 to 5 years
Being Friends Karen Beaumont 2 to 5 years
My Friend Rabbit Eric Rohmann Birth to 3 years
Chrysanthemum Kevin Henkes 3 to 6 years
Chesters Way Kevin Henkes 3 to 6 years
Big Al Andrew Clements 3 to 6 years
Cant You Sleep, Little Bear Martin Waddell 2 to 5 years
I Have a Little Problem, Said the Bear Heinz Janisch 3 to 6 years
Theres a Nightmare in My Closet Mercer Mayer 3 to 6 years
Medical Appointments
My Friend the Doctor Joanna Cole 18 months to 3 years
Franklin Goes to the Hospital Paulette Bourgeois 2 to 5 years
Next Please Ernst Jandel 2 to 5 years
Monsters
Go Away, Big Green Monster! Ed Emberley 2 to 5 years
My Monster Mama Loves Me So Laura Leuck 2 to 5 years
I Need My Monster Amanda Noll 3 to 8 years








Providence Talks!



Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon Patty Lovell 3 to 6 years
Wemberly Worried Kevin Henkes 3 to 6 years
Shark Vs. Train Chris Barton 3 to 8 years
Williams Doll Charlotte Zolotow 4 to 8 years
Delores Meets Her Match 4 to 8 years
Enemy Pie Derek Munson 4 to 8 years

Grief and Loss
Title Author Age Range
Losing a Favorite Comfort Object
Dogger Shirley Hughes 3 to 6 years
Explaining Death
When Dinosaurs Die: A Guide to
Understanding Death
Laurie Krasny Brown and Marc Brown 2 to 6 years
I Miss You: A First Look at Death Pat Thomas 2 to 6 years
Lifetimes Bryan Mellonie 3 to 8 years
Water Bugs & Dragonflies: Explaining Death to Young Children Doris Stickney 4 to 8 years
The Fall of Freddie the Leaf: A Story of Life 4 to young adult
Loss of a Pet
Goodbye Mousie Robie Harris 2 to 5 years
Ill Always Love You Hans Wilhelm 3 to 6 years
Alfie and the Birthday Surprise Shirley Hughes 3 to 6 years
Saying Goodbye to Lulu Corinne Demas 3 to 6 years
The Tenth Good Thing About Barney Judith Viorst 2 to 6 years
Jasper's Day Marjorie Blain Parker 3 to 6 years
Loss of a Loved One
Where Are You? A Childs Book About Loss Laura Olivieri 3 to 8 years
Sad Isn't Bad: A Good-Grief Guidebook for Kids Dealing With Loss Michaelene Mundy 4 to 8 years
When Your Grandparent Dies: A Childs Guide to Good Grief Victoria Ryan 3 to 6 years
Nana Upstairs & Nana Downstairs Tomie dePaola 2 to 8 years
Badgers Parting Gifts Susan Varley 3 to 8 years
Gentle Willow: A Story for Children About Joyce C. Mills 4 to 8 years







Providence Talks!




Dying
Title Author Age Range
Grandmas Purple Flowers Adjoa J. Burrowes 4 to 8 years
Everett Anderson's Goodbye Lucille Clifton 4 to 8 years
Saying Goodbye to Daddy Judith Vigna 4 to 8 years
The Blue Roses Linda Boyden 4 to 8 years
Tear Soup Pat Schweibert 4 to young adult
Lifetimes Warren Hanson 4 to young adult
Grief or Trauma
A Terrible Thing Happened* Margaret M. Holmes 2 to 8 years
*The "terrible thing" mentioned in the title is not specified in the book which allows parents and caregivers to use this story to support children who have experienced the loss of a
loved one or another type of trauma (e.g., physical or sexual abuse).

Divorce
Title Author Age Range
Lets Talk About It: Divorce Fred Rogers 2 to 5 years
Mama and Daddy Bears Divorce Cornelia Maude Spelman 2 to 5 years
Two Homes Claire Masurel 2 to 5 years
Was It the Chocolate Pudding: A Story for Little Kids About Divorce Bryan Langdo 2 to 5 years
Standing on My Own Two Feet: A Child's Affirmation of Love in the
Midst of Divorce
Tamara Schmitz 3 to 5 years
Dinosaurs Divorce Marc Brown 3 to 5 years
Its Not Your Fault Koko Bear Vicki Lansky 3 to 5 years
My Familys Changing: A First Look at Family Break-Up Pat Thomas 3 to 5 years
I Have Two Homes Marian DeSmet 3 to 5 years
Where Am I Sleeping Tonight? A Story of Divorce Carol Gordon Ekster 5+ years
From: Zero to Three
Permission Pending Zero to Three







Providence Talks!




























Providence Talks!



Every child learns at his/her own pace and here are some guidelines:
2 Months 4 Months
6 months
9 Months

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Begins to smile at people
Can briefly calm himself make use sucking
as a means of calming
Tries to look at parent

Language/Communication
Coos, makes gurgling sounds
Turns head toward sounds

Cognitive
Pays attention to faces
Begins to follow things with their eyes and
recognize people at a distance

Movement/Physical Development
Can hold head up and begins to push up
when lying on tummy
Makes smoother movements with arms
and legs
Can hold up head with little support


Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Smiles spontaneously, especially at people
Copies some movements and facial
expressions, like smiling or frowning

Language/Communication
Cries in different ways to show hunger, pain,
or being tired
Makes open vowel sounds

Cognitive
Lets you know when they are happy and sad
Responds to affection
Recognizes familiar people and things at a
distance

Movement/Physical Developmental
Reaches for toy with one hand
Uses hands and eyes together, such as
seeing a toy and reaching for it
Follows moving things with eyes from side
to side
Watches faces closely
Holds head steady, unsupported
Pushes down on legs when feet are on hard
surface
May be able to roll over from tummy to back
Can hold a toy and shake it and swing at
dangling toys
Brings hands to mouth
When lying on stomach, pushes up to elbow


Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Knows familiar faces and begins to know if
someone is a stranger
Likes to play with others, especially parents
Responds to other peoples emotions and often
seems happy
Likes to look at self in a mirror

Language/Communication
Responds to sounds making sounds
Stringing vowels together when babbling (ah,
eh, oh)
Responds to own name
Makes sounds to show joy and displeasure
Begins to sat consonant sounds (jabbering with
m, b)

Cognitive
Looks around at things nearby
Brings things to mouth
Shows curiosity about things and tried to get
things that are out of reach
Begins to pass things from one hand to the
other

Movement/Physical Development
Rolls over in both directions
Begins to sit without support
When standing, supports weight on both legs
and might bounce
Rocks back and forth, sometimes crawling
backwards before moving forward

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
May start to show anxiety towards
strangers
May be clingy to familiar adults
Start to have a preference for certain
toys/items

Language/Communication
Makes a lot of different sounds like
dadadada and bababa
Copies sounds and gestures of others

Cognitive
Starts to look for things that are no
longer in sight
Plays games like peek-a-boo
(cause/effect)
Starts to use thumb and index finger to
pick things up and start to self feed

Movement/Physical Development
Can get themselves into and out of the
sitting position
Crawls
Holds bottle
Transfers items from hand to hand


Developmental Milestones









Providence Talks!









12 Months 18 Months 24 Months

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Can be shy or nervous around strangers
Cries when a familiar adult leaves them
Starts to show fear in some situations
Starts to make noises to get attention
Starts to assist with dressing by pushing arms and legs
through

Language/Communication
Responds to simple requests/questions
Will shake head no and wave bye
Has a few single words like mama and dada and they
mean something
Tries to say words you say

Cognitive
Can look at the right picture when that items is named
Copies gestures
Starts to understand what object functions are cups are
for drinking, brushes are for your hair
Starts to take things out of a container and then put them
back in
Points to things to get your attention

Movement/Physical Development
Walks along furniture while holding on
Takes steps while holding your hands
Stands alone
May start to take a few steps on their own

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Likes to hands things to others
Starts to have temper tantrums
Shows affection towards familiar people
Starts to pretend may feed a doll
May cling to familiar adult in new situations
Explores environment on their own but frequently checks
in with parent

Language/Communication
Has a minimum of 10-15 single words
Says no
Points to show someone something that they want
Follow one step verbal command without gesture

Cognitive
Knows what every day items are like a spoon or cup
Shows interest in toys like stuffed animals and dolls
Points to a body part
Can start to scribble with a crayon

Movement/Physical Development
Walks alone
May walk up stairs holding on to railing
Can pull a toy behind them when they walk
Can help undress self
Drinks from a cup
Can feed self with spoon may be messy

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Likes to copy others
Gets excited when around other children
Shows more independence
Can be defiant
Plays beside other children

Language/Communication
Points to items or pictures when named
Knows names of familiar people and body parts
Says 2 word phrases
Repeats words that are overheard
Points to items in a book

Cognitive
Begins to identify shapes and colors
Can complete rhymes in familiar stories
Can build towers of blocks
Follows 2 step directions that are related
Names and labels items
Plays simple make believe

Movement/Physical Development
Runs
Kicks a ball
Stands on tiptoes
Walks up and down stairs holding on
Throws a ball
Starts to climb up and down furniture
Developmental Milestones







Providence Talks!





Center for Disease Control and Prevention 2012

36 Months
Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Shows affection for friends
Takes turns in a game
Shows empathy for others
Understands mine, his, hers
Shows a wide range of emotions
Separates more easily from familiar adults

Language/Communication
Follows 2-3 step directions
Names most familiar items
Understands words like, in, on, under
Says first name, knows age, and gender
Can name friends
Uses pronouns and plurals appropriately I, me, you, dogs
Can be understood by strangers most of the time
Can talk in 2-3 sentences

Cognitive
Can work toys with buttons, levers, and moving parts
Can do puzzles that have at least 7 pieces
Understands number concepts like give me, two
Copies a circle with pencil or crayon
Can screw and unscrew things like the cover of a water bottle
Turns pages of a book one at a time
Runs easily
Engage in pretend play using props

Movement/Physical Development
Climbs well
Pedals a tricycle
Can walk up and down stairs one foot at a time
Week 3: Respond to your childs lead








Providence Talks!



CURRICULUM MAP
Topic RIELDS Activities Materials/Resources
1. Go over LENA Recording Reports.

2. Talk about how to respond to
verbal and nonverbal signals that
babies and toddlers use to
communicate what they want
and what they need.

3. Discuss the importance of
interactions while following your
childs lead.

Show the video about
representing a cooking activity
with words and turns.

4. Make and age appropriate toy or
recipe with the family.

5. Discuss effects of television
watching and how it effects
brain development.

6. Note from visit.


SE 1 Social Emotional-Relationships
with Others

SE 2 Social Emotional- Sense of Self

SE 3 Social Emotional- Self Regulation

LD 3 Language Development-
Pragmatics

CD 2a Cognitive Development-Memory
and Working Memory

PH 3a Physical Health and Motor
Development-Fine Motor Development

CA 1a Creative Arts-Experimentation
and Participation in Creative Arts


1. N/A.

2. N/A.

3. Answer any questions the
family may have about the
video.

4. Make some toys from
homemade materials that are
appropriate for childs age and
interest.

5a. N/A.

6. N/A.

1. LENA recording report

2. N/A

3. Video Slicing and Dicing

4. Recipe book parent handout

5. Article on TV time and children parent
handout

6. Note from visit

Bring books:
0-1 Lets Go to the Zoo
1-2 Where is Babys Belly Button?
2-3 Knuffle Bunny












Providence Talks!



LESSON PLAN
OBJECTIVE: Parent/Caregiver will
o Review and Analyze Recording Report form.
o Practice, observe and articulate concepts for following their childs lead (responding, interacting)
o Discuss the benefits of following their childs lead
o Learn about the effects of television on brain development

Topic Details and Handouts RIELDS Timing Notes
Go over LENA Recording
Reports.
















Talk about how to respond
to verbal and nonverbal
signals that babies and
toddlers use to
communicate what they
want and what they need.

Familiarize yourself with the Recording Report
and identify areas that will serve as a
conversation starter with family.

Provide parent/caregiver with Recording
Report. Today I have your first Recording
Report for us to review. To engage
parent/caregiver in the process of the review,
it is best to ask open ended questions. For
example, Is there anything that stands out to
you at first glance? Are there any differences
you see from the last report? If so, how does
the information help you? What areas do you
feel most confident about?

Ask how the Time of Day Activity & Notes
worksheet is working. Are there concerns?
Questions? Changes to make?

Engage the parent/caregiver in a discussion
(while playing with child) about following
their childs lead. Use open ended questions to
begin the conversation. For example:
o In what ways does your child let



















SE 1 Social Emotional-
Relationships with
Others

SE 2 Social Emotional-
Sense of Self
Prior to visit



10 minutes














15 minutes







Week 3: Lesson Plan







Providence Talks!

























Discuss the importance of
interactions while following
your childs lead. Show the
video about responding to
your childs lead.







you know what he/she needs or
wants?
o What are some things you do to
respond?
o When your child seems interested
in something like a book or an
object, how do you keep him/her
interested?
o Points revealed/discovered from discussion
with parent/caregiver includes:
Interpret what your child is saying/doing by
imitating your childs actions/gestures and
sounds/words.
Expand the interaction-Repeat sounds,
word approximations and words in short
simple questions.
Ask questions
Emphasize words and facial expressions
Join in childs play
Be at eye level with your child, it shows
him/her you are interested and allows you
to observe his/her actions and interests.
Use modeling, coaching, observation and
participation in discussion based on
parent/caregiver level of comfort.

o Ask the parent/caregiver, When you follow
your childs lead what do you think your child
is learning? Respond positively to their
answer and expand on their response. For
example, Yes, by following your childs lead
he does learn more about language because
you encourage your childs speech and
listening skills when you respond to his/her

SE 3 Social Emotional-
Self Regulation

LD 3 Language
Development-
Pragmatics
















CD 2a Cognitive
Development-Memory
and Working Memory

SE 1 Social Emotional-
Relationships with
Others

SE 2 Social Emotional-
Sense of Self























5 minutes


















Providence Talks!













Show video representing
words and turns when
cooking.



Make and age appropriate
toy or recipe with the
family.












Discuss effects of television
watching and how it effects
brain development.
interests. There are also other benefits. Your
child learns to explore his/her surroundings
and to be curious. What are some things your
child does to show his/her curiosity?
o Other benefits that may be elicited from the
conversation.
o Allows child to learn decision making
skills because he/she has chosen what
to do with the activity.
o Allows your child to hear speech
modeled to him/her.
o Allows you and your child the art of
listening while using word and turns.

Show the Slicing and Dicing video. Engage the
parent in conversation about observations made in
the video. Ask the parent /caregiver about their
own experience. (If the parent/caregiver is hesitant,
point out an experience you have observed.

Prior to visit decide on an age appropriate activity
and the materials needed for the activity. (The
family may have materials at home)
Let the child explore the materials and lead as you
and the parent/caregiver guide the activity. If the
child is more interested in the materials, it is ok.
The product is not what is important here. (You can
always leave the instructions for the parent to do
with the child later) Give the parent/caregiver the
Recipes handout.

Provide the Television and Young Children parent
handout. Engage in an open discussion about
television and other electronic media. Make note of

















PH 3a Physical Health
and Motor
Development-Fine
Motor Development

CA 1a Creative Arts-
Experimentation and
Participation in Creative
Arts










5 minutes





15 minutes










5 minutes













Providence Talks!









Notes from Visit.

the information on the parent handout is a
recommendation from the American Academy of
Pediatrics. Ask the family about television use in
their family? If they want to change anything?
What are some ways they can decrease the use of
the television.

Visit Note
Give book to family:
0-2 Lets Go to the Zoo
1-2 Where is Babys Belly Button?
2-3 Knuffle Bunny



5 minutes

















Providence Talks!





Time of Day Activity Notes

















Time of Day Activity & Notes







Providence Talks!




RECIPES
UNCOOKED PLAY DOUGH:
3/4 cups flour
3/4 cup salt
3/4 to 1 cup water with preferred color food coloring
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
Mix all ingredients. Knead until smooth consistency. Keep it covered and in refrigerator when not using it.

COOKED PLAY DOUGH:
1 cup flour
1/2 cup salt
2 teaspoons cream of tartar
1 cup water with preferred color food coloring
1 tablespoon oil
Mix all ingredients. Cook over medium heat, until the mixture forms into a ball and becomes "translucent", not "milky". Knead dough. Store play dough in plastic covered bowl in
refrigerator when not using it.

SNOWMAN PLAY DOUGH:
1 1/3 cups salt
1 1/3 cups flour
1 tablespoon oil
water
Mix the salt, flour and oil together. Add a small amount of water at a time until you have a big ball of dough. Knead the dough on a floured surface until very smooth and elastic. If
too dry, add water; if too moist, add flour to the surface. On a floured surface sculpt the dough into a snowman... to join 2 pieces of dough together, moisten both edges of dough
with water and press together.
Hardening the dough:
let them air dry for at least 48 hours
OR, bake them in the oven at 325- 350 degrees on foil lined sheet, allow a 1/2 hour for each 1/2 each thickness or until surfaces turn golden brown. If the dough puffs up, turn
your oven down and poke a hole in them to let the air out.
After drying, they can be painted with water colors, acrylics, enamels, or spray paints.








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SAND PLAY DOUGH: (Textured play dough!)
1 cup sand
1/2 cup cornstarch
3/4 cup water
Mix ingredients in saucepan and cook until thick. Allow to cool, knead and allow to harden enough for use.

SAND MODELING DOUGH: (Textured play dough!)
1 cup sand
1/2 cup cornstarch
1 teaspoon Alum
3/4 cup hot water
food coloring if desired
Mix sand, cornstarch and Alum in bowl. Add hot water and stir vigorously. Add food coloring if desired. Cook over medium heat until thick. Let dough cool. Mold into desired shapes
and let dry in the sun for several days. Store any leftover dough in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

OAT PLAY DOUGH: (Textured play dough!)
Note: This play dough is for tactile stimulation. Young children love it. It has a rough texture and is great for exercising hand muscles. You should use this dough the same day you
make it, as it will get moldy within a day or two.
2 cups water
1 cup oatmeal
1 cup flour
cinnamon (optional)
Heat water until boiling. Combine boiling water and oatmeal in mixing bowl. Add enough flour to make it dough. Add cinnamon for smell if desired.

EASY SALT DOUGH:
1 1/2 cups flour
3/4 cup salt
3/4 cup water
Mix all ingredients in a bowl, add more water if needed. Knead into soft ball of dough. Have fun playing with it.








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FUN CLAY:
1 cup cornstarch
2 cups salt
1 1/3 cups cold water paint
Put salt and 2/3 cup water in a pot and bring to a boil. Mix cornstarch and remaining 2/3 cup water in separate bowl and stir well. Add salt mixture to cornstarch mixture in bowl.
Knead dough. Model or mold dough and let it dry for several hours. Paint when dry if desired. Keep unused clay in airtight container or Ziploc in refrigerator.

BASIC ART DOUGH:
4 cups flour
1 cup iodized salt
1 3/4 cups warm water
Mix all ingredients in bowl. Knead dough for 10 minutes. Model as with any clay. Bake sculptures at 300 degrees until hard. Let air dry for a few days.

MODELING CLAY:
1 box baking soda (16 oz.)
1 cup cornstarch
1 1/4 cups cold water
food coloring, if desired
microwave
In a large mixing bowl, combine baking soda and cornstarch. In a two cup measuring cup, combine water and food coloring. Pour colored water over baking soda mixture. Stir until
smooth. Microwave on high for 4 to 8 minutes, stirring after every minute until mixture is firm. Cover with a damp towel until cool. Knead until smooth. Store in airtight containers or
Ziploc bags.

SCENTED PLAY DOUGH: (Smells awesome and kids LOVE IT!)
1 package of sugar free gelatin; .3 oz size (use any flavor you want, as the dough will have that scent when done; I believe you can replace the gelatin with a Kool-Aid packet instead
for even more scented varieties!)
2 cups flour
1 cup salt
4 tablespoons cream of tartar
2 cups boiling water
2 tablespoons cooking oil
Mix dry ingredients together in pot, add the boiling water and cooking oil. Stir over medium heat until it forms a ball. Let it cool. Keep in air tight container in refrigerator when not
playing with it.

GINGERBREAD PLAY DOUGH: (Scented!)







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1 cup flour
1/2 cup salt
2 teaspoons cream of tartar
1 cup water
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
lots of cinnamon, allspice, ginger, nutmeg!
Mix the flour, salt, and cream of tartar together. Play with the spices until you get the scent and color you want, and add to dry ingredients. Mix water and oil together FIRST, then
add them to the dry ingredients and stir. In a pot, cook the mixture for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring frequently. The dough will start to pull away from the sides of the pot and clump
together. Take the dough out of the pot and knead it until soft and smooth. Allow to cool and store in an airtight container

COOKED FINGERPAINTS:
1 cup flour
2 teaspoons salt
3 cups cold water
3 cups boiling water
food coloring
Mix the flour and salt in an electric skillet. Add the cold water and stir until smooth. Add the hot water and stir until boiling. Boil until clear. Then add desired food coloring. Mix until
smooth.

UNCOOKED FINGERPAINTS: (Textured!)
1 cup flour
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 cup water
food coloring
Mix flour and salt, add water. Mixture will be "grainy".

CORNSTARCH AND WATER: (Fun!)
Mix cornstarch and water until it has a thick, watery feeling.
To play: It will feel dry when you pick it up, but turns "goopy and watery" as you squeeze it and let it drip through your fingers. It is pretty wild! Store in a covered container. If it dries
out over time, you can revive it by adding a small amount of water.









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Television & Children
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children under 2 years of age do not watch any TV and that those older than 2 watch no more than 1
to 2 hours a day of quality programming. The first 2 years of life are considered a critical time for brain development. TV and other electronic media can get in the
way of exploring, playing, and interacting with parents and others, which encourages learning and healthy physical and social development. As kids get older, too
much screen time can interfere with activities such as being physically active, reading, doing homework, playing with friends, and spending time with family.

Too much TV time has been linked to:
Obesity
Sleep problems
Lower academic performance
Behavior issues
Less time to play, and Violence.
Limit your childs TV time:
Be a good model
Eliminate background TV noise
Keep TV and other electronics out of the bedroom
Keep TV and other electronics off while children are doing school work
Keep TV and other electronics off during meal times
Set a schedule, and Talk to other caregivers.
Become involved:
Understand TV ratings,
Preview programs,
Watch with your child,
Plan what your child watches, and
Offer other fun activities.








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CURRICULUM MAP
Topic RIELDS Activities Materials/Resources
1. Go over LENA recording
reports.

2. Talk about the importance
of reading every day. Show
video on reading.

3. Engage in story time with
child and family.



4. How to make your own
books out materials found
in your home.



5. Opportunities for parents
to model reading
throughout their day.


6. Visit note.

SE 1.a Social Emotional- Relationships
with Others (Adults)

SE 1.b Social Emotional-Relationships
with Others (other children)

LD 1.a Language Debelopment-
Receptive Language

PH 3.a Physical Health- Fine Motor
Development

L 4.a Literacy-Comprehension and
Interest

CD 3.a Cognitive Development-
Attention and Inhibitory Control

L3a Literacy- Print Knowledge

CA 1a Creative Arts-Experimentation
and Participation in Creative Arts

1. N/A

2. Answer any questions from the
video.

3. Read a book with the family-
show where there are
opportunities to engage the
child in the story.

4. Make a book about themselves
and some of their favorite
people or things.

5. N/A

6. N/A

1. LENA recording report

2. Video Read all about it

3a. How to choose an appropriate book -
parent handout

3b. List of the top books for children by ages

4. Magazines, clear tape, cardboard to make
books

5. N/A

6. Note from the visit

Bring Book
0-1 Peek-a Who
1-2 The Mitten
2-3 Snuggle Puppy






Week 4: Reading with your Child Every Day







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LESSON PLAN
Objective: Parent/Caregiver will
Review and Analyze Recording Report form.
Articulate the importance of reading
Describe new ideas learned when reading to their child
Recognize their successes when reading to their child

Topic Details and Handouts RIELDS Timing Notes
Go over LENA recording
reports.
















Talk about the importance
of reading every day. Show
video on reading.




Familiarize yourself with the Recording Report
and identify areas that will serve as a
conversation starter with family.

Provide parent/caregiver with Recording
Report. Here is this weeks recording report
for review. To engage parent/caregiver in the
process of the review, it is best to ask open
ended questions. For example, Is there
anything that stands out to you at first
glance? Are there differences you see from
the last report? If so how does the
information help you? What areas do you
feel most confident about?
Ask how the Time of Day Activity & Notes
worksheet is working. Are there concerns?
Questions? Changes to make?

Engage the parent/caregiver in a conversation
about reading with their child. Ask Are there
particular times of the day you and your child
like to read books? What are your childs
favorite books? What do you think your child
is learning when you read together? If the
child is an infant talk about the importance of

























Prior to visit



10 minutes













10 minutes







Week 4: Lesson Plan







Providence Talks!
















Engage in story time with
child and family.



















introducing books at a very young age. Let the
parent/caregiver know the advantages
children get when exposed to books from a
very young age are increased social and
educational skills.
Show the video Read All About It. Engage the
parent in conversation about observations
made in the video. Ask the parent/caregiver if
there is anything they learned that they want
to incorporate into their reading experience
with their child.

If the child is old enough, offer 2 to 3 books to
choose from.
Let the parent/caregiver lead the process but
do engage in the story with the
parent/caregiver and child
Let the child turn pages. Encourage childs
participation.
Model the use of different voices or
expressions for different characters in the
book.
Provide positive feedback to the
parent/caregiver on an observation you made.
Use modeling, coaching, observation and
participation in discussion based on
parent/caregiver level of comfort.
Give the parent/caregiver the Tips for Parents:
choosing Books for Infants and Toddlers and
List of Top Books for Children by Ages
handouts.

Bring magazines, cardboard, glue stick/tape
and yarn to make a book. Let the child explore













SE 1.a Social Emotional-
Relationships with
Others (Adults)

SE 1.b Social Emotional-
Relationships with
Others (other children)
(if other children in the
home)

LD 1.a Language
Development-Receptive
Language
CD 3.a Cognitive
Development- Attention
and Inhibitory Control

L 4.a Literacy-
Comprehension and
Interest
L3a Literacy- Print













15 minutes



























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How to make your own
books out materials found
in your home.



Opportunities to model
reading throughout the
day.














Visit note.
the materials and lead as you and the
parent/caregiver guide the activity. If the child
is more interested in the materials, it is ok.
(You can always leave the instructions for the
parent to do with the child later)
Brainstorm with parent/caregiver about other
types of items to use when making a book. For
example, items with different textures,
photographs, collage items, childs own
artwork or drawings. Use paper grocery bag to
make book pages etc.

Refer back to the video shown earlier. Call
attention to the dad reading the newspaper.
Brainstorm other way the parent/caregiver
can model reading throughout the day. For
example, reading signs in the community, read
your own book while your child is engaged
with their own book, read recipes with child
while cooking etc.

Visit Note
Give book to family
0-2 Peek-a Who
1-2 The Mitten
2-3 Snuggle Puppy
Knowledge

PH 3.a Physical Health-
Fine Motor
Development

SE 1.a Social Emotional-
Relationships with
Others (Adults)

CA 1a Creative Arts-
Experimentation and
Participation in Creative
Arts




15 minutes













5 minutes








5 minutes







Providence Talks!



Time of Day Activity Notes

















Time of Day Activity & Notes







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Tips for Parents: Choosing books for Infants and Toddlers
Infants: Birth to Six Months
Content. Choose books with large pictures or bright and bold illustrations set against a contrasting background. Look for books that have simple pictures, one
per page.
Language. Infants will enjoy looking through wordless picture books, or books that have just a single word along with a big picture. But also try books that
contain phrases or short sentences. It's important for infants to hear language. Nursery rhymes and verse books are good for this age, too.
Design. Books for infants should be interesting and appealing to look at. Try stiff cardboard books, books with fold-out pages that create colorful panels, cloth
or soft vinyl books, and books with handles.
Reading Aloud. Infants want your full attention, so try reciting rhymes and songs that you remember by heart. Also, try reading to your infant while she has a
toy to hold. Reading at bedtime is always a nice way to end the day!
Infants: Seven to 12 Months
Content. Children this age will enjoy books with medium to large photos and bright, bold illustrations. Look for books that have simple drawings of familiar
things, actions and events.
Language. Children begin to focus on content and can relate pictures to their world. While they still enjoy picture books, try some books with simple stories
that have one line of text per page.
Design. Infants this age like to handle cloth and vinyl books and cardboard books with stiff, thick pages.
Reading Aloud. As your baby gets older, try this four-part interaction sequence:
1. Get your baby's attention by pointing out something in a book. ("Look!")
2. Ask a labeling question. ("What's that?")
3. Wait for your baby to respond, verbally or non-verbally. If necessary, provide the answer yourself. ("That's a monkey!")
4. Acknowledge your baby's response. ("Yes" or repeat your baby's word.) If your baby mislabels the picture, correct him in a positive manner. ("Yes, it's
brown like a dog, but it's a monkey.")
Keep in mind that you may not get through a whole book in one reading. As your child starts to explore books, support his/her progress by watching, listening and
acknowledging.
Infants: 12 to 18 months
Content. For children this age, try books with pictures of familiar characters, like animals, children, TV characters or adults in familiar roles. Look for books
that have action pictures - your baby is starting to be able to enjoy pictures with more details.
Language. This is a great age to try books with songs and repetitive verses. Books that have a simple story line that relate to your child's own experiences will
also have appeal. You might also look for theme books that show a series of related pictures and a few words. These books follow a progression of simple
activities, but don't try to introduce a plot or complex storyline.
Design. Even though your baby is growing fast, he/she will still enjoy playing with books with handles and books with stiff, thick pages. And he/she will still
like having these books read to him/her. Books with thinner pages that are plastic-coated are also a good choice for this age.







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Reading Aloud. Your infant will probably still enjoy reading with you as he/she sits on your lap or close to you in a comfortable chair. This helps your baby
associate reading with feeling secure. Connecting sounds with the pictures he/she sees in the books will make reading together even more fun. Make your
own sounds, and don't be surprised if your baby joins in! You may also notice your child looking through the book alone and making noises (sometimes called
"book babble").
Toddlers: 19 to 30 Months
Content. Toddlers will continue to enjoy books with familiar characters, however, they will also begin to take interest in pictures filled with information,
action and detail. Try some short stories, cause and effect stories, and fictional books that describe a problem or circumstance to overcome.
Language. Try predictable books with repeated text, words that rhyme, and pictures that correspond to the text. Books with songs and repetitive verses are
still a good choice for this age.
Design. Toddlers can enjoy books with paper pages, however, they will still enjoy books with a picture on every page and just a little bit of text.
Reading Aloud. Let your toddler decide if he/she wants to sit on your lap while you read, or next to you on the couch or floor. Follow his/her cues. Talk about
the characters and events in the story, relating them to your child's own experiences. Pause when you read aloud to let your child fill in a word or phrase. This
works great with rhyming and repetitive books.

Head Start, Office of the Administration for Children and Families, Early Childhood Learning Center, Courtesy of the National Center for Family Literacy Website.








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Suggested Books by Age NEED SPANISH LIST

0-1 year
Baby Face Board Book #2 Smile Roberta Grobel Intrater Orientation
How Does Baby Feel Karen Katz Week 2
Let's Go to the Zoo Ellen Weiss Week 3
Peek-a-Who Nina Laden Week 4
Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? Bill Martin Jr. Eric Carle Week 5
Llama Llama Night Night Anna Dewdney Week 6
Goodnight Gorilla Peggy Rathman Week 7
Bright Baby Animals Roger Priddy Week 8

Time for School Mouse Laura Numeroff Month 1
Goodnight Moon Margaret Wise Brown Month 2
The Very Hungry Caterpillar Eric Carle Month 3
Blue Hat, Green Hat Sandra Boynton Month 4
Guess How Much I Love You Sam McBratney Month 5
Moo Baa La La La Sandra Boynton Month 6
The Very Busy Spider Eric Carle Month 7
Good Night Spot Eric Hill Month 8

1-2 years
Baby's Colors Karen Katz Orientation
Happy Hippo, Angry Duck A Book of Moods Sandra Boynton Week 2
Welcome Spring Kjill Ackerman Week 3
The Mitten Jan Brett Week 4
Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed Eileen Christelow Week 5
The Going to Bed Book Sandra Boynton Week 6
Where is Baby's Belly Button? Karen Katz Week 7
The Foot Book Dr. Seuss Week 8







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From Head to Toe Eric Carle Month 1
Maisey Goes Shopping Lucy Cousins Month 2
We're Going on a Bear Hunt Helen Oxenbury and Michael Rosen Month 3
Curious George at the Zoo H.A Rey Month 4
Mr. Brown Can Moo Can You? Dr. Seuss Month 5
Happy Birthday Mouse Laura Numeroff Month 6
Polar Bear, Polar Bear What Do You Hear? Bill Martin Jr. Eric Carle Month 7
What Makes a Rainbow Betty Ann Schwartz Month 8


2-3 years
Llama Llama Red Pajama Anna Dewdney Orientation
The Pigeon Has Feelings Too Mo Willems Week 2
Knuffle Bunny Mo Willems Week 3
Snuggle Puppy Sandra Boynton Week 4
Green Eggs and Ham Dr. Seuss Week 5
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom Bill Martin Jr Week 6
Giraffes Can't Dance Giles Andreae Week 7
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie Laura Numeroff Week 8

Clifford's Day with Dad Norman Bridwell Month 1
The Jacket I Wear in the Snow Shirley Neitzel Month 2
Bear Snores On Karma Wilson Month 3
Snowballs Lois Ehlert Month 4
Just Me and My Mom Mercer Mayer Month 5
Love You Forever Robert Munsch Month 6
Snowmen At Work Carolyn Buehner Month 7
Maisey Goes to Preschool Lucy Cousins Month 8









Providence Talks!





CURRICULUM MAP
Topic RIELDS Activities Materials/Resources
1. Go over LENA recording
reports.

2. Repeat and add one more
how to expand your childs
language.

3. Repeat correctly but do not
correct- show video on
expanding vocabulary.

4. Demonstrate how to bring
books to life.

5. Introduce list of common
words to families.

6. Note from visit.


LD 1 Language Development-Receptive
Language

LD 2 Language Development-Expressive
Language

SE 1 Social Emotional- Relationships with
Others

L 1 Literacy- Phonological Awareness

L4a Literacy- Comprehension and Interest



1. N/A.

2a. Model how to add vocabulary to
childs existing vocabulary
without correcting their words.

2b. Answer any questions from the
Video.

3. Read book with actions and
model them.

4. N/A.

5. N/A.



1. LENA recording reports

2a. N/A

2b. Video Gab it up at the Grocery Store

3. Action book

4. List of common words parent handout

5. Note from visit

Bring books:
0-1 Brown Bear Brown Bear
1-2 Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed
2-3 Green Eggs & Ham



Week 5: Repeating and adding to your childs words







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LESSON PLAN
OBJECTIVE: Parent/caregiver will
o Review and Analyze Recording Report form.
o Practice, observe and articulate concepts for expanding language.
o Discuss ways they expand on their childs language throughout the day.
o Learn about the kinds of words their child needs to develop

Topic Details and Handouts RI ELDC Standards Timing Notes
Go over LENA recording
reports.

Familiarize yourself with the Recording
Report and identify areas that will serve as
a conversation starter with family.

Provide parent/caregiver with Recording
Report. Here is this weeks recording
report for review. To engage
parent/caregiver in the process of the
review, it is best to ask open ended
questions. For example, Is there anything
that stands out to you at first glance? Are
there differences you see from the last
report? If so how does the information
help you? What areas do you feel most
confident about?

Prior to visit




10 minutes


Repeat and add one more
how to expand your childs
language.
Repeat correctly but do not
correct.

Engage in play with the child and
parent/caregiver. (If the activity is a daily
routine, like meal time, use the routine to
engage parent/caregiver.)
Respond to body language, gestures,
sounds, word approximations with words
and simple phrases. If the child has words,
expand by adding new words. For example,
LD 1 Language
Development-
Receptive Language

LD 2 Language
Development-
Expressive Language

15 minutes
Week 5: Lesson Plan







Providence Talks!



if the child brings over a toy car and says
ca expand on their language by adding
words, Yes, that is a car. A blue car.
When responding to the childs
communication use object, action and idea
words by labeling and attaching words to
the experience they are engaged in.
Incorporate concepts from previous weeks-
words and turns, describing what the child
is doing, following the childs lead,
Use modeling, coaching, observation and
participation in discussion based on
parent/caregiver level of comfort.

SE 1 Social
Emotional-
Relationships with
Others

Show video on expanding
vocabulary.

Show the Gab it up at the Grocery Store
video. Engage the parent/caregiver in
conversation about observations made in
the video. Ask the parent/caregiver if there
is anything they learned that they want to
incorporate into their day. Point out times
where youve observed the
parent/caregiver repeating and adding
words to their childs language.

5 minutes


Bringing books to life. Open discussion by referring to week 4
Read with Your Child Everyday topic. Ask
parent open ended questions about their
experiences since the last visit. What did
you enjoy most about reading to your
child? Were there any challenges? Are
there certain books your child likes more
than others? Which ones?
Read the book you are giving to the family
or a book the child picks. Invite the parent
LD 1 Language
Development-
Receptive Language

LD 2 Language
Development-
Expressive Language

SE 1 Social
Emotional-
15 minutes








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join in reading activity.
Demonstrate:
Involving child by letting him/her turn
pages.
Use of expression-Change your voice for
each character in the story.
Use puppets, finger plays or gestures
during reading
For books with a rhythmic or sing song
pattern, let the child clap and sing.
Let the child finish sentences for books
with repetitive patterns and rhymes.
Substitute your childs name for a
character in the book.
o Reassure parent/caregiver that it is ok if
their child doesnt sit still for an entire
book. Considerations:
Children will have preferences for
certain books or even certain pages in a
book. Focus on what the child is
interested in. Its ok if you dont finish
the entire book.
Reading can occur for a few minutes at a
time but do it often. As the child grows
so will his/her attention span.
When reading the same book over and
over use the same expression and
emphasis each time.
Relationships with
Others

L 1 Literacy-
Phonological
Awareness

L4a Literacy-
Comprehension and
Interest
Introduce list of common
words to families.

o Give parent/caregiver the List of Common
Words handout. Explain that the list is a
guide they can use to follow their childs
word acquisition. Let them know that their
child will learn or may have words not on
the list Points to discuss:
LD 2 Language
Development-
Expressive Language

10 minutes









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o Nouns (names of people, places
and things) are learned first.
o Use of verbs or action words (sleep,
run, open, see, throw, climb, tickle
etc.)
o Prepositions or location words (up,
down, on, off etc.)
o Adjectives/adverbs or descriptive
words (hot, cold, loud, funny, silly,
clean, dirty, color words
o Pronouns- me, mine, you, I, it
o Remind parent/caregiver that reading,
engaging in words and turns, narrating their
childs day, repeating and adding words
following their childs lead and reading all
aid in language development.
Note from visit. Visit Note
Give book to family
0-1 Brown Bear Brown Bear
1-2 Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed
2-3 Green Eggs & Ham










Providence Talks!



Time of Day Activity & Notes




Time of Day Activity Notes
























Providence Talks!



List of Common Words
Food
Apple
Banana
Bread
Butter
Cake
Candy
Cereal
Cheese
Coffee
Cookie
Crackers
Drink
Egg
Food
Grapes
Gum
Hamburger
Hot dog
Ice cream
Juice
Meat
Milk
Orange
Pizza
Pretzel
Soda
Soup
Spaghetti
Tea
Toast
Water
Toys
Ball
Balloon
Blocks
Book
Bubble
Crayons
Doll
Present
Slide
Swing
Teddy bear
Outdoors
Flower
House
Moon
Rain
Sidewalk
Snow
Star
Street
Sun
Tree
Animals
Bear
Bee
Bird
Bunny
Cat
Chicken
Cow
Dog
Duck Elephant
Fish
Frog
Horse Monkey
Pig
Puppy
Snake
Tiger
Turkey
Turtle
Body Parts
Arm
Belly
Bottom
Chin
Ear
Elbow
Eye
Face
Finger
Foot
Hair
Hand
Knee
Leg
Mouth neck
Nose
Teeth
Thumb
Toe
Tummy
Places
Church
Home
Hospital
Library
McDonalds
Park
School
Store
Zoo
Actions
Bath
Breakfast
Bring
Catch
Clap
Close
Come
Cough
Cut
Dance
Dinner
Doodoo
Eat
Feed
Finish
Fix
Get
Give
Go
Have
Help
Hit
Hug
Jump
Kick
Kiss
Knock
Look
Love
Lunch
Make
Nap
Outside
Pattycake
Peekaboo
Peepee
Push
Read
Ride
Run
See
Show
Sing
Sit
Sleep
Stop
Take
Throw
Tickle
Walk
Want
Wash
Household
Bathtub
Bed
Blanket
Bottle
Bowl
Chair
Clock
Crib
Cup
Door
Floor
Fork
Glass
Knife
Light
Mirror
Pillow
Plate
Potty
Radio
Room
Sink
Soap
Sofa
Spoon
Stairs
Table
Household Continued







Providence Talks!



Telephone
Towel
Trash
TV
Window
Personal
Brush
Comb
Glasses
Key
Money
Paper
Pen
Pencil
Penny
Pocketbook
Tissue
Toothbrush
Umbrella
Watch
People
Aunt
Baby
Boy
Daddy
Doctor
Girl
Grandma
Grandpa
Lady
Man Mommy
Own name
Pet name
Uncle
Ernie, etc.
Others
A, B,C etc.
Away
Bye, bye
Curse word
Here
Hi, hello
In, out
Me
Meow
My myself
Night, night
No, yes
On, off
Please
Sesame St
Excuse me
Shut up
Thank you
There
Under
Welcome
What
Where
Why
Woof, woof
You
Yum, yum
1,2,3, etc.
Clothes
Belt
Boots
Coat
Diaper
Dress
Gloves
Hat jacket
Mittens
Pajamas
Pants
Shirt
Shoes
Slippers
Sneakers
Socks
Sweater

Vehicles
Bike
Boat
Bus
Car
Motorbike
Plane
Stroller
Train
Trolley
Truck

Modifiers
All gone
All right
Bad
Big
Black
Blue
Broken
Clean
Cold
Dark
Dirty
Down
Good
Happy
Heavy
Hot
Hungry
Little
Mine
More
Open
Pretty
Red
Shut
Stinky
That
This
Tired
Up
Wet
White
yellow
Yuck









Providence Talks!



CURRICULUM MAP

Topic RIELDS Activities Materials/Resources

1. Go over LENA recording reports.

2. Why do we use finger plays,
rhymes and songs throughout
the day?

3a. Make your own instruments.

3b. Make your own finger puppets.

4. Note from visit.



LD1a Language Development-
Receptive Language

SE1a Social Emotional-Relationships
with Others


C1a Creative Arts-Experimentation
and Participation in Creative Arts

CD4a Cognitive Development
Cognitive Flexibility



1. N/A.

2. Explain when you might sing
songs; during transition times,
waiting at the doctors office in line
for the grocery story, changing,
dressing, bathing, etc.

3a. Make instruments with the family.
3b. Make finger puppets with materials
in the home.

4. N/A.



1. LENA recording report

2a. Song book parent handout

3a. Materials to make instruments see
sheets based on age of child parent
handout

3b. Materials to make finger puppets

4. Note from visit

Bring books:
0-1 Llama Llama Nighty Night
1-2 The Going to Bed Book
2-3 Chicka Chicka Boom Boom


Week 6: Use Songs, Rhymes & Finger Plays







Providence Talks!



Lesson Plan
OBJECTIVE: Parent/caregiver will
o Review and Analyze the Recording Report form
o Learn how music is a great way to enhance language development in infants and toddlers
o Engage in song, rhyme and finger play activities

Topic Details and Handouts RI ELDC Standards Timing Notes
Go over LENA recording
reports.

Familiarize yourself with the Recording
Report and identify areas that will
serve as a conversation starter with
family.

Provide parent/caregiver with
Recording Report. Here is this weeks
recording report for review. To
engage parent/caregiver in the
process of the review, it is best to ask
open ended questions. For example,
Is there anything that stands out to
you at first glance? Are there
differences you see from the last
report? If so how does the
information help you? What areas
do you feel most confident about?

Prior to visit




10 minutes

Week 6: Lesson Plan







Providence Talks!



Why do we use finger plays,
action rhymes and songs
throughout the day?

Show the Songs and Rhymes video.
Engage the parent/caregiver in
conversation about music and
movement. For example, What songs
and rhymes does your child like? Are
you familiar with finger-plays? Which
ones do you do with your child?
When do you and your child sing and
dance together? What do you enjoy
most about these moments? If the
parent/caregiver is unfamiliar with the
term finger-plays, provide them with
some examples or refer to the video.
Engage in some songs and finger plays
with the child and parent. Make note
of observations. As children get older
follow their lead. Let the child pick the
song or rhyme. Sometimes they want
to sing it to you or make up their own
rhyme. Praise your childs efforts for
any and all attempts.
Points revealed/discovered activity
discussion with parent/caregiver
includes:
o Engaging in songs and rhymes can
happen during daily routines. For
example, at the grocery store
while waiting in checkout, during
diapering, or taking a walk.
o Children naturally move when
they hear music. Movement helps
them learn motor skills, fine and
gross.
o Children build memory and
LD1a Language
Development-Receptive
Language



SE1a Social Emotional-
Relationships with Others





C1a Creative Arts-
Experimentation and
Participation in Creative
Arts

CD4a Cognitive
Development Cognitive
Flexibility
15 minutes









Providence Talks!



sequencing by learning to do
movements in a particular order
o Music builds communication and
literacy skills. Songs, action rhymes
and finger plays promote
awareness of sounds and builds
vocabulary. Children also learn
concepts of fast and slow, loud
and soft, and high and low.
o Songs, rhymes and finger plays
builds relationships and sharing
joy with others.
o Dont worry if you dont have a
good voice. Your child wont
notice.
o Provide parent/caregiver with the
Finger-plays, Poems and Rhymes
parent handout.

Make your own finger
puppets.
o Engage in conversation about what
makes songs, rhymes and finger plays
fun. Inform parent/caregiver that
another way to make this activity is to
have finger puppets that represent
characters in the song, rhyme or finger
play. Take out the Making Finger
Puppets from Cardboard and Paper
instructions and materials you brought
to the visit.
o Involve the child in the
activity. Let them color and
glue. Older children can begin
to snip paper with safety
scissors.
C1a Creative Arts-
Experimentation and
Participation in Creative
Arts

PH 3a Physical Health and
Motor Development-Fine
Motor Development
15 minutes









Providence Talks!



o Use the cutouts a guide for
making a puppet with the
parent/caregiver.
o If the parent/caregiver or
child has other ideas, adapt
the project to reflect their
choices.
o Discuss other ideas for making
finger puppets.
Note from visit

Visit Note
Give book to family
0-2 Llama Llama Nighty Night
1-2 The Going to Bed Book
2-3 Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
5 minutes












Providence Talks!



Time of Day Activity & Notes




Time of Day Activity Notes
























Providence Talks!



SONG BOOK

A Peanut Sat on a Railroad Track
A peanut sat
On a railroad track,
His heart was all a-flutter,

Round the bend
Came number ten.
Toot! Toot! Peanut butter!
SQUISH!
Tune: Polly, Wolly, Doodle (Unknown)

Pop! Goes the Weasel
All around the mulberry bush
The monkey chased the weasel.
The monkey thought 'twas all in fun.
Pop! goes the weasel.

A penny for a spool of thread,
A penny for a needle.
That's the way the money goes.
Pop! goes the weasel.

Up and down the City Road,
In and out of the Eagle,
That's the way the money goes.
Pop! goes the weasel.

Half a pound of tuppenney rice,
Half a pound of treacle,
Mix it up and make it nice,
Pop! goes the weasel.
(1855) Roud Folk Song Index 5249.



Baa, Baa, Black Sheep
Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir,
Three bags full.

One for my master,
One for my dame,
And one for the little boy
Who lives down the lane.

Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir,
Three bags full.

One for my master,
One for my dame,
And one for the little boy
Who lives down the lane.
(1744) Roud Folk Song Index 4439


Baby Bumblebee
I'm bringing home a baby bumblebee,
Won't my mommy be so proud of me,
(Cup hands together as if holding bee)

I'm bringing home a baby bumblebee,
Ouch! It stung me!
(Shake hands as if just stung)

I'm squishing up the baby bumblebee,
Won't my mommy be so proud of me,








Providence Talks!



('Squish' bee between palms of hands)

I'm squishing up a baby bumblebee,
Ooh! It's yucky!
(Open up hands to look at 'mess')
I'm wiping off the baby bumblebee,
Won't my mommy be so proud of me,
(Wipe hands off on shirt)

I'm wiping off the baby bumblebee,

All clean!
As adapted by Colonel Sanford C. Faulkner.

Down By the Station
Down by the station
Early in the morning
See the little pufferbellies
All in a row.

See the station master
Turn the little handle
Puff, puff, toot, toot
Off we go!

Down by the station
Early in the morning
See the little pufferbellies
All in a row.

See the station master
Turn the little handle
Puff, puff, toot, toot
Off we go!
Lee Ricks and Slim Gaillard




Five Little Ducks
Five little ducks
Went out one day
Over the hill and far away
Mother duck said,
Quack, quack, quack, quack
But only four little ducks came waddling back

Four little ducks
Went out one day
Over the hill and far away
Mother duck said,
Quack, quack, quack, quack
But only three little ducks came waddling back

Three little ducks
Went out one day
Over the hill and far away
Mother duck said,
Quack, quack, quack
But only two little ducks came waddling back

Two little ducks
Went out one day
Over the hill and far away
Mother duck said,
Quack, quack
But only one little ducks came waddling back

One little duck
Went out one day
Over the hill and far away
Mother duck said,
Quack
But none of the five little ducks came waddling back








Providence Talks!



Sad mother duck
Went out one day
Over the hill and far away
The sad mother duck said
Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack"
And all of the five little ducks came back


Five Little Monkeys
Five little monkeys jumping on the bed
One fell off and bumped his head
So Momma called the doctor and the doctor said
No more monkeys jumping on the bed!

Four little monkeys jumping on the bed
One fell off and bumped his head
So Momma called the doctor and the doctor said
No more monkeys jumping on the bed!

Three little monkeys jumping on the bed
One fell off and bumped his head
So Momma called the doctor and the doctor said
No more monkeys jumping on the bed!

Two little monkeys jumping on the bed
One fell off and bumped his head
So Momma called the doctor and the doctor said
No more monkeys jumping on the bed!

One little monkey jumping on the bed
He fell off and bumped their head
So Momma called the doctor and the doctor said
No more monkeys jumping on the bed!

No little monkeys jumping on the bed

None fell off and bumped his head
So Momma called the doctor and the doctor said
Put those monkeys back in bed!


Hurry, Hurry, Drive the Fire Truck
Hurry, hurry, drive the fire truck
(Hands on steering wheel)
Hurry, hurry, drive the fire truck
Hurry, hurry, drive the fire truck
Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding!
(Ring bell)

Hurry, hurry, turn the corner
(Lean to the right)
Hurry, hurry, turn the corner
(Lean to the left)
Hurry, hurry, turn the corner
(Lean to the right and left)
Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding!
(Ring bell)

Hurry, hurry, climb the ladder
(Pretend to climb ladder)
Hurry, hurry, climb the ladder
Hurry, hurry, climb the ladder
Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding!
(Ring bell)

Hurry, hurry, squirt the water
(Pretend to spray hose)
Hurry, hurry, squirt the water
Hurry, hurry, squirt the water
Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding!
(Ring bell)









Providence Talks!



Slowly, slowly, back to the station
(Lean slowly to the left and right)
Slowly, slowly, back to the station
Slowly, slowly, back to the station
Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding!
(Ring bell)


If Youre Happy and You Know It
If you're happy and you know it,
Clap your hands.
(Clap hands twice)

If you're happy and you know it,
Clap your hands.
(Clap hands twice)

If you're happy and you know it,
Then your face will surely show it
If you're happy and you know it,
Clap your hands.
(Clap hands twice)

If you're happy and you know it,
Tap your toes.
(Tap toes twice)

If you're happy and you know it,
Tap your toes.
(Tap toes twice)

If you're happy and you know it,
Then your face will surely show it
If you're happy and you know it,
Tap your toes.
(Tap toes twice)

If you're happy and you know it,
Nod your head.
(Nod head)

If you're happy and you know it,
Nod your head.
(Nod head)

If you're happy and you know it,
Then your face will surely show it
If you're happy and you know it,
Nod your head.
(Nod head)

If you're happy and you know it,
Clap your hands.
(Clap hands twice)

If you're happy and you know it,
Clap your hands.
(Clap hands twice)

If you're happy and you know it,
Then your face will surely show it
If you're happy and you know it,
Clap your hands.
(Clap hands twice)

If you're happy and you know it,
Then your face will surely show it
If you're happy and you know it,
Clap your hands.
(Clap hands twice)

Latvian Folk Song as adapted by Alfred B. Smith










Providence Talks!



Mr. Sun
Oh, Mr. Sun, Sun,
Mr. Golden Sun,
Please shine down on me.

Oh Mr. Sun, Sun,
Mr. Golden Sun,
Hiding behind a tree

These little children
Are asking you
To please come out
So we can play with you.

Oh Mr. Sun, Sun,
Mr. Golden Sun,
Please shine down on,
Please shine down on,
Please shine down on me.


Peanut Butter and Jelly
First you take the peanuts
And you crunch 'em, you crunch em
Then you take the grapes
And you squish 'em, you squish em
Then you take the bread
And you spread it, you spread it
Then you take your sandwich
And you eat it, you eat it

'Cause its good, peanut butter
And jelly!





Old MacDonald
Old MacDonald had a farm,
Ee i ee i oh!
And on that farm he had some chickens,
Ee i ee i oh!
With a cluck-cluck here,
And a cluck-cluck there.

Here a cluck, there a cluck,
Everywhere a cluck-cluck.
Old MacDonald had a farm
Ee i ee i oh!

Old MacDonald had a farm,
Ee i ee i oh!
And on that farm he had some dogs,
Ee i ee i oh!
With a woof-woof here,
And a woof-woof there.

Here a woof, there a woof,
Everywhere a woof-woof.
Old MacDonald had a farm
Ee i ee i oh!
(Add other animals as well)
(1949) Roud Folk Song Index 745


Six Little Ducks
Six little ducks
That I once knew
Fat ones, skinny ones,
Fair ones, too
But the one little duck
With the feather on his back









Providence Talks!



He led the others
With a quack, quack, quack

Quack, quack, quack,
Quack, quack, quack
He led the others
With a quack, quack, quack

Down to the river
They would go
Wibble, wobble, wibble, wobble,
To and fro
But the one little duck
With the feather on his back
He led the others
With a quack, quack, quack

Quack, quack, quack,
Quack, quack, quack
He led the others
With a quack, quack, quack

Back from the river
They would come
Wibble, wobble, wibble, wobble,
Ho, hum, hum
But the one little duck
With the feather on his back
He led the others
With a quack, quack, quack

Quack, quack, quack,
Quack, quack, quack
He led the others
With a quack, quack, quack



Skip to My Lou
Skip,skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.
Fly's in the buttermilk,
Shoo, fly, shoo,
Fly's in the buttermilk,
Shoo, fly, shoo,
Fly's in the buttermilk,
Shoo, fly, shoo,
Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.

Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.

Cows in the corn field,
What'll I do?
Cows in the corn field,
What'll I do?
Cows in the corn field,
What'll I do?
Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.

Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.

There's a little red wagon,
Paint it blue
There's a little red wagon,
Paint it blue
There's a little red wagon,
Paint it blue
Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.







Providence Talks!




Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.


Skidamarink
Skidamarink a dink a dink,
Skidamarink a doo,
I love you.
Skidamarink a dink a dink,
Skidamarink a doo,
I love you.

I love you in the morning
And in the afternoon,
I love you in the evening
And underneath the moon;

Oh, Skidamarink a dink a dink,
Skidamarink a doo,
I love you!
(1910) From The Echo


Take Me Out to The Ball Game
Take me out
To the ball game
Take me out
With the crowd
Buy me some peanuts
And Crackerjacks




I don't care if
I never ever get back

Let me root, root, root
For the home team
If they don't win
It's a shame
For it's one, two,
Three strikes you're out
At the old ball game!
Jack Norwarth and Albert Von Tilzow


Apples and Bananas
I like to eat, eat, eat apples and bananas
I like to eat, eat, eat apples and bananas

Now change the vowel sound to A:
I like to ate, ate, ate ay-ples and ba-nay-nays
I like to ate, ate, ate ay-ples and ba-nay-nays

Now change the vowel sound to E:
I like to eat, eat, eat ee-ples and bee-nee-nees
I like to eat, eat, eat ee-ples and bee-nee-nees

Now change the vowel sound to I:
I like to ite, ite, ite i-ples and bi-ni-nis
I like to ite, ite, ite i-ples and bi-ni-nis

Now change the vowel sound to O:
like to ote, ote, ote oh-ples and bo-no-nos
I like to ote, ote, ote oh-ples and bo-no-nos
American Childrens Song












Providence Talks!



Down by the bay
Down by the bay
where the watermelons grow.
Back to my home
I dare not go
for if I do
my mother will say:

"Did you ever see a bear
combing his hair
down by the bay?"

Down by the bay where the watermelons grow.
Back to my home
I dare not go
for if I do my mother will say:
"Did you ever see a bee
with a sunburned knee
down by the bay?"

Down by the bay
where the watermelons grow.
Back to my home
I dare not go
for if I do
my mother will say
"Did you ever see a moose
kissing a goose
down by the bay?"

Down by the bay
where the watermelons grow.
Back to my home
I dare not go
for if I do
my mother will say

"Did you ever see a whale
with a polka dot tail
down by the bay?"

Traditional Childrens Song


Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are.
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
English Lullaby (Jane Taylor)


The More We Get Together
Oh, the more we get together,
Together, together,
Oh, the more we get together,
The happier we'll be.

For your friends are my friends,
And my friends are your friends.
Oh, the more we get together,
The happier we'll be!
English Folk Song


The Wheels on the Bus
The wheels on the bus go round and round, round and round.
The wheels on the bus go round and round
All through the town.
(Roll hands over each other)

The wipers on the bus go "Swish, swish, swish,
Swish, swish, swish, swish, swish, swish"







Providence Talks!



The wipers on the bus go "Swish, swish, swish"
All through the town.
(Put arms together in front of you and 'swish' like windshield wipers)

The door on the bus goes open and shut
Open and shut, open and shut
The door on the bus goes open and shut
All through the town.
(Cover eyes with hands on 'shut' and uncover them on 'open')

The horn on the bus goes "Beep, beep, beep
Beep, beep, beep, beep, beep, beep"
The horn on the bus goes "Beep, beep, beep"
All through the town.
(Pretend to honk horn)

The money on the bus goes "Clink, clink, clink,
Clink, clink, clink, clink, clink, clink"
The money on the bus goes "Clink, clink, clink"
All through the town.
(Pretend to put money in cash box on bus)

The baby on the bus says, "Wah, wah, wah!
Wah, wah, wah, wah, wah, wah!"
The baby on the bus says, "Wah, wah, wah!"
All through the town.
(Fisted hands in front of eyes and rub them like baby crying)

The people on the bus say, "Shh, shh, shh,
Shh, shh, shh, shh, shh, shh"
The people on the bus say, "Shh, shh, shh"
All through the town.
(Put pointer finger to mouth to 'shhh')




The mommy on the bus says, "I love you,
I love you, I love you"
The daddy on the bus says, "I love you, too" All through the town.
(Point to self on 'I', right hand over heart on 'love', and point to other on 'you'
American Folk Song


The Ants Go Marching
The ants go marching one by one, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching one by one, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching one by one,
the little one stops to suck his thumb
and they all go marching down into the ground, got to get out of the rain.
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

The ants go marching two by two, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching two by two, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching two by two,
the little one stops to tie his shoe
and they all go marching down into the ground, got to get out of the rain.
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

The ants go marching three by three, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching three by three, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching three by three,
the little one stops to climb a tree
and they all go marching down into the ground, got to get out of the rain.
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

The ants go marching four by four, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching four by four, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching four by four,
the little one stops to shut the door
and they all go marching down into the ground, got to get out of the rain.
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

The ants go marching five by five, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching five by five, hurrah, hurrah!







Providence Talks!



The ants go marching five by five,
the little one stops to take a dive
and they all go marching down into the ground, got to get out of the rain.
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

The ants go marching six by six, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching six by six, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching six by six,
the little one stops to pick up sticks
and they all go marching down into the ground, got to get out of the rain.
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

The ants go marching seven by seven, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching seven by seven, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching seven by seven,
the little one stops to look up to heaven
and they all go marching down into the ground, got to get out of the rain.
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

The ants go marching eight by eight, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching eight by eight, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching eight by eight,
the little one stops to shut the gate
and they all go marching down into the ground, got to get out of the rain.
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

The ants go marching nine by nine, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching nine by nine, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching nine by nine,
the little one stops to scratch his spine
and they all go marching down into the ground, got to get out of the rain.
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

The ants go marching ten by ten, hurrah, hurrah!




The ants go marching ten by ten, hurrah, hurrah!
The ants go marching ten by ten,
the little one stops to say "THE END"
and they all go marching down into the ground, got to get out of the rain.
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!
Adapted from the Patrick Gilmore version of When Johnny Comes Marching Home


Teasing Mr. Crocodile
Five little monkeys
Sitting in a tree
Teasing Mr. Crocodile,
"You can't catch me."
Along came Mr. Crocodile,
Quiet as can be
SNAP!

Four little monkeys
Sitting in a tree
Teasing Mr. Crocodile,
"You can't catch me."
Along came Mr. Crocodile,
Quiet as can be
SNAP!

Three little monkeys
Sitting in a tree
Teasing Mr. Crocodile,
"You can't catch me."
Along came Mr. Crocodile,
Quiet as can be
SNAP!












Providence Talks!



Two little monkeys
Sitting in a tree
Teasing Mr. Crocodile,
"You can't catch me."
Along came Mr. Crocodile,
Quiet as can be
SNAP!

One little monkey
Sitting in a tree
Teasing Mr. Crocodile,
"You can't catch me."
Along came Mr. Crocodile,
Quiet as can be
SNAP!

No more little monkeys
Sitting in a tree.


I Say Thank You!
(Sung to If You are Happy and You Know it)
When my friends give me something,
I say thank you!
When my friends give me something
I say thank you!
I can see it makes them happy
When I say it so politely
Yes, good manners mean to always say:
Thank You!

Please and Thank You!
(Sung to Frere Jacques)
Please and thank you.
Please and thank you.
Sounds so nice.


Sounds so nice.
Manners are important.
Manners are important.
Be polite!
Be polite!


We Say Thank You
(Sung to Twinkle Twinkle)
We say thank you.
We say please.
We dont interrupt, we dont tease.
We dont argue, we dont fuss.
We listen when teachers talk to us.
We share our toys, we take our turn,
Good manners are easy for us to learn!


Im a Little Snowman
(Sung to Twinkle Twinkle)
Im a little snowman,
Short and fat (hold arms in front of belly).
Here is my scarf, (pretend to wrap scarf around head)
and here is my hat (put hat on head).
Lumps of coal for my eyes (point to eyes)
And a carrot nose (point to nose)
And Im all ready for
When the cold wind blows! (wrap arms around self and shiver)

Five Little Hot Dogs
Five little hot dogs frying in a pan
The grease got so hot that one went bam (Clap)
4, 3, 2, 1
No little hot dogs frying in a pan
The grease got so hot that the pan went bam (Clap)










Providence Talks!



Rainbow Song
(Sung to Twinkle, Twinkle)
Red and orange, green and blue,
Shiny yellow, purple too!
All the colors that you know
live inside a rainbow!


Green Speckled Frogs
Five green and speckled frogs sat on a speckled log
eating some most delicious bugs. (Yum, yum).
One jumped into the pool where it was nice and cool,
Then there were four green speckled frogs sitting on a speckled log,
Eating some delicious bugs. (Yum, yum).
(Count down from here.)


Im a Little Pumpkin
(Sung to Im a Little Teapot)


Itsy Bitsy Spider
The itsy bitsy spider went up the water spout
down came the rain and washed the spider out.
Out came the sun and dried up all the rain
And the itsy bitsy spider went up the spout again.
Roud Folk Song Index 11586
24.SONG BOOK AR 13-ST











orange and round (hold arms in front of belly).
Here is my stem, (puts hands together on top of head pointing up)
and here is the ground (point to floor).
When I get all cut up, (karate chop hands)
Dont you shout! (wag index finger back and forth)
Just open me up, (pretend to take lid off)
and scoop me out! (pretend to scoop out inside of pumpkin)
Im a little pumpkin








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FINGER PLAY BOOK










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How to Make Musical Instruments

Bean Shakers

What You Will Need:
Soda Bottle (any size)
Dried peas, beans or
lentils
Glue or Duct tape



Directions:
o Clean out the bottle and allow it to dry.
o Fill the bottle about 1/4 full with the peas, beans or lentils.
o Place superglue around the threads of the bottle opening and quickly tighten the lid and allow the glue to dry before playing with
the shaker. You can also tape the top with duct tape.

Drum

What You Need:
Oatmeal or Pringles
container
Rubber bands or duct tape
Fabric (faux or real
leather, vinyl --
experiment with different
types for different sounds)



Directions:
o Remove the container lid and discard.
o Cut the fabric large enough to fit over the container and overlap the edges by 1 1/2 inches.
o Cover the container and secure the fabric tightly by using many rubber bands or the duct tape.

Tambourine

What You Need:
2 paper plates
Stapler or glue
Hole punch
String
Jingle bells or Beans
Crayons


Directions:
Staple or glue two paper plates together, facing each other
Using a hole punch, make holes around the plates and tie jingle bells to the holes with string.
Decorate the tambourine with crayons.










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CURRICULUM MAP
Topic RIELDS Activities Materials/Resources

1. Go over LENA recording
reports.

2. Discuss how to ask open ended
questions throughout the day
explain the difference between
open ended and closed ended
questions show video on
questions.

3. Engage in story time with child
and family.

4. Explain how to use questions
throughout your daily routines.

5. Administer ASQ3 and ASQSE.

6. Note from visit.

SE1a Social Emotional Relationships with
Others

SE2a Social Emotional- Sense of Self

LD1a Language Development-Receptive
Language

LD3a Language Development- Pragmatics

CD1 Cognitive Development-Logic and
Reasoning

L 4.a Literacy-Comprehension and
Interest


L3a Literacy- Print Knowledge



1. N/A.

2. Answer questions about
video.

3. Model how to read a book and
ask questions through the
book.

4. Demonstrate how to ask
questions through routines
and show parents how to
make choices with everyday
items.

5. N/A.

6. N/A.




1. LENA recording reports

2a. How to use open ended questions
parent handout

2b. Video Laundry

3. Book to model asking questions

4. N/A

5. ASQ3 and ASQSE materials

6. Note from visit

Bring books:
0-1 Goodnight Gorilla
1-2 Where is Babys Belly Button
2-3 Giraffes Cant Dance







Week 7: Asking open ended questions







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Lesson Plan
OBJECTIVE: Parent/caregiver will
o Review and Analyze Recording Report form.
o Learn about open ended and closed ended questions
o Practice the use of open ended questions during play, routines and story time.

Topic Details and Handouts RIELDS Timing Notes
Go over LENA recording
reports.

Familiarize yourself with the Recording Report
and identify areas that will serve as a
conversation starter with family.

Provide parent/caregiver with Recording
Report. Here is this weeks recording report
for review. To engage parent/caregiver in the
process of the review, it is best to ask open
ended questions. For example, Is there
anything that stands out to you at first
glance? Are there differences you see from
the last report? If so how does the
information help you? What areas do you
feel most confident about?

Prior to visit


10 minutes

Discuss how to ask open
ended questions
throughout the day
explain the difference
between open ended and
closed ended questions
show video on questions.

Provide the parent/caregiver with the How to
Use Open Ended Questions with Children
handout. Discuss how closed ended questions
require a one word answer. Brainstorm
examples of closed ended questions with the
parent/ caregiver. For example, Did you eat
your cheerios? Was that a good story? Both
of the questions elicit the answer yes. Ask the
parent/caregiver if there are other ways to ask
the question so their child can use or hear
SE1a Social Emotional
Relationships with
Others

SE2a Social Emotional-
Sense of Self

LD1a Language
Development-Receptive
Language
20 minutes
Week 7: Lesson Plan







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more language. They may say, for example,
What did you do with all your cheerios?,
You ate them! Where did they all go?
Thats right! In your tummy!
Discuss how the use of open ended questions
allows the child to share their thoughts and
ideas as well as build their language and
cognitive skills. Open ended questions can be
used during play, routines, stories, and art
activities.
If the child is an infant the parent can still use
and then answer their open ended questions
during daily routines, songs and story time.
Respond to the babys movements and
vocalizations because that is their answer!
While engaged in play, model the use of open
ended questions with the child (remember to
follow the childs lead).
If the family is engaged in a daily routine, use
that opportunity to practice open ended
questions.
Provide positive feedback to the
parent/caregiver on the observations you
make.
Use modeling, coaching, observation and
participation in discussion based on
parent/caregiver level of comfort.
Show the Laundry video. Engage the
parent/caregiver in discussion about the video.
Did they notice the use of open ended
questions? Were there times in the video
where the parent used closed ended
questions? What could the parent in the video
done instead?

LD3a Language
Development-
Pragmatics

CD1 Cognitive
Development-Logic and
Reasoning








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Engage in story time with
child and family.

Using the below concepts from Lesson 4,
engage the family in story time.
If the child is old enough, offer 2 to 3 books to
choose from.
Let the parent/caregiver lead the process but
do engage in the story with the
parent/caregiver and child
Let the child turn pages. Encourage childs
participation.
Model the use of different voices or
expressions for different characters in the
book.
Use open ended questions during the story.
What will the bear do next?
Provide positive feedback to the
parent/caregiver on an observation you made.
Use modeling, coaching, observation and
participation in discussion based on
parent/caregiver level of comfort.
L 4.a Literacy-
Comprehension and
Interest


L3a Literacy- Print
Knowledge

LD1a Language
Development-Receptive
Language

LD3a Language
Development-
Pragmatics

CD1 Cognitive
Development-Logic and
Reasoning

SE1a Social Emotional
Relationships with
Others
15 minutes
Administer ASQ3 and
ASQSE.

Prior to visit determine if the child has a recent
screening on file. If not, select the age
appropriate screening to bring on visit.

Today we are going to do the Ages & Stages or
ASQ screenings. The screening will provide us
with information about your childs
development since the last time we did the
screening. The screening looks at development
in other areas of development beside language.
These include gross and fine motor skills,




Prior to visit


15 minutes
(Longer is
kit is used to
administer
the tool)








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thinking skills, language, social emotional and
adaptive (self-help) skills
If the ASQ was previously completed, review
the results and talk with parent/caregiver about
any changes they have noticed since the last
screening.

Note from visit Visit Note
Give book to family
0-2 Goodnight Gorilla
1-2 Where is Babys Belly Button
2-3 Giraffes Cant Dance










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Time of Day Activity & Notes




Time of Day Activity Notes
























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How to Use Open Ended Questions with Children

Asking open-ended questions when reading or playing with your child is one of the most powerful
tools for learning. Using open ended questions expands your childs curiosity, creativity, reasoning
ability, and independence.
What is an open-ended question? Glad you asked!
There are two kinds of questions:
Open-ended questions
Closed-ended questions
Open-ended questions cannot be answered with one word answers such as yes or no. They are
questions with no single right or wrong answer. Open ended questions offer children the opportunity
to freely express feelings, motives and ideas. Open ended questions allow you and your child to build
knowledge together.

Example:
Why do you think the bear is feeling grumpy?
How did the frog end up on top of the mans head?
Tell me about your picture.
What do you think would happen if...?
Open-ended questions often begin with:
What
How
Who
Why


Closed-ended questions can be answered with one or two word answers such as yes or no. A
closed-ended questions like, "What color is that block?" evokes a one-word answer. But an open-
ended question such as, "Tell me about the blocks you are using," encourages a child to describe the
blocks or explain what he or she is doing. There is no right or wrong answer.

Closed-ended questions dont allow for extra information, opinions, thoughts, or expansion of ideas
and concepts. Closed-ended questions do not require that the child actively engage in the
conversation and denies a child the opportunity to give an opinion, explain thoughts, or offer ideas.

Example:
Do you like ice-cream? Answer: Yes/No.
Do you want an apple? Answer: Yes/No.
Closed-ended questions often begin with:
Did you ?
When ?
Do you want to ?
Will you ?
Have you ?










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Why Are Open-Ended Questions Better Than Closed-Ended Questions?
Open-ended questions encourage children to:
Expand their vocabulary. Instead of asking yes or no questions, give your child the opportunity to provide responses that draw on a wider range of
vocabulary. Hint: encourage children to communicate more interactively by following up with how, what, where, why or when questions.
Think about their answers before providing details that reasonably answers the question.
Elaborate with details, express thoughts or offer an opinion.
Be creative.
Think of new ideas.
Use imagination.
Give more information.
Problem-solve and use cognitive (intellectual) skills. Children must search for vocabulary and form sentences which convey thoughts, opinions, ideas, etc.
rather than simply answering yes or no.
Build relationships. Children become more invested in the conversation when they have to actively engage in it with full sentences. They are able to relate
something of meaning and respond to the person/people with whom they are communicating. In this way, open-ended questions are used to positively build
and deepen relationships.

Open-Ended Questions & Childrens Self-Esteem
When children are asked open-ended questions, it shows them that their opinions, ideas, thoughts, feelings, etc, matter. After all, if you didnt want to know, you
wouldnt ask.
When you ask open-ended questions, it tells a child that their contribution mattersits a sign of respect. You want to know what they think. You value their opinion.
You are genuinely interested in their ideas. Attentive listening and responding strengthens your childs positive self-esteem and self-image, as well as strengthening
the relationship between you and your child.

Using Open-Ended Questions Together With Books
Start with the cover.
Ask, What do you think this story will be about? Clues can be drawn from the illustration on the cover along with the title. This question involves the
intellectual skill of prediction.
As you read through the book, ask questions
Sometimes it may be more productive to use open-ended questions on the second reading of the book especially if its a book that really has captured your childs
imagination. A child can sometimes become frustrated with the stopping and starting as all she/he wants to do is find out what happens next. How will the problem be
solved? What will happen to the character? Will he make it out of this looming disaster okay?
Once the first reading of the picture book has been completed, the urgency has passed as the questions have been resolved. However, this is where the opportunity
arises to revisit and relook at the story, expanding on ideas, thoughts, opinions and reasoning.







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Great questions to ask on the second reading may include:
Why do you think .?
What is happening .?
Why is the ?
Ask questions which help your child relate the story to their own life and experiences. For example,
What would happen if came to your house?
What would happen if .. the fly landed on your birthday cake?

Using Open-Ended Questions with Closed-Ended Questions
Sometimes, its helpful to combine open end questions and closed questions together. For example, if youre reading a book about a boy at the zoo, you could ask:
Closed-ended question: Have you ever been to the zoo?
Open-ended question: What happened when you went there? Or What did you like the most about going to the zoo?
Closed-ended question: Which animal did you like the most?
Open-ended question: Why did you like the (giraffes) the most? What did they do when you were watching them?
In these examples, the closed-ended questions are used to establish facts upon which the open-ended questions can be used to expand the conversation with more
information, details, thoughts, opinions, etc.
In certain situations, closed-ended questions may be appropriate. The adult needs to gauge when to use each type of question in order to guide the conversations with
a mix of open-ended and closed-ended questions.


Stories and Children Permission Pending









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CURRICULUM MAP

Topic RIELDS Activities Materials/Resources

1. Go over LENA Recording
Reports.

2. Talk about a variety of play
opportunities:
a. Spend uninterrupted
play time with your
child.
b. Give your child
opportunity for
independent play.
c. Give your child
opportunities to
interact with other
familiar children and
adults -watch video
on play.
3. Play
a. Age appropriate
toys.
b. Discuss toy safety
4. Review ASQ3 and ASQSE
results.

5. Note from Visit.

6. Plan for follow up visits.

PH1.a Physical Health- Helath and Safety
Practices (structured and unstructured
physical activity)

PH2.a Physical Health- Gross Motor
Development

SE1.a Social Emotional- Relationships
with Others (Adults)

SE1.bSocial Emotional- Relationships
with Others (Other Childen)

SE2.a Social Emotional-Sense of Self
(awareness)

SE2.b Social Emotional- Sense of Self
(confidence)

LD1.a Language Development-Receptive
Language

CD1.a Cognitive Development-Logic and
Reasoning

1. N/A.

2. Answer questions from video.

3a. Work with parents on age
appropriate turn taking games and
activities peek a-boo, red light,
green light, patty cake, pretend to
be animals.

3b. N/A.

3c. Make a book about favorite
activities.

Show parents examples of different
kinds of toys such as cause and
effect toys, blocks, coloring, in and
out play.

4. N/A.

5. N/A.

1. LENA Recording Reports

2a. The Importance of Play parent
handout
2b. Benefits of Play parent handout
2c. Video Great Outdoors

3a. Play Materials for Young Children &
Household Objects that Encourage
Creativity parent handout

3b. Toy Safety Tips-parent handout

4. ASQ 3 and ASQ SE tools

5. Note from visit

Bring Books:
0-1 Bright Animals
1-2 The Foot Book
2-3 If You Give A Mouse A Cookie

Week 8: Daily Play







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Lesson Plan
OBJECTIVE: Parent/caregiver will
o Review and Analyze Recording Report form.
o Discuss the importance of play for their developing child
o Learn about toy safety and age appropriate toy selection

Topic Details and Handouts RIELDS Timing Notes
Go over LENA Recording
Reports.

Familiarize yourself with the Recording Report and
identify areas that will serve as a conversation starter
with family.

Provide parent/caregiver with Recording Report. Here is
this weeks recording report for review. To engage
parent/caregiver in the process of the review, it is best to
ask open ended questions. For example, Is there
anything that stands out to you at first glance? Are
there differences you see from the last report? If so
how does the information help you? What areas do you
feel most confident about?

Prior to visit


10 minutes

Talk about a variety of play
opportunities:
a. Uninterrupted play with
your child.

b. Independent play.

c. Opportunities to interact
with familiar children and
adults.


a. Provide parent handouts The Importance of Play and
Benefits of Play. Engage the parent/caregiver in
conversation about play. Use open ended questions to
begin the conversation about play with their child. For
example, What are your favorite things to play with your
child? Is your child able to play for short periods on
his/her own? If so, what does he/she play? In what
ways does your child show you he/she enjoys play?
b. Points revealed/discovered from discussion with
parent/caregiver includes:
Play encourages physical skills by letting children use
their bodies to explore
PH1.a Physical
Health- Helath and
Safety Practices
(structured and
unstructured
physical activity)

PH2.a Physical
Health- Gross Motor
Development

SE1.a Social
15 minutes
Week 8: Daily Play







Providence Talks!




























Watch video on play.

Play encourages children to learn about their world by
exploring with different toys and objects.
Play allows children to express emotions and develop
communication skills.
Play builds relationships and nurtures self-esteem and
confidence.
Children learn best when they experiment and
discover themselves rather than being shown by
adults.
Toys can be used in many different ways. Nesting
blocks can be used for filling, dumping, stacking, and
sorting. In addition, they can be used to make
buildings or to pretend they are garages for cars or
homes for animals.
Play that engage a childs senses: touch, smell, sight
and sound include a variety of textures, singing and
dancing, sand and water play, finger painting.
Toys that support healthy play are toys that allow
children to use their imagination. For example, A
simple car or doll can do whatever the child imagines,
while a battery operated doll or care that does things
at a press of a button limits what a child might
pretend.
Show Play video. Engage the parent/caregiver in
discussion about the video and how they use outdoor
experiences when playing with their child.
Emotional-
Relationships with
Others (Adults)

SE1.bSocial
Emotional-
Relationships with
Others (Other
Childen)

SE2.a Social
Emotional-Sense of
Self (awareness)

SE2.b Social
Emotional- Sense of
Self (confidence)

LD1.a Language
Development-
Receptive Language

CD1.a Cognitive
Development-Logic
and Reasoning
Play
Play Materials for young
children.




Engage in play with the child and parent/caregiver.
Use the Play Materials for Young Children as a guide
when discussing age appropriate toys.
Incorporate concepts from previous weeks- words and
turns, describing what the child is doing, following the
childs lead etc.
Use modeling, coaching, observation and participation in
SE2.a Social
Emotional-Sense of
Self (awareness)

SE2.b Social
Emotional- Sense of
Self (confidence)
15 minutes







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b. Discuss toy safety

discussion based on parent/caregiver level of comfort.
Provide the Toy Safety Tips parent handout and discuss
points identified on handout.


LD1.a Language
Development-
Receptive Language

CD1.a Cognitive
Development-Logic
and Reasoning
Review ASQ 3 and ASQ-SE
results.

o When reviewing results highlight the childs strengths. Let
parent/caregiver know that the ASQ allows us to monitor
developmental milestones and provide support for areas
that may need more practice. Describe each area in terms
of cutoff (above cutoff, below cutoff). Refer to the ASQ-3
Users Guide for guidelines for communicating results if
needed.

10 minutes
Note from Visit

Visit Note
Give book to family
0-2 Bright Animals
1-2 The Foot Book
2-3 If You Give A Mouse A Cookie
5 minutes











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Time of Day Activity & Notes
Time of Day Activity Notes
























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Importance of Play to the Development of your Child

Child development play is a very important part of your child growing up. Play helps him/her...
Have a sense of well-being and good self-esteem.
Deal with tragedies and setbacks.
Have a sense of control.
Make good relationships with you and his/her peers.
Understand and care about others.
Be creative and imaginative, think and have ideas, develop concentration.
Be physically coordinated.
Your child wants you to be involved in his/her play. There must be a concerted effort on your part to set aside time to play with him/her. You need to learn how to
play with him/her though some play may be silly. These are the reasons for the importance of your childs play. Play is a very important part of your childs life. When
playing, his/her brain is at work. His/her brain is progressively influenced by the environment and what he/shes being exposed to, which will have a long term impact
on him/her.

When you play regularly with her you impart your family values and influence his/her behavior and attitude at home and at school. As soon as he/she enters this
world he's primed to learn. You will see this very distinctively when observing his/her imitation and learning process in his/her early years. His/her mind is like empty
memory cache; whatever you feed his/her mind with will be stored in his/her memory. It is important you provide the stimulation he/she needs. Toys you provide
serve as an attraction and stimulant for him/her to develop through his/her play during his/her early stages of development. Play with him/her in an entertaining way
that is more fun, to help him/her learn. Playing with him/her should be fun for you both. A simple play can be swinging him/her from right to left like a swing or
stacking blocks of wooden bricks together.

Playing with him/her contributes to his/her physical, emotional and intellectual development. Through play he/she learns to communicate with you and others and
count and solve problems. He/she also learns to respect you and to get along with others like his/her peers, siblings, and teachers. This is especially important for
his/her social development.

Play provides an invaluable window to his/her personality. By observing how he/she plays, you can learn how he/she reacts to obstacles, victory and failures. The
manner of playing with him/her will provide you with insights of his/her emotions, aptitudes and preferred learning styles. Responding to instructions through visual
images, hands-on and boldness to try something unknown can be checked. Use words of encouragement and praises to motivate him/her during play and always use
positive words. Playing with his/her also serves as a bonding process. The eagerness to be involved with you in his/her play is very obvious when he/she is younger.
You need to spend time to focus on playing with him/her instead of trying to multi-task on mundane chores. He/she will detect your willingness and enthusiasm easily;
so do not create negativity or no response to his/her request. Bonding through play needs consistent efforts. The results of such are a special closeness between you
and him/her as he/she grows.







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Thus, play is a very essential and important part of your child's life. Playing helps him/her to develop physically, emotionally, mentally and also creates bonding
between the two of you. It is through child development play that his aptitude and personality can be fully explored. Through play, his/her social skills are also
developed to help him/her be aware of other people around him/her and learn how to respect and interact with them.

Child-Development Guide.Com Pending Permission









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Benefits of Play

o Play enables your child to interact and respond to you and others.
o The most important play for your child is when you play with him/her. Make time for play every day. You are your child's favorite playmate!
o From the early days of your child's life, he/she engages in play with you. Playing with him/her is not only enjoyable but is one of the most important ways
you can nurture his/her development.
o There are many fun activities your child can take part in to support social skills, creativity and intellectual development. Role play is a very important part
of a childs education. The imagination is a powerful tool which allows your child to take on the role of others. For example, playing house allows your
child to act out everyday family roles. Imaginative play comes naturally for some children but needs encouraging in others.
o Imaginative play also supports emotional development. The display of a range of emotions within the play allows your child to practice sharing, self-
control, and problem solving skills.
o Play is also a major contributor to your child's physical development. There are many activities which can benefit her physical development. He/she uses
her hands and fingers (fine motor skills) for drawing and painting, pushing buttons and turning the pages of a book.
o Running, climbing, lifting, carrying, stretching and balancing supports large muscle (gross motor) development.
o Various types of play your child participates in everyday will help him/her to grow in all areas of development.
o Play is an ideal opportunity for your child to continually learn new skills. Play is an important part in his/her life.
o All areas of your child's development are enhanced through his/her play activities. From infancy, preschool and school age years, he/she develops social,
emotional, language, and physical skills through play.
o The most beneficial play is initiated by your child. Most learning takes place during free play. When your child begins playing with blocks he/she will
explore them, bang them, and eventually begin to stack them. The earliest form of play in early childhood is called functional play.

Child-Development Guide.Com Permission Pending








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Play Materials for Young Children
Adapted from: The Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers & Twos- 2
nd
Edition

Young Infants- Provide toys that appeal to the senses
o Mobiles and Pictures
o Babies love the sight and sounds of them
o Mobiles or pictures that have patterns and high contrast
o Babies love to focus on toys and objects that resemble a face.
o Babies see best if mobile or pictures are about 14 inches from their eyes.
(Once baby begins to reach for mobile, be sure it is high enough to avoid baby knocking it down.)
o Mirrors
Babies love mirrors (4-6 months)
Use an unbreakable mirror in play spaces so your baby can enjoy looking at images.
o Soft Toys-
Soft, washable stuffed animals, dolls
o Grasping and Mouthing toys
Rattles
Teething toys
Plastic Key Rings
Grasping balls
Cloth toys
o Mobile Infants, 6-12 months
o Balls
o Balls of different sizes and textures.
o Balls that make sound when rolled
o Manipulative toys
Nesting cups
Ring stacker
Shape sorter
o Blocks
o Foam, cloth-covered and small plastic best for this age
Push and Pull toys







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o Toddlers
o Push and Pull toys that encourage pretend play (doll carriage, wagon)
o Animal figures
o Puzzles (4-5 piece, knob) made of durable materials
o Manipulative toys
Peg boards
Snap beads
o Transportation toys
Cars
Trucks
Trains
o Gross Motor
Ride on toys
Spaces to crawl through
Climb
o Twos
o Puzzles and Matching games (shapes ,colors and pictures)
o Manipulative toys
Stringing beads
Items to fit together and take apart
Toys with snaps buttons etc.
Toys with knobs, levers etc.
Transportation toys
Blocks
o A variety of sturdy blocks for building structures
o Props
o Toy animals and people to enhance block play
o Dolls
o Items to play house
o Dress up items
o Gross motor
o Ride on toys
o Tricycles (near age 3)
o Balls for kicking, throwing, catching etc.







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Household Objects that Encourage Creativity
o Small pots and pans
o Wooden spoons
o Clean laundry detergent tops
o Cardboard boxes (fun to decorate too)
o Paper towel rolls
o Measuring spoons, cups
o Plastic tubs with lids (yogurt or margarine containers)





























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Toy Safety Tips

1. Find the perfect toy for your childs age:
Make sure you check the recommended age on the toy.
Be sure that children under 3 are not around small pieces they can put in their mouths.
Inspect toys before you give them to your child to make sure there are no loose pieces or sharp edges.

2. Toy Storage
Use a bin or box that is easy to store the items in when play is done.
Before putting toys away make sure the toys have been cleaned if needed.
Never put toys away wet, they will get moldy.

3. Sign up for recalled toy items:
Go to www.recalls.gov to find the latest updates on toys that have been recalled.
Be sure to follow any directions that you are given from this website.













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What does My Child Learn from Pretend Play?

Young children learn by imagining and doing. They like to pretend to be animals, or make you food with empty bowls and wooden spoons. Have you ever wondered
what they are learning when they are pretending? Lets look at the different areas:
Social and Emotional:
When your child engages in pretend (or dramatic) play, he is actively experimenting with the social and emotional roles of life. Through cooperative play, he learns
how to take turns, share responsibility, and creatively problem-solve. When your child pretends to be someone else, he has the experience of "walking in someone
else's shoes," which helps teach children what it feels like to be someone else. They can learn how to empathize with others by doing this. . It is normal for young
children to see the world from their own point of view, but through cooperative play, your child will begin to understand the feelings of others. Your child also builds
self-esteem when he discovers he can be anything just by pretending!
Language

If you have ever listened to your child when they are pretend playing then you have probably heard them use words and phrases you didnt even know they had. You
will often hear our own words reflected in the play of children. Kids can do a perfect imitation of mom, dad, and their teachers. Pretend play helps your child
understand the power of language. They understand that words create stories and they can be acted out. This helps with reading skills later on.
Thinking

Pretend play provides your child with a variety of problems to solve. Whether it's two children wanting to play the same role or searching for the just right material to
make a roof for the playhouse, your child calls upon important cognitive thinking skills that he needs.
Some researchers in early brain development believe that pretend play helps develop the part of the brain that regulates behavior.

How to encourage pretend play
Not enough pretend play at your house? Consider creating a prop box or corner filled with objects to spark your preschooler's fantasy world. You might include:
a. Large plastic crates, cardboard blocks, or a large, empty box for creating a "home"
b. Old clothes, shoes, backpacks, hats
c. Old telephones, phone books, magazines
d. Cooking utensils, dishes, plastic food containers, table napkins, silk flowers
e. Stuffed animals and dolls of all sizes
f. Fabric pieces, blankets, or old sheets for making costumes or a fort
g. Theme-appropriate materials such as postcards, used plane tickets, foreign coins, and photos for a pretend vacation trip









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Items Used for Pretend Play?

Take-out menus.
Boxes and cans from food in the house be sure there are no sharp edges.
Notebooks and pens.
Hair brush.
Pretend animals.
Scarves (with adult supervision).
Dresses.
Hats.
Ties (with adult supervision).
Dress shirts.
Pocketbooks.
Wallets.
Socks for sock puppets.
Cars.
Stuffed animals.
Dolls.
Pots and pans, bowls, spoons and cups.
Boxes.
Sheets or blankets to make a tent.




LENA DLP Guide, Page 2
DLP Screens Explained
DLP Modes Display Screen Description
Sleeping

The DLP is idle. Screen displays Sleeping when the POWER
On/Off button is pressed on an empty DLP. If the DLP is left
sleeping for more than 15 minutes it will turn off and the
display screen will be blank. The battery icon in the upper left
corner of the screen indicates how much power is stored in
the battery.
Recording

The DLP is recording. Screen displays Recording when the REC
button is pressed and held for 4 seconds. Elapsed recording
time is displayed in hours, minutes, and seconds.
Paused

The DLP recording process is paused. Screen displays Paused
when the interchangeable RECORD/PAUSE (REC) button is
pressed and held for 4 seconds during recording. Elapsed
recording time is displayed in hours, minutes, and seconds. If
the DLP is left paused for more than 15 minutes it will turn off
and the display screen will be blank. Press the POWER On/Off
button to turn the DLP on again. It will be in Paused mode and
you may resume recording by pressing the REC button.
Note: It is not advisable to pause the DLP for brief or long periods of time
during a recording day such as when the child is napping. LENA
percentiles can only be generated from contiguous >10 hour recordings.
If the DLP were paused under the 10-hour cutoff (even if later resumed),
LENA might not have enough contiguous data to generate percentile rank
information for reports.
Memory
Full

Screen displays Memory Full when the DLP has recorded for
16 continuous hours. The DLP will not hold any more audio
data. If the memory is full, the DLP will turn off after 15
minutes and the display screen will be blank.
Charging

The DLP is charging. Screen displays Charging when your DLP
is plugged into a Wall Charger/Charging Station or when it is
plugged into a computer via USB cable but not transferring
audio. It takes 3-4 hours to fully charge the DLP battery.
Note: Always fully recharge the DLP before every recording day.

LENA DLP Guide, Page 3
DLP Screens Explained
Charged

The DLP is fully charged and ready to use. Screen displays
Charged on a DLP connected to power after charging has
completed.
Low
Battery

The DLPs battery is depleted and recording has stopped. The
DLP must be connected to the Wall Charger/Charging Station
and be charged before another recording session can be
completed. Due to the amount of time it may take to recharge
the battery, it is not advisable to continue recording on the
same day after the DLP has recharged.
Audio
Transfer

The DLP is connected to the computer via USB cable and audio
data is being transferred. Do not disconnect the DLP from the
computer before the Audio Transfer is complete. Transferring
a full 16-hour recording usually takes around 2-3 minutes.
Power
Off

DLP has been powered off by pressing the POWER On/Off
button for 4 seconds. Power off displays briefly on the screen
before going blank.
Blank
Display

There are 3 potential scenarios in which the DLP screen will
appear blank:
1) Following an automatic power turn off (e.g., after a 16-
hour recording has been completed or recording has
been paused for more than 15 minutes).
2) The DLP battery has been fully depleted. The Low
Battery screen displays if insufficient charge is
available to record but enough charge remains to
activate the display screen. If you have tried turning
the DLP on and the screen remains blank, connect the
DLP to a power source to verify if a depleted battery is
the cause. The screen will activate following power
connection if the battery has been empty.
3) The DLP is malfunctioning and requires technical
evaluation. If after connecting a DLP to a power source
the display screen remains blank, please contact LENA
Research Foundation for further assistance.

LENA DLP Guide

DLP Features






REC Button
POWER On/Off Button
Display Screen
DLP Serial Number
DLP Model Number
FRONT
BACK
Microphone
Copyright LENA Research Foundation 2014








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Every child learns at their own pace and here are some guidelines:

2 Months 4 Months
6 months
9 Months

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Begins to smile at people
Can briefly calm himself make use
sucking as a means of calming
Tries to look at parent

Language/Communication
Coos, makes gurgling sounds
Turns head toward sounds

Cognitive
Pays attention to faces
Begins to follow things with their
eyes and recognize people at a
distance

Movement/Physical Development
Can hold head up and begins to push
up when lying on tummy
Makes smoother movements with
arms and legs
Can hold up head with little support

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Smiles spontaneously, especially at people
Copies some movements and facial
expressions, like smiling or frowning

Language/Communication
Cries in different ways to show hunger, pain,
or being tired
Makes open vowel sounds

Cognitive
Lets you know when they are happy and sad
Responds to affection
Recognizes familiar people and things at a
distance

Movement/Physical Developmental
Reaches for toy with one hand
Uses hands and eyes together, such as seeing a
toy and reaching for it
Follows moving things with eyes from side to
side
Watches faces closely
Holds head steady, unsupported
Pushes down on legs when feet are on hard
surface
May be able to roll over from tummy to back
Can hold a toy and shake it and swing at
dangling toys
Brings hands to mouth
When lying on stomach, pushes up to elbow

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Knows familiar faces and begins to know if
someone is a stranger
Likes to play with others, especially parents
Responds to other peoples emotions and often
seems happy
Likes to look at self in a mirror

Language/Communication
Responds to sounds making sounds
Stringing vowels together when babbling (ah,
eh, oh)
Responds to own name
Makes sounds to show joy and displeasure
Begins to sat consonant sounds (jabbering with
m, b)

Cognitive
Looks around at things nearby
Brings things to mouth
Shows curiosity about things and tried to get
things that are out of reach
Begins to pass things from one hand to the other

Movement/Physical Development
Rolls over in both directions
Begins to sit without support
When standing, supports weight on both legs and
might bounce
Rocks back and forth, sometimes crawling
backwards before moving forward

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
May start to show anxiety towards
strangers
May be clingy to familiar adults
Start to have a preference for certain
toys/items

Language/Communication
Makes a lot of different sounds like
dadadada and bababa
Copies sounds and gestures of others

Cognitive
Starts to look for things that are no
longer in sight
Plays games like peek-a-boo
(cause/effect)
Starts to use thumb and index finger to
pick things up and start to self feed

Movement/Physical Development
Can get themselves into and out of the
sitting position
Crawls
Holds bottle
Transfers items from hand to hand



Developmental Milestones







Providence Talks!



12 Months 18 Months

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Can be shy or nervous around strangers
Cries when a familiar adult leaves them
Starts to show fear in some situations
Starts to make noises to get attention
Starts to assist with dressing by pushing arms and legs through

Language/Communication
Responds to simple requests/questions
Will shake head no and wave bye
Has a few single words like mama and dada and they mean something
Tries to say words you say

Cognitive
Can look at the right picture when that items is named
Copies gestures
Starts to understand what object functions are cups are for drinking, brushes are for
your hair
Starts to take things out of a container and then put them back in
Points to things to get your attention

Movement/Physical Development
Walks along furniture while holding on
Takes steps while holding your hands
Stands alone
May start to take a few steps on their own

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Likes to hands things to others
Starts to have temper tantrums
Shows affection towards familiar people
Starts to pretend may feed a doll
May cling to familiar adult in new situations
Explores environment on their own but frequently checks in with parent

Language/Communication
Has a minimum of 10-15 single words
Says no
Points to show someone something that they want
Follow one step verbal command without gesture

Cognitive
Knows what every day items are like a spoon or cup
Shows interest in toys like stuffed animals and dolls
Points to a body part
Can start to scribble with a crayon

Movement/Physical Development
Walks alone
May walk up stairs holding on to railing
Can pull a toy behind them when they walk
Can help undress self
Drinks from a cup
Can feed self with spoon may be messy











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24 Months
36 Months

Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Likes to copy others
Gets excited when around other children
Shows more independence
Can be defiant
Plays beside other children

Language/Communication
Points to items or pictures when named
Knows names of familiar people and body parts
Says 2 word phrases
Repeats words that are overheard
Points to items in a book

Cognitive
Begins to identify shapes and colors
Can complete rhymes in familiar stories
Can build towers of blocks
Follows 2 step directions that are related
Names and labels items
Plays simple make believe

Movement/Physical Development
Runs
Kicks a ball
Stands on tiptoes
Walks up and down stairs holding on
Throws a ball
Starts to climb up and down furniture
Social/Emotional/Adaptive
Shows affection for friends
Takes turns in a game
Shows empathy for others
Understands mine, his, hers
Shows a wide range of emotions
Separates more easily from familiar adults

Language/Communication
Follows 2-3 step directions
Names most familiar items
Understands words like, in, on, under
Says first name, knows age, and gender
Can name friends
Uses pronouns and plurals appropriately I, me, you, dogs
Can be understood by strangers most of the time
Can talk in 2-3 sentences

Cognitive
Can work toys with buttons, levers, and moving parts
Can do puzzles that have at least 7 pieces
Understands number concepts like give me, two
Copies a circle with pencil or crayon
Can screw and unscrew things like the cover of a water bottle
Turns pages of a book one at a time
Runs easily
Engage in pretend play using props

Movement/Physical Development
Climbs well
Pedals a tricycle
Can walk up and down stairs one foot at a time
United States Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2012 Developmental Milestones 2- 24 Months








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(If you feel that your child is not doing the following)
You would want to contact your pediatrician or seek out Early Intervention services in your area.



2 Months 4 Months 6 Months 9 Months

Not yet responding to loud sounds

Not yet watching things as they move

Hasnt begun to smile at others

Isnt bringing hands to mouth

Cant hold head up when pushing up on
tummy

Doesnt cry when hungry or tired


Doesnt watch things as they move

Not yet smiling at people

Cant hold head steady

Isnt cooing or making sounds

Doesnt bring things to mouth

Doesnt push down when legs are
placed on hard surface

Has trouble moving one or both eyes in
all directions


Doesnt try to get things that are in
reach

Shows no affection towards caregivers

Doesnt respond to sounds around them

Has difficulty bringing toys or hands to
mouth

Doesnt make open vowel sounds

Doesnt roll over in either direction

Doesnt laugh or make squealing noises

Seems very stiff

Seems very floppy


Doesnt bear weight on legs with
support

Doesnt sit alone

Doesnt babble

Doesnt play games like peek-a-boo

Doesnt respond to own name

Doesnt seem to recognize familiar
people

Doesnt look where you point

Doesnt transfer toys from hand to the
other

Areas of Concern







Providence Talks!




United States Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2012 Developmental Milestones



12 Months 18 Months 24 Months 36 Months

Doesnt crawl

Doesnt pull to stand or cruise on
furniture

Cant stand when supported

Doesnt search for things that are hidden

Doesnt say at least one single word

Doesnt wave bye or shake head no

Doesnt point to things

Loses skills once had


Doesnt point to show things to others

Cant walk

Doesnt know what familiar things are

Doesnt understand simple requests

Doesnt copy others

Doesnt gain new words

Doesnt have at least 10 words

Doesnt mind or notice when a caregiver
leaves

Loses skills he once had



Doesnt begin to use 2 words together

Doesnt know how to use simple things
like a cup or a brush

Doesnt copy actions or words

Doesnt follow simple instructions

Doesnt walk steadily

Loses skills that once had

Doesnt share eye contact

Cant do a puzzle with 3 or more pieces

Cant stack blocks



Falls down a lot

Has trouble climbing stairs

Cant do simple puzzles

Doesnt speak in sentences

Doesnt understand simple instructions

Doesnt know how to pretend or play
make-believe

Doesnt make eye contact

Loses skill once had

Cant calm down from tantrums within a
reasonable amount of time

Areas of Concern







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INSERT ASQ








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INSERT MACARTHUR BATES









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Language Development Charts
Months
Vocalization with intonation
Responds to his/her name
Responds to human voices without visual cues by turning his/her head and eyes
Responds appropriately to friendly and angry tines

12 Months
Uses one or more words with meaning.
Understands simple instructions, especially if vocal or physical cues are given.
Practices inflection.
Is aware of the social value of speech.

18 Months
Has vocabulary of approximately 5-20 words.
Vocabulary made up chiefly of nouns.
Some echolalia (repeating a word or phrase over and over).
Much jargon with emotional content.
Is able to follow simple commands

24 Months
Can name a number of objects common to his/her surroundings.
Is able to use at least two prepositions, usually chosen from the following: in, on, under.
Combines words into a short sentence-largely noun-verb combinations (mean) length of sentences is given as 1.2 words.
Approximately 2/3 of what child says should be intelligible.
Vocabulary of approximately 150-300 words.
Rhythm and fluency often poor.
Volume and pitch of voice not yet well-controlled.







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Can use two pronouns correctly: I, me, you (although me and I are often confused).
My and mine are beginning to emerge.
Responds to such commands as show me your eyes (nose, mouth, hair).

36 Months
Use pronouns I, you, me correctly.
Is using some plurals and past tenses.
Knows at least three prepositions, usually in, on, under.
Knows chief parts of body and should be able to indicate these if not name.
Handles three word sentences easily.
Has in the neighborhood of 900-1000 words.
About 90% of what child says should be intelligible.
Verbs begin to predominate.
Understands most simple questions dealing with his/her environment and activities.
Relates his/her experiences so that they can be followed with reason.
Able to reason out such questions as what must you do when you are sleepy, hungry, cool, or thirsty?
Should be able to give his/her sex, name and age.
Should not be expected to answer all questions even though he/she understands what is expected.

4 years
Knows names of familiar animals.
Can use at least four prepositions or can demonstrate his/her understanding of their meaning when given commands.
Names common objects in picture books or magazines.
Knows one or more colors.
Can repeat 4 digits when they are given slowly.
Can usually repeat words of four syllables.
Demonstrates understanding of over and under.
Has most vowels and diphthongs and the consonants p, b, m, w, n well established.
Often indulges in make-believe.
Extensive verbalization as he/she carries out activities.
Understands such concepts as longer, larger, when a contrast is presented.
Readily follows simple commands even though the stimulus objects are not in sight.







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Much repetition of words, phrases, syllables, and even sounds.

5 Years
Can use many descriptive words spontaneously-both adjectives and adverbs.
Knows common opposites: big-little, hard-soft, heave-light, etc.
Has number concepts of 4 or more. Can count to ten.
Speech should be completely intelligible, in spite of articulation problems.
Should have all vowels and the consonants, m,p,b,h,w,k,g,t,d,n,ng,y (yellow).
Should be able to repeat sentences as long as nine words.
Should be able to define common objects in terms of use (hat, shoe, chair).
Should be able to follow three commands given without interruptions.
Should know his/her age.
Should have simple time concepts: morning, afternoon, night, day, later, after, while.
Tomorrow, yesterday, today.
Should be using fairly long sentences and should use some compound and some complex sentences.
Speech on the whole should be grammatically correct.

6 Years
In addition to the above consonants these should be mastered: f, v, sh, zh, th,1.
He/she should have concepts of 7.
Speech should be completely intelligible and socially useful.
Should be able to tell a rather connected story about a picture, seeing relationships.
Between objects and happenings.