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BMC Impact Solutions Event

Management Guide

Supporting
BMC Impact Manager 7.3
BMC Impact Explorer 7.3
BMC Impact Portal 7.3
BMC Impact Event Adapters 7.3

February 2009

www.bmc.com

Contacting BMC Software


You can access the BMC Software website at http://www.bmc.com. From this website, you can obtain information
about the company, its products, corporate offices, special events, and career opportunities.

United States and Canada


Address

BMC SOFTWARE INC


2101 CITYWEST BLVD
HOUSTON TX 77042-2827
USA

Telephone

713 918 8800 or


800 841 2031

Fax

(01) 713 918 8000

Fax

713 918 8000

Outside United States and Canada


Telephone

(01) 713 918 8800

Copyright 2007-2009 BMC Software, Inc.


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BMC Software considers information included in this documentation to be proprietary and confidential. Your use of this information is
subject to the terms and conditions of the applicable End User License Agreement for the product and the proprietary and restricted
rights notices included in this documentation.

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U.S. Government Restricted Rights to Computer Software. UNPUBLISHED -- RIGHTS RESERVED UNDER THE COPYRIGHT LAWS OF
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restrictions, as applicable, set forth in FAR Section 52.227-14, DFARS 252.227-7013, DFARS 252.227-7014, DFARS 252.227-7015, and DFARS
252.227-7025, as amended from time to time. Contractor/Manufacturer is BMC SOFTWARE INC, 2101 CITYWEST BLVD, HOUSTON TX
77042-2827, USA. Any contract notices should be sent to this address.

Customer support
You can obtain technical support by using the BMC Software Customer Support website or by contacting Customer
Support by telephone or e-mail. To expedite your inquiry, see Before contacting BMC.

Support website
You can obtain technical support from BMC 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at http://www.bmc.com/support_home. From
this website, you can
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s
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read overviews about support services and programs that BMC offers
find the most current information about BMC products
search a database for issues similar to yours and possible solutions
order or download product documentation
download products and maintenance
report an issue or ask a question
subscribe to receive proactive e-mail alerts when new product notices are released
find worldwide BMC support center locations and contact information, including e-mail addresses, fax numbers, and
telephone numbers

Support by telephone or e-mail


In the United States and Canada, if you need technical support and do not have access to the web, call 800 537 1813 or
send an e-mail message to customer_support@bmc.com. (In the subject line, enter SupID:<yourSupportContractID>,
such as SupID:12345). Outside the United States and Canada, contact your local support center for assistance.

Before contacting BMC


Have the following information available so that Customer Support can begin working on your issue immediately:
s

product information

product name
product version (release number)
license number and password (trial or permanent)

operating system and environment information

machine type
operating system type, version, and service pack or other maintenance level such as PUT or PTF
system hardware configuration
serial numbers
related software (database, application, and communication) including type, version, and service pack or
maintenance level

sequence of events leading to the issue

commands and options that you used

messages received (and the time and date that you received them)

product error messages


messages from the operating system, such as file system full
messages from related software

License key and password information


If you have questions about your license key or password, contact BMC as follows:
s

(USA or Canada) Contact the Order Services Password Team at 800 841 2031, or send an e-mail message to
ContractsPasswordAdministration@bmc.com.

(Europe, the Middle East, and Africa) Fax your questions to EMEA Contracts Administration at +31 20 354 8702, or send
an e-mail message to password@bmc.com.

(Asia-Pacific) Contact your BMC sales representative or your local BMC office.

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Contents
Chapter 1

Introduction to event management

19

Event management process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Related documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Elements of the Events View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the Events View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dashboard View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cell data view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing access to Help for events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for setting login timeout value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

19
20
20
21
21
25
27
29
29
30

Chapter 2

33

Working with event adapters (walk-through)

Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prerequisite. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LogFile Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gathering event information from the third-party event source . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Task summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample log file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating the mcxa.conf file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining the MAP file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining the .baroc file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining the rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generating test events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SNMP Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gathering event information from the third-party event source . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the SNMP Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Publishing the MIB files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing/Editing the MAP file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the generated .baroc files in the cells KB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unpublishing MIBs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generating test events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33
34
34
34
35
35
36
37
38
40
40
45
47
47
48
48
49
51
52
53
53

Chapter 3

55

Event rules

Rules and event management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56


Rule structure and syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Contents

MRL files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
MRL conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
General rule syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
MRL event selection clauses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Where clauses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Using clause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Using_policy clause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Unless clause. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
When clause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Body clause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Variables in rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Dynamic data in rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Global records in rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Interfaces in rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Interface instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Indexes in rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Using indexes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Compiling rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Testing a rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Tracing a rule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Configuring rule tracing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Customizing rule trace message headers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Undefined events, processing errors, and deprecated slots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Undefined events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Event processing errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Using deprecated slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Chapter 4

Working with collectors

87

Creating or modifying a collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88


Collector syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Best practices for defining collectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Collector security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Defining static collectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Defining dynamic collectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Default event management collectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
self_collector.mrl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
catchall_collector.mrl. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
mc_bystatus_collectors.mrl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
mc_bylocation_collectors.mrl. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
MCxP collector set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
bii4p_collectors.mrl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
mc_evr_collectors.mrl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Default service impact management event collector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Chapter 5

Event lists

101

Event list details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102


Events View details pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
New Common Event Model slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
6

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

How to determine event states. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Understanding event status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding event severity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding event priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing display settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the effect of event status and severity on collectors color . . . .
Understanding the effect of event status on event count for collectors . . . . . . .
Working with event lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing event lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting the type of event list to view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing event details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing related events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refreshing and freezing the event list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing floating windows in full screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Organizing events in the event list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using MetaCollectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filtering events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sorting events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning events to users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

106
108
108
109
110
112
113
114
114
115
116
116
117
119
120
120
121
129
133

Chapter 6

137

Event groups and image views

Event groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of event groupings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event group configuration files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event tree hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event tree objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Image views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Planning event groups and image views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with event groups and image views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an event group (event tree top-level) node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an event group subnode (event tree node) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting an event group subnode (event tree top-level node) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hiding a collector in an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Showing a hidden collector in an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Putting an event group into production or development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a custom image view to an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for viewing custom slots in an event view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Granting user access to event groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

138
138
139
140
140
141
143
144
144
145
146
146
147
147
148
150
151

Chapter 7

153

Event operations

Performing event operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Executing remote or local actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manually setting component status or maintenance mode with a remote action . .
Viewing event operations history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing event relationships for abstracted, correlated, or propagated events. . .
Copying and printing event information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to event sources through hyperlinks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alias formulas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents

154
156
159
160
160
161
162
163
7

Working with Event Alias Formulas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163


Working with the CIEM Dashboard View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Creating the CIEM Dashboard View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Specifying a web browser for your components home page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Launching the web browser from your dashboard homepage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Editing the CIEM dashboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Copying the CIEM dashboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Deleting the CIEM dashboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Guidelines for managing high availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Relating events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Event relation definition example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Guidelines for implementing an event relation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Chapter 8

Creating local and remote actions

189

Defining and executing local actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190


Local action definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
File naming guidelines for action executables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Defining a local action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Creating a user-defined local action for multiple events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Configuring BMC Impact Explorer to run a local action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Version control of local actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Adding buttons for actions to the toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Defining and executing remote actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Remote action result events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Location of remote actions and executables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Requirements for action executable files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Defining a remote action. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Remote action definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Remote action execution results. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Action execution variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Defining a remote action in a BMC Impact Manager cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Chapter 9

Remote execution

211

Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Component descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Admin record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Action rule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Action task. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Credential record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Process summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Working with credential records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
How IAS searches for credentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Interactive remote execution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
GUI walkthrough: interactive remote execution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
Defining the remote action rule and task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Automatic remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
8

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Work flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Authentication guidelines for automatic remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GUI walkthrough: automatic remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining the remote execution policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supplemental manual procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual configuration of interactive remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual configuration of automatic remote execution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Properties files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ias.properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
centraladmin-strings.properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
remoteexecution.properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Executing reboot command via remote action results in timeout messages . . .
A script is deployed on a remote UNIX system but does not execute . . . . . . . .
PsExec is not supported on 64-bit Windows 2008 Server systems. . . . . . . . . . . .
Issues in high availability environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Excluded character in action group name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

236
237
237
237
240
240
251
252
252
253
253
254
254
255
255
256
256

Chapter 10

257

Event management policies

Event management policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258


Out-of-the-box event management policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
How event management policies work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Event management policy workflow overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Event selectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
Event selector groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
Event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Timeframes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
Evaluation order of event policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
How dynamic data enrichment event management policies work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
External enrichment data sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
How to create a new local timeframe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
How to add a notification service (notification policies only). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment
source file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
Creating new standard event management policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Creating a new standard blackout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
Creating a new component based enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
Creating a new closure policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
Creating a new correlation policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
Creating a new enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
Creating a new escalation policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
Creating a new notification policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
Creating a new propagation policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
Creating a new recurrence policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Creating a new remote action policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
Creating a new suppression policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
Creating a new threshold policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
Contents

Creating a new timeout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319


Enabling and disabling out-of-the-box standard event management policies . . . . . 322
Creating a new dynamic data enrichment event management policy . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
Enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event management policies . . . 334
Enabling a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
Enabling a dynamic data enrichment location policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
Enabling a dynamic data enrichment service contact policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation policy . . . . 346
Importing dynamic data enrichment source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Verifying that the policy is running. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Editing event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Deleting an event selector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Trouble-shooting event management policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Problem: The policy is not running . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Problem: The notification policy is configured to generate a notification email,
but no email is being sent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
Problem: I receive an invalid data error when running a dynamic data
enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
Problem: I receive an error message when running a dynamic data enrichment
blackout policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
Problem: I have several thousand data records displayed in the Dynamic Data
Editor tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Trouble-shooting tools for dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Chapter 11

Dynamic data editor

357

Dynamic data definition using the Dynamic Data Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358


Navigating the Dynamic Data Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358
Navigation pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358
Toolbar functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360
Filtering and sorting the Data List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360
Filtering slots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360
Sorting data fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363
Working with data instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364
Extended Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365
Internals tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365
Data instance context menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365
Adding a new data instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365
Editing slots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367
Exporting data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
Chapter 12

User-defined policies

371

Understanding user-defined event policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372


Understanding event processing rules (MRL) for policy types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372
Format of event processing rules for policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372
How a rule for a policy type is processed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
Sources of information about rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
User-defined event policy type creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
Creating user-defined policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
10

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Defining the policy data class for a new policy type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
Defining presentation names for a new policy type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376
Creating the event processing rule(s) for a new policy type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377
Index

379

Contents

11

12

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Figures
Location of elements in the Events View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Events View navigation pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
A CIEM Dashboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Impact Manager Information dialog box General tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Impact Manager Information dialog box Workload tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Impact Manager Information dialog box Components tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Selector Details: Logfile Adapter example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Add Event Criteria: LogFile Adapter example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Selector Details complete: LogFile Adapter example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
By Policy Type selection: LogFile Adapter example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Selector Chooser: LogFile Adapter example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Notification Policy Details: Logfile Adapter example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Event message: LOGFILE_BASE event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Event message: BACKUP_MONITOR event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Rule syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Event selection criteria example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
when condition triggered by any change to a specified slot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
when condition triggered by a specific change to a specified slot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
when condition triggered by a specific change to a specified slot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Rule containing a when clause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Sample data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Execute rule using dynamic data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Interface instance example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Collector definition syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Collector tree definition example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Static collector example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Static collector example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Self collector definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Catchall collector definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
MC_SMC_EVENTS collector definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
How event operations affect event state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Events View subtab of Edit Configuration dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Severity section of Events View subtab of Edit Configuration dialog box . . . . . . . . 113
Event count section of Events View subtab of Edit Configuration dialog box . . . . 114
Event Sources selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Float command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
MetaCollector addition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Slot quick filter and severity quick filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Edit Event View dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Slot order creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Figures

13

Single-click sorting indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132


Multiple column sorting indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Edit Configuration dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Event tree hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Image view widgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Custom image view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Image view with float option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Event Group editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Event tree node addition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Event annotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Remote action selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Local action selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Active Explore Event Relationships icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Alias Formulas Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Add Alias Formula dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Example of match attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Home Page URI slot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Dashboard with CI homepage link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Related events command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Event relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Local action general syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Syntax to limit local actions available by user role . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Syntax to limit local actions by event class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Syntax to execute a local actions against multiple events of the same type . . . . . . . 195
Example of an action definition that uses the batchmode parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Example celleventdata.xml file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Edit Toolbar Actions dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Local toolbar action selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Local action toolbar button order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Action rule syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Example of a specified role . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Action argument syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Primitive to perform an action from a rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Example of exit code that returns an argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Example of exit code that returns a specified value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Process overview: remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Add Event Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Remote action result icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Automatic remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Remote Action Policy definition window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Interactive remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Event management policy definition workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Event selector group name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Flow of data required to implement a dynamic data enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . 267
Default PMEP event classes and slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Timeframes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Example edited location.csv file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275
Sample rows in the TextTranslation.csv file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Variable syntax example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278

14

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Selector Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Class Chooser dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selection Definition section of the Add Event Criteria editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example event selection criteria expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completed event selection criteria in Selector Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blackout Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Component Based Enrichment Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Closure Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Correlation Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enrichment Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Escalation Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Time Escalation Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rate of Event Arrival Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Notification Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Propagation Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Propagation cell list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recurrence Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Suppression Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Threshold Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hold Events options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pass Events Through options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Timeout Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
List of event management policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Import confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Import confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Import Data Confirmation dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Import confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Import confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Import confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Import tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
History tab showing executed dynamic data enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Invalid data error: dynamic enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Invalid timeframe error: dynamic blackout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamic Data Editor Navigation Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamic Data Editor toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slot Quick Filter dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unfiltered data list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type field list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Message bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New data instance created with the New Copy option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Figures

279
280
281
281
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284
287
291
294
297
301
303
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306
309
310
312
314
317
318
319
321
323
325
328
330
333
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338
339
340
342
343
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346
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348
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354
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15

Type field List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367


Export Data dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
Export Data dialog boxSelecting the data format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
Contents of mcdata.csv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
Export file containing four data instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369

16

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Tables
Event management processes implemented through BMC IX Console . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Chapter overviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Description of elements in the Events View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Description of elements in the Events View navigation pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Help Info subtab display settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
mcxa.conf parameters: Logfile adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
mcxa.conf parameters: SNMP Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Syntax object description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Conditions for the using clause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
MC_CELL_PARSE_ERROR slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
MC_CELL_UNDEFINED_CLASS slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
MC_CELL_PROCESS_ERROR slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
BMC Impact Manager standard roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
By Status collector set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
By Location collector set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Collectors included in the MCxP collector set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Event relations icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Events View Details pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
New CEM-related slots in BMC IX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Event states resulting from event operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Current operator information in event list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Event status icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Event severity levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Event priority icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Events View subtab display settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Default filters and filter options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Event group configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Event tree objects and definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Description of conditional operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Related event and source event slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Example event relation definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Tags for the local action general syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Tags for defining multiple actions in one file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Standard locations for action executables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Action rule syntax variable descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Action execution variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Elements of credential_repository.xml . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Process description: remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
iadmin options for remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Required fields: adding a credential record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Tables

17

Required fields: modifying a credential record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222


Required fields: deleting a record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Create Remote Actions dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Data fields (part 1): Create Remote Actions dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Add Event Criteria descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Data fields (part 2): Create Remote Actions dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Rule and task correspondence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
Input arguments: admin_execute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Parameters: action task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Remote execution properties in ias.properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Remote execution port and timeout properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Standard event management policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Out-of-the-box policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Out-of-the-box event selectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
Timeframe types and descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
Evaluation order of event policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
Dynamic data enrichment source files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
Enrichment configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
Timeframe Edit dialog options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Standard event management policy types and procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Cause Event tab controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
Out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event policy types and procedures . . . . 334
Import tab uneditable fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Administration tab navigation pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359
Policy Type Creation process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374

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BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Chapter

Introduction to event management


The BMC Impact Explorer (BMC IX) component provides a cross-platform operator and
administrator interface for defining and managing events and for viewing service models that
have event associations.

Event management process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Related documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Elements of the Events View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the Events View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dashboard View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cell data view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing access to Help for events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for setting login timeout value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

19
20
20
21
21
25
27
29
29
30

Event management process


The BMC Impact Explorer Console provides a means for monitoring, managing, and
taking actions on events. Event monitoring can be as simple as an operator taking
note of the severity levels of events originating from different components and then
reporting the information to an administrator. Event managing can run the gamut
from initiating simple management actions such as acknowledging the event to
launching remote actions on the impacted component. Event managing also includes
the creation of Master Rule Language (MRL) rules and of policies, both of which are
designed to process incoming events that match specified criteria. You create MRL
rules manually, but you can define the policies through the BMC IX Console.
Table 1 on page 20 lists the different ways that BMC Event Manager can implement
the different aspects of event management. Some implementations apply to more
than one process.

Chapter 1

Introduction to event management

19

Related documentation

Table 1

Event management processes implemented through BMC IX Console

Event management process


Normalization and enrichment

BMC IX implementation
s
s
s
s

Filtering

s
s
s
s

Prioritization

s
s

Suppression

s
s

MAP files at the event adapter source


Enrichment policy
Dynamic enrichment policy
Component based enrichment policy
Selectors
MAP files at the event adapter source
Suppression policy
Threshold policy
Enrichment policy
Escalation policy
Suppression policy
Closure policy

Deduplication

Recurrence policy

Abstraction

Not implemented in BMC IX. You must apply the MRL rules instead.

Correlation

Correlation policy

Escalation

s
s
s

Notification

s
s

Automation

s
s

Escalation policy
Propagation policy
Set Manual Status menu option
Notification policy
Send Event as SMTP Email menu option
Remote Action Policy
Run Book Automation integration module

Related documentation
This guide is part of the BMC Impact Solutions documentation set. You should review
it together with the following complementary guides:
s
s
s
s
s

BMC Impact Solutions Concept Guide


BMC Impact Solutions Getting Started Guide
BMC Impact Event Adapters User Guide
BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide
BMC Impact Solutions Infrastructure Administration Guide

Using this guide


Table 2 on page 21 provides an overview of each chapter in the guide.

20

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Elements of the Events View

Table 2

Chapter overviews

Chapter Title

Summary

Working with event adapters (walk- shows how to set up the LogFile and SNMP Adapters and
through)
their MAP files to normalize events at the event source

Event rules

explains how to write rules in the Master Rule Language to


process events. It assumes an understanding of MRL and the
BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference
Guide.

Working with collectors

describes the default event collects and tells how to write


custom collectors

Event lists

describes how to use the GUI to handle events

Event groups and image views

shows how to manage the GUI through event groups and


image views

Creating local and remote actions

provides the procedure for defining local and remote actions


that you perform from the GUI

Event operations

tells how to initiate different actions on events in the GUI

Remote execution

explains how to implement and use the remote execution


feature

10

Event management policies

shows how to create the different types of event management


policies to handle event processing

11

Dynamic data editor

tells how to use the Dynamic Data Editor to create data


instances that supplement rules and policies

12

User-defined policies

describes how to create and implement user-defined policies


to handle specialized event processing

Elements of the Events View


This section describes some of the main GUI elements and navigation features of the
Events View in the BMC Impact Explorer (BMC IX) Console.

Accessing the Events View


To access the Events View in the BMC IX Console, click the Events tab. The Events
View contains a toolbar, a navigation pane, the event list, and subtabs containing
various types of details about the events that are displayed in the events list. You can
view events for a cell, a collector, a MetaCollector, or an event group
Event instances are displayed in an event list. From the event list, you can perform
event operations (such as closing or escalating an event), view event relationships
(such as correlation), perform actions on an event, or view business services related to
an event.

Chapter 1

Introduction to event management

21

Accessing the Events View

Figure 1 shows an example of the BMC IX Events View.


Figure 1

Location of elements in the Events View

3
1

4
5
6

7
2
8

Table 1 lists and describes the main elements of the Events View.
Table 3

Description of elements in the Events View (part 1 of 2)

Name

Description

Information Display
Selection tabs

provide access to the available categories of event information such as cells, cell
groups, collectors, MetaCollectors, and event groups

navigation pane

displays cells, cell groups, collectors, MetaCollectors, and event groups in a


hierarchical relationship tree

View Selection tabs

provide access to the Events, Services, Administration, and Dashboard Views

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BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Accessing the Events View

Table 3

Description of elements in the Events View (part 2 of 2)

Name

Description

Event Sources list

provides access to the default filters, which provide variations of the event list:
s

list all events

limit the event list to active, new, closed, or blackout events in the following
categories:
Basic Information: displays the default slots of the class EVENT
Supervisor Information: displays the same slots as Basic Information,
except that action count is replaced by current owner
SMC Information: displays information from the collector
MC_SMC_EVENT that collects all events in which the mc_smc_id slot
contains information

list service model component events in the following categories:


impact events
status history events

For more information, see Using the default filters on page 122.
5

Slots

columns that display the status, priority, severity, action count (Occurrences),
event relation, receipt date (Occurred), and message for events

event list

displays the contents of a cell or collector as a list of events with slot information
and filters.
Each line of the list represents one event.

Pending Events
indicator

displays the number of events in the current list and the number of events
pending
In Figure 1 on page 22, Pending Events shows that 98 events are in the current
event list and no events are pending.

details pane

displays details about the currently selected event in each subtab


For descriptions of each subtab, see Table 18 on page 104.

Figure 2 on page 24 shows the navigation panel and tree in detail.

Chapter 1

Introduction to event management

23

Accessing the Events View

Figure 2

Events View navigation pane


2
10
1

4
5
9

6
7

Table 4 on page 25 lists and describes the main features of the navigation panel.

24

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Dashboard View

Table 4

Description of elements in the Events View navigation pane

Name

Icon

Collectors
subtab

displays the cells, cell groups, and collectors available for viewing

MetaCollectors
subtab

displays the MetaCollectors available for viewing

Event Groups
subtab

displays the event groups available for viewing

cell group icon

identifies a cell group

cell icon

identifies a cell

hierarchy
indicator

indicates existence of a hierarchy below the monitored cell, cell group, or


collector

collector icon

identifies a collector

severity level
indicator

varies

Description

identifies by color the highest severity level of the events contained in the
collector (for the configured statuses).
For more information about the severity levels for events, see Table 23 on
page 109.
For more information, see Understanding the effect of event status and
severity on collectors color on page 112.

event count

none

displays the number of events contained in the collector and the number of
events that you selected to count.
For more information, see Understanding the effect of event status on event
count for collectors on page 113.

10 View Selection
tabs

none

access the Events, Services, Administration, or Dashboard Views

Dashboard View
When the Impact Manager cell that your important components reside on is a BMC
EM cell, clicking the Dashboard tab on BMC IX displays a CI-centric Event
Management (CIEM) Dashboard View. This view displays the important components
that you want to monitor, but does not display relationships between those
components or how an impacted component can affect a service.

Chapter 1

Introduction to event management

25

Dashboard View

The CIEM Dashboard View is a consolidated view that enables service


administrators, managers, as well as operators to easily monitor and detect problems
in the most important components. Using the various panes on the Dashboard View,
you can quickly get the details about:
s
s
s

important componentscomponents that you want to monitor


event listevent details for the selected component
component homepagedetailed information or troubleshooting tips about the
selected component

Figure 3

A CIEM Dashboard

NOTE
The Operators, Service Operators, and Service Operators - Senior user groups cannot see the
Dashboard tab.

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BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Cell data view

Cell data view


Property and performance information for a cell is maintained in the Impact Manager
Info dialog box. You can access this information by right-clicking a cell in the
navigation pane and choosing View Manager Info from the menu. Cell property data
is presented on the General subtab, including the cell name, description, IP address
and port number for the primary cell server, IP address and port number for the
secondary cell server (if applicable), release and build versions, service address, port
number, and platform information.
The Workload subtab presents performance statistics for the cell, including how much
data the cell has received, the number of errors, and how much data has been stored,
removed, and propagated. The service performance data presented on the
Components tab pertains specifically to the number of service model components
associated with the cell, such as the type of components and the relationships.
Figure 4 on page 27, Figure 5 on page 28, and Figure 6 on page 28 show examples of
property and performance data presented on the tabs of the dialog box.
Figure 4

Impact Manager Information dialog box General tab

Chapter 1

Introduction to event management

27

Cell data view

Figure 5

Impact Manager Information dialog box Workload tab

Figure 6

Impact Manager Information dialog box Components tab

NOTE
To refresh the contents of the Impact Manager Information dialog box, click Refresh

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BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Online help

Online help
Provided that your administrator has set up online event Help, you can use the Help
Info subtab in the Edit Configuration dialog box to select options for displaying that
additional event information. See your administrator for details about using static or
dynamic Help.

Customizing access to Help for events


Static Help is based on classes and is created by the console with a combination of the
Help Info URL, the class name of the event, and the HTML suffix. An .html or .htm file
must already exist for each class used in your enterprise environment. These files
must be available to your browser.
Dynamic Help is based on slot information for the selected event. When you access
dynamic Help, a script creates a web page from a combination of the Help Info URL,
the slot names, and the slot values of the selected event.

Before you begin


Before you enable either static or dynamic Help, you must obtain the following
information:
s
s
s
s

whether you have static or dynamic Help


the URL of the backup web server you will use
the local path to the directory location of the Help HTML files
the location of the directory for dynamic Help

To customize access to event Help


1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Configuration.
2 In the Edit Configuration dialog box, click the Help Info subtab.
3 Use the information in Table 5 to determine the appropriate settings.

Chapter 1

Introduction to event management

29

Guidelines for setting login timeout value

Table 5

Help Info subtab display settings

Field

Description

Enable dynamic CGI lookups enables or disables dynamic Help


for Help Info check box
(required for dynamic Help
only)
Help Info URL box

specifies the URL for the web server from which the online
Help information is obtained

Backup Info URL box

specifies the URL for a secondary web server that will be


accessed if the Help Info URL cannot be accessed

HTML Suffix box


specifies the type of HTML suffix (.html or .htm)
(required for static Help only)
Preferred Web Browser box

specifies the web browser to use on this console; provides a


Browse function for locating the correct browser file

4 Click OK to save the changes and exit the dialog box.


After this configuration, you can click

to see Help information for an event.

NOTE
If you have not configured a default web browser for the console, you will be prompted to
select the Web browser the first time that you access the Help.

Guidelines for setting login timeout value


After you log into the BMC IX Console, it can take a few minutes for all the cell data
to load, depending on
s
s
s
s

the number of cells


amount of data stored in the cells
network response time
speed of the local system

To ensure that the cell data is fully loaded before you start interacting with the
console, BMC Software has provided a progress bar to indicate when the data loading
process is complete. The default timeout value of the progress bar is 60,000
milliseconds.
Depending on your BMC Impact Solutions configuration, you can increase or
decrease this value. If you have multiple cells with large amounts of data, you may
want to increase it. If you are managing a single cell on a fast system (for example,
with dual CPU and 4 GB RAM), then you may want to decrease the value.
30

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Guidelines for setting login timeout value

You can modify this value in the


IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\console\etc\ix.properties file by assigning a different

value to the init_time parameter. Remember to restart the BMC IX Console after
modifying the ix.properties file.

TIP
Do not try to interact with the BMC IX Console, such as clicking objects in the navigation tree,
until the data is fully loaded. Otherwise, the BMC IX Console will experience performance
delays.

Chapter 1

Introduction to event management

31

Guidelines for setting login timeout value

32

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Chapter

Working with event adapters (walkthrough)


2

Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prerequisite. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LogFile Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gathering event information from the third-party event source . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Task summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample log file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating the mcxa.conf file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining the MAP file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining the .baroc file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining the rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generating test events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SNMP Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gathering event information from the third-party event source . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the SNMP Configuration Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Publishing the MIB files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing/Editing the MAP file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unpublishing MIBs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generating test events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33
34
34
34
35
35
36
37
38
40
40
45
47
47
48
48
49
51
53
53

Purpose
This walk-through summarizes the major steps in implementing two of the BMC
Impact Event Adapters: the LogFile Adapter and the SNMP Adapter. The main
purpose is to show you how to normalize events at the adapter level before the events
are received by the BMC Impact Manager. For optimal event processing, BMC
recommends that you reformat the event messages at the adapter level.

Chapter 2 Working with event adapters (walk-through)

33

Prerequisite

Prerequisite
You should be familiar with the MAP files, directory structure, and the configuration
parameters and procedure of the LogFile Adapter and SNMP Adapter. Refer to the
BMC Impact Event Adapters User Guide.

LogFile Adapter
The Logfile Adapter reads text-based logfiles that contain records which can be
interpreted by Perl regular expressions.
Some log files that the Logfile Adapter monitors are:
s
s
s

Syslog messages on UNIX-based systems through the mcsyslogd.map file


Apache log files through the mcapache.map file
other text-based log files through the mclogfile.map file
This walk-through provides guidelines on editing the mclogfile.map file.

Gathering event information from the third-party event


source
You can install the BMC Impact Event Adapters on the event source or on a system
that points to the event source.
When installing the BMC Impact Event Adapters separately from the other BMC
Impact Solution components, you are prompted to specify the
s
s

host name of the BMC Impact Administration Server


name of the cell to which to send the BAROC events

The installer creates an mcell.dir file for the event adapter with an entry for the cell.
The installer also populates the ServerName parameter of the mcxa.conf file with the
cell name.
When installing the BMC Impact Event Adapters with the BMC Impact Manager cell,
you specify the host name of the BMC Impact Administration Server. The installer
automatically updates the mcell.dir file of the event adapter with the cell entry and
populates the ServerName parameter of the mxca.conf file with the cell name.

34

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Task summary

When installing the BMC Impact Event Adapters with the BMC Impact Manager cell
and the BMC Impact Administration Server, the installer automatically updates the
mcell.dir file with the cell record and populates the ServerName parameter in the
mcxa.conf file with the cell name.

TIP
Make sure that the Adapter has permission to access the log file by checking the permissions
on the log file.

Task summary
To prepare the Logfile Adapter, obtain a sample log file from the event source, and
determine the relevant event messages that you want to translate into BAROC
format. You specify the log file that you are monitoring in the mcxa.conf file by
entering the full path to the log file as the Logfile parameter value.
You then can modify the MAP file to add new class definitions that translate
messages to BAROC format. If you have customized class definitions in the MAP file,
you must modify the classes in the mcxa.baroc file to accommodate the specified
classes and slots. You can define rules and policies that implement actions based on
the class definitions, and you can send test events to verify event processing.

Sample log file


The following sample log file, drive:\temp\backupMonitor.log, contains event
messages that you can prepare the Logfile Adapter to monitor:
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb

10
10
10
10
10

9:01:01
9:01:05
9:01:20
9:01:23
9:01:23

EnterpriseNightlyBackups
EnterpriseNightlyBackups
EnterpriseNightlyBackups
EnterpriseNightlyBackups
EnterpriseNightlyBackups

Accounting Backups Pass: 10 Fail: 0


Marketing Backups Pass: 7 Fail: 3
Finance Backups Pass: 11 Fail: 1
Sales Backups Pass: 9 Fail: 0
HR Backups Pass: 20 Fail: 0

The event messages indicate the number of successful backups.

Chapter 2 Working with event adapters (walk-through)

35

Updating the mcxa.conf file

How the LogFile Adapter processes log file data


The LogFile Adapter converts log file data into records containing fields. The
LogRecordSeparator parameter delimits log file records, and the LogFieldSeparator
parameter delimits log file record fields. The default LogRecordSeparator parameter
is the Perl regular expression for newline: \n. The default LogFieldSeparator
parameter is the Perl regular expression for one or more white space characters: \s+.
This log file example contains 5 log file records having 10 fields each.

Updating the mcxa.conf file


In the MCELL_HOME\etc\mcxa.conf file, you can identify the full path to the
backupMonitor.log file in the LogFile parameter:
LogFile =c:\temp\backupMonitor.log

You can define a LogFile Adapter instance, such as in the following extract:
[backupMonitor adapter]
#provides the name of the adapter instance
Engine = MA::ELogfile
#required for LogFile Adapters
LogFile =c:\temp\backupMonitor.log #pointer to the log file

When monitoring multiple log files, you must configure a LogFile Adapter instance
for each log file. Each LogFile Adapter instance must be able to access the log file that
it monitors. Otherwise, it cannot generate events.
Generally, you can use the default specific parameter values to indicate to the LogFile
Adapter how to process the log files. However, you can customize how the Adapter
processes the log files by completing the specific parameters in its mcxa.conf file.
Table 6 describes these parameters and provides brief annotations of each. For more
detailed descriptions, see the BMC Impact Event Adapters User Guide.
Table 6

mcxa.conf parameters: Logfile adapter (part 1 of 2)

Parameter

Annotation

Logfile

the complete file path to the log file name. The parameter accepts only one log
file.

LogFieldSeparator

a regular expression that delimits event attributes. Used only when the
LogRegExpr parameter is empty

LogFlushPosPeriod

number of events after which the log position is saved to disk

LogKeepEmpty

Boolean value that indicates whether to drop or save empty events

LogMaxCount

maximum number of log files to keep when log file rotation is enabled. Enter 0 if
you do not want to keep log files. Enter -1 to keep all log files.

36

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Defining the MAP file

Table 6

mcxa.conf parameters: Logfile adapter (part 2 of 2)

Parameter

Annotation

LogMaxSize

maximum log file size in bytes before the log file is rotated

LogProcessName

name of daemon process name that receives the kill HUP command (UNIX)

LogReadAll

Boolean value that indicates whether the log file is read upon Adapter startup

LogReadAllReopen

Boolean value that indicates the Adapter opens a new log file [from the beginning
or the end] when it detects that a log file has changed

LogRecordSeparator

regular expression that delimits two events

LogRegExpr

Perl 5 regular expression that is used to match an event

LogRegExprGlobal

Boolean value that indicates whether the LogRegExpr event matching is


performed globally

LogRememberPos

Boolean value that indicates whether the Adapter stores the position of the last
log entry

LogRotate

Boolean value that indicates whether a new logfile is created when the logfile size
exceeds the maximum specified by the LogMaxSize parameter

LogSmartOpen

Boolean value that indicates whether the part of the current log file that has not
been read is appended to the beginning of a new log file, when the current log file
is replaced

LogStatPeriod

the interval at which the Adapter performs the stat command

LogSupportKillHUP

Boolean value that indicates whether the kill-HUP command is launched at each
rotation of the log file (UNIX)

LogVarPrefix

input variable prefix defined in the INPUT_VARIABLES stanza of the MAP file

If you modify the mcxa.conf during run-time, the Adapters engine manager detects
the change and restarts the Adapter. Otherwise, you will need to start the Adapter to
initialize the changes.

Defining the MAP file


MAP files are located in the MCELL_HOME\etc directory. The MAP file defines how
an event is converted from its internal representation into BAROC format.
For the LogFile Adapter, BMC recommends that you use the default MAP file,
mclogfile.map, as the basis for creating mapping customizations. The default MAP
file is already mapped to the BAROC classes in the cells KB. To add any
customizations, you must manually edit the MAP file. If you customize the MAP file,
you must ensure that you update the BAROC classes accordingly.

TIP
Make a backup copy of the default MAP file before beginning any customizations. Rename
the backup copy or save it to a different directory location.

Chapter 2 Working with event adapters (walk-through)

37

Defining the .baroc file

The following extract of the default MAP file mclogfile.map is customized to capture
specific event messages from the event sources log file backupMonitor.log.
INPUT_VARIABLES
$LOGFILE
$complete
$logname
$varlog 0-i
END
CLASS LOGFILE_BASE
logfile
= $logname
msg
= $complete
mc_tool
= $logname
CLASS BACKUP_MONITOR
$complete equals /^(...\s+\d+\s+\d+:..:..)\s+(\w+)\s+(\w+)\s+(\w+)\s+(\w+\:)\s+(\d+)\s+(\w+\:)\s+(\d+)\s*$/
app_fail_count=$varlog9

END
END

In this extract, we specify the input variables that we want to use for populating event
slots. In this example, these input variables are assigned to the event slots defined
under the CLASS:LOGFILE_BASE section. For example, $logname is assigned to the
mc_tool slot and $complete is assigned to the msg slot.
Our custom class, BACKUP_MONITOR, is embedded within the LOGFILE_BASE
class, meaning that the BACKUP_MONITOR event class is a subclass of the
LOGFILE_BASE and inherits all the LOGFILE_BASE slot definitions. The
BACKUP_MONITOR event class has a condition: the Perl regular expression that is
defined on the line below "CLASS BACKUP_MONITOR". Only log records that
satisfy this condition are processed as BACKUP_MONITOR events. Otherwise, the
log record is processed as a LOGFILE_BASE event.
In addition, the BACKUP_MONITOR event class has a custom slot called
app_fail_count. It is assigned the tenth field of the log record. In our example, this is
the number of backup failures.
After modifying the MAP file, restart the Logfile Adapter.

Defining the .baroc file


BAROC classes for Adapters are defined in the mcxa.baroc file, installed under
MCELL_HOME\etc\cell_name\kb\classes directory. The classes defined in the
MAP file correspond to the names of the BAROC classes of the cells KB. You must
manually customize the .baroc file if you customize classes in the MAP file.

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Defining the .baroc file

TIP
Make a backup copy of the default .baroc file before beginning any customizations. Rename
the backup copy or save it to a different directory location.

In the following extract, we define the subclass BACKUP_MONITOR of the


LOGFILE_BASE class, and we specify the data type of the slot app_fail_count
(INTEGER).
# Logfile classes
MC_EV_CLASS :
LOGFILE_BASE ISA MC_ADAPTER_BASE
DEFINES
{
logfile
: STRING;
mc_tool_class : default = "Logfile";
};
END
MC_EV_CLASS :BACKUP_MONITOR ISA LOGFILE_BASE
DEFINES
{
app_fail_count : INTEGER;
};
END

WARNING
Add the class definitionin this example, BACKUP_MONITORafter the LOGFILE_BASE
definition in the MAP file. Otherwise, you will encounter a compilation error.

A BAROC event is created when the log record from the event source matches the
defined class in the Adapters MAP file and thereby enables the slot assignments to
be made. A BAROC event is then sent to the designated cell.
After you update the BAROC classes, you define an MRL rule to process the event of
class BACKUP_MONITOR.

Chapter 2 Working with event adapters (walk-through)

39

Defining the rule

Defining the rule


First, access the MCELL_HOME\etc\cellName\kb\rules\.load file, and add the line
backupMonitorRule. Then specify the rule definition in the
MCELL_HOME\etc\cellName\kb\rules\backupMonitorRule.mrl file, as shown in
the following extract of a refine rule:
refine BACKUP_MONITOR_FAILED:
BACKUP_MONITOR ($EV) where [$EV.app_fail_count > 0]
{$EV.severity = MAJOR ;}
END

In this example, we have added a custom rule named BACKUP_MONITOR_FAILED.


This rule is triggered if our custom event, BACKUP_MONITOR, contains a value
greater than zero in its custom slot, app_fail_count. If the rule is triggered, the event
severity is changed to MAJOR because the app_fail_count slot contains the tenth field
of the log file record ($varlog9), which is the number of backup failures.
If the tenth field is greater than zero, meaning that there are backup failures, the
BACKUP_MONITOR event will have a severity of MAJOR.
Recompile the cells KB and restart the cell.

Creating a policy
Here we create a sample notification policy that uses the specified event condition
formula to process the incoming event forwarded by the Adapter.
Refer to Chapter 10, Event management policies,for details on policy creation. In
this section we provide a series of snapshots with short explanations of how to build a
notification policy that references the previously defined custom event class,
BACKUP_MONITOR and its custom slot, app_fail_count.
In the BMC IX Console, under the Administration View, select the cell in the
navigation tree and click the Add Event Selector icon to specify the selector
BACKUP_MONITOR_FAILED _Events for this notification policy. See Figure 7 on
page 41.

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BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Creating a policy

Figure 7

Selector Details: Logfile Adapter example

Enter a description for this selector, such as EnterpriseNightlyBackup Failures in the


example. You then click on the ellipses next to the Base Event Class field to open the
Class Chooser dialog from which you select a subclass that contains the selection
criteria. In this example, it would be the subclass you assigned to the Logfile Adapter:
BACKUP_MONITOR.
You next add the event selection criteria in the Add Event Criteria dialog. Access the
the Add Event Criteria dialog by clicking Add.
Figure 8

Add Event Criteria: LogFile Adapter example

Chapter 2 Working with event adapters (walk-through)

41

Creating a policy

The event class you chose is copied to the Event Class field. In the Add Event Criteria
dialog, you add a description of the class, such as EnterpriseNightlyBackup Failures.
Then you specify a condition for the class: in this example, you would choose the slot
app_fall_count, which you have already defined in the mcxa.baroc file. Select an
appropriate operator, such as > in this example, and a value, such as 0. Add the
condition to the definition by clicking Insert.
Then click OK to return to the Event Selection Criteria pane. The line item should
display the event class, its description, and the selection criteria.
Figure 9

Selector Details complete: LogFile Adapter example

Click OK to accept the changes to the event selector.


Next you associate the policy type Notification Policy with the selector. In the
navigation tree of the left panel, choose Notification Policy under the By Policy Type
category. See Figure 10 on page 43.

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Creating a policy

Figure 10

By Policy Type selection: LogFile Adapter example

Now click the Add Event Policy icon to open the Selector Chooser dialog from which
you select the already defined BACKUP_MONITOR_FAILED_Events selector.
Figure 11

Selector Chooser: LogFile Adapter example

Click OK to add the details of the notification policy. Under the Notification Policy
Details tab, add the following information:
Field

Description

Policy Name

EnterpriseNightlyBackup Failure

Description

Send Notification when EnterpriseNightlyBackupFailue


detected

Users to Notify

valid email address

Chapter 2 Working with event adapters (walk-through)

43

Creating a policy

Compare with the following example screen:


Figure 12

Notification Policy Details: Logfile Adapter example

Click Add. Here you enter the notification text, adding the event slot to include with
the log message, as shown in the following example screen:

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Generating test events

Then click Insert to complete the notification policy details:

Click OK to make the policy available to the cell.

Generating test events


To test that the Logfile Adapter is reading the log file and sending BAROC events,
you add a message to the bottom of the log file that it monitors. First, however, ensure
that BMC Impact Manager cell and the BMC Impact Event Adapters are running.
Then launch the BMC IX Console and connect to the target cell. Open the Events
View, and click the All Events collector. Verify that the Events list displays startup
events for the BMC Impact Event Adapters and for the LogFile Adapter.
The example log file, drive:\temp\backupMonitor.log, is shown below:
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb

10
10
10
10
10

9:01:01
9:01:05
9:01:20
9:01:23
9:01:23

EnterpriseNightlyBackups
EnterpriseNightlyBackups
EnterpriseNightlyBackups
EnterpriseNightlyBackups
EnterpriseNightlyBackups

Accounting Backups Pass: 10 Fail: 0


Marketing Backups Pass: 7 Fail: 3
Finance Backups Pass: 11 Fail: 1
Sales Backups Pass: 9 Fail: 0
HR Backups Pass: 20 Fail: 0

In the first test, append the following line to the bottom of the log file:
This line should result in a LOGFILE_BASE event!

This message does not satisfy the condition of the BACKUP_MONITOR event, so it is
processed as a LOGFILE_BASE event. In the BMC IX Console, verify that a
LOGFILE_BASE event is displayed, as shown in Figure 13 on page 46.

Chapter 2 Working with event adapters (walk-through)

45

Generating test events

Figure 13

Event message: LOGFILE_BASE event

In the next test, add the following line to the bottom of the log file:
Feb 10 9:01:01 EnterpriseNightlyBackups Accounting Backups Pass: 10 Fail: 0

This message satisfies the condition of the BACKUP_MONITOR event, but its
app_fail_count slot is not greater than 0. This event will have a severity of OK.
In the BMC IX Console, verify that a BACKUP_MONITOR event message with a
severity of OK is displayed.
In the last test, append the following line to the bottom of the log file:
Feb 10 9:01:05 EnterpriseNightlyBackups Marketing Backups Pass: 7 Fail: 3

This message satisfies the condition of the BACKUP_MONITOR event, and its
app_fail_count slot is greater than 0. This event will have a severity of MAJOR, as
defined in the rule.
In the BMC IX Console, verify that the BACKUP_MONITOR event message with a
severity of MAJOR is displayed, as shown Figure 14 on page 47. Also verify that
expected email notification has been sent by the previously configured notification
policy. Check that the email notification contains the same message slot text as
recorded in the event.

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BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

SNMP Adapter

Figure 14

Event message: BACKUP_MONITOR event

SNMP Adapter
The SNMP Adapter is a User Datagram Protocol (UDP) SNMP server that listens for
SNMP traps. It uses an internal utility to convert Management Information Base
(MIB) files into BAROC classes and other data, both of which are used to format traps
into BMC Impact Manager events.
The SNMP Adapter relies on the SNMP Configuration Manager, a web-based utility
that automates the MIB conversion task and makes the MAP file editing task easier.

Gathering event information from the third-party event


source
Install the BMC Impact Manager and the BMC Impact Event Adapters on the system
on which you want to receive the SNMP traps. See the earlier discussion on page 34
for installation guidelines.

Chapter 2 Working with event adapters (walk-through)

47

Installing the SNMP Configuration Manager

Installing the SNMP Configuration Manager


Install the SNMP Configuration Manager utility on a system where the SNMP
adapter, the MAP file, and the MIB files reside. Create a directory to which you copy
or move the MIB files you wish to convert.
Launch the SNMP Configuration Manager to access its web-based interface. The
usual URL link is http://hostName:port/snmpadapter; for example:
http://mycomputer:8080/snmpadapter.

Configuring the adapter


To create an SNMP adapter instance, add the following entry to the
MCELL_HOME\etc\mcxa.conf file:
[Snmp]
Engine = MA::ESnmpTrap

The SNMP Adapter requires specific parameters in its mcxa.conf file. Table 7 on
page 49 describes these parameters and provides brief annotations of each. Generally
you update the default values of these specific parameters in only when required. For
example, you would modify the SnmpLocalAddr parameter when the SNMP adapter
resides on a system that has multiple Network Interface Cards. You would enter the
IP address to which the SNMP adapter listens.
For more detailed descriptions, see the BMC Impact Event Adapters User Guide.

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Publishing the MIB files

Table 7

mcxa.conf parameters: SNMP Adapter

Parameter

Description

SnmpDatFile

File name of the .dat file that contains information used to translate incoming
traps
If the parameter value is a relative path, the file must be located in the
MCELL_HOME\etc directory. The .dat file is an enhanced version of the old .oid
file. It can contain additional information to map enumerations and to extract
indexes.
This file contains the results of the output of the BMC Impact Manager mib2map
tool. Do not attempt to create this file manually.
Default: mcsnmptrapd.dat

SnmpGetIndexes

Boolean indicator (0,1) that indicates whether to start or stop index extraction.
Valid values:
s
s

0 starts
1 stops

SnmpLocalAddr

IP address that specifies which interface to use on a computer with two or more
interface cards

SnmpOIDFile

Name of the file containing translations from SNMP OIDs to strings


Default: mcsnmptrapd.oid

SnmpPort

port number of the UDP SNMP server


Default: 162

SnmpTrapLength

initial size of the buffer that receives SNMP traps


Default: 8192
Use the SnmpTrapLength parameter default setting. If you must modify it, be
aware that an MC_ADAPTER_ERROR occurs if the SnmpTrapLength value is
smaller than the actual size of the trap.

Publishing the MIB files


Your first step is to import the MIB files to the MAP file, which stores the classes of
each SNMP trap.

Chapter 2 Working with event adapters (walk-through)

49

Publishing the MIB files

In the SNMP Configuration Manager GUI, select Publish MIBS to open the Publish
Management Information Base File (MIBs) window.

TIP
Make a backup copy of the default MAP file and an existing mcsnmptrapd.dat file before
beginning any customizations. Rename the backup copies or save them to a different directory
location. The SNMP Configuration Manager creates backup copies of any files it modifies.
Refer to the BMC Impact Event Adapters User Guide.

Using the navigation commands in the window, browse to locate the SNMP MIB files
of the SNMP device or devices that you want to monitor. Click Add to include the
MIB file in your list. You can select and publish up to 10 MIB files simultaneously.
After listing the MIB files, click Publish MIBs to create the class definitions and
corresponding slot definitions in the mcsnmptrapd.map file. At the prompt, choose to
restart the BMC Impact Event Adapters to enable them to receive events from the
SNMP devices with the MAP file modifications.
You can view the Publishing Messages section for status and error messages. It
documents the actions and results of the mib2map.pl utility as it processes the MIBs
and updates the mcsnmptrapd.map and mcsnmptrapd.dat files.
Next, you can view or edit the mcsnmptrapd.map file to ensure that it conforms with
your requirements.

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BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Viewing/Editing the MAP file

Viewing/Editing the MAP file


You can select the View/Edit MAP command to access the View/Edit MAP File
window where you can customize the mcsnmptrapd.map file for the SNMP Adapter.

The SNMP class hierarchy is displayed in a tree view.


You can choose from among the list of published classes to add or edit the following
variables:
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

msg
mc_tool_class
mc_tool
mc_host_address
mc_location
severity
mc_priority
mc_notes

For example, to add the value Cold start first to the msg slot of the COLD_START
class, select the COLD_START class entry in the tree view. Then click Add New in the
edit pane. In the Add New Variable - Web Page Dialog, select msg from the Variable
drop-down box. Enter text Cold start first in the Value text box, and click Save.
An asterisk appears next to the class name in the displayed list when its slots have
been modified.

Chapter 2 Working with event adapters (walk-through)

51

Installing the generated .baroc files in the cells KB

Click Update Map File, and then at the prompt dialog, click Yes to restart the BMC
Impact Event Adapters to enable them to receive events from the SNMP devices with
the map file modifications.
After verifying or editing the classes in the MAP file, you must add the new class
definitions to the cells Knowledge Base.

Installing the generated .baroc files in the cells KB


When you publish the MIB files of the SNMP devices you wish to monitor, the
mib2map.pl utility, which operates behind the scenes, automatically generates two
.baroc files: mcsnmptrapdmib.baroc and mcsnmptrapdmibe.baroc. To enable the cell
to receive events from the SNMP devices, you must copy the mcsnmptrapdmib.baroc
and mcsnmptrapdmibe.baroc files to the cells
MCELL_HOME\etc\cellName\kb\classes directory.
Then you append the mcsnmptrapdmib.baroc and mcsnmptrapdmibe.baroc files to
the .load file. When appending these files to the .load file, do not include the .baroc
extension; just enter the file name. Make sure that mcsnmptrapdmibe is listed before
mcsnmptrapdmib in the .load file:
mcsnmptrapdmibe
mcsnmptrapdmib

Compile the KB and then restart the cell.


You must repeat this procedure for all cells that receive the events.

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Unpublishing MIBs

Unpublishing MIBs
When a device is removed from a system, you can unpublish its associated MIBs to
remove entries from the mcsnmptrapd.map file. Choose the Unpublish MIBs option
in the navigation bar to open the Unpublish Management Information Base files
window.

You can select one or more MIB files to unpublish. After you click Unpublish, the
unpublished MIB file entries are removed from the mcsnmptrapd.map file. When you
restart the BMC Impact Event Adapters to initialize the change, the SNMP Adapter
no longer uses the associated class definitions to process incoming events.
The class definitions of the unpublished MIB file entries are removed from the
mcsnmptrapd.map file, and the BMC Impact Event Adapters no longer apply them to
incoming traps.

Generating test events


Before generating test events, ensure that you have started or restarted the BMC
Impact Event Adapters to initialize any changes. Also ensure that the cell has been
restarted after you have added the mcsnmptrapdmibe.baroc and
mcsnmptrapdmib.baroc files to the cells KB and compiled it.

Chapter 2 Working with event adapters (walk-through)

53

Generating test events

Using the device or application that generates the traps or a trap generator, generate
the SNMP traps that satisfy the event class conditions that have been published to the
mcsnmptrapd.map file and added to the .baroc files. To locate the parameters that a
trap generate requires, such as the OID, trapType, and Specific Type number, you can
view the class definitions of the mcsnmptrapd.map file.
In the BMC IX Console, you can view whether the traps result in the expected BMC
Impact Manager events, with the corresponding event class and slot values.

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BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Chapter

Event rules
Rules and event management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rule structure and syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MRL files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MRL conventions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General rule syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MRL event selection clauses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where clauses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using clause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using_policy clause. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unless clause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
When clause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Body clause. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Variables in rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamic data in rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Global records in rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interfaces in rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interface instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Indexes in rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using indexes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Compiling rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing a rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tracing a rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring rule tracing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing rule trace message headers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Undefined events, processing errors, and deprecated slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Undefined events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event processing errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using deprecated slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 3

Event rules

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55

Rules and event management

Rules and event management


Rules specify which events are selected for processing and then determine how they
are processed. Rules differ from policies (see Chapter 10, Event management
policies) insofar as they are manually edited, require more effort to implement, but
provide more flexibility.

Rule structure and syntax


You write rules using MRL and then compile and store them in the cells KB. For
detailed information about MRL, see the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base
Development Reference Guide.

MRL files
Rule files have an .mrl extension and are located in the rules subdirectory of a
Knowledge Base. Rules must be compiled before they can be used by the cell. The
compiled files have a .wic or .pkg extension and are also located in the rules
subdirectory.
The order of loading into the cell at startup, which determines the order of evaluation,
is specified in the .load and .loadwic files (files with the compiler extensions).

MRL conventions
BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide addresses the
purpose of each rule phase with programming examples. This section focuses on the
general syntax of rules and the roles of the different objects and syntactic constructs.
When writing rules, use the following conventions:
s

56

Use single quotation marks for all literal strings. This convention is not mandatory
for text without internal spaces but is required for text that does contain spaces.
When a cell name contains a hyphen, the cell name must be enclosed in single
quotation marks ().

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

General rule syntax

When a primitive contains an argument that is a list arg, such as the first argument
of a concatenation string, the argument must be enclosed with square brackets.

concat([this,is,a,quick,example],$CONCAT_STR);

The compiler validates syntax on primitive arguments. For example, use of a


SIMPLE type instead of a LIST will result in a compilation error.
s

Literal strings can be no more than 65535 characters in length. If you attempt to
compile a rule file containing a slot assignment of a string greater than 65535
characters, the compiler replaces it with the empty string.

If the newline character, \n, is received as input for a slot value, it is stored as part
of the slot value. Neither the cell nor the operators interpret slot values. Therefore,
if the newline character is part of the slot value, any search for a match must
contain the newline character. Otherwise, the match search is unsuccessful.

MRL is case sensitive. References to classes and slots must respect case.

An event is referenced with a variable name within the rules. Variable names begin
with $ and must contain only alphabetic characters. Slots belonging to a particular
event are accessed using the $eventVariable.slotName notation.

Many rules contain an action block. The action block contains one or more actions
that are executed by the rule. Braces ({}) delimit action blocks, and semicolons (;)
separate actions within an action block.

Rules end with the END keyword.

General rule syntax


All rules, in general, have the same structure which includes the rule introduction, the
event selection criteria, and the rule body.
The generic rule syntax presented in Figure 15 on page 58 shows the syntax objects
that can appear in a rule, and Table 8 on page 58 describes those objects.

Chapter 3

Event rules

57

General rule syntax

Figure 15

Rule syntax

RuleType RuleName:
<ClassName> { ($<EventVariableName>)}
{ where [ <BooleanExpression> ]}
{ | using {ALL} | unless |
'{'
<ClassName> { ($<ObjectVariableName>)}
{where [< BooleanExpression> ]}
...
< ClassName> { ($<ObjectVariableName>)}
{where [< BooleanExpression> ]}
'}'
}
<RuleSpecific>
'{'
<Call>;
...
<Call>;
'}'
END

Table 8

Syntax object description (part 1 of 2)

Object

Description

RuleType

specifies the phase for which the rule is written


The rule types are:
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

RuleName

Refine
Filter
Regulate
New
Abstract
Correlate
Execute
Threshold
Propagate
Timer
Delete

specifies the unique, descriptive name of the rule, using


alphanumeric characters (it can include underscores).
The name must be unique across the entire Knowledge Base,
and it should be descriptive because you need to identify it
easily in tracing and log output files.

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General rule syntax

Table 8

Syntax object description (part 2 of 2)

Object

Description

Event condition formula

event condition formula (ECF) begins with <ClassName>


The ECF specifies the conditions that the event currently
being processed must match for the rule to be evaluated.
ClassName specifies the event class that the event must
match. The class of the event instance can be a subclass of
ClassName.
Note: To apply the rule to all incoming event instances,
specify ClassName as EVENT

optional clause

The optional clause is enclosed within the curly braces. It


begins with { | using and ends before
<RuleSpecific>.
This portion of the syntax contains a query clause that directs
the rule engine to retrieve data or events from the dynamic
data repository to be used in the remainder of the rule.
This example includes the Using clause qualified by an
Unless clause.
The object that matches the specified conditions is retrieved
by the Using query clause and can be used in the body of
the rule.
If the query has no matches, then the Unless clause is
applied.
The body of the rule (see below) is executed for every match
to these queries when the optional keyword "ALL" is
specified after the using keyword.
For more information about the use of clauses, see MRL
event selection clauses on page 60.

{}

optional clause indicators (curly braces)

the actual character {

| using {ALL} | unless> | using either {ALL} or unless


<EventVariableName>

name of a variable representing an event

<ObjectVariableName>

name of a variable representing an event or data


an expression whose value is a boolean
an assignment or a primitive call

< BooleanExpression>
<Call>
<RuleSpecific>

the body of the rule, specifying actions to be performed on


events, slots to be modified, and primitives to be used.
The syntax of the rule body and meaning of the primitives
depend on the rule type to which the rule belongs.

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MRL event selection clauses

MRL event selection clauses


Whether the event being processed triggers the execution of the rule depends on the
eventss conformance with the selection criteria specified in the rule.
For example, suppose that an event class is defined as follows:
Figure 16

Event selection criteria example

MC_EV_CLASS :
APPLICATION_UP ISA APPLICATION_EVENT DEFINES
{
severity: default = INFO;
};
END

And the engine receives the following event:


APPLICATION_UP;
mc_host=babble;
...
status=OPEN;
END

The following rule will accept the instance and will be evaluated.
filter application_events : PASS
APPLICATION_EVENT ($APEV)
where [
....
]
...

Where clauses
where clauses are an optional part of the ECF and establish restrictive selection
criteria. A where clause consists of the keyword where followed by the criteria within
square brackets:
where [criteria]

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Where clauses

The criteria portion of the statement is a logical combination of expressions about


the slots of the event.
where clauses can use logical combination operators, as described in the BMC Impact

Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide, as well as any of the following
condition operators:
equals (==)

within

matches

not_equals (!=)

outside

ip_greater_or_equals

greater_than (>)

has_prefix

ip_smaller_or_equals

greater_or_equal(<)

has_suffix

ip_matches

smaller_than (>=)

contains

ip_matched_by

smaller_or_equals (<=) contains_one_of

superclass_of

between

subclass_of

contained_in

MRL primitives, functions, and operations also can be used in expressions. An


exhaustive list can be found in the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development
Reference Guide.
In the following example, the where clause syntax requires that the mc_host slot of
the event under analysis literally is to be set to thishost.
APPLICATION_EVENT ($APEV)
where [
$APEV.mc_host == thishost;
]

The syntax in the next example requires that the mc_host slot of the event under
analysis literally to be set to thishost or to thathost if the source does not contain
NT.
APPLICATION_EVENT ($APEV)
where [
$APEV.mc_host == thishost OR
$APEV.mc_host == thathost AND
NOT $APEV.source contains NT
]

NOTE
Quotation marks are mandatory when the string contains spaces, punctuation characters, or
arithmetic operators (+, -, *, /, and so forth).

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Where clauses

You can write the same rule using parentheses to specify priority or precedence, as
shown in the following example:
APPLICATION_EVENT ($APEV)
where [
($APEV.mc_host == thishost) OR
(($APEV.mc_host == thathost) AND
(NOT ($APEV.source contains NT)));
]

You can also use parentheses to alter the precedence. In the following example, the OR
operator would be evaluated first because it is enclosed in parentheses.
APPLICATION_EVENT ($APEV)
where [
($APEV.mc_host == thishost OR
$APEV.mc_host == thathost)
AND $APEV.source contains NT;
]

For information about the order of precedence for combination operators, see the
BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide.

Where clause syntax best practices


Maintaining the rule engine performance
To avoid slowing the performance of the rule engine, try to specify a selector that
refers to a specific event class. It takes the cell less processing time to search a specific
class than it does a generic class. Also, try to avoid performance-intensive where
clauses and complex queries in the Using clause.
For example, using a match_regex() call can cause performance problems. Instead,
use an equals, contains, matches, has_prefix, or has_suffix clause.
The following line:
EVENT($EV) where [$EV.CLASS == APPLICATION_EVENT]

may appear equivalent to


APPLICATION_EVENT ($EV)

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Using clause

However, they are not equivalent. The rule engine maintains an inheritance table that
enables it to be extremely efficient at manipulating classes. In the first syntax
example, the rule engine literally must check to see if the class name is the string
APPLICATION_EVENT. This literal comparison does not take advantage of the
inheritance mechanism, and places a much heavier demand on the performance of
the rule engine than the syntax in the second example. Using class comparisons in a
where clause does not use the inheritance table optimization and results in
performance degradation of the rule engine.

Equivalent syntax and backward compatibility


The following line:
$APEV.mc_host equals thathost

can also be written as


mc_host:equals thathost

However,
$EV.mc_host:equals thathost

is permitted only for backward compatibility with the first initial releases of the MRL.

Syntax shortcut
In a where clause slot: is a shortcut for $EV.slot.
$EV.slot: is syntactically incorrect.

Using clause
The using clause retrieves information from the event repository of the rule engine to
be used in the context of a rule. You can use the using clause to retrieve data
instances for a dynamic rule, or to retrieve instances of past events. The syntax for the
using clause is as follows:
EventClassName (Variable)
where [Expression CondOperator Expression, ...]
using [ALL] {DataClassName (Variable)
where [Expression CondOperator Expression,
Expression CondOperator Expression,
...];

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Using clause

DataClassName (Variable)
where [Expression CondOperator Expression,
Expression CondOperator Expression,
...];
... ;
}

To search for event instances, you must write a valid criteria block with a valid event
class name instead of a data class name.
You can define indexes on events and data. Querying instances can be
computationally intensive and might dramatically reduce cell performance. When
there are only conjunctions (ANDs but no ORs) in the using clause, the compiler
performs the following optimizations:
s

Equality constraints against mc_ueid and mc_udid (like $D.mc_udid == <value>)


are compiled to use the internal hash table associated with these special slots.

Equality and order constraints (==, <, >, <=, >=, between, has_prefix) against key
slots (a slot with facet key=yes) are compiled to use the internal key index.

If you need to query potentially large tables but the above optimizations are not
possible, consider declaring an index on the table and query the table using the index.
For further information, see Indexes in rules on page 76.
You can use conditions in the using clause to set controls on event processing. For
example, you can indicate that the remainder of a rule is to be skipped if no relevant
data is located. Table 9 on page 64 lists additional conditions that affect rule
processing.
Table 9

Conditions for the using clause (part 1 of 2)

Condition

Result

Only a single instance of the data is The rule is evaluated only for the single instance.
found in the repository.
No data that matches the specified
criteria is found in the repository.

The remainder of the rule is skipped.

More than one instance of the data


exists in the repository.

Only the first data instance is retrieved.


Note: You can alter this behavior by using the ALL keyword. If you use
the ALL keyword and more than one instance of data is found, the rule
is evaluated for each instance. The ALL keyword contains a hidden
recursive mechanism that produces this result.

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Using_policy clause

Table 9

Conditions for the using clause (part 2 of 2)

Condition

Result

The using clause in a rule contains The rule engine searches for an instance corresponding to the criteria in
several queries.
the first using query, then an instance for the criteria in the second
query, until all queries are exhausted. At least one instance of each
query must exist for the rule to evaluate.
For a using clause to succeed, each of its queries must find a solution.
If the ALL keyword is present in the using clause, the body of the rule
is executed for all the possible combinations of the different query
solutions.
A condition in a query can refer to the slot values of the main event of
the rule, data, or event, each of which is retrieved by preceding queries
in the using clause.
The ALL keyword is used in the
using clause.

The rule is evaluated for all combinations of the instances found.


For example, if a using clause contains two blocks, the first block
retrieving three instances and the second block five, the rule is
evaluated a total of fifteen times.

Using_policy clause
Policy instances can be referenced before the selection part of a rule as shown in this
example:
new bmc_im_internal_closure:
using_policy { EVENT_CLOSURE_POLICY($POL)
where [ calendars_active($POL.active_calendars) ] }
$POL.closing_event($CLOSING)
where [ $CLOSING.status != CLOSED ]
updates ALL $POL.closed_event($CLOSED)
within $POL.time_window
{
$CLOSED.status = CLOSED;
if ($POL.suppress_restoring_event == 1) then
{
drop_new;
}
}

Each instance of EVENT_CLOSURE_POLICY is instantiated at runtime. The


closing_event and closed_event criteria are linked dynamically at runtime.
ECF slots can be used in place of the class name in the main selection of a static rule.
Where clauses specified in the rule are logically ANDed with the where clause in the
ECF instance.

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Unless clause

QUERY slots can be used in place of class names in using or update selections of a
static rule. Where clauses specified in the rule are logically ANDed with the where
clause of the QUERY instance.

This construct is called a DynamicSelection and is defined as:


<DynamicSelection>=
[ using_policy [ALL] { [ <UsingCriteria> { <UsingCriteria> } ] } ]
<DynamicCriteria>
[ using [ ALL ] '{'
[ <DynamicCriteria> { <DynamicCriteria> } ] '}' ]
<DynamicCriteria> =
<VariableSlot>
[ ( <Variable> ) ] [ where '[' [ <SlotExp> ] ']' ] <Criteria>
<Criteria> = <Class>
[ ( <Variable> ) ] [ where '[' [ <SlotExp> ] ']' ]
<UsingCriteria> = <Class> [ ( <Variable> ) ] [ <Where> ] [ <Sorting> ]

The compiler ensures that the queries used in a dynamic selection respects the order
of the query definitions. The compiler compiles the rule, taking into account the class
for which the ECF and QUERY slots are defined. Only the slots of these classes can be
referenced in the rest of the rule.
using_policy [ALL] executes the rule for all policy instances.

Unless clause
You might want to apply an action if certain instances of data or events do not exist.
In these cases, you would use the unless clause. It has the same syntax as the using
clause, but the logic is essentially reversed; that is, if the queries inside the unless
clause are successful, the selection fails and the action is not applied.

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When clause

The syntax of the unless clause is as follows:


EventClassName (Variable)
where [Expression CondOperator Expression, ...]
unless {DataClassName (Variable)
where [Expression CondOperator Expression,
Expression CondOperator Expression,
...];
DataClassName (Variable)
where [Expression CondOperator Expression,
Expression CondOperator Expression,
...];
... ;
}

When clause
Use a when clause to trigger part of a rule each time a specified slot of a previously
processed event is modified or is assigned a specific value.
The when clause can be used in the Execute, Abstract, Correlate, and Propagate rule
phases. Rules containing a when clause are evaluated completely when a new event is
processed that matches the where condition of the rule. The when clauses in these
rules are re-evaluated each time the processed event is modified so that it matches the
when condition.
The general syntax of the when clause is:
when = WhenCondition CallList
CallList is the part of the rule that is re-evaluated when the event is modified. The
syntax for WhenCondition depends on whether you want the slots and conditions to

be static or dynamic.
To trigger the when clause when a specified slot changes, use the syntax in Figure 17.
Figure 17

when condition triggered by any change to a specified slot

WhenCond = when $VarName.SlotName

In Figure 17, the name of an existing variable must be specified, as well as the name of
the slot to be monitored for changes. The when clause is triggered each time the
specified slot changes.

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When clause

To trigger the when clause when a specified slot changes to a specified value, use the
syntax in Figure 18.
Figure 18

when condition triggered by a specific change to a specified slot

WhenCond = when $VarName.SlotName [:] Op Condition

In Figure 18, the name of an existing variable must be specified, as well as the name of
the slot to be monitored for changes. The when clause is triggered only when the slot
value changes to match the operator and condition expression specified by Op
Condition.
When the slot name and/or the condition are not known in advance, use the syntax in
Figure 19.
Figure 19

when condition triggered by a specific change to a specified slot

WhenCond = when ([$VarName,]SlotExpr,OpExpr,CondExpr)

In Figure 19, $VarName is the name of an existing variable. If $VarName is not


specified, the variable used in the where clause of the rule is used. The slot name is
determined dynamically by evaluating the expression SlotExpr, which must result
in a valid slot name.
The condition that the slot must meet also is specified dynamically. The operator is
determined by evaluating the expression OpExpr, which must result in a valid
operator name. The conditional expression is derived by evaluating the expression
CondExpr. CondExpr is evaluated twiceonce to determine a conditional expression
and a second time to evaluate if the slot matches that conditional expression.
When an event is modified by a rule containing a when clause so that it becomes a
candidate for evaluation by another rule, that evaluation does not take place
immediately. Instead, the request is queued for the rule engine to process after all
other pending requests or events are processed.

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Body clause

when clause example


Figure 20

Rule containing a when clause

execute Exec1: EVENT($E) where ...


using { NOTIFY_RULE($N) where [$N.object_class == $E.mc_object_class] }
when($N.trigger_slot,$N.trigger_op,$N.trigger_expr)
{
...
}

Figure 21

Sample data

NOTIFY_RULE; object_class=CLS1; trigger_slot=severity; trigger_op='>=';


trigger_expr=MAJOR; END
NOTIFY_RULE; object_class=CLS2; trigger_slot=status; trigger_op=within;
trigger_expr='[ACK,ASSIGNED]'; END

The sample data determines in which cases an incoming event will trigger the when
clause in the Execute rule, depending on the mc_object_class of the event:
s

For object class CLS1, the when clause is triggered when the event's severity is
MAJOR or higher.

For object class CLS2, the when clause is triggered when the event's status is within
ACK, ASSIGNED.
Note for object class CLS2, the list value of trigger_expr must be within single
quotation marks to form a STRING type value, instead of a LIST. The arguments
used in the when clause must be type STRING.

Body clause
Use a body clause in a rule to call slot assignments, primitives, or functions. In a body
clause, functions return an expression and primitives return a Boolean value
expressing the success or failure of the primitive. For more information about
primitives and functions, see the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development
Reference Guide.

NOTE
When a primitive fails, that is, returns the value FALSE, the remainder of the block is not
executed.

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Body clause

The syntax of the body clause is as follows:


{
Variable.SlotName = Value;
Call ;
}

NOTE
Except for the last statement, all statements in a body clause must be separated using a
semicolon (;).

The syntax to call a slot assignment in a body clause is as follows:


$EV.SlotName = expression

if-then-else construct
The if-then-else construct is a special call used in a body clause that specifies a
conditional execution. The syntax for the if-then-else construct is:
if Expression
then
{
Variable.SlotName = Value;
Call ;
}
[ else
{
Variable.SlotName = Value;
Call ;
}
]

The else body clause is optional. If the Expression is evaluated as true, the
statements in the then block are executed. However, if an else block is included in
the body clause and the statement is evaluated as false, the statements in the else
block are executed.

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Variables in rules

You can refer to a local variable declared in the then and else block after the ifthen-else call if the variable is declared in both the then and else block with the
same data type, as shown in the following example:
if Boolean expression then
{
...
$TEMP = ' yes' ;
...
}
else
{
...
$TEMP = ' no';
...
};
$EV.msg = $TEMP;

NOTE
It is unnecessary to use an if-then-else construct to create a conditional affectation. A
simpler solution is to use a conditional expression. For information about conditional
constructs, see the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide.

Variables in rules
Use variables in rules to point to MRL objects, such as events, data, global records, or
interfaces, and to reference results returned by a primitive.
In a rule, you must declare variables at their first occurrence in the text. The scope of
the variable is from its declaration to the end of the rule. The value for a variable
cannot change during the life of the variable. For example, you cannot assign another
value to a variable after the first occurrence in a rule.
The syntax for a declaring a variable is as follows:
$VariableName

The name of the variable must be composed of alphanumeric characters; it also can
contain underscore characters.

NOTE
BMC Impact Manager uses a naming convention of variables with short uppercase names.

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Dynamic data in rules

In the following example, the variable $EV points to the event being evaluated so that
$EV.SlotName refers to the slot of the specified name for that event. The slot must
exist in the BAROC definition of that object class. You then can use the $EV variable in
expressions in the rule or in assignment statements.
ClassName ($EV) where
[expression op expression,
. . . ,
expression op expression ]

NOTE
The same principles that apply to events also apply to interface objects: a variable points to the
interface instance returned by an external program. Additionally, it allows the use of the
individual slot values in subsequent expressions.

Global record instances are predefined in the Knowledge Base; therefore, the scope of
global record variables is the entire Knowledge Base. A variable
$UNDER_MAINTENANCE refers to the unique instance of the UNDER_MAINTENANCE global
record. You can use variables in primitives to obtain the values they return, as shown
in the following example:
concat( [from top, to bottom ], $MSG0;
$EV.msg = $MSG ;

The concat primitive concatenates a list of strings into another string. The $MSG
variable obtains the result, so that the concatenated string can be used in subsequent
clauses. The result is used as an assignment.

Dynamic data in rules


Dynamic data objects are BAROC objects that are used as parameters within rules
and as structured objects in the Service Information Management model. Like events,
they are stored in the persistent repository of the cell. The cell uses dynamic data
objects to process rules.
Using dynamic data enables you to avoid writing several similar rules that differ only
by values that can be stored within the data instances. When the cell evaluates a
generic rule that references dynamic data, it queries a dynamic data table to access the
relevant data.

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Dynamic data in rules

In the following example, the business impact of an unavailable application


determines the severity level of the associated APP_DOWN event. Upon receiving an
APP_DOWN event, an Execute rule retrieves the first instance of
SEVERITY_BY_APP_DOWN that matches the application name set in the APP_DOWN
event. The instance contains the appropriate severity to associate with the
application, so the rule makes the assignment as shown:
Figure 22

Execute rule using dynamic data

execute Set_App_Down_Severity :
APP_DOWN ($AD)
using SEVERITY_BY_APP_DOWN ($SBAD)
where [$SBAD.application == $AD.application]
when $AD.status == OPEN
{
$AD.severity = $SBAD.severity;
}
END

The rule searches the data instances to find the instance of the application in the
APP_DOWN event. When a match is found, the rule stops searching the data instances
and continues processing with the matching instance, as follows:
SEVERITY_BY_APP_DOWN ;
application = mail ;
severity = CRITICAL ;
END

The data must be populated beforehand; otherwise, the rule engine does not find an
instance and the remainder of the rule is skipped. In other words, when the using
clause is present in a rule, it must return data or the selection fails, and the remainder
of the rule is skipped. You can also define dynamic data instances by using the
Dynamic Data Editor in BMC Impact Explorer. For instructions, see Chapter 11,
Dynamic data editor.

NOTE
Using an index dramatically improves the performance of a query in the data repository. If
key slots are present in the Event Condition Formula (ECF), optimization is performed on the
data query. For information about indexes, see Indexes in rules on page 76.

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Global records in rules

Global records in rules


Global records maintain specified values across rule phases. You can use global
records for sharing data between events. For example, you can use a global record to
maintain a list of systems under maintenance. You can ignore the new events for one
of these systems using a Filter rule until the system is no longer part of the global
record list.
You can query or modify the contents of a global record either from the rule engine or
through the mgetrec or msetrec commands. For more information about the
mgetrec and msetrec commands, see BMC Impact Solutions Infrastructure
Administration Guide.
Global records are created using .baroc files. The global record files are located in the
Records directory of the cells Knowledge Base.

NOTE
Global records maintain their information when the cell is stopped and restarted.

The syntax for global records is as follows:


RECORD RecordName
DEFINES {
SlotName : SlotType ;
SlotName : SlotType ;
}
END

Global records are addressed by name, so you must know the name of the global
record to use it. You can use global records in an expression, an assignment, or a
primitive. Use the following syntax in a rule to refer to a slot listed in a global record:
$RecordName.SlotName

The following is a simple example of a global record:


RECORD
UNDER_MAINTENANCE DEFINES {
hosts: LIST_OF STRING ;
}
END

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Interfaces in rules

Interfaces in rules
Refine rules use interfaces to import external data to the rule engine. For example,
you can create an interface and use it as an interface instance to return data to the
Refine rule.
Interfaces are maintained in .baroc file in MCELL_HOME\etc\CellName\kb\classes on
Windows platforms and in MCELL_HOME/etc/CellName/kb/classes on UNIX platforms.
Slots defined in an interface follow the same syntax as used in a class definition, as
shown:
MC_INTERFACE: InterfaceName
DEFINES {
SlotName: DataType, Facet, Facet;
SlotName: DataType;
...
};
END

In the following example, the interface is designed to retrieve additional data about a
system that is potentially down.
MC_INTERFACE: LOCATION
DEFINES {
site: STRING;
phone: STRING;
};
END

Interface instances
The pieces of data collected by the external program or script are assigned to the slots
of the interface, creating an interface instance. The life of an interface instance is
limited, since only the calling Refine rule can use it. To access the data in the future,
the slot values must be stored in a global record or an event.
The syntax for an interface instance is as shown:
InterfaceName ;
SlotName = Value ;
SlotName = Value ;
END

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Indexes in rules

After the external information exists in an interface instance, a Refine rule assigns it to
slots or uses it another manner, such as normalizing an event message.
In conjunction with the interface instance defined above, the interface instance in
Figure 23 provides values for the system location and phone number for the
responsible party.
During rule processing, you can use the following functions or primitives to execute
an external script or program: execute, get_external, or confirm_external. The
external script or program that you reference in a rule must be located in the correct
bin subdirectory or it will not execute. The platform for the host computer that you
use determines where the script or program resides. For further information about
the bin directory, see the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference
Guide.
Figure 23

Interface instance example

LOCATION ;
site = B3R123
phone = 555-555-5555 ;
END

Indexes in rules
Use indexes to improve rule performance. Indexes enable the rule engine to find
event or data instances more rapidly. When only a limited selection of instances is
required, an index avoids iteration over all instances. You can also use an index to
determine the order of iteration over a set of event or data instances.
A sorted index implements an order on the instances. If the goal is to determine the
search order, use a sorted index. When the goal is mainly performance improvement,
a hashed index (an index based on a hash table) will produce the best results.
You should define key slots when there is a need to enforce uniqueness on a
combination of slots. Hashed indexes do not enforce uniqueness. Several instances
can have the same value for all of their indexed slots, but with key slots, only one
instance can have a certain combination of slot values. When there is no need to
enforce a uniqueness, use hashed indexes rather than key slots for optimization.
Indexes are defined with in the MRL with a rule-like syntax. An index rule will not do
any processing on an incoming event. The syntax for an index definition within a rule
is
index IndexName : CLASS ( sorted|hashed )
Slot | '[' Slot { , Slot } ']'
END

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Using indexes

You can define an index for an event class, as well as for a data class.
You can define an index for a single slot or for a list of slots. On a list of slots, a sorted
index will start sorting on the first slot. Instances with same value in the first slot will
be sorted on the second slot and so on. The slots in the slot list must be slots of the
indicated class or of one of its superclasses.
You can define more than one index for the same class. A subclass inherits an index
definition from its superclass if one is defined. An index definition for a subclass does
not override an inherited index. All index definitions for a class remain effective
whether they are defined directly for the class or inherited from a superclass.
The following example shows two index definitions. The first is a sorted index for
two slots; the second is a hashed index for a single slot.
index Idx1 : EVENT_CLASS sorted [date_reception,data_handle] END
index Idx2 : BMC_Base_Element hashed Name END

Using indexes
You use an index in a using clause. Instead of specifying a class name, you specify an
index name defined for that class.
The following example shows three general forms of an index using clause.
using index IndexName '[' ']' '(' $IndexVariable ')' [ where '[' ... ']' ]
using index IndexName '[' SlotVal [ { , SlotVal } ] ']' '(' $IndexVariable ')'
[ where '[' ... ']' ]
using index IndexName '[' Slot=SlotVal [ { , Slot=SlotVal } ] ']' '('
$IndexVariable ')' [ where '[' ... ']' ]

The difference among these three forms is in the specification of the actual indexed
slot values.
s

The first form does not specify any slot value.

The second form specifies one or more values for indexed slots in the same order as
in the index definition.

The third form specifies one or more values for indexed slots by name. In this case,
it is not necessary to list the slots in the same order as in the definition.

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77

Using indexes

A sorted index does not require you to provide an actual value for each of the indexed
slots. However, all slots for which an actual value is specified must be at the
beginning of the slot list in the definition. For example, if an index is defined for the
slot list [slot1, slot2, slot3, slot4], it is valid to have an actual value for slot1
and slot2 and no values for slot3 and slot4. It is not valid to provide an actual
value for slot2 and slot3 only, because the first slot, slot1, is left unspecified. It
also valid to specify none of the indexed slots for a sorted index.
To use a hashed index, you must specify all indexed slots with an actual value.
The rule compiler will report invalid use of an index in error messages.
For these indexes:
index Idx1 : EVENT_CLASS sorted [date_reception,data_handle] END
index Idx2 : BMC_Base_Element hashed Name END

the following example illustrates their use in New rules:


new Rule1 : EVENT($EV) where [...]
using ALL { index Idx1[]($E) where [...] }
...
END
new Rule2 : MY_EVENT($EV) where [...]
using { index Idx2[$EV.ci_name]($D) }
...
END

The rules use $E to refer to the EVENT_CLASS instances and $D to refer to the
BMC_BaseElement instances that are retrieved through the indexes.
The first rule, Rule1 uses the sorted index Idx1 without specifying any of the indexed
slots. As a result, it will iterate over all EVENT instances in the order of the index
(which can impact performance if there is a large number of instances). The
additional where condition will select the desired data instances.
The second rule, Rule2 uses a hashed index. It provides the mandatory actual value
for the indexed slot Name, assuming that the MY_EVENT instance has a slot ci_name
that contains the Name of the relevant BMC_BaseElement instance.

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Compiling rules

Compiling rules
Rules do not immediately start processing events after they are created. The
Knowledge Base (KB) for the cell must be compiled so the rules are read into it. You
can use the mccomp command to compile the KB. For more information about using
the mccomp command, see the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development
Reference Guide.

NOTE
To monitor rule behavior you can compile the KB with a tracing option. For more information,
see the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide.

Testing a rule
You can test a rule to verify that it processes events correctly. The process for testing a
rule is to send an event to a cell and then review how the event is processing through
the rules.

To send an event to a cell


Use the msend command to send an event to a specific cell from any source. For more
information about the msend command, see the BMC Impact Solutions Infrastructure
Administration Guide.

To review event processing


Use rule tracing as described in Tracing a rule.

Tracing a rule
Tracing enables you to follow the flow of events through each rule phase. Tracing the
execution of a rule also helps Knowledge Base developers to find logical errors or
enhance performance.

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79

Configuring rule tracing

The MRL compiler (mccomp) generates rule trace code that contains the following
fields:
s
s
s
s
s
s

message id (identifying the type of statement being executed)


source file name
source line number
name of the rule
reference to the main event being processed
class name of the main event being processed

This code is generated each time the compiler is run. Impact on performance is
minimal when rule trace is not enabled.

Configuring rule tracing


You can configure rule tracing both statically and dynamically.

Configuring static rule tracing


Rule tracing can be statically configured in mcell.conf. Each time the cell starts, it
reverts to this rule trace configuration. While the cell is running, the rule trace
configuration can be adapted dynamically.
The following mcell.conf parameters determine which rules are traced and the level of
tracing:
s
s
s
s

TraceRuleLevel
TraceRulePhases
TraceRuleNames
TraceRulePorts

The TraceRuleLevel parameter controls rule tracing globally. It can have the
following values:
s

1 enables run time error reporting, and disables rule tracing. This is the
recommended setting for normal production environments.

80

0 completely disables rule tracing as well as run time error reporting. It is not
recommended.

2 enables rule tracing. This should only be used in development, for analysis or
when debugging the Knowledge Base.

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Configuring rule tracing

If rule tracing is enabled, the TraceRulePhases and TraceRuleNames parameters


control which rules are traced. A rule is only traced if both the phase to which it
belongs and the rule itself are configured for tracing.
The TraceRuleNames parameter contains a comma-separated sequence of
module:rule combinations or the keyword ALL to indicate all modules and/or rules.
Each rule name optionally can be prefixed with a + or - sign to indicate addition or
removal from the list. To trace rules from the global module, enter the rule name by
itself without an accompanying module name. The list is interpreted in sequential
order.
The TraceRulePorts parameter determines the category of tracing messages that are
reported. This parameter is a comma-separated list of any of the following trace
message categories:
s

entrya message is displayed when an event satisfies the main selector of a rule.
If the rules refer to a policy, the messages are displayed for every policy instance
that matches the event. For example,

im_internal.mrl, 60: refine im_internal_lowercase_hostname: EVENT #5: Rule execution


starting with $EV = 0xd926d0 (class: EVENT, event_handle: 5, mc_ueid:
mc.ruleTrc9612.7de944e.0)

usinga message is displayed when an object instance is retrieved by a query in a


using block. For example,

ruleTrc9612.mrl, 31: refine idx_data_s: IDX_EVENT #5: solution 1 to data query:


$X = 0x13c5468 (class: IDX_DATA, data_handle: 374, mc_udid: mc.ruleTrc9612.7f100f7.327)

using_policya message is displayed when a policy is retrieved by a query in a


using_policy block. For example,

im_internal.mrl, 207: refine im_internal_timeout: EVENT #5: solution 1 to policy query:


$POL = 0x109e4b8 (class: IM_TIMEOUT_POLICY, data_handle: 32, mc_udid:
mc.ruleTrc9612.7de9405.19)

using_failurea message is displayed when there are no instances that statisfy


a query in a using block. For example,

ruleTrc9612.mrl, 13: refine idx_event_h: IDX_EVENT #5: no solution for $X in context


$E = 0x146ca80 (class: IDX_EVENT, event_handle: 5, mc_ueid: mc.ruleTrc9612.7f100f7.349)

using_policy_failurea message is displayed when there are no instances that


statisfy a query in a using_policy block. For example,

im_internal.mrl, 18: refine im_internal_blackout: EVENT #5: no solution for $POL in context
$EV = 0xd926d0 (class: EVENT, event_handle: 5, mc_ueid: mc.ruleTrc9612.7de940c.0)

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81

Configuring rule tracing

assigna message is displayed for each assignment instruction. For example,

im_internal.mrl, 167: refine im_internal_default_location: EVENT #5: $EV.mc_location =


'bmc.com'

Static rule tracing configuration example


TraceRuleLevel=2
TraceRulePhases=ALL,-refine,-regulate
TraceRuleNames=TroubleTicketing:ALL,TroubleTicketing:rule1,SendMail:rule1,SendMail:rule2
TraceRulePorts=entry,assign

These settings enable tracing of the following rules:


s

All rules from module TroubleTicketing that are not refine or regulate,
except rule1

Rules rule1 and rule2 from module SendMail, if they are not refine or
regulate

All entry to the specified rules is traced, as well as assignments within those rules.

Configuring dynamic rule tracing


While the cell is running, rule tracing configuration can be changed using the
mcontrol CLI. Controls that influence rule tracing are:
s

tracerule on|off globally enables (on) or disables (off) rule tracing

tracerule phases Phases modifies the configuration of which rule phases are
enabled for tracing. The Phases value has the same format as the
TraceRulePhases parameter. For example,
mcontrol -n CellName tracerule phases -new,-abstract

This command disables tracing of all new and abstract rules.


s

tracerule names Names modifies the configuration of which rules are enabled
for tracing. The Names value has the same format as the TraceRuleNames

parameter. For example,


mcontrol -n CellName tracerule names problem_rule

This command enables tracing of the rule named problem_rule (assuming that
problem_rule is of a phase that has rule tracing enabled).

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Customizing rule trace message headers

tracerule ports Ports determines which tracing ports are enabled. Ports is a
string with the same format as the TraceRulePorts parameter, described on

page 81.
Each time the cell starts, it reverts to the static rule tracing configuration defined in
mcell.conf.

Customizing rule trace message headers


Each rule trace message is a standard cell trace message. The first part of this message
is the standard cell trace message header. This header can be customized using the
TraceRuleHeader parameter in mcell.conf.
The header is specified as text and can contain references to parameters, using the
following designations to represent the associated parameters:
s

%I message id

%F source file name

%L source line number

%M KB module name

%R rule name

%P rule phase

%H handle of the main event being processed (event_handle slot)

%C class name of the main event being processed

For example, the following default TraceRuleHeader parameter value:


TraceRuleHeader= %F, %L: %P %R: %C #%H:

results in messages like:


mc_intevt.mrl, 42: new StbldStop: MC_CELL_STATBLD_STOP #118: Rule execution starting

The text of the message is retrieved from the message catalog through the message
identifier and can be localized.

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83

Undefined events, processing errors, and deprecated slots

Undefined events, processing errors, and


deprecated slots
This section briefly describes how the rule engine handles undefined events and
errors in event processing. It also tells you how to process deprecated slots that you
wish to continue to use.

Undefined events
Events with errors, or undefined events, are treated so that as much correct data as
possible is retained and incorrect data is made available for use in rules. The rule
engine determines incorrect data through parsing errors and incompatibilities with
the BAROC class definitions.
The following incorrect events are handled by the cell as specified:
s

The event message cannot be parsed as an event.


An internal event of class MC_CELL_PARSE_ERROR is created. It contains slots with
the complete message text, as well as the line number and column number in the
message text that locates the error message. Specific slots for this internal event are
listed in Table 10.

Table 10

MC_CELL_PARSE_ERROR slots

Slot

Data

error_column

column number in text where error occurs

error_line

line number on text where error occurs

error_message

error message

event_text

complete event message text

The event is of an undefined class.


An internal event of class MC_CELL_UNDEFINED_CLASS is generated. Its class
definition is shown below:

MC_EV_CLASS:
MC_CELL_UNDEFINED_CLASS ISA MC_CELL_EVENT
DEFINES {
severity : default = MINOR;
class_name: STRING;
};
END

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Event processing errors

It contains slots with the undefined class name, a list of slot names, and a list of slot
values. The specific slot used is described in Table 11.
Table 11

MC_CELL_UNDEFINED_CLASS slots

Slot

Data

class_name

name of class as specified in the message

The event is of a defined class, but contains undefined slots.


The event is generated as one of the specified class, and the undefined slots are
stored in the bad slot list slots, in corresponding order, as shown below:

mc_bad_slot_names : LIST_OF STRING;


mc_bad_slot_values: LIST_OF STRING;
s

The event has slot values that do not match the data type of the slot, such as a nonnumeric value for a numeric type.
The event is generated as specified, except the bad slots. Because a valid value is
not assigned for the bad slots, the default value applies to those slots. All bad slot
values are stored in the two slot lists, as for the event of a defined class with
undefined slots.

Event processing errors


When an error occurs during the processing of an event, the cells trace displays an
error message. It also generates an internal event of class MC_CELL_PROCESS_ERROR,
with the slots listed in Table 12.
Table 12

MC_CELL_PROCESS_ERROR slots

Slot

Data

error_code

the error number

error_goal

the part of the processing command that has the error

error_message

an error description message

error_source

the position in the rule source where the error occurred

event

the mc_ueid of the event that was being processed

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85

Using deprecated slots

Using deprecated slots


Deprecated slots are obsolete in the product and may not be available in a future
release. They were retained for a limited time for backward compatibility with earlier
releases. If you are using slots that have been deprecated and want to continue to use
them, define them and enable them. The definitions for deprecated slots are located in
mc_root_redef.baroc. You can enable this file in the .load file, or you can define the
individual slots that you need.
If you enable deprecated slots, their values are displayed in the Deprecated subtab of
the details pane in the Events View. Administrators can access the Deprecated subtab,
and they can grant access to other user roles.

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Chapter

Working with collectors


This chapter describes the procedures for defining and working with collectors. It
depicts the default event collectors that are included with the installation. This
chapter presents the following topics:
Creating or modifying a collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Collector syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Best practices for defining collectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Collector security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining static collectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining dynamic collectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default event management collectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
self_collector.mrl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
catchall_collector.mrl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
mc_bystatus_collectors.mrl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
mc_bylocation_collectors.mrl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MCxP collector set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
bii4p_collectors.mrl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
mc_evr_collectors.mrl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default service impact management event collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 4

Working with collectors

88
88
90
91
93
94
96
96
96
97
97
98
98
99
99

87

Creating or modifying a collector

Creating or modifying a collector


The collector .mrl file can be named anything you choose, but it must be located in the
Knowledge Base collectors directory and must be added to the .load file. Any time
you make a change to a collector, recompile the Knowledge Base for that cell and
restart the service. For more information, see the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base
Development Reference Guide.
The following topics describe how to create or modify a collector:
s
s
s
s

Collector syntax on page 88


Collector security on page 91
Defining static collectors on page 93
Defining dynamic collectors on page 94

Collector syntax
Figure 24

Collector definition syntax


2
3

collector CollectorName {[ r | w | x Role ]}


5

[create Expression
6

[ delete ] ]
7

[ CLASSEVENTNAME where
[slot_name: condition_operator slot_value,
. . . ]
| CatchAll ]
END

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Collector syntax

# Description
1 keyword that specifies how the text in the collector file is interpreted
2 a composed sequence consisting of the Collector Tree name, followed by the names of the collectors down
the path to the actually defined collector. Collector names can contain only alphanumeric characters and
the underscore character
The CollectorName is assigned by:
s defining the cell itself using the keyword self
s specifying the parent collector name, such as Network
s specifying the child collector name, such as Network.Subnet
s specifying a dynamic collector name by using an asterisk, such as Network.*
Note: An ECF cannot be specified in the definition of the Collector Tree.
3 specifies the permission level that users have to the collector
Available permission levels include
s rread access
s wwrite access
s xexecute access
4 role level that can access the collector
Multiple roles with unique access rights may be defined for any collector. Also, the asterisk (*) creates
dynamic role definitions. See Defining dynamic collectors on page 94 for more information.
5 The format for expression is the keyword $THIS followed by the name of an event slot. $THIS
substitutes the slot value in place of the * in relevant collector names.
Examples of the Create clause using the CORE_EVENT base class:
s
s

$THIS.mc_originsubstitutes the value of mc_origin for the asterisk in the collector name
$THIS.mc_causesubstitues the value of mc_cause for the asterisk in the collector name

Note: The Create clause is required when defining a dynamic collector.


6 instructs the cell to delete an empty dynamic collector in BMC Impact Explorer after it and its child
collectors have been empty for a defined period of time
A Create or Delete clause always refers to the last named component only, defined as an asterisk (*).
Collector definitions with a fixed last name component cannot use either a Create or Delete clause.
The time period is specified in the CollectorKeepEmpty parameter in the mcell.conf configuration
file. The default value is 600 seconds; the minimum value is 60 seconds. An empty dynamic collector with
or without a Delete clause is deleted when empty for the specified time period and when the cell is
restarted.

Chapter 4

Working with collectors

89

Best practices for defining collectors

# Description
7 identifies which events require further processing by the collector
This section is referred to as an Event Condition Formula (ECF). The ECF includes the name of the event
class and all the slot conditions for that class.
Note: The ECF portion of a collector can contain references to the dynamic data by using a Using clause.
Use this type of reference with extreme care because it can result in the performance degradation of the
cell, particularly when large tables are searched on unindexed slots.
8 collects all events, including any events not picked up by the collectors you define

Best practices for defining collectors


To preserve the optimum cell performance, observe the following guidelines. Any
new event or any slot change forces the cell to reconfigure collector conditions.
s

Define Where clauses in event condition formulas (ECFs) as simply as possible. Use
narrowly defined classes rather than complex Where clauses. For example:

collector HostsDown : HOST_DOWN


END

is more efficient than


collector HostsDown : EVENT
where (CLASS: equals HOST_DOWN)
END
s

Avoid complex pattern-matching conditions on slot contents.

Design collectors to take full advantage of the class hierarchy and its specialization
properties. For example, write a collector condition on a class that catches all
events belonging to any of its subclasses. In the following example, the collector
catches all instances of any HOST_DOWN or HOST_UP events, assuming HOST_EVENT
is a superclass of HOST_UP and HOST_DOWN.

collector AllHostsEvents : HOST_EVENT


END

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Collector security

The following collector does not catch all instances of HOST_UP or HOST_DOWN
events because the comparison is done literally on the string.
collector HostsEvents : EVENT
where (CLASS: equals HOST_EVENT)
END
s

If you want to use dynamic data in the Using clause of an ECF, keep tables short
and always search on indexed slots.

Collector security
The administrator for BMC Impact Manager specifies which collectors in each
Knowledge Base users can view and act upon in the BMC Impact Explorer Console.
For example, a user might be able to connect to a cell but not view all the collectors.
Table 13 lists the standard BMC Impact Manager roles that can be defined within the
collectors.
Table 13

BMC Impact Manager standard roles

Role

Description

Administrator roles
Full Access

manages everything in the environment

Service Administrator

manages the BMC Impact Manager infrastructure events, events,


and services

Service Manager roles


Service Managers- Senior manages services and events with full customization capabilities
Service Managers

manages services and events with limited customization


capabilities

Operator roles
Service Operators- Senior manages events and services with full customization capabilities
Service Operators

manages events and services with limited customization


capabilities

In addition, the read-only role restricts you to viewing events and services.
For more information about user roles in BMC Impact Manager, see BMC Impact
Solutions Infrastructure Administration Guide.

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Working with collectors

91

Collector security

How collector permissions work


Child collectors inherit the permissions and role assignments specified for the parent
collector. You cannot override a role assignment at a child collector level once the role
has been assigned at a parent level. Therefore, roles and related permissions should
be assigned at the highest level collector.
A self collector must be defined in each collector tree. If more than one .mrl file
containing collector definitions exists for any Knowledge Base, you need only one
self collector defined. Figure 25 illustrates the main collector, self, followed by the
c1 collector and its child collectors, c1.one and c1.two. The collector tree also
contains the c2 collector and its child collectors, c2.one and c2.two.
Figure 25

Collector tree definition example

collector self:
{r[Full Access]; w[Full Access]; x[Full Access]}
END
collector c1:
{r[Service Administrator,Service Operators]; w[Service Administrator,Service
Operators]; x[Service Administrator,Service Operators]}
END
collector c1.one:
{r[Service Managers-Senior]}
END
collector c1.two:
{r[Service Managers-Senior], w[Service Managers-Senior]}
END
collector c2:
{r[Service Managers-Senior,Service Administrator]; w[Service ManagersSenior,Service Administrator]; x[Service Managers-Senior,Service Administrator]}
END
collector c2.one:
{r[Service Operators], w[Service Operators]}
END
collector c2.two:
{r[Service Operators]}
END

The following points describe the user roles and associated permissions for the
collectors defined in Figure 25:
s

92

Users with a Full Access role have read, write, and execute permissions for all
collectors and subcollectors defined in this example.
Users with Service Administrator and Service Operators roles have read,
write, and execute permissions on collector c1 and subcollectors c1.one and
c1.two.

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Defining static collectors

Users with a Service Managers-Senior role have read permissions at collector c1,
subcollector c1.one, and read and write permissions on subcollector c1.two.

Users with Service Managers-Senior and Service Administrator roles have


read, write, and execute permissions on collector c2, and subcollectors c2.one and
c2.two.

Users with a Service Operators role have read permissions at collector c2,
subcollector c2.two, and read and write permissions at subcollector c2.one.

Defining static collectors


Static collectors remain visible for a cell regardless of whether that collector contains
any events. A static collector requires that event criteria are fully defined.
In Figure 26, the self collector has no roles or access rights defined. The Networks
parent collector does not have an ECF but it does define read access rights for a user
with the Service Administrator role.
Figure 26

Static collector example 1

collector self :
END
collector Networks :
{ r [Service Administrator] }
END
collector Networks.Local :
{ r [Service Operators]
w [Service Operators, Service Administrator]
} :
EVENT where
[source: ip_matches 172.16.23.<128]
END

collector Networks.Remote :
{ w [Service Administrator] } :
EVENT where
[source: ip_matches 172.16.23.>128]
END

The Local and Remote child collectors in Figure 26 accept only events that originate
from a computer within the specified IP address range. The Local collector inherits
the rights and roles defined for the Networks collector and defines additional access
rights for Service Operators and Service Administrator users. The Remote child
collector inherits the Networks collector rights and roles and defines additional access
rights for Service Administrator users.

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93

Defining dynamic collectors

When multiple ECFs exist for a single collector, the cell interprets the ECFs by using
the OR operator. If multiple slot conditions exist in the same ECF for a collector, the
cell uses the AND operator. In Figure 27, the static collectors are defined with single
and multiple ECFs.
Figure 27

Static collector example 2

collector AllEvents :
{r [Service Operators, Service Administrator, Full Access ]
w [Service Operators, Service Administrator, Full Access ]
x [Service Administrator, Full Access]
}
END
collector AllEvents.Open :
EVENT where [status: equals OPEN]
END
collector AllEvents.Ack :
{x [Service Operators]}:
EVENT where [status: equals ACK,
severity: equals FATAL]
EVENT where [severity: not_equals UNKNOWN]
END
collector AllEvents.NotOpen :
EVENT where [status: not_equals OPEN]
END

When a collector uses multiple ECFs, you must ensure that the ECFs match outcomes.
For example, in Figure 27 the AllEvents.Ack collector accepts events with an ACK
status. The first ECF complies with that request and adds another stipulation to
accept only events with an ACK status and a FATAL severity. However, the second ECF
states that the collector accepts an event with any status as long as its severity is not
UNKNOWN.
The access rights and permissions set in the AllEvents parent collector are inherited
by all of its children collectors. The only modification to the inherited permissions is
in the AllEvents.Ack collector, which adds execute access rights for a Service
Operators user.

Defining dynamic collectors


Dynamic collectors are created automatically when specified events are received.
When specified events are deleted or changed and the associated collector becomes
empty, the collector is removed. Dynamic collectors reflect the dynamic nature of
event sources.

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Defining dynamic collectors

The following is the definition of class NET, for which events are generated for
network-related issues:
MC_EV_CLASS: NET ISA EVENT ; END

In the following example, NET events are generated for network-related issues. When
the issue is specific to a subsystem, the kind of subsystem is specified in the
mc_object_class slot. The collector definitions shown create a collector structure for
each subsystem that produces events. The name of the collector is determined by the
mc_object_class slot. Events that are not related to a specific subsystem are
collected in the Global subcollector.
Within the subsystem collector, a distinction is made between events coming from
servers and events coming from clients. When the mc_origin_class slot has the
value SERVER, the event is assumed to come from a server. In that case, a subcollector
is created for each server that produces events. The name of the subcollector is taken
from the mc_origin slot.
collector Net END
collector Net.* : NET where [$THIS.mc_object_class != '']
create $THIS.mc_object_class delete
END
collector Net.*.Server : NET where [$THIS.mc_origin_class == SERVER]
END
collector Net.*.Server.* : NET
create $THIS.mc_origin
END
collector Net.*.Client : NET
END
collector Net.Global : NET
END

Dynamic roles in dynamic collectors


In a dynamic collector, dynamic role assignments depend on characteristics of the
incoming event. The dynamic roles are created with the dynamic collector. The $THIS
variable in the following example refers to the incoming event and is used in the role
name definition.
collector Net.*.Server.* : { r[$THIS.mc_origin] } : NET
create $THIS.mc_origin
END

This example assigns a read permission to a role having the same name as the value
of the mc_origin slot. For example, if the name of a server is host12 in an event, the
dynamic collector creates a new collector host12. The role host12 must be listed in
the list of roles if it is to see what is contained in the collector.

Chapter 4

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95

Default event management collectors

NOTE
The roles computed dynamically and assigned to dynamic collectors must be defined in the
BMC Portal. Also, users must receive these roles before they can access the collectors.
[WRONG: not necessarily in the PORTAL anymore]. For more information about user roles,
see BMC Impact Solutions Infrastructure Administration Guide.

Default event management collectors


The following collectors, which group events based on their associated collector rules,
are defined in the Knowledge Base collectors directory.

self_collector.mrl
The self collector defines a collector for the cell. It is the parent node for all collectors
defined for that cell.
Figure 28

Self collector definition

collector self :
{
r['Full Access']
w['Full Access']
x['Full Access']
}
END

catchall_collector.mrl
The catchall collector defines the All Events collector for a cell, which is the last
collector in the tree. This collector is used to capture events that do not match any
collector criteria.
Figure 29

Catchall collector definition

collector 'All
{
r['Service
w['Service
x['Service
}

Events' :
Administrators']
Administrators']
Administrators']

catchall
END

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mc_bystatus_collectors.mrl

mc_bystatus_collectors.mrl
This file defines the By status collector set. Table 14 lists the collectors included in
the mc_bystatus_collectors.mrl file.
Table 14

By Status collector set

Subcollector branch

Description

ByStatus.Open

shows all events in OPEN status

ByStatus.Acknowledged

shows all events in ACK status

ByStatus.Assigned

shows all events in ASSIGNED status

ByStatus.Closed

shows all events in CLOSED status

ByStatus.Blackout

shows all events in BLACKOUT status

mc_bylocation_collectors.mrl
This file defines the By location collector set. This collector set collects either
system events or standard events. System events are directed to the static collector
named ByLocation.Syste; other events go to the By Location.* dynamic
subcollector branch. Table 15 lists the collectors included in the
mc_bylocation_collectors.mrl file.
Table 15

By Location collector set (part 1 of 2)

Subcollector branch

Description

ByLocation.System

This collector stores events belonging to the following classes:


s
s
s
s
s

s
s

MC_CELL_CONTROL
MC_CLIENT_BASE
MC_ADAPTER_CONTROL
MC_MCCS
'By Location'.System.'Event Processor' that collects
MC_CELL_CONTROL events
'By Location'.System.'Event
Processor'.'Heartbeat Log' that collects
MC_CELL_HEARTBEAT_EVT events
'By Location'.System.'Event
Processor'.'Connection Log' that collects
MC_CELL_CLIENT and MC_CELL_CONNECT events
'By Location'.System.'Event Processor'.'Action
Log' that collects MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT events
'By Location'.System.'Adapters' that collects
MC_CLIENT_BASE and MC_ADAPTER_CONTROL events
'By Location'.System.'Configuration Server' that
collects MC_MCCS events

Chapter 4

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97

MCxP collector set

Table 15

By Location collector set (part 2 of 2)

Subcollector branch

Description

By Location.*

This collector collects all event types except SMC_STATE_CHANGE


events. Events are stored in a dynamic collector named by their
domain name, which is stored in their mc_location slot. If this slot is
empty, the event goes into the Unknown collector.

collector By Location.*.* At this second level, events are stored in a dynamic collector named by
host name, which is extracted from their mc_host slot. If this slot is
empty, the mc_host_address slot is used. If this slot is also empty,
the event goes into the Unknown collector.
By Location.*.*.*

The name of the third level is based directly on slot mc_tool_class.


Events with an empty mc_tool_class slot are not accepted at this
subcollector level.

By Location.*.*.*.*

The name of the fourth level is based directly on the mc_tool slot.
Events with an empty mc_tool slot are not accepted at this

subcollector level.

MCxP collector set


The MCxP collector set contains a hierarchy of dynamic collectors that collect
PATROL_EV events.
Table 16

Collectors included in the MCxP collector set

Collector

Description

MCxP.*

The first level of the hierarchy is created based on mc_host slot.

MCxP.*.*

The second level of the hierarchy is created based on the


p_application slot, provided this slot is not empty.

MCxP.*.*.*

The third level of the hierarchy is created based on p_instance slot,

provided this slot is not empty.


MCxP.*.*.*.* The fourth level of the hierarchy is created based on mc_parameter slot,

provided this slot is not empty.

bii4p_collectors.mrl
The bii4p_collectors.mrl file contains collector rules used by BMC Impact Integration
for PATROL Enterprise Manager. For more information, see the BMC Impact
Integration for PATROL User Guide.

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mc_evr_collectors.mrl

mc_evr_collectors.mrl
The mc_evr_collectors.mrl file contains collector rules for event relations. The event
relations collector tree is not visible in the Events View in BMC Impact Explorer. This
collector tree is used internally.

Default service impact management event


collector
The service model requires only the MC_SMC_Events collector node. This collector tree
is used by the Services View to retrieve the events of a specific component, based on
its type and its logical ID, stored in the mc_udid slot. Figure 30 shows the
MC_SMC_EVENTS collector definition.
Figure 30

MC_SMC_EVENTS collector definition

collector MC_SMC_Events:
{
r['Full Access', 'Service Administrators']
w['Full Access', 'Service Administrators']
x['Full Access', 'Service Administrators']
}
END
collector MC_SMC_Events.*:
EVENT
where [$THIS.mc_smc_id != ""]
create cond($THIS.mc_smc_type == '', "Unknown", $THIS.mc_smc_type)
END
collector MC_SMC_Events.*.Impacts:
EVENT
where [$THIS.mc_smc_impact == 1]
END
collector MC_SMC_Events.*.History:
SMC_STATE_CHANGE
END

An example query issued by the collector is shown in the following example:


select open events from collector MC_SMC_EVENTS.component_type
where [$THIS.mc_smc_id equals component_mc_udid]

Chapter 4

Working with collectors

99

Default service impact management event collector

This query varies depending on the menu command selected in the Services View:
Menu command Query type
All Events
Impact Events

any open or acknowledged event associated to the component and elected

History Events

100

any open or acknowledged event associated to the component


any open or closed event of class SMC_STATE_CHANGE for that component

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Chapter

Event lists
This chapter describes how to work with event lists. It contains the following topics:
Event list details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Events View details pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Common Event Model slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to determine event states. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding event status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding event severity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding event priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing display settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the effect of event status and severity on collectors color . . . .
Understanding the effect of event status on event count for collectors . . . . . . .
Working with event lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing event lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting the type of event list to view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing event details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing related events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refreshing and freezing the event list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing floating windows in full screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Organizing events in the event list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using MetaCollectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filtering events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sorting events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning events to users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 5

Event lists

102
104
105
106
108
108
109
110
112
113
114
114
115
116
116
117
119
120
120
121
129
133

101

Event list details

Event list details


From the event list, you can access the event data collected for the cells contained in
your BMC Impact Manager (BMC IM) environment. Also, you can
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

select a different view for the event list of a cell or collector


access the specific details collected for an event
perform operations on an event, such as take or decline ownership or reopen
annotate individual or multiple events
explore event relationships
sort column data by clicking on the column heading
copy and print event data

The event list displays selected event details, including operational status. Each row
in the table shows information for one event. The columns are determined by the type
of information that you select in Event Sources and the slots (event attributes) selected
for display. For example, if you select All Events and Basic Information from the Event
Sources list, the default event list displays the following columns:
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

status
priority
severity
action count (number of remote actions applied to the event)
event relations
receipt date of the event
message associated with the event
SMC priority

NOTE
The SMC priority slot contains a numerical value that indicates the priority of the event in its
impact on the SIM model. Events that are the root cause of an impact on an important
component have a priority value greater than zero. See the description of the mc_smc_priority
slot of the CORE_EVENT base class in the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base
Development Reference Guide.

The set of slots (columns) presented in the event list is called the slot order. Depending
on your role and access privileges, you can select different slots to see other event
information (and therefore other columns in the event list). When you change the
slots presented, either by adding or removing slots or by rearranging them, you are
changing the slot order. To use a new slot order, you must associate it with a filter. For
instructions, see Sorting events on page 129.

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Event list details

You can click a column heading in the event list to switch between ascending and
descending sort order according to that column. For example, you could display the
events sorted by date, either earliest to latest (ascending order) or newest to oldest
(descending order). You could also display the events sorted by their messages,
which would display them in alphabetical order (ascending order) or reverse
alphabetical order (descending order).
If the event has related events, one of the icons shown in Table 17 on page 103 is
displayed in the event relations column.
Table 17
Icon

Event relations icons


Event relation
Generic
Notification
Incident
iBRSD-related incident errors

You can also customize the display of the event list, as described in Customizing
access to Help for events on page 29.

Chapter 5

Event lists

103

Events View details pane

Events View details pane


The event details pane provides all of the recorded information about an event. The
subtabs of the details pane organize the information, as shown in Table 18 on
page 104.
Table 18

Events View Details pane (part 1 of 2)

Subtab
name

Sections in subtab

Description of contents

Summary

Workflow Status

status, priority, and owner of the event

Event Information

basic information about the event, such as date


and time of occurrence, severity, any associated
message, and the event class

Actions

a list of actions against the event and the


number of occurrences of actions

Monitored

information about the host of the monitored


object, such as its name and location and the
object class

Service Model

the component type and ID and any impact the


event has on the component

Notes

none

a text box in which users can view and submit


annotations about the event

History

Time Stamps

time and date for event occurrence, arrival,


receipt, and modifications

Original Settings

severity and priority of the event when it


originated

Operations Log

time and date of each event operation


performed on the event, logon ID of user who
performed the operation, and type of operation

Notification Log

logon ID of the user to whom notification is


sent if an event operation is a notification

Adapter/Gateway

information about the adapter or gateway from


which the event came, including name, class,
and IP address

Origin

information about the origin of the event,


including class and encryption key

Object

Source

Details

104

classes and subclasses

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

New Common Event Model slots

Table 18

Events View Details pane (part 2 of 2)

Subtab
name

Sections in subtab

Description of contents

Internals

Tracking

tracking information, such as the tracking ID,


event handle, collectors, and propagations

Relationships

information about events abstracted from this


one, abstractions, causes and effects, and
associations

Undefined Attributes

a list of undefined attributes and values

Deprecated none

a list of slots that are no longer used; for more


information, see Customizing access to Help
for events on page 29

New Common Event Model slots


The use of the BMC Atrium Common Event Model (CEM) results in the addition of
nine new slots that you can view in the BMC IX Events View details pane. All of these
slots belong to the default class EVENT.
Table 19 describes these slots.
Table 19

New CEM-related slots in BMC IX (part 1 of 2)

Slot label in IX
GUI
Reported from
Source

CEM name

BAROC name

ReportTime

mc_incident_
report_time

Data
type
integer

Description
indicates the date and time when
the event was reported.
Displayed in the format

mm/dd/yyyy hh:mm
Tool Address

ComponentHostAddress

mc_tool_address string

specifies the network address of


the reporter

Tool Time

EventTime

mc_tool_time

integer

indicates when the reporter


received the event. It translates
reporter time into epoch time.

Tool Suggestion EventSuggestion

mc_tool_
suggestion

string

suggests a solution for the


situation defined by the reporter

Object Owner

ComponentOwner

mc_object_owner

string

string data type that identifies


the owner of the source
component

Parameter Unit

MetricValueUnit

mc_parameter_
unit

string

specifies the unit of measure of


the metric

Parameter
Threshold

MetricThreshold

mc_parameter_
threshold

string

defines the threshold value that,


when exceeded, results in the
generation of an event

Chapter 5

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105

How to determine event states

Table 19

New CEM-related slots in BMC IX (part 2 of 2)

Slot label in IX
GUI

CEM name

BAROC name

Data
type

Account

Account

mc_account

string

CEM version

EventModelVersion

mc_event_model_ string
version

Description
identifies the account associated
with the event
specifies the version number of
the data model

How to determine event states


The event list displays sufficient information for you to recognize an events current
state quickly. Each events state depends on multiple factors:
s
s
s

severity, reflected in the severity icon and color of the event line
priority, reflected in the priority icon
the last event operation performed on the event, reflected in the status icon

When you perform an event operation on an event, the state of the event changes
according to Table 20.
Table 20

Event states resulting from event operations

Event operation performed

Resulting state

Acknowledge Event

Acknowledged

Take Ownership

Assigned

Decline Ownership

Acknowledged

Assign To

Assigned

Close Event

Closed

Reopen Event

Open

Black Out

Blacked Out

Figure 31 on page 107 shows how an event in any state is affected by the operations
that are valid for that current state. The circles represent the event states. Each arrow
represents an action, with the direction of the arrow indicating the flow of the action.
For example, if the event is currently in the Acknowledged Event state, you can
perform a Reopen Event, Close Event, Take Ownership, or Assign To action.
Conversely, for that event to be in the Acknowledged Event state, an Acknowledge
Event or Decline Ownership action must have been taken against it.

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How to determine event states

Figure 31

How event operations affect event state

A user with a supervisory role (Full Access is the only default supervisory role) can
select Supervisor Information from the secondary menu of the Event Sources list to see
current operator information based on the last event operation applied. This
information is displayed in the mc_owner column in the event list, according to
Table 21.
Table 21

Current operator information in event list

Last event operation action Current operator information displayed in mc_owner


Take Ownership

logon user ID of the user who took ownership

Assign To

logon user ID of the user to whom the event is assigned

Decline Ownership

none

Close

none

Acknowledge

none

Reopen

none; this operation clears previous information from the event


list

Set Priority

no change to displayed information

Other factors can also affect the information displayed, such as whether an event has
been propagated, abstracted, correlated, or recycled.

Chapter 5

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107

Understanding event status

Understanding event status


The status of an event provides basic information about the events response activity.
The cell assigns a status value to each event, and then you can change the status by
performing event operations or other actions on the event. Also, the status of the
event can be changed automatically by a rule.
Table 22 lists the icons that are displayed in the event list to represent event status.
Table 22
Icon

Event status icons


Event status
Open
Closed
Acknowledged (ACK)
Assigned
Blackout

The color of the status icon is always the same. However, if you have configured the
Events View to use the severity color for the event line, the color of the icons
background varies with the severity of the event.

Understanding event severity


Each event has a severity level associated with it that indicates the seriousness of the
event. In combination with status and priority, the severity level indicates the urgency
of the need to take action. For example, a high severity level for an event in the Closed
status is no cause for alarm, but a high severity level for an event in the Open status
and with a priority of 1 indicates an urgent need for action.
The color of each line (row) in the event list table is determined by settings in the
Events View subtab in the Edit Configuration dialog box and by the severity of the
event depicted in the line, as follows:
s

If you selected Line Color Severity in the configuration, the line shows the color
associated with the severity level of the event.
For events that have no severity (statuses Closed and Blackout have no severity
level associated with them), the line has no color (is displayed as white).

108

If you did not select Line Color Severity, the line has no color (is displayed as white).

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Understanding event priority

Table 23 lists the default severity levels and colors for the events that appear in the
navigation pane and event list and shows the icons used in the event list.
Table 23

Event severity levels

Color

Icon in Event List

Severity level

red

CRITICAL

dark orange

MAJOR

light orange

MINOR

yellow

WARNING

blue

INFO

green

OK

gray

UNKNOWN

The event with the highest severity level in an event group on the Event Group tab
determines the severity indicator that you see for the event group in the navigation
tree. For example, if one event has a severity of Critical, the event group is displayed
in the navigation tree with a Critical (red) severity indicator.

Understanding event priority


In addition to a severity level, each event has a priority level. Distinguishing between
severity and priority helps you to understand which event requires action first.
Table 24 lists the icons that are displayed in the event list to represent event priority.
Table 24
Icon

Event priority icons


Event Priority
Priority 1 (highest)
Priority 2
Priority 3
Priority 4
Priority 5 (lowest)

Chapter 5

Event lists

109

Customizing display settings

Customizing display settings


In the Events View, you can define the following attributes to help you monitor and
manage events:
s
s
s
s

color
confirmation dialog boxes
icons
counters

To customize display settings for the events tab


1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Configuration.
2 In the Edit Configuration dialog box, click the Events View subtab, if necessary.
The Events View subtab is displayed, as shown in Figure 32 on page 111.

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Customizing display settings

Figure 32

Events View subtab of Edit Configuration dialog box

NOTE
In this example, the users_filter property in the
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\server\conf\ix.properities file is set equal to false.
Compare with Figure 43 on page 5-134.

3 Use the information in Table 25 to determine the appropriate settings.


Table 25

Events View subtab display settings (part 1 of 2)

Field

Description

Line Color Severity

enables and disables the display of the severity color for the
entire event line.
If cleared, the line displays the severity color only in the severity
column and the rest of the line has no color.

Keep Severity Color on


Close

leaves the severity color unchanged when an event is closed

Chapter 5

Event lists

111

Understanding the effect of event status and severity on collectors color

Table 25

Events View subtab display settings (part 2 of 2)

Field

Description

Event Operation
Confirmation

enables a notification when a user takes ownership of an event

Use icons for the status,


priority, and severity
columns

enables and disables the display of icons instead of text for the
status, priority, and severity columns

Severity/Priority/Counter determines the color displayed for the collector in the tree:
s
s
s
s
s

OPEN: selects events with status Open


ACKNOWLEDGED: selects events with status
Acknowledged
ASSIGNED: selects events with status Assigned
CLOSED: selects events with status Closed
BLACKOUT: selects events with status Blackout

For more information, see Understanding the effect of event


status and severity on collectors color on page 112
Second Event Count

determines which statuses contribute to the event count:


s
s
s
s
s

OPEN: selects events with status Open


ACKNOWLEDGED: selects events with status
Acknowledged
ASSIGNED: selects events with status Assigned
CLOSED: selects events with status Closed
BLACKOUT: selects events with status Blackout

For more information, see Understanding the effect of event


status on event count for collectors on page 113.

4 Click OK to save the changes and exit the dialog box.

Understanding the effect of event status and severity on


collectors color
You can affect the color of a collector by your selection of event statuses in the Events
View subtab of the Edit Configuration dialog box. The collector color that you see in
the tree is determined by the severity color of the highest severity event that also has
a status selected from the list under Severity/Priority/Counter, as shown in Figure 33 on
page 113.

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Understanding the effect of event status on event count for collectors

Figure 33

Severity section of Events View subtab of Edit Configuration dialog box

For example, if you select all of the statuses and one of the closed events has a
severity of Critical, the relevant collector will be displayed in red, even though no
open event has a Critical severity. That severity color will be propagated up through
the hierarchy of collectors in that branch of the tree, so you will see a red severity
indicator for each hierarchical level.

NOTE
No status is available for the top-level node in an event tree.

Understanding the effect of event status on event count for


collectors
In the navigation pane of the Events View, two counters are displayed beside each
node in the tree. The first counter is enclosed in parentheses and represents the
number of unacknowledged (Open) events. This counter decreases whenever the
status changes from open to some other state. Also, this counter is always present for
all nodes except the top-level node.
The second counter represents the number of events that match the statuses that you
selected to count. You can affect the event count of a collector by your selection of
event statuses in the Second Event Count section of the Events View subtab of the Edit
Configuration dialog box (see Figure 34 on page 114).

Chapter 5

Event lists

113

Working with event lists

Figure 34

Event count section of Events View subtab of Edit Configuration dialog


box

In the Second Event Count section of the Events View subtab, all status types are
selected by default, but you may select one status or any combination of statuses.
For example, if you select only the Open status, the event count will not include
events of other statuses. Not even the event count for the All Events collector will
include events of any status other than Open.

To customize the second counter


1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Configuration.
2 In the Edit Configuration dialog box, click the Events View subtab, if necessary.
3 In the Events View subtab, under Second Event Count, activate the status that you
want to count for the event.

4 Click Apply to save the changes, or click OK to save and exit the dialog box.

Working with event lists


This section describes some of the interactions that you can perform with the event
lists.

Viewing event lists


The procedures for viewing events for a cell, a collector, a MetaCollector, and an event
group are similar. They differ in the tab or the tree icon that you select. BMC Impact
Explorer (BMC IX) displays the events for the selected object in the event list pane.

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Selecting the type of event list to view

To view the event list for a cell


1 At the top of the Events navigation pane, click the Collectors tab
2 Expand the hierarchy to locate the cell

whose events you want to display.

3 Click the cell.


To view the event list for a collector
1 At the top of the Events navigation pane, click the Collectors tab
2 Expand the hierarchy to locate the collector

whose events you want to display.

3 Click the collector.


To view the event list for a MetaCollector
1 At the top of the Events navigation pane, click the MetaCollectors tab

2 Expand the hierarchy to locate the MetaCollector whose events you want to
display.

3 Click the MetaCollector.


To view the event list for an event group
1 At the top of the Events navigation pane, click the Event Groups tab

2 Expand the hierarchy to locate the event group whose events you want to display.
3 Click the event group.

Selecting the type of event list to view


From the Event Sources list box, you can select different views of the event list,
including events that match specific criteria or the results from a filter, as shown in
Figure 35.

Chapter 5

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Figure 35

Event Sources selection

Event Sources list box

Available event list views

For more information about filtering, see Filtering events on page 121.

Viewing event details


From the Events View, you can access various kinds of data for an event. The details
pane provides tabs that categorize the data, as described in Table 18 on page 104. If
you hide the details pane, you can access the same information by double-clicking the
event in the event list or by selecting the event and choosing View => Event Details
from the menu bar.

Viewing related events


An event in the event list displays one or more icons when that event has another
event associated with it. The icon that is displayed depends on the type of event to
which it is associated. For example, if the related event is about trouble ticket
information, an icon that represents a trouble ticket is displayed.
You can view related events in the following ways:
s
s

from the events list


from the main menu

To view related events from the events list


1 From the events list, right-click a row.
2 From the menu, choose Views => Related Events.
A list of related events is displayed.
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3 Perform one of the following actions:


s

To view one type of related event, select a type.


An event list of the selected type, as denoted by its title, is displayed.

To view all related events, select Show all related events.


All related events are displayed.

NOTE
If you move the cursor over an event relations icon, a summary of the number of related
events by category is displayed briefly.

To view related events from the main menu


1 From the main menu, choose View => Related events.
2 Perform one of the following actions:
s

To view one type of related event, select a type.


An event list of the selected event, as denoted by its title, is displayed.

To view all related events, select Show all related events.


All related events are displayed.

Refreshing and freezing the event list


All of the event sources in the BMC Impact Manager system can generate thousands
of events. You can choose whether to view all of those events as they occur. You can
configure refresh of the event list to occur automatically or manually, and even if you
use the automatic refresh, you can manually refresh at any time to be sure that you
have the most recent data. When you manually refresh the event list, the cell is
queried for any changes in events. The console updates the event list if changes are
present.
Using manual refresh gives you the ability to freeze the event list at an instant.
Freezing the event list can be useful for troubleshooting, in that it prevents the events
of interest from being displaced in the view by new events at each refresh interval.
Instead of being displayed in the event list, new events increment the Pending Events
indicator at the lower right of the event list pane.

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Refreshing and freezing the event list

To automatically refresh the event list


1 In the Events View, choose Edit => Configuration.
2 In the Edit Configuration dialog box, configure the function and the refresh
interval, as follows:

A On the Global subtab, select Auto Refresh active by default.


B On the Impact Managers subtab, in the advanced option, specify a value in
Refresh Freq (in seconds).

3 On the event list, ensure that Auto Refresh

is active.

If Auto Refresh is not enabled and active when an event is modified externally from
the console, the event is not updated until you manually refresh the event list.

NOTE
If the cell is extremely busy, the event list may not be refreshed until the cell completes the
current event processing load.

To manually refresh the event list


Use any of the following methods:
s
s
s

From the menu bar, choose View => Refresh.


On the toolbar, click Refresh
.
Press F5.

To freeze the event list


In the upper-left corner of the event list, click Auto Refresh

The auto refresh activity stops. The list updates only when you click Auto Refresh
or Refresh
again.

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Viewing floating windows in full screen

Viewing floating windows in full screen


The BMC IX Console provides different ways for you to arrange and view the data.
For example, it supplies a Float menu command, available off of the right-click menu
in the window tab area, as seen in Figure 36.
Figure 36

Float command

When you activate the Float command, you are able to place the focus on the window
and drag it to different areas of the BMC IX Console. You can move the focus to other
parts of the BMC IX Console and activate other options, while using the floating
window as a reference point.
To view the floating window in full screen, click the Toggle Full Screen button, as
displayed in the following image:

To return to a normal floating window view, click the Toggle Full Screen button again.
To return to a non-floating view, click the Close button (X).

NOTE
In the Services View, do not create or edit relationships between components in a floating
window using the Edit Relationships command. Always create and edit relationships in the
main window.
Also, the Close and Take Ownership buttons are not working as expected in a floating
window.

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Organizing events in the event list

Organizing events in the event list


You can use various techniques to organize events and view information about them:
s
s
s
s

Use MetaCollectors to arrange events from different sources.


Filter events to see only the ones of interest.
Change the sorting of the event list.
Change the columns displayed in the event list.

Using MetaCollectors
BMC IX has an organizational tool, called a MetaCollector, that both operators and
administrators can use to view and manage numerous events from different sources
in meaningful ways. With MetaCollectors, you can display events from multiple,
connected cells in a single tree node in the navigation pane, grouping events in your
own customized ways. MetaCollectors are displayed in the navigation pane in their
own tab.

To create a MetaCollector
1 At the top of the navigation pane of the Events View, select the MetaCollectors
tab

2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => MetaCollectors.


The Edit MetaCollector dialog box is displayed.

3 On the dialog box toolbar, click the New button

The MetaCollector Naming dialog box is displayed.

4 Enter a name for the MetaCollector and click OK.


The new MetaCollector is displayed in the right pane of the dialog box.

5 Select the new MetaCollector.


6 Select a cell or collector from the left pane that you want to include in the new
MetaCollector.

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7 Click the right arrow button to move the cell or collector to the MetaCollector, as
shown in Figure 37.
Figure 37

MetaCollector addition

The cell is added to the


MetaCollector

TIP
You can also drag the cell or collector to the right pane to add it to the MetaCollector.

8 When you have finished adding collectors to the MetaCollector, click OK.
9 Click the MetaCollectors tab in the navigation pane to view the new MetaCollector.

Filtering events
Using filters, you can narrow the scope and number of events displayed. BMC IX
offers the following filtering methods:
s

default filters, provided in the Event Sources list, which filter events based on
status, time, or affiliation with the service model and provide global event views

quick filters, provided in the Slot Quick Filter


and Severity Quick Filter
lists, which show events based on a specific slot value or severity level

local filters, which you create and which are unique to your logon user name

global filters, which an administrator creates and which are available to any user
logged on to the server where the global filter was created

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Using the default filters


The default filters provide an easy way to see only the events that are active, new,
closed, or those that are related to the service model. To use a default filter, click the
down arrow next to Event Sources and choose the default filter that you want to use.
Table 26 summarizes the default filters and their options.
Table 26

Default filters and filter options

Filter name

Primary options

All Events

Active Events

New Events

Secondary options

Basic Information
Supervisor Information
SMC Information

none

Closed Events
Blackout Alerts

SMC Events

s
s

SMC Impact Events


SMC Status History Events

Basic Information
Supervisor Information
SMC Information

s
s

CI Incidents

CI Incident Information

Incident Events

Event Incidents

Event Incident Information

All of the default filters have the following options to differentiate the event
information that is displayed:
s

Basic Information displays


status
severity
priority

Supervisor Information displays


status
severity
priority

date and time the event was received


owner of the event
message produced by the event

SMC Information displays

122

number of operation actions performed on the event


date and time the event was received
message produced by the event

status
severity
priority
receipt date and time
class

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impact
type of service model component
component ID
causes
effects

Filtering events

The SMC Events filter also has the following intermediate options to differentiate
between the types of service model component events that can be displayed:
s
s

SMC Impact Events


SMC Status History Events

Using the quick filters


The quick filters provide an easy way to specify a single criterion for comparison and
filtering. You can specify a single slot, a value, and an appropriate comparison
operator (such as equal to, not equal to, contains, and so forth), or a minimum severity
level and view only the events that match that criterion.

To filter events by using slot names


1 From the event list, click the down arrow next to Slot Quick Filter, as shown in
Figure 38.
Figure 38

Slot quick filter and severity quick filter


Slot Quick Filter

Severity Quick Filter

The Slot Quick Filter dialog box is displayed.

2 In Slot, select the slot that you want to use as a filter.


3 In Operator, select a comparison operator.
4 In Value, enter a value against which you want the filter to compare.
5 Click OK.
NOTE
To toggle the filter, click Slot Quick Filter (which turns on the filter) or the filter specification
(which turns off the filter). When the filter specification is displayed instead of the Slot Quick
Filter icon, the events that are displayed are filtered.

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To filter events using severity


1 From the event list, click the down arrow next to Severity Quick Filter as displayed
in Figure 38 on page 123.
A list of severity levels is displayed.

2 Select the minimum severity level that you want to use to filter the event list.
The Severity Quick Filter filters out any events that have a severity level below the
severity level that you selected. For example, if you select a severity status of
Minor, only events of status Minor, Major and Critical would be displayed, and all
events with a severity level below Minor would be filtered out.

NOTE
To toggle the filter on and off, click Severity Quick Filter (which turns on the filter) or the
filter specification (which turns off the filter). When the filter specification is displayed
instead of the Severity Quick Filter icon, the events that are displayed are filtered.

Using global and local filters


Administrators can create filters and make them accessible to all users who are
logged on to the server where the filters were created; these filters are global filters.
Any user can create filters that are unique to the logon user name and only that user
can access; these filters are local filters. You can use the filters that are available to you
to adjust the view of the events list just as you use the quick filters or default filters.

To create a filter
1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Views.
The Edit Event View dialog box is displayed.

2 On the toolbar, click Edit Filters

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, as indicated in Figure 39 on page 125.

Filtering events

Figure 39

Edit Event View dialog box


Edit Filters

Filters pane

The Edit Filter dialog box is displayed.

3 On the toolbar, click New Basic Filter

A new filter is displayed in the Filters pane.

TIP
An administrator can create a global filter by selecting Global Filter Group and clicking
New Basic Filter. An operator can create only a local filter; Global Filter Group is not
available for selection.

4 In Filter Name, enter the name for the filter.


5 In Event Class, click Browse

6 In the Class Chooser dialog box, specify the following items:


s

In Impact Managers, select the cell for which you are creating the filter.

In Search for, specify the event class.

7 (optional) To filter events by age, select Age Limit and specify a number of minutes.
8 (optional) To filter events according to one or more slots, specify the following
information for each slot:

A In Slot, select the slot name.


B In Operator, select a comparison operator.
C In Value, enter a value against which you want the filter to compare.

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D If you want to add another filter condition (slot), select a logical operator of And
or Or and then click Add.

TIP
To remove a filter condition, select the condition you want to delete and click Remove.

9 Click OK.
The Edit Filter dialog box closes and the new filter is displayed in the Filters pane
of the Edit Event View dialog box.

NOTE
If you want to create or edit a filter using more complex logic, you can click Promote to
Advanced and use the editing tool to add and remove logic, change operators, and so forth.

10 In the Edit Event View dialog box, select the new filter in the left pane.
11 In the right pane, select the options that you want to use for displaying the results
of the new filter (referred to as slot orders), and then click the left arrow between
the panes.
The slot orders are added to the filter hierarchy in the left pane.

12 Click OK to return to the main console window.


Your new filter is ready for use. You can access it in Event Sources.

To edit a filter
1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Views.
The Edit Event View dialog box is displayed.

2 On the toolbar, click Edit Filters

The Edit Filter dialog box is displayed.

3 From the Filters pane, select the filter that you want to modify.
4 Edit the settings for the filter (see steps 4 through 8 on page 125 for guidance).
5 Click OK.
6 Click OK to return to the console.
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To delete a filter
1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Views.
The Edit Event View dialog box is displayed.

2 On the toolbar, click Edit Filters

The Edit Filters dialog box is displayed.

3 From the Filters pane, select the filter that you want to delete, and click Delete
on the toolbar.

4 Click OK.
5 Click OK to return to the console.

Organizing local filters into groups


You may have enough local filters to warrant organizing them into groups. Using
local filter groups can make finding a particular filter easier.

NOTE
A filter group labeled Global Filter Group is created during the installation process and is
displayed in the Filters hierarchy in the Edit Event Views dialog box. An administrator can
add filters to this group to make them available to other users. Otherwise, access is restricted
to the user who created the filter.

To create a filter group


1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Views.
The Edit Event View dialog box is displayed.

2 On the toolbar, click Edit Filters.


The Edit Filter dialog box is displayed.

3 On the toolbar, click New Filter Group.


In the Filters pane, a new filter group is displayed.

4 In Filter Group Name, enter a name for the filter group.

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5 Click OK.
6 Click OK to return to the console.
To rename a filter group
1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Views.
The Edit Event Views dialog box is displayed.

2 On the toolbar, click Edit Filters.


The Edit Filter dialog box is displayed.

3 From the Filters pane, select the filter group whose name you want to change.
4 In Filter Group Name, enter a new name for the filter group.
5 Click OK.
6 Click OK to return to the console.
To delete a filter group
1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Views.
The Edit Event View dialog box is displayed.

2 On the toolbar, click Edit Filters.


The Edit Filters dialog box is displayed.

3 From the Filters pane, select the filter group you want to delete and click Delete on
the toolbar.

4 Click OK.
5 Click OK to return to the console.

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Sorting events

Sorting events
Slots identify information within an event class. Each event class has defined slots.
Some slots are common to all event classes, while others are unique to one event class.
The default slots in the event list provide basic information about an event. By
changing the slots presented in the event list, you can view additional pertinent
information or change the order in which event data is presented.
The set of slots presented in the event list is called the slot order. When you change the
slots presented, either by adding or removing slots or by rearranging them, you are
changing the slot order. To use a new slot order, you must associate it with a filter.

To create a new slot order


1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Views.
The Edit Event View dialog box is displayed.

2 On the toolbar, click Edit Slot Orders, as indicated in Figure 40.


Figure 40

Slot order creation


Edit Slot Orders

Slot orders pane

The Edit Slot Order dialog box is displayed.

TIP
You can also access the Edit Slot Order dialog box by double-clicking a slot listed in the Slot
orders pane.

3 On the toolbar, click New Slot Order

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4 In Slot Order Name, enter the name for the new slot order.
TIP
An administrator can create a global slot order (available to all consoles connected to the
BMC IX) by selecting Global SlotOrder.

5 In Event Class, click Browse

6 In the Class Chooser dialog box, specify the following items:


s
s

In Impact Manager, select the cell for which you are creating the slot order.
In Search for, specify the event class.

7 Use the left and right arrow buttons to move slots between Available Slots and
Selected Slots.

The slots listed in Available Slots depend on the level within the event class
hierarchy of the specified class. The higher the class is in the hierarchy, the more
slots are available.

8 (optional) Use the up and down arrow buttons to move a slot up or down in the
Selected Slots list.

9 Click OK.
The Edit Event View dialog box is displayed, listing the new slot order in the Slots
pane.

10 Click OK to return to the console.


NOTE
You must associate the new slot order with a filter before you can use it. For more information,
see To associate a slot order with a filter on page 131.

To modify an existing slot order


1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Views.
The Edit Event View dialog box is displayed.

2 Click the Edit Slot Orders button on the toolbar.


The Edit Slot Order dialog box is displayed.

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3 From the Slot orders pane, select the slot order to edit.
4 Edit the settings.
5 Click OK.
6 Click OK to return to the console.
To associate a slot order with a filter
1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Views.
The Edit Event View dialog box is displayed.

2 From the Slots orders pane, select a slot order.


3 From the Filters pane, select a filter or filter group.
4 Click the left arrow button, located between the Slots orders and Filters panes.
5 Expand the filters hierarchy indicator to display the new relationship with the slot
order.

NOTE
You can associate only a global slot order with a global filter.

6 Click OK.

Single-click sorting
You can use single-click sorting by clicking the header of the column that you want to
use as the basis of your event list sort, as shown in Figure 41 on page 132. Even if a
multiple sort order has been established, you can click any column heading that is not
part of the designated multiple sort order to reset sorting. This action establishes
single-column sorting, and the column on which you clicked is designated as the first,
and only, column in the new sort order.

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Figure 41

Single-click sorting indicators

Indicates that the event


list is being sorted in an
ascending order.

Indicates that the


message subject
listed in the
message column
is being used to
sort the event list.

Multiple column sorting


Designating multiple columns for a sorting order is useful in resolving sort order
conflicts in the event list. You can set a multiple column sort order for a maximum of
three columns, as shown in Figure 42.
Figure 42

Multiple column sorting indicators

The event list is first


sorted using the priority
column in descending
order.

The status column is being selected to use


as the second criteria for sorting the event
list.

The Message column is used as the


third criteria to sort the event list.

In the following procedures, you can select or deselect the column headings that you
want to use to sort the contents of the event list.

Before you begin


Following are multiple column sorting considerations:
s

132

Sorting is resolved by the second sort column only if the first sort column has a
sorting conflict.
Sorting extends to the third sort column only if the second sort column has a
sorting conflict.

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Assigning events to users

To add a column to the sort order


Use one of the following methods:
s

Right-click a column heading and choose a position order from the Slot Order
Indicator menu. Repeat this step to add a second or third column to the sort order
for the event list.

Press the Ctrl key and click a column heading. Repeat this step to add a second or
third column to the sort order for the event list.

NOTE
If you have established a multiple sort order in the event list, clicking one of the sort order
columns toggles that columns display between ascending and descending order.

To remove a column from the sort order


Use one of the following methods:
s
s

Right-click a column heading and choose None from the Slot Order Indicator menu.
Press the Ctrl key and click a column heading contained in the sort order.

Assigning events to users


NOTE
See the discussion of the BMC Impact Administration server in the BMC Impact Solutions
Infraststructure Administration Guide for a description of file-based and LDAP user groups.

Using the Flexibility for Event Assignment feature, you can assign events to different
sets of user groups:
s

s
s

BMC EM users (local, file-based user authentication definitions contained in the


user_definitions.xml file)
LDAP users as defined in the ldap_configuration.xml file
a combination of BMC EM users and LDAP users

Before you begin


You must be logged into the BMC IX Console as a user with supervisory permission.

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Assigning events to users

Ensure that the users_filter property in the


IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\server\conf\ix.properities file is set equal to true. The
default value is false.

To assign events to users


1 Choose Edit => Configuration from the main menu bar in the BMC IX Console to
open the Edit Configuration dialog box.

2 In the Edit Configuration dialog box, click the Events View tab.
Figure 43

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Edit Configuration dialog

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Assigning events to users

NOTE
If the users_filter property is set equal to false (the default value), the different groups
under Users List for Assigning Events do not display in the Events View tab.

3 In the Users List for Assigning Events section, choose one of the group options:
User

Description

All Users in BMC Event Manager all local users defined in the
user file
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\server\conf\user_definitions.xml
file
All LDAP Users

LDAP users from all LDAP configurations specified in the

IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\server\conf\
ldap_configuration.xml file
Your LDAP Users

LDAP users from the LDAP configuration(s) to which the login user
belongs

Your Group - both LDAP and


BMC EM user file members

all local and LDAP users who belong to the user group of the login user

4 In the AssignTo drop-down list dialog box, choose the user that you wish to assign
to the event.

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Chapter

Event groups and image views


This chapter describes event groups and image views and explains how to create
them. This chapter presents the following topics:
Event groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of event groupings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event group configuration files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event tree hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event tree objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Image views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Planning event groups and image views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with event groups and image views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an event group (event tree top-level) node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an event group subnode (event tree node) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting an event group subnode (event tree top-level node) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hiding a collector in an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Showing a hidden collector in an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Putting an event group into production or development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a custom image view to an event group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for viewing custom slots in an event view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Granting user access to event groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 6 Event groups and image views

138
138
139
140
140
141
143
144
144
145
146
146
147
147
148
150
151

137

Event groups

Event groups
The Event Groups tab on the Events View of BMC Impact Explorer allows you to create
and control access to the event groups and their image views that IT operators use to
monitor and manage events.

NOTE
Unlike metacollectors, which operators can define themselves in BMC Impact Explorer, only
administrators create event groups and image views.

Event groups allow the organization of cells and collectors to make event displays
meaningful for operators. For example, you might create an event group for collectors
that gather database warning events and allow only operators that are database
administrators access to that event group. Event groups are displayed in a
hierarchical navigation tree. Although some of the objects displayed in the tree are
unique to event groups, other objects are common across all three event management
tabs on the Events tab of the BMC Impact Explorer. The remainder of this section
provides more detail about the navigation tree and its objects.

Types of event groupings


In BMC Impact Explorer, events can be grouped or organized in these ways:
s

event collectors--an event list, a meaningful grouping of events or events grouped


by their relationships

MetaCollectors--a grouping of events from several different event lists (collectors),


showing their combined status

event groups--a hierarchy of event lists

image views--a graphical representation of the collectors in an event group

Event collectors
Event collectors group events for display in an event list to provide operators with
meaningful groups of events and to show relationship through the hierarchy of the
nodes in the tree. To access the event list for a collector, operators click the collector
node in the navigation tree.

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Event group configuration files

Event collectors are dynamic or static. Nodes for dynamic collectors appear or
disappear from the navigation tree based on whether or not events are present that
meet the collectors criteria. Nodes for static collectors remain in the navigation tree
whether events are present or not.

MetaCollectors
A MetaCollector is a grouping of collectors. Operators create MetaCollectors to view
events from several event lists. Each event list is shown as a tab in the event list pane.
The MetaCollector node represents the state of the combined events. MetaCollectors
are often used to view collectors from multiple cells in the network.

Event groups
An event group is another way for showing the relationship of events through the
hierarchy of the navigation tree. Service administrators and managers define event
groups and associate them with one or more collectors. Each level of the collector is
shown as a node under the event group. An event list is associated with the lowest
level nodes of an event group. The parent level of an event group represents all of the
events associated with the collectors and it is associated with an image view.

Image views
An image view is a graphical representation of the collectors in an event group. The
collectors are represented by objects that can be placed on a background image. The
objects can be graphics, such as icons; statistical information, such as the number of
events by priority or by severity; or text, such as a label.

Event group configuration files


The event group configuration file structure is listed in Table 27:
Table 27

Event group configuration files (part 1 of 2)

Folder

Contains

\Images

Backgrounds and Icons directories

\Images\Backgrounds

background image files that are shared by all Map


definitions

\Images\Icons

image files which are shared by all Map definitions

\Map

event group tree node template


MapObjectTemplate.xml

\Map

event group default image view configuration


DefaultMapPage.xsl

\Map

Map tree definition Maps.xml

Chapter 6 Event groups and image views

139

Event tree hierarchy

Table 27

Event group configuration files (part 2 of 2)

Folder

Contains

\Map\Map_xxx

Map.xml for Map_xxx as well as its MapPages directory

\Map\Map_xxx\MapPages

all map page definitions for Map Map_xxx

Event tree hierarchy


Event groups are displayed in a hierarchical tree, the event tree, in the navigation
pane of the Event Groups tab, as shown in Figure 44. Although administrators see all
the event groups they create in the event tree, operators viewing the event tree see
only those event groups to which they are granted access.
Figure 44

Event tree hierarchy

Event groups appear as event tree top-level nodes. Beneath event tree top-level nodes
you can add event tree nodes (child nodes of event groups) to further organize event
tree display. To event tree top-level nodes and event tree nodes you can add collectors
and subcollectors which represent, cells, collectors, and subcollectors. Use the Event
Group Editor to create and modify the event group hierarchy to organize the display
of these objects.

Event tree objects


Table 28 on page 141 shows the icons and descriptions of the objects represented in
the event tree.

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Image views

Table 28
Object
icon

Event tree objects and definitions


Name and definition
event tree top-level node in production status; the top-level node of an event
group that is in production status, making the Event Group Editor and Image
View Editor unavailable for the event group
event tree top-level node in development status; the top-level node of an event
group that is in development status, making the Event Group Editor available
for the event group
event group node; an event group subnode of an event tree top-level node or
another event group node
child collector node; displays information from a collector or subcollector of a
cell or collector added as a collector node
subcollector node; child node of a collector node

Additionally, each object icon in the event tree has an associated status, shown as an
icon to the right of the object icon. For information about the statuses represented by
each icon, see the BMC Impact Solutions: Event Monitoring.

Image views
Image views provide operators with a graphical representation of the aggregated
state of the event groups they represent. Administrators create image views by
dragging and dropping an image view object, called a widget (shown in Figure 45 on
page 141), onto a background image. Each widget represents a group node, collector,
or child collector from the event tree.
Figure 45

Image view widgets

image view widgets

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Image views

All event tree nodes with children (event tree top-level nodes, event group nodes, and
collector nodes with child collectors) have either a default image view or a custom
image view. All such nodes initially display a default image view that contains a
blank background and a widget for each child node, as shown in Figure 45.
Administrators create custom image views by adding an imported image (for
example, a map of a geographical region or a diagram of the IT system of an
enterprise) to replace the blank background of a default image view and by arranging
widgets representing some or all of the child odes on the background, as shown in
Figure 46.
Figure 46

Custom image view

You can right click on image view tab to open a pop-up menu that displays Float,
Close, and Lock options as shown in Figure 47 on page 143. When you choose Float,
you can separate the image view into a separate window and move about it the GUI.
You can click the Close (X) button of the floating window to dock it. The image view
while in a floating window shows map updates whenever related events change.

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Planning event groups and image views

Figure 47

Image view with float option

The floating image view does not respond to mouse clicks. You can only float the
image view, not the related events list or associated events toolbar.

Planning event groups and image views


Planning is essential to creating event groups and image views that logically and
efficiently depict IT assets of your enterprise. Before creating event groups and image
views, consider these guidelines:
s

Event groups and image views organize and represent the contents of collectors
Consequently, you should carefully plan and create the collectors for your
enterprise. Event groups and image views can provide no more information than
that gathered by collectors. (Collectors must be created before the event groups
that use them. For more information about collectors, see the BMC Impact Solutions:
Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide.)

Creating event groups by using static collectors allows you to create the event
groups before you run the event management system in a test or production
environment. However, this practice can require a significant amount of manual
work depending on the number of event groups you create.
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Working with event groups and image views

Creating event groups by using dynamic collectors requires less manual work than
using static collectors, but the event groups do not exist until cells receive events to
populate the dynamic collectors.

Working with event groups and image views


This section provides instructions for creating event groups and adding associated
nodes that make up an event tree. This section also provides instructions for defining
custom image views for event groups.

NOTE
Event groups are a prerequisite for image views. You must first create an event group to which
you then add an image view.

Creating an event group (event tree top-level) node


Use the Event Groups tab to create an event group.

To create an event group (event tree top-level node)


1 On the menu bar of the Event Groups tab of the Events tab view, choose Edit => Add
Event Group.

The Event Group Editor, shown in Figure 48, is displayed.


Figure 48

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Creating an event group subnode (event tree node)

2 On the Available Collectors pane, select a cell, collector, or subcollector to add to the
new event group.

3 On the Event Group pane, select NewEventsGroup.


4 To add the selected collector in the Available Collectors pane to the new event group
in the Event Group pane, click the right arrow.
The selected collector appears beneath the new event group in the Event Group
pane.

5 To add another collector (or cell or subcollector) to the new event group, select the
additional collector from the Available Collectors pane and click the right arrow.
Repeat this step as necessary to add more cells, collectors, or subcollectors to the
new event group.

6 To save the event group, click OK.

Creating an event group subnode (event tree node)


Use the Event Groups tab to create an event group subnode.

To create an event group subnode (event tree node)


1 On the menu bar of the Event Groups tab of the Events tab view, choose
Edit => Add Event Group.

The Event Group Editor is displayed.

2 On the Event Group pane, select NewEventsGroup and click Insert Group.
An event group subnode, NewGroup, is inserted beneath the NewEventsGroup
node, as shown in Figure 49.
Figure 49

Event tree node addition

3 On the Available Collectors pane, select a cell, collector, or subcollector to add to the
new event group subnode.
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Deleting an event group subnode (event tree top-level node)

4 To add the selected collector in the Available Collectors pane to the new event group
subnode in the Event Group pane, click the right arrow.

5 To add another collector (or cell or subcollector) to the new event group subnode,
select the additional collector from the Available Collectors pane and click the right
arrow.
Repeat this step as necessary to add more cells, collectors, or subcollectors to the
new event group subnode.

6 To save the event group subnode, click OK.

Deleting an event group subnode (event tree top-level node)


Use the Event Groups tab to delete an event group subnode.

To delete an event group (Event tree top-level node)


1 On the event tree of the Event Groups tab, select an event group or any of its
descendant nodes.

NOTE
To delete an event group, it must be in development status. If the event group is in
production status you must change the status before deleting it.

2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Delete Event Group.
WARNING
Deleting an event group deletes the entire event group and all its descendants, regardless
of what node you select in the event group.

An action confirmation dialog box appears.

3 To delete the event group and its descendants, click OK.

Hiding a collector in an event group


Use the Event Group pane to hide a collector in an event group.

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Showing a hidden collector in an event group

To hide a collector in an event group


1 In the Event Group pane, select a collector node.
2 Click Hide.
A lock icon is displayed with the node to show that the collector will not appear in the
production event group. Event information from the collector and any subcollectors
are still aggregated by the event group it appears in.

Showing a hidden collector in an event group


Use the Event Group pane to show a hidden event group.

To show a hidden collector in an event group


1 In the Event Group pane, select a hidden collector node.
2 Click Show.
The collector now appears in the production event group.

Putting an event group into production or development


Use the Image Group Editor to put an event group into production or development.

To put an event group into production or development


1 On the menu bar of the Event Groups tab of the Events tab view, choose
Edit => Add Event Group.

The Event Group Editor is displayed.

2 In the Event Group navigation pane, select an event group.


3 Click the appropriate Status radio button.
4 Click OK to save your change.

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Adding a custom image view to an event group

NOTE
If two administrators have the same event group open and one administrator changes the
status of the event group from development to production, the properties of the event group
will not be protected and the other administrator will be able to edit the properties of the
event group.
Image view objects become disabled after editing the event group.

Adding a custom image view to an event group


Under the path IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\data\Image\Background, you find a
series of default *.gif files that you can use as background images for different event
groups. For example, they include
s
s
s

Korea.gif
North_America.gif
Europe.gif

From the Events Group tab off of the Events View, you can launch the Image View
Editor to add a custom image view to the selected event group.

TIP
For performance considerations, do not load more than 100 icons in the Image View Editor.

Before you begin


Custom image views require files in .jpg or .gif format for use as background and icon
images.
To make these images available to the Image View Editor, perform the following steps
on the system where the BMC Impact Administration server is installed and running:

1 Copy the designated .jpg or .fig file or files to the Background or Icon subdirectory
in the path IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\data\Image\.

2 Open the
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\data\Image\Icon\component_icon.properties

text editor.

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file in a

Adding a custom image view to an event group

A Add an entry that specifies the custom icon or icons. Use a format as shown in
the following example:
sms.component.icon.BMC_Collection=BMC_Collection

B Save and close the


IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\data\Image\Icon\component_icon.properties

file.

3 Restart the BMC Impact Explorer Console.


To add a custom image view to an event group
1 From the event tree of the Event Groups tab, select the event group (an event tree
top-level node).

NOTE
An event group must be in development status to add a custom image view. If the event
group is in production status you must change the status before adding the image view.

2 Choose from the following selection options:


s
s

From the menu bar, choose Edit => Edit Image View... .
Right-click to display the pop-up menu, and choose Edit Image View... .

The Image View Editor is displayed. The Image View Editor opens with a descriptive
text of the default image view.

3 To add a custom image view background, click Use Custom in the right-hand pane.
The View tab is enabled.

4 In the list of fields, under the heading Background Image click the Filename dropdown list to display the names of the available .gif and .jpg files, including the
ones you have added.
The selected image file appears in the left-hand image pane of the Image View
Editor.
If you have any widgets representing collectors for the event group, their object
labels display in the top part pane above the selected image. Go to step 5.
If you do not have any widgets to add, go to step 6.

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Guidelines for viewing custom slots in an event view

5 To place the widgets representing collectors for the event group, drag and drop
their icon objects onto the selected background image in the view pane below
them.
When you drag and drop a widget, the Selected Object tab on the right-hand pane
is enabled for the widget. You can use the controls on this tab to modify the
appearance of the widget on the image view background.

NOTE
You should choose contrasting widget fill colors and custom image canvas colors. Some
color combinations can result in text that cannot be seen. For example, if the widget fill
color is set to transparent and the custom image canvas color is set to white, white letters
that appear on the widget cannot be seen against the white canvas.

6 To save the custom image view and close the Image View Editor, click Save Custom
Image & Close.

The saved image view is displayed in the Event Groups tab above the display of the
event list for the selected event group.

TIP
To modify the appearance of widgets that appear on a default image view, edit the object
appearance attributes in the XML-based defaultmappage.xsl located under
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\server\data\Map and under
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\server\data\iwcMaps. You can modify attributes such as
width and height, font, and icon name. The file also contains helpful comments that identify
the appearance attributes. Restart the BMC IX Console after making your changes and saving
the file.

Guidelines for viewing custom slots in an event view


Define the custom slots in the mc_root_redef.baroc file of the cells KB. Refer to the
BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide for more
information.
To view the custom slots of a particular cell, ensure that only that one cell is connected
in the Collector Tree view. In this way, you load the custom slots defined in its
mc_root_redef.baroc file. Ensure that any other cells are disconnected.
You can choose Edit => Event Views... from the main menu bar to open the Edit Event
View window. In the Edit Event View window, you can view the custom slots from
the Edit Slot Order dialog, and you can create custom filters with the custom slots
through the Edit Filter dialog.

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Granting user access to event groups

After you load the custom slots of the target cell and have finished with viewing
custom slots and updating custom filters, you can reconnect the other cells.

Granting user access to event groups


Administrators grant operators access privileges for event groups using the Event
Group Properties editor. The Event Group Properties editor controls access to and the
status of each event tree top-level node.

To grant user access to event groups


1 From the event tree of the Event Groups tab, select an event group (an event tree
top-level node).

2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Edit Event Group Properties.
The Event Group Properties editor, shown is displayed.

3 (optional) Add a text description of the event group.


4 Modify the Read and Write permissions to grant or deny access for each group as
necessary. When complete, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the access settings for the selected event group

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Chapter

Event operations
This chapter describes typical event management operations that you perform in the
BMC IX Console, including the Dashboard View, and by editing text files. This
chapter presents the following topics:
Performing event operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Executing remote or local actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manually setting component status or maintenance mode with a remote action . .
Viewing event operations history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing event relationships for abstracted, correlated, or propagated events. . .
Copying and printing event information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to event sources through hyperlinks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alias formulas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Event Alias Formulas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the CIEM Dashboard View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying a web browser for your components home page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Launching the web browser from your dashboard homepage . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating the CIEM Dashboard View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing the CIEM dashboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying the CIEM dashboard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting the CIEM dashboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for managing high availability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Relating events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event relation definition example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for implementing an event relation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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154
156
159
160
160
161
162
163
163
168
173
174
168
174
175
176
177
179
184
186

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Performing event operations

Performing event operations


You can perform basic management actions on events, such as acknowledge, close,
assign, and so forth. You can also annotate an event, providing it with additional
information. The following sections provide instructions for performing the event
operations and annotating events.

NOTE
Although all the event operations that are available to your user role are available when you
have selected two or more events in the event list, an operation is performed only on the
selected events whose status makes the operation valid. If the operation is not valid for some
selected events, a message box reports the mc_ueid slot values for those events, and the
events are not changed.

To acknowledge an event
1 From the event list, select one or more open events designated with

2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Operations => Acknowledge Event.
A confirmation dialog box is displayed.

3 Click Yes.
To take ownership of an event
1 From the event list, select one or more events of which to take ownership.
2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Operations => Take Ownership.
A confirmation dialog box is displayed.

3 Click Yes.
To assign an event to an individual
1 From the event list, select one or more events to assign.
2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Operations => Assign to.
3 In the Assign To dialog box, select the person to whom you want to assign the
event, and then click OK.

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NOTE
The list of users in the Assign To dialog box contains only users who are in the same
account as the logged-on user. BMC Software recommends that all BMC Impact Explorer
users be in the same account.

To decline ownership of an event


1 From the event list, select one or more events that have been assigned to you.
2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Operations => Decline Ownership.
A confirmation dialog box is displayed.

3 Click Yes.
To close an event
1 From the event list, select one or more events to close.
2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Operations => Close Event.
A confirmation dialog box is displayed.

3 Click Yes.
To reopen an event
To reopen a closed event, you must have either an MC_SuperAdmins or MC_Admins
role ID established.

1 From the event list, select an event that has a status of Closed.
2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Operations => Reopen Event.
A confirmation dialog box is displayed.

3 Click Yes.
To set the priority for an event
1 From the event list, select an event.
2 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Event Operations => Set Priority.

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Executing remote or local actions

3 In the Set Priority dialog box, select the priority level for the event, and then click
OK.

To annotate one or more events


1 Access the Notes subtab on the details pane.
2 From the event list, select one or more events.
3 On the details pane, select the Notes subtab.
4 Enter the annotated text in the text box, as shown in Figure 50, and click Submit to
annotate a single event or Submit to All to annotate multiple events with the same
text.
Figure 50

Event annotation
Selected event

Annotation area

Executing remote or local actions


You can respond to a selected event by choosing to execute either a remote or a local
action. These local and remote actions are created by an administrator as a response to
specific events as required for your environment.
When you use a remote action, it is issued from your local console but executed on
the computer where the cell is installed. When you use a local action, the action runs
on the computer on which the console is installed.

To respond to an event by using a remote action


1 From the event list, select one or more events and choose Edit => Execute.
The Execute Remote Action dialog box is displayed.

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Executing remote or local actions

2 Expand the Remote Actions folder and select a remote action, as shown in Figure 51
on page 157.
Figure 51

Remote action selection

3 Enter the appropriate settings required to run the selected remote action.
NOTE
If you select Set Status as the remote action, you must enter a comment that explains the
reason for changing the status.

4 Click Execute.
5 To access the results of the remote action, right-click the individual event you ran
the remote action for and choose Actions => Remote Action Results from the menu.

TIP
You can export the information about the remote action to a file by highlighting the action
information in the Remote Action Results dialog box and clicking Export.

To respond to an event by using a local action


1 From the event list, select one or more events and Edit => Actions => Execute.
The Actions dialog box is displayed.

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Executing remote or local actions

2 Expand the Local Actions folder and select a local action, as shown in Figure 52.
Figure 52

Local action selection

3 Direct the results of the local action to the results dialog box or to a file:
s

To view the results in a dialog box, clear both the Suppress Feedback and Log
output to file check boxes.

To disable the display of results and send the output to an external file, clear the
Suppress Feedback check box, and select the Log output to file check box. Enter
the location for the output file in Log output to file or click the Browse button to
specify the directory in which to place the output file.

NOTE
The Batch Mode check box in the Local Action dialog box will not be editable unless the
batchmode=true parameter is enabled. For more information about the batchmode
parameter, see To create a user-defined local action to respond to multiple events on
page 194.

4 Enter the appropriate settings to run the selected local action.


5 Click Execute.
Either the Local Action Results dialog box is displayed, containing the results of the
local action, or those results are sent to the specified file.

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Manually setting component status or maintenance mode with a remote action

To suppress local action results for all events


You can choose to suppress local action results for all events by manually editing the
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\console\etc\event_op\mc_actions.xml file. You can add
the attribute suppress_feedback=true to the ActionDef element, as shown in the
following extract:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!--DOCTYPE Actions SYSTEM "Actions.dtd"-->
<Actions xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
xsi:noNamespaceSchemaLocation="Actions.xsd">
<ActionDef id="mc_ping" label="Ping EVENT origin"type="executable"
target="mc_ping" suppress_feedback="true">
Ping the system from which the event originated.
</ActionDef>

NOTE
After modifying the mc_actions.xml file, restart the BMC Impact Administration Server.

When you add the attribute suppress_feedback=true, you receive status messages
but you do not receive the local action results in the Local Actions Results popup
window.

Manually setting component status or


maintenance mode with a remote action
Similar to responding to an event with a remote action, you can set the status of a
service component manually by using a remote action. You can also put a component
in maintenance mode by using this feature. When you use the manual status feature,
you must enter a comment that explains why the status was changed. To remove the
manually set status or to return a component to operation, you must use another
remote action to clear the manually set status. For instructions, see To respond to an
event by using a remote action on page 156.

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Viewing event operations history

Viewing event operations history


BMC IX maintains a list of the event operations performed on an event. You can view
this information in the History subtab in the details pane in the Events View. The
Operations Log box in the History subtab shows the date and time of the event
operation, the logon ID of the user who performed the operation, and the type of
operation. The History subtab also displays the original severity and priority settings
for the event, the time stamps for the events occurrence, reception, arrival, and any
modification, and the time elapsed until the event was closed.

Analyzing event relationships for abstracted,


correlated, or propagated events
BMC IX provides high-level descriptions of problems to help control the number of
events that you must view at one time. You can learn more about the details and
origin of a particular event by using the Explore Event Relationships function from the
Events tab, as described in the following procedure.

NOTE
You can explore event relationships only for events that have been abstracted, correlated, or
propagated.

To view relationships between events


1 From the event list, select an abstracted, correlated, or propagated event.
The Explore Event Relationships icon on the toolbar becomes active, as shown in
Figure 53.
Figure 53

Active Explore Event Relationships icon


Active Explore Event Relationships icon

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Copying and printing event information

2 Click the Explore Event Relationships icon.


The relationships pane is displayed, in which you can explore the hierarchy of
additional events that contributed to the original events correlation, abstraction, or
propagation.
The following actions and more are available from the relationships window:
s
s
s
s

reopen an event
execute actions against an event
open a service impact view for an event
display event details

Copying and printing event information


You can copy the detailed data collected for an event to the clipboard and then paste
that data into another program, such as a spreadsheet or a text editor.

To copy event information


1 From the event list, select one or more events and choose Edit => Copy Events.
2 Paste the copied information into Notepad, Microsoft Word, or another program.
You can print the detailed data collected for an event to your local printer.

To print event information


1 From the event list, select one or more events and choose File => Print.
2 In the Print dialog box, change the settings for the printer, print range, and number
of copies, if necessary, and click OK.

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Connecting to event sources through hyperlinks

Connecting to event sources through


hyperlinks
Application developers can define events in the appropriate files of their application
so that BMC IX users connect with the event source via a hyperlinked URI. The
specified URI is defined in the mcevent.baroc file under the Event class. The
mc_tool_uri parameter contains the URI value. This parameter is linked with the
mc_tool parameter, which identifies the event source. The event source can be any
integration application, such as a console or a server.
The Monitoring Tool field of the Events View - Summary tab captures and displays
the mc_tool and mc_tool_uri parameter values. It displays the information in the
format nameOfEventSource-launch in browser where launch in browser is a hyperlink of
the event source. The event source is displayed as it is defined in the mc_tool
parameter definition. The URI value is not displayed, but is hidden behind the
hyperlink label launch in browser.
When you click the hyperlink launch in browser, the object identified by the URI is
opened in a separate browser window with the focus already on it. The object can be
the event source or a gateway though which you can navigate to the event source.

Before you begin


Check your default browser settings. Under MS Windows, the hyperlink will open in
the default browser. Under Solaris and other UNIX operating systems, the default
browser should be specified in the PATH variable.

NOTE
In MS Internet Explorer v. 6.x, the object is launched in the current browser window. If you are
using MS Internet Explorer v.7 or later or any tabbed browser, then it is launched in a separate
window.

To connect to an event source


1 In the Events View, select the event.
2 Open the Summary tab.
3 Locate the Monitoring Tool field that identifies the event source.
4 Click the launch in browser hyperlink.
The URI object is opened in a separate browser window, or in the current one if
you are using MS Internet Explorer v. 6.x.

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Alias formulas

5 Enter authentication credentials if you are prompted.

Alias formulas
You can add and edit alias formulas across all views (Dashboard, Events, Services,
and Administration) of the BMC IX Console provided you
s
s

belong to the Full Access or Service Administrators group


have at least one cell connection to the BMC IX Console

The procedure for adding and editing alias formulas in the BMC IX Console is very
similar to the procedure used in the BMC Impact Service Model Editor.
Several default alias formulas are provided out-of-the-box. For example, default
aliases for the BMC Patrol product are offered for PATROL events of class
PATROL_EV. These aliases can be used by the BMC Impact Integration for PATROL
product.
For background information about defining component aliases and event alias
associations, see the BMC Impact Solutions Service Modeling and Publishing Guide.

Working with Event Alias Formulas


1 From the menu bar, choose Tools =>Event Alias Formulas.
The Alias Formulas Editor window is displayed. It lists the connected cells in the
Cell drop-down list. It displays all current alias formulas for the selected cell in the
drop-down list, as shown in Figure 54 on page 164.

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Working with Event Alias Formulas

Figure 54

Alias Formulas Editor

The menu bar at the top of the window contains the following icons:
Icon

Purpose
to edit a selected alias formula

to create a new alias formula

to copy an existing alias formula to use as a template for


creating a new alias formula
to delete a selected alias formula

to copy an existing alias formula

to paste an alias formula

2 In the Cell drop-down list, select the cell you want to work on.
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3 To add a new alias formula, click the New Alias Formula icon.
The Add Alias Formula dialog box is opened.
Figure 55

Add Alias Formula dialog

4 In the Formula Name text box, enter a name for the alias formula.
5 Under the Event Match Criteria label, in the Event Class box, select an event class
from the list.
When an event arrives at the cell, its event class has to match the event class or a
subclass of the event class before the alias formula is even considered.

6 (optional) In the Match Attributes box, choose attributes and enter values to refine
which events (within the event class) will generate aliases.
For each attribute you choose, select one of the conditional operators, as described
in Table 29 on page 166, and enter a value in the text box to further define the
events that are used to generate aliases using this formula.

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Table 29

Description of conditional operators

Conditional
operators

Description

anything

the attribute can contain any value and is not used as a selection criteria
If every attribute listed has anything that means that every incoming
event that belongs to the event class will pass through alias formula
processing

contains

the characters you enter in the text box occur someplace in the value

has prefix

the value starts with the characters you enter in the text box

has suffix

the value ends with the characters you enter in the text box

equals

the value exactly matches the characters you enter in the text box

If you use more than one attribute, each condition must test true (the Boolean
operator between the selection criteria phrases is AND) before the alias formula
process is performed. For example, in Figure 56 on page 166, the search phrase
would read: Hostname contains SALLOG and IP address equals 555.22.19.105. Both
conditions must be true for the event to be selected for alias processing.
Figure 56

Example of match attributes

7 In the Alias Formula area, use the Attribute, Text, and Function buttons in any order
and as many times as needed to build the formula:

A To insert an attribute in the formula, click the Attribute button. The attributes
shown are those that belong to the event class you selected in the Event
Definition area.
When an attribute is selected, the control shows the attribute name, and the
preview area is updated to show the syntax of the formula as it currently exists.

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TIP
If your formula for a component instance (CI) contains the mc_host slot with a host
name value, then the mc_host slot of the matching event definition should also contain
the host name value, not the IP address, of the CI. For example, if you assign the
mc_host slot in your formula the value mycomputer.abc.com, then the mc_host slot of
the incoming event should contain the same host name value, not the IP address.
You can check with your system administrator for the correct Domain Name System
(DNS) resolution if the object represented by the component instance experiences host
name resolution errors.

B To insert literal text (for example, a period, semi-colon, the word Oracle), click on
the Text button. In the text box, type the literal text that you want in the alias
formula.
Literal text appears in the first part of the alias formula with data type
definitions.

C To insert a function that defines the data type and an expression in the formula,
click on the Function button. Type the function and choose the data type.
For a list of functions you can use, see BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base
Development Reference Guide.

D (optional) To change the order of the elements in the alias formula, select the part
of the formula you want to move and click the Move arrow button as
appropriate.

E (optional) To delete one of the elements in the alias formula, select the part of the
formula you want to delete and click the Delete button.

8 When the alias formula is complete, click Save.


To edit an event alias formula
1 Choose Tools => Event Alias Formulas.
2 In the Alias Formulas Editor window, select an existing alias computing formula.
3 Click the Edit Alias Formula icon.
4 In the Edit Alias Formula dialog box, make changes as needed.
5 When your changes are complete, click OK.

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To delete an event alias formula


1 Choose Tools =>Event Alias Formulas.
2 In the Alias Formulas Editor window, select an existing alias computing formula.
3 Click the Delete Alias Formula icon.
To add/edit an alias formula associated with a component instance
1 Open a service model in a View window of the Services tab.
2 Select a component instance, right-click to display the pop-up, and choose Event
Alias Formulas to open the Alias Formulas Editor window.

3 Refer to the procedures described in this topic, Working with Event Alias
Formulas on page 163.

Working with the CIEM Dashboard View


The Configuration Item Event Management (CIEM) dashboard allows you to define
different component views for BEM cells and for different user groups.

Creating the CIEM Dashboard View


The Full Access and Service Administrator user roles can create a new CIEM
dashboard for that BEM cell in BMC IX. For default user roles and the operations that
they can carry out in the Dashboard view, see the BMC Impact Solutions Infrastructure
Administration Guide.

To create an CIEM dashboard


1 Click the

(Edit Dashboards) icon from the toolbar.

The Dashboard Views dialog box opens.

2 Click the

(New Dashboard) icon.

The New Dashboard dialog box opens.

3 Type a name for the dashboard in the Name of Dashboard View field.

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4 Type a relevant description for the Dashboard View that you want to create.
5 To make the dashboard immediately available to the selected user roles after
saving, select the Public check box.
If you do not select the check box, the dashboard is saved in your Dashboard Views
till you make it available to all relevant user roles by selecting Public.

6 Select the user groups that the dashboard should be available to from the list of
user groups. You must select at least one user group to proceed. The available user
groups are:
Admins
Full Access
Operators
Read Only
Service Administrators
Service Managers
Service Managers - Senior
Service Operators
Service Operators - Senior
Supervisors

NOTE
s

The default user groups are defined in the <MCELL_HOME>\conf\group_roles.xml file.

One user group can contain multiple user roles. Each role, in turn, can have different
permissions.

The default permissions for each role are defined in the


<MCELL_HOME>\conf\default_role_permissions.xml file. BMC strongly recommends
that you do not modify this file, but add or modify the required permissions in the
<MCELL_HOME>\conf\role_permissions.xml file.

Users that belong to each user role are defined in the


<MCELL_HOME>\conf\user_definitions.xml file. The user ID, user role, and encrypted
password for that user are stored in this file. Full Access users and Service Administrators
(Admins) can add, delete, or modify user credentials such as user ID and user group using
this file.

7 Click Next.
8 From the Impact Manager (cell) list, select the BMC EM cell that contains the
components that you want to monitor using the new dashboard.

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NOTE
In the BMC IX Dashboard View, when the Full Access users log on for the first time, all the
cells in the cell_info.list file are auto-connected. If you add any cells to this file while you
have BMC IX running on your computer, you must manually add the cell name to the
Selected Impact Managers list using the Edit Configuration dialog box.

This list contains only those BMC IM cells that you can select for the user groups
that you specified earlier. To add permission for a user group to access a BMC IM
cell that is not in the list, edit the <MCELL_HOME>\conf\cell_info.list file.
A typical entry in the cell_info.list file has the following format:
<cellname> <celltype> <encryption key> <hostname:port> <environment> user role1,
user role2,....
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

All fields are tab-separated.


The first field must start with the word cell. Cell type can be appended after cell.
The available cell types are: SIM, EM and Admin.
The second field is the cell name. This name must match the definition in the mcell.dir
file.
The third field is the encryption key.
The fourth field is the location of the cell, that is, the host name.
If this cell has a failover cell, then it must be defined as the fifth field. Otherwise, the
fifth field can be omitted.
The environment can be either Production or Test.
If the cell can be accessed by all users, use * to indicate all the user groups, otherwise,
type the user group names separated by commas. If the user group contains space, this
field must be surrounded by double quotes.

For example:
cell.IAC Admincell mc compname.company.com:1828 production Full Access, Admins
Where:
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

cell typeIAC (Impact Administration Cell)


cell nameAdmincell
encryption keymc
host namecompname.company.com
port number1828
environmentproduction
user groups that can see this cellFull Access and Admins

9 By default, the Important Components Status pane is selected.


NOTE
In the CIEM dashboard, because no service impact relationships can be created, edited, or
deleted, the CIEM dashboard does not display causal components for a selected important
component.

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10 Click Next.
11 Select a Components Selection Method.
Static list of componentsSearch components based on the criteria that you require

and then add the required components that you want displayed in the important
components pane to the Components to show in Top Pane list.

A To see the component names that contain a specified string, type a name or part
of a name in the Name contains field.

B To see the components owned by a particular user, type the user name in the
Owner name contains field.

C To see the components of a certain type, select a type from the Type of component
list.

D To see the components with an impact cost above a certain limit, specify the cost
limit per second in the Cost greater than/equal to field.

E To see the components belonging to a particular location, select the location type
and then type the location name in the Location field.

F Click Find. The Results list displays all the components that match the specified
criteria.

G Select required components and click Add. You can add multiple components
using the Ctrl and Shift keys.

H Optionally, to remove a component, select it and click Delete.


Dynamic FilterSpecify components using a dynamic filter which BMC IX will use

at runtime. Because the dynamic filter is used at runtime, if component properties


change, the selection of components will change too.

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Creating the CIEM Dashboard View

A Under Available Filters, select the filter name, filter condition, and type or select
a value to match.

NOTE
BMC IX inserts an AND condition for different filter names that you select. For
the same filter name, if you want to specify different values, it inserts an OR
condition.
For example:
NAME contains EM
OR
NAME equates SIM
AND
Status equals Impacted
OR
Status equals Warning

B To preview the components that this filter will select, click Test Filters.
C Check the components in the Test of Filters window and click Close.
D Optionally, to remove a selected filter from the list, select it and click Delete.
12 Specify the content to be optionally displayed as follows:
Events Paneselect this check box to display the events pane on the dashboard.
Component Homepageselect this check box to display the component
homepage on the dashboard.

13 To make this a default dashboard for the selected user roles, select the Default
Dashboard check box.

14 Click Save to save the new dashboard.


If you are a Full Access or Service Administrator (Admin) user, and if you have
created the dashboard yourself, you can see the dashboard once you refresh the
BMC IX window. If a dashboard is created for your user role by the Admin users
and is made public, you must log out of BMC IX and log on again to see the
dashboard.

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Specifying a web browser for your components home page

Specifying a web browser for your components home page


You can specify a web browser in which to launch the home page for a selected
dashboard component, provided you have defined the components Home Page URI
slot with a valid URL value.

To define a Home Page URI value


1 In the Edit Service Component or Create Service Component dialog of the Services
View for the selected component, locate the Home Page URI slot, as shown in
Figure 57.
Figure 57

Home Page URI slot

2 Enter a valid URI value, and click OK.


The value will populate the Homepage for: componentName slot on the dashboards
home page screen.

To specify a web browser


1 In the BMC IX Console, choose Edit => Configuration to open the Edit
Configuration dialog.

2 In the Edit Configuration dialog, choose the HelpInfo tab.


3 In the Preferred Web Browser field of the HelpInfo tab, click the Choose Browser
icon to select the full path to the web browser executable.

4 Click OK to close the Edit Configuration dialog.

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Launching the web browser from your dashboard homepage

Launching the web browser from your dashboard homepage


If you have defined a URI for a component in its Home Page URI slot and have
specified a preferred web browser, then you can launch the components URL in the
web browser to view detailed information about the component.

To launch a web browser for a selected component


On the dashboard home page, click the URL of the selected component in the
Homepage for: componentName field, as shown in Figure 58.
Figure 58

Dashboard with CI homepage link

Editing the CIEM dashboard


Only the Full Access and Service Administrator users can edit a dashboard in BMC
IX. Rest of the users can only edit the dashboards that they have created.

To edit a CIEM dashboard


1 Select the dashboard for editing and click the
toolbar.
The Edit Dashboard dialog box opens.

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(Edit Dashboards) icon from the

Copying the CIEM dashboard

2 Edit the following if required:


Name of the dashboard
Description of the dashboard
Publicwhether the dashboard should be inserted in the users dashboard list
once edited or not.

NOTE
You cannot edit the following settings:
s

Groups that see the dashboard

Impact Manager (Cell)

Type of the dashboard (Important components)

3 Change the Components Selection Method if required. For more information, see
step 11 on page 171.

4 Click Save to save the changed dashboard settings.

Copying the CIEM dashboard


Only the Full Access and Service Administrator users can copy and/or edit a
dashboard for all user groups in BMC IX. Rest of the users can only copy and edit the
dashboards that they have created.

To copy a CIEM dashboard


1 Click the

(Edit Dashboards) icon from the toolbar.

The Dashboard Views dialog box opens.

2 Select the dashboard for copying and click the

(Copy Dashboard) icon from

the Dashboard Views toolbar.

3 The dashboard details open in a new window titled Copy of <dashboard name>.
You can rename the dashboard as is, or edit it.

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Deleting the CIEM dashboard

4 Edit the following if required:


Name of the dashboard
Description of the dashboard
Publicwhether the dashboard should be inserted in the users dashboard list
once edited or not.

NOTE
You cannot edit the following settings:
s

Groups that see the dashboard

Impact Manager (Cell)

Type of the dashboard (Important components)

5 Change the Components Selection Method if required. For more information, see
step 11 on page 171.

6 Click Save to save the changed dashboard settings.

Deleting the CIEM dashboard


Only the Full Access and Service Administrator users can edit a dashboard for all
user groups in BMC IX. Rest of the users can only delete the dashboards that they
have created.

To delete a CIEM dashboard


1 Click the

(Edit Dashboards) icon from the toolbar.

The Dashboard Views dialog box opens.

2 Select the dashboard for deletion and click the

(Delete Dashboard) icon from

the Dashboard Views toolbar.


BMC IX displays the following message:
Are you sure you want to delete the selected Dashboard(s)?

3 Click Delete.

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Guidelines for managing high availability

The dashboard is no longer displayed in the list of dashboards in the Dashboard


Views dialog box.

Guidelines for managing high availability


A high availability configuration of a primary cell and a secondary cell provides
redundant access to the event repository should the primary cell become unavailable.
This section describes the interaction of primary and secondary cells and their impact
on the Events View. It tells how to activate and change the status of the cells. It
explains how events related to high availability interactions are generated.
The primary cell copies event data to the secondary cell. When the primary cell is in
active mode, the secondary cell is in standby mode. By default, if the primary cell
becomes unavailable, the BMC IX automatically connects to the designated secondary
cell server. The secondary cell then changes to active mode and performs the same
functions as the primary cell. When the primary cell becomes available again, the
secondary cell changes back to standby mode.
During the time in which the active cell is down and the secondary cell is still in
standby mode, the cell continues to collect events; however, you cannot perform any
actions on those events. You will see the following changes in the Events View of
BMC IX:
s

s
s

s
s

In the Events list, the following message is displayed:


Event List frozen xx:yy:zz time primary server for cell is
down
Tabs associated with the cell are highlighted in yellow
In the navigation pane, cells, cell groups, collectors, MetaCollectors, and
subcollectors are highlighted in yellow
Local and remote actions are disabled
The following Edit menu commands are disabled:

Event Operations
Execute
MetaCollectors
Edit Event Group

By default, the cells are configured for automatic failover. If your administrator
changes this configuration, you can manually change the status of the primary or
secondary cells by performing the following procedures.

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Guidelines for managing high availability

To manually activate a primary or secondary cell


1 Open a command prompt.
2 Enter the following command:
mcontrol -n cellName# number start

The variable cellName is the name of either the primary or secondary cell and the
variable number is either 1, for the primary cell, or 2 for the secondary cell.

To manually change the status of the secondary cell from active to standby
1 Open a command prompt.
2 Enter the following command:
mcontrol -n cellName# 2 pause

The variable cellName is the name of the secondary cell.


For details about high availability, see the BMC Impact Solutions Infrastructure
Administration Guide guide.

High availability related events


A high availability cell operates the same way that a standard cell operates.
To keep the primary and secondary cell servers synchronized, the primary cell server
transmits all its transactions to the secondary server. This happens transparently. For
instance, it is not visible in BMC Impact Explorer. Also, the Knowledge Base rules do
not have to be modified for synchronization and there are no specific events
generated for it.
When the primary server loses contact with the secondary server and cannot transmit
its transactions, it generates an internal event of class MC_CELL_DUPLICATE_FAILURE
with severity=MAJOR. All transactions are buffered for transmission to the
secondary server. As soon as the primary server has re-established a connection with
the secondary, it generates an internal event of class MC_CELL_DUPLICATE_ON with
severity=OK and with the down_time slot indicating (in seconds) how long the
connection between primary and secondary servers was down.

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Relating events

Each time a cell changes its operation mode, it generates an


MC_CELL_ACTIVITY_CHANGED class event.
MC_EV_CLASS: MC_CELL_ACTIVITY_CHANGED ISA MC_CELL_CONTROL
DEFINES {
active_server : INTEGER; -- 0 = Regular cell / 1 = Primary node / 2 = Secondary
node of HA cell
duplicate_connected : MC_YESNO;
paused : MC_YESNO; };
END

The active_server slot indicates which of the cell's servers became the active one. A
value of 1 indicates the primary server is active and a value of 2 indicates the
secondary server is active. If the cell is not a high availability cell, this slot is 0.
When the primary server is active for the high availability cell, the
duplicate_connected slot indicates whether or not the secondary server is
connected. If the primary server is not active and/or the secondary server is not
connected, the value of the duplicate_connected slot is NO.
If the value of the paused slot is YES, the cell is paused (or has limited activity). If the
value is NO, the cell is fully active.
This event is generated by a failover or switchback. It is also generated when the
active server switches between limited activity and full activity. On a high availability
cell, the event is generated only by the active server. In case of a switch between
primary and secondary servers, the event is generated just after the switch.

Relating events
Certain operations on an event can generate another event. You can associate that
generated event to the source event. Several types of event relations can occur, such as
the following examples:
s
s

an action result event related to the event on which an action was performed
a trouble ticket event related to the event that automatically created the trouble
ticket

One event can have multiple related events, but a related event can be related to only
one source event. From the source event, you can retrieve all its related events.

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Relating events

The following definitions will help you to better understand this section:
Term

Definition

source event

an event that generates a related event

related event

an event that is generated by a source event


A related event can also be the source of other related events.

relation

a logical association that expresses the relevance of one event to another

relation definition a data instance that defines a relation


relation type

a string in the relation definition for an event class that indicates its type

Generic event relations mechanism


By using the generic event relations mechanism, you can define relationships
between events. The generic event relations mechanism consists of the following KB
elements:
s

the MC_EVENT_RELATION data class for defining relations

180

slots in the CORE_EVENT class that identify source events and related events

the relate and unrelate primitives to establish and remove a relation between
two events

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Relating events

Figure 59

a console command mechanism that creates a Related Events command so users


can view event relations in the BMC Impact Explorer Console, as shown in
Figure 59:

Related events command

Event relation slots


Table 30 lists the CORE_EVENT slots used to identify source events and related events
and the presentation names for those slots that are displayed in the BMC Impact
Explorer and BMC Impact Portal consoles. For more information about the
CORE_EVENT class, see the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference
Guide.

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Table 30

Related event and source event slots

Slot name and definition Presentation name Contains


mc_relation_source Relation Source

the mc_ueid of the source event to which this event is related


This slot links a related event to its source event.

mc_event_relations Event Relations

a list of tuples
s
s

The first element of the tuple contains the relation type.


The second element is the mc_ueid of the related event.

This slot links a source event to one or more related events.

Figure 60 illustrates how the slots are populated.


Figure 60

Event relations

source event

In a source event, the mc_event_relations


slot contains the relation type and the
mc_ueid of one ore more related event.

related event
and source
event

related event

related event

related event

In a related event, the mc_relation_source


slot contains the mc_ueid of the source
event. A related event can be associated
with only one source event.

related event

Event relation data class


The MC_EVENT_RELATION data class defines the types of relations between events. Its
class definition is shown below:
MC_DATA_CLASS: MC_EVENT_RELATION ISA MC_CELL_DATA
DEFINES {
class : STRING, read_only=yes, key=yes; # Related event class
type : STRING;
# Relation type
}; END

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NOTE
The presentation name displayed in the BMC Impact Explorer and BMC Impact
Portal consoles for the MC_EVENT_RELATION class is Event Relation.

You create a relation definition by defining an instance of the MC_EVENT_RELATION


data class. The data instance defines the possible relation types for a specific event
class.
The following table describes the slot values of the MC_EVENT_RELATION class.
Slot

Value

class specifies the class of the related events


A subclass of a class that is used in a relation inherits this relation. A relation defined
on a more specific class overrides any inherited relation.
type

specifies the relation type


Only one type of relation is allowed per event class, and only one event class should
be named explicitly in a relation type.

To see an example of how the slot values define a relation type, go to Event relation
definition example on page 184.
Modifications to an MC_EVENT_RELATION data instance do not affect existing event
relations, even after a cell restart. After two events have been related, they remain
related until they are explicitly unrelated.

WARNING
When an MC_EVENT_RELATION data instance is modified, performing an unrelate operation
on existing event relations of that type might yield unexpected results. Therefore, you should
not modify an existing type of relation as long as there are related events of that type.

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Event relation definition example

Event relation primitives


The following table lists the primitives used to establish and remove event relations.
Primitive

Description

relate(Object)

establishes a relation between a generated event and a source event


The relation primitive associates the related events object handle (Object) to the
source event as set in the mc_relation_source slot of the source event. The
relation type is determined by the class of this event or its most specific superclass
that has a relation type defined.
The result of this operation is that the relation type and the mc_ueid of this event
are added to the mc_event_relations slot of the source event.
For the relation to occur, the mc_relation_source slot of the related event must
be set correctly. The slot should be set by the agent that generates the related event.
However, the fact that this slot has a non-empty value does not imply that this event
is correctly related to the event indicated in the mc_relation_source slot.

unrelate(Object)

removes an existing relation between two events


The unrelate primitive uses the related events object handle (Object) to remove
the related events mc_ueid from the mc_event_relations slot of the source
event.
The related event contains the mc_ueid of the source event in the
mc_relation_source slot. The mc_relation_source slot is not modified.
The rule that performs the unrelate could also clear the mc_relation_source slot
to ensure that the event is no longer related.

Event relation definition example


Suppose that one relation is evaluated for action results and one is evaluated for
trouble tickets. Whenever an action is performed on an event, a corresponding action
result event is generated. The generated event is related to the source event with a
relation type of action. If an event triggers a trouble ticket to be created in BMC
Remedy Service Desk, it generates a corresponding trouble ticket event that is related
to the source event with relation type of tt_ars.
Instances of the MC_EVENT_RELATION data class define the event relations, as shown:
MC_EVENT_RELATION; type=action; class=MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT; END
MC_EVENT_RELATION; type=tt_ars; class=ARS_TROUBLE_TICKET; END

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Event relation definition example

Now, event E001 generates the related action result event A001.
EVENT;
mc_ueid=E001;
...
mc_event_relations=[action,A001];
END
MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT
mc_ueid=A001;
...
event=E001;
mc_relation_source=E001;
END

The generated action event has a slot named event that contains the same value as
the mc_relation_source slot. This duplication ensures backward compatibility with
existing action events originating from pre-7.0 BMC Impact Manager cells.
Now, event E002 generates the associated trouble ticket event T001 and two action
result events, A002 and A003.
EVENT;
mc_ueid=E002;
...
mc_event_relations=[action,A003,tt_ars,T001,action,A002];
END
MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT
mc_ueid=A002;
...
event=E002;
mc_relation_source=E002;
END
MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT
mc_ueid=A003;
...
event=E002;
mc_relation_source=E002;
END
ARS_TROUBLE_TICKET
mc_ueid=T001;
...
mc_relation_source=E002;
END

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Guidelines for implementing an event relation

Guidelines for implementing an event relation


The following guidelines, presented in a sequential order, describe one scenario in
which you can implement an event relation.

1 In the cells \EM or \SM KB directory, which is MCELL_HOME\etc\CellName\kb on


Windows platforms and in MCELL_HOME/etc/CellName/kb on UNIX platforms,
create the files and entries shown in Table 31.
Table 31

Example event relation definitions

File to create

Entry to include in file

classes/test_tt.baroc

MC_EV_CLASS: ARS_TROUBLE_TICKET ISA EVENT; END

data/test_tt.baroc

MC_EVENT_RELATION; class=ARS_TROUBLE_TICKET; type=tt_ars; END

rules/test_tt.mrl

refine ars_trouble_ticket_relate : ARS_TROUBLE_TICKET($E)


{ relate($E); }
END
execute ars_trouble_ticket_unrelate : ARS_TROUBLE_TICKET($E)
when $E.status != OPEN { unrelate($E); }
END

bin/test_tt.mrl

action ARS test_tt [] END

bin/A/test_tt

mposter -n $CELL_NAME -a ARS_TROUBLE_TICKET -b


"mc_relation_source=$mc_ueid;"

bin/w4/test_tt.cmd

@echo off
mposter -n %CELL_NAME% -a ARS_TROUBLE_TICKET -b
mc_relation_source=%mc_ueid%;

In this example, you are adding an instance of the Action Request System (ARS)
trouble ticket class.

2 Add test_tt to the .load file in the \classes, \data, \rules, and \bin directories.
3 Stop the cell, compile the KB, and restart the cell.
(See the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide for the
procedures.)
In BMC Impact Explorer, connect to the cell.

4 In the Events list, right-click an event and choose Actions => Remote Actions=> ARS.
The following events are generated:
MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT
ARS_TROUBLE_TICKET

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Guidelines for implementing an event relation

5 To view the event relations, choose View => Related Events and then select the
relation type.

6 To unrelate the event, select the ARS_TROUBLE_TICKET event and close it.
The ARS_TROUBLE_TICKET event is unrelated.

Chapter 7

Event operations

187

Guidelines for implementing an event relation

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Chapter

Creating local and remote actions


Defining and executing local actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local action definitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
File naming guidelines for action executables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining a local action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a user-defined local action for multiple events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring BMC Impact Explorer to run a local action. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Version control of local actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding buttons for actions to the toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining and executing remote actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Location of remote actions and executables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Requirements for action executable files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining a remote action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote action definitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote action execution results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Action execution variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining a remote action in a BMC Impact Manager cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 8 Creating local and remote actions

190
190
190
190
194
197
197
198
200
201
202
202
202
208
209
209

189

Defining and executing local actions

Defining and executing local actions


Local actions are defined in local BMC Impact Explorer configuration files and can be
launched by a user from an event in the console only. Local actions always run locally
in the console's environment.
The action definition can prompt the user performing the action for arguments. An
executable associated with an action can be a script or binary. The executable is run on
the OS platform on which the cell is running.
You execute local actions are executed in the BMC Impact Explorer Console. The
action name and arguments are displayed in the console.

Local action definitions


Local actions are created as .xml files and saved in the BMC Impact Explorer Console
directory, and are defined in the BMC Impact Explorer Console directory under
etc\event_op. The action definition includes the action name as it appears in BMC
Impact Explorer and the path to the associated executable.
The action definition also can indicate permission roles that are required in order to
perform the action. An optional selection condition indicates the events to which the
action is restricted. The definition also lists the requested arguments by name or
description.

File naming guidelines for action executables


Files are executable under different conditions, depending on the operating system.
On UNIX systems, the execute permission for the file must be set, and the file must
have an UNIX executable file format. Also on UNIX, a text file is considered
executable if it begins with the characters #! followed by a path used to interpret the
script. On Windows platforms a file is executable if it has a suffix that corresponds to
an executable system. These suffixes are listed in the PATHEXT environment variable.

Defining a local action


This section describes how to define a local action in BMC Impact Explorer
configuration files.

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Local action definitions


Local actions definition files determine how the actions appear in the BMC Impact
Explorer Console interface. The BMC Impact Explorer Console directories contain
local action definitions. The BMC Impact Explorer Console is configured through files
created with XML. The local actions definition files are LocalActions.dtd and
LocalActions.xsd. Actions.dtd and Actions.xsd define the action files. The .dtd files are
DTD definitions for the format of the files. DTD and XSD accomplish the same thing
insofar as they define the acceptable format for an XML file. XSD allows definition of
an elements type as well as the structure of the document. DTD defines only the
document structure, not element type, such as Integer, String, or Float. In an .xsd file,
therefore, you can specify element <x> is of type Integer. In a .dtd file there is no such
distinction.
Either of the XML files, .dtd or .xsd, can be used to create well formed XML or to
validate existing .dtd files. You may be able to utilize these files in conjunction with a
third party XML editing tool to develop new local action files. The following local
actions and actions definition files are shipped with the BMC Impact Explorer
Console and installed in the IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\console\event_op\spec
directory:
s
s
s
s

LocalActions.dtd
LocalActions.xsd
Actions.dtd
Actions.xsd

Configure the BMC Impact Explorer Console to run local actions using the
LocalActions.xml file. To locate this file, the BMC Impact Explorer Console first looks
in the home directory. The home directory location is C:\Documents and
Settings\<user_name>, represented here as %HOME%:
%HOME%\.econsole\etc\event_op

If the LocalActions.xml file is not found in that location, the BMC Impact Explorer
Console looks in the BMC Impact Solutions home directory:
MCELL_HOME\console\etc\event_op

NOTE
The first directory in which the BMC Impact Explorer Console looks to locate the
LocalActions.xml file, %HOME%\.econsole\etc\event_op, contains a dot prefix, .econsole,
as part of the path. Because of this dot notation the directory is hidden on UNIX platforms.

Chapter 8 Creating local and remote actions

191

Defining a local action

Figure 61 shows the general syntax for a local action.


Figure 61

Local action general syntax

LocalActions
ActionGroup name=""tip=""
ActionGroup name=""tip=""
Action location=""id=""
Action location=""id=""/
Action location=""id=""/
/ActionGroup>
Action name=""/
Action name=""
/ActionGroup
/LocalActions

Table 32 lists the tags for the local action general syntax.
Table 32

Tags for the local action general syntax

Tags

Attributes

ActionGroup name

shows as the name for a group node

ActionGroup tip

shows as the tooltip for the node

Action location

location to find the action

Action id

ID of the action to be loaded and added to the action tree

Limiting local actions by role


The definition of local actions allows the actions to be displayed and available, based
on the roles the current user has been granted by the BMC Impact Explorer and the
specific event that is selected in the BMC Impact Explorer Console.
Figure 62 lists the syntax that uses roles to limit the local actions available. The Dev
Tools group is displayed only when the current user has either the Full Access or
the Service Administrator role.
Figure 62

Syntax to limit local actions available by user role

<ActionGroup name="Dev Tools" tip="Actions that help with development">


<Action location="mc_actions.xml" id="mc_showenv"/>
<Action location="mc_actions.xml" id="mc_export"/>
<Action location="mc_actions.xml" id="mc_crtfilter"/>
<Action location="mc_actions.xml" id="mc_crtregulate"/>
<Role>Full Access</Role>
<Role>Service Administrator</Role>
<EventClass>*</EventClass>
</ActionGroup>

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Limiting local actions by event class


The file LocalActions.xml in the console\etc\event_op directory, defines actions for
other events. These actions are available only if an event that inherits from this class is
selected in the BMC Impact Explorer Console event display. In the syntax shown in
Figure 63, the Launch Manager Action group displays only if an event class in the
CA_EVENT event class hierarchy or in the PATROL_EVENT class hierarchy is selected, as
specified in Figure 63.
Figure 63

Syntax to limit local actions by event class

<ActionGroup name="Launch Manager" tip="Actions that launch an element manager">


<Action location="uniactions.xml" id="UniConsole">
<EventClass>CA_EVENT</EventClass>
</Action>
<Action location="mc_actions.xml" id="mc_patrol">
<EventClass>PATROL_EVENT</EventClass>
</Action>
<EventClass>CA_EVENT</EventClass>
<EventClass>PATROL_EVENT</EventClass>
</ActionGroup>

Defining multiple actions in one file


Multiple actions can be defined in a single <Actions>.mrl file, as shown.
<Actions>
<ActionDef id="" type="executable" target="">
<Argument label=""
tip=""required="Y|N|T|F|yes|no|true|false" defaultvalue=""
type="" fieldsize="" rows=""columns=""/>
<Argument label="" tip""required=required""
defaultvalue=""
type="" fieldsize="" rows="" columns=""/>
<Argument
label=""tip""required=required""defaultvalue=
""type=""fieldsize=""rows="" columns=/>
</ActionDef>
<ActionDef id=""label=""type"executable"target=""/>
</Actions>

Table 33 lists the tags for the syntax.


Table 33

Tags for defining multiple actions in one file (part 1 of 2)

Tags

Attributes

ActionDef label

shows as the name of the action in the action tree; if not specified, label
=

ActionDef target for

fully qualified path to an executable to be run when executing action; if


not specified, target =

type = executable

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Creating a user-defined local action for multiple events

Table 33

Tags for defining multiple actions in one file (part 2 of 2)

Tags

Attributes

ActionDef id

identifies the action; if not specified, id =

Argument label

name of the argument; if not specified, default value =

Argument tip

tooltip to be shown when hovering over the argument label; if not


specified, default value =

Argument required

determines if this argument is required; if not specified,


required = false

Argument defaultvalue

default value to be displayed for the argument; if not specified,


default value =

Argument fieldsize

size of the argument field; if not specified, field size = 50

Argument type

type of argument, either: textfield or textarea; if not


specified, type = textfield

Argument rows

number of rows to make the displayed size of the text area


Only use if type = textarea; if not specified, rows = 5

Argument columns

number of columns to make the displayed size of the text area


Only use if type = textarea; if not specified, columns = 25

Creating a user-defined local action for multiple events


The mc_actions.xml file allows you to define your own local actions. By default, each
action is taken only on the first event that matches the criteria in the action definition.
If you want the action to be taken on all events that match the action definition
criteria, you must enable batch mode. When you enable batch mode, the
celleventdata.xml file is created in the same directory where the mc_actions.xml file is
located. You could use this file to execute a script that could parse all of the slots that
are in the file and possibly change or take whatever action you want. For instance you
could add a comment, change a slot value, or update a table using SQL.

To create a user-defined local action to respond to multiple events


1 Using a text editor, open the mc_actions.xml file.
The file is located in one of the following directories, depending on your operating
system:
s
s

194

Windows: C:\Program Files\BMC Software\console\etc\event_op


UNIX: opt/bmc/Impact/console/etc/event_op

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Creating a user-defined local action for multiple events

2 In the mc_actions.xml file, add the batchmode=true parameter to the action that
you want to execute against multiple events, as shown in Figure 64:
Figure 64

Syntax to execute a local actions against multiple events of the same type

<Actions>
<ActionDef id="" type="executable" target="" batchmode=true>
</Actions>

For example, Figure 65 illustrates how you can enable the batchmode parameter to
ping each system from which a specified event originates:
Figure 65

Example of an action definition that uses the batchmode parameter

<ActionDef id="mc_ping" label="Ping EVENT origin" type="executable"


target="mc_ping" batchmode="true">

The resulting celleventdata.xml file might look similar to Figure 66:


Figure 66

Example celleventdata.xml file (part 1 of 2)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>


- <BMC_Impact_Manager version="1.0">
- <IMPACT_EVENT>
- <TST_EV>
<event_handle>315</event_handle>
<mc_ueid>mc.ci-70.4198e3d.1</mc_ueid>
<mc_client_address>192.168.2.2</mc_client_address>
<adapter_host />
<mc_location>adprod.bmc.com</mc_location>
<mc_service />
<mc_host_class />
<mc_host>HostNameWouldBeHere</mc_host>
<mc_host_address>IPWouldBeHere</mc_host_address>
<mc_object_class />
<mc_object />
<mc_tool_class />
<mc_tool />
<mc_tool_rule />
<mc_tool_key />
<mc_tool_sev />
<mc_origin_class />
<mc_origin>IPWouldBeHere</mc_origin>
<mc_origin_key />
<mc_origin_sev />
<mc_parameter />
<mc_parameter_value />
<mc_event_category>OPERATIONAL</mc_event_category>
<mc_incident_time>0</mc_incident_time>
<mc_arrival_time>1142525501</mc_arrival_time>
<mc_local_reception_time>1142525501</mc_local_reception_time>
<date_reception>1142525501</date_reception>
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Creating a user-defined local action for multiple events

Figure 66

Example celleventdata.xml file (part 2 of 2)

<date>20060316081141.000000-480</date>
<status>OPEN</status>
<severity>WARNING</severity>
<mc_original_severity>WARNING</mc_original_severity>
<mc_priority>PRIORITY_5</mc_priority>
<mc_original_priority>PRIORITY_5</mc_original_priority>
<mc_owner />
<msg>test modify for administrator</msg>
<duration>0</duration>
<mc_timeout>0</mc_timeout>
<repeat_count>0</repeat_count>
<mc_action_count>0</mc_action_count>
<administrator><unknown>@hostnameWouldBeHere</administrator>
<mc_acl />
<mc_date_modification>1142525501</mc_date_modification>
<mc_notes />
<mc_operations />
<mc_notification_history />
<mc_bad_slot_names />
<mc_bad_slot_values />
<mc_history />
- <mc_modhist>
<LI>ci-70</LI>
</mc_modhist>
<mc_propagations />
- <mc_collectors>
<LI>1.1</LI>
<LI>2.2.1</LI>
<LI>6</LI>
</mc_collectors>
<mc_abstraction />
<mc_abstracted />
<mc_associations />
<mc_cause>0</mc_cause>
<mc_effects />
<mc_event_relations />
<mc_relation_source />
<mc_smc_id />
<mc_smc_alias />
<mc_smc_impact>0</mc_smc_impact>
<mc_smc_type />
<mc_smc_causes />
<mc_smc_effects />
<in_state>one</in_state>
<out_state>unknown</out_state>
<restrict>not_two</restrict>
</TST_EV>

You can parse the resulting celleventdata.xml file.

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Configuring BMC Impact Explorer to run a local action

Configuring BMC Impact Explorer to run a local action


1 Place the action in the etc\event_op directory under the BMC Impact Explorer
Console home directory.

2 Create an .xml file to refer to the executable.


3 Update the LocalActions.xml file to reflect the new action name to be viewed in the
BMC Impact Explorer Console.

4 Restart the BMC Impact Explorer Console.

Version control of local actions


If you install BMC Impact Explorer to run as a Java Web Start application, software
updates are downloaded automatically. Each time a user launches a BMC Impact
Explorer as a Web Start application, Webstart Application Manager checks whether a
new version of BMC Impact Explorer is deployed on the BMC Impact Portal. If there
is a new version, the update is downloaded into the client cache as needed. To enable
users to customize local actions and maintain their customizations through these
automatic software updates, BMC Impact Explorer provides version control of local
actions.
During the initial download of BMC Impact Explorer to run as a Web Start
application, the local action scripts are downloaded to a local directory so they can be
executed when needed and you can customize them. On Windows platforms, the
local directory is C:\Documents and Settings\userName\.econsole\webconsole\
BIP_hostname_BIP_port# \etc\event_op. You can modify the local scripts in this
directory as needed.
During software updates, the local action scripts are maintained in this way:
s

If the local copy of the script is newer than the one on the BMC Impact Portal, the
script is kept as it is.

If the local copy is older than the one on the BMC Impact Portal,
the local copy is saved in this local directory: C:\Documents and Settings\
userName\.econsole\webconsole\BIP_hostname_BIP_port# \etc\event_op_bak
\current_system_time.
the original local copy is replaced by the new version from the BMC Impact
Portal.

Chapter 8 Creating local and remote actions

197

Adding buttons for actions to the toolbar

Adding buttons for actions to the toolbar


You can modify your toolbar to provide appropriate buttons for local actions that you
need. You can add up to 16 custom toolbar buttons for local actions. Also, you can
change the order in which the buttons are displayed, and you can remove buttons.
Each button is associated with only one action, which is platform independent.
You can specify a GIF image to be used as the icon for the additional toolbar buttons.
The images must be available on the local computer where the console is installed,
but they are not stored by the console. You must maintain the availability of these
images. When the specified image is not available, the console displays a generic
image.

NOTE
You can create custom toolbar buttons for local actions only on the Events tab. This
functionality is not available on either the Services or Administration tab.

To add a local action button to the toolbar


1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Toolbar Actions.
The Edit Toolbar Actions dialog box is displayed, but it is empty except for a
toolbar, as shown in Figure 67 on page 198.
Figure 67

Edit Toolbar Actions dialog box

Delete a toolbar action


Create a new toolbar action

2 Click Create a new toolbar action.


The Edit Toolbar Actions dialog box is updated to display the Action Parameters
box.

3 Provide information about your new button in the Action Parameters box:
A In the Name box, enter the name of the new toolbar button.
B In Local Action, select an action from the list, as shown in Figure 68.

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Figure 68

Local toolbar action selection

C At Icon Search,

, click the ellipsis (. . .) to locate an icon to use on the button.

D In Tool Tip, enter the text that you want to display when the mouse cursor is
placed over the button.

E Click OK.
The new button is displayed on the console toolbar at the far right.

To reorder local action toolbar buttons


As you create more local action toolbar buttons, you might want to change the order
in which they are displayed (for example, to group some of them together).

1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Toolbar Actions.


The Edit Toolbar Actions dialog box is displayed with the local toolbar actions
listed in the left pane in the same order that their buttons appear in the toolbar.

Chapter 8 Creating local and remote actions

199

Defining and executing remote actions

2 Click an action in the list, and then click a directional arrow on the toolbar to move
that action up or down one position in the list box, as shown in Figure 69.
Figure 69

Local action toolbar button order


Directional Arrows

Toolbar Actions

3 Click OK to save the changes.


To delete a local action button from the toolbar
1 From the menu bar, choose Edit => Toolbar Actions.
The Edit Toolbar Actions dialog box is displayed.

2 Select the action that you want to delete from the list of actions.
3 On the dialog box toolbar, click Delete a toolbar action.
The action is deleted from the list of actions, and its corresponding button is
deleted from the toolbar.

4 Click OK.

Defining and executing remote actions


Remote actions are defined in the BMC Impact Manager Knowledge Base and are
executed by the BMC Impact Manager.
You can define remote actions through the BMC IX Console. The action name and
arguments are displayed in the console. You are asked to provide values for the
arguments when performing an action on an event. Actions performed from the BMC
Impact Explorer Console always generate a result event in the form of
MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT.
You can also define a remote action through a rule. If an action is executed in a rule,
an action result event is not automatically generated, nor is the result available in the
BMC Impact Explorer Console. If you want to generate an action result event, you
must code the action definition to generate it.

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Remote action result events

External program actions are executed asynchronously; therefore, an asynchronous


result notification mechanism is provided.

Remote action result events


An external action that is performed on an event from the console will result in
another event. An event that occurs as the result of an action is designated as an
internal event of class MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT.
This MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT instance consists of the return code and the standard
output and error streams produced by the external program. If the size of those
streams is not too large, they are included literally in the action result event.
Otherwise, they are stored in a file whose reference name is stored in the action result.
The size limit is set with configuration parameter ActionResultInlineLimit, which
has a default value of 4096, or 4KB.
If an action cannot be started, the action result event indicates the reason in the
failure slot contained in the MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT class.
For information about this parameter, see BMC Impact Solutions Infrastructure
Administration Guide.

Location of remote actions and executables


Actions and relevant executables are placed in the cells kb\bin directory. The
subdirectory location within the bin directory depends on the platform type on which
the cell is running, as defined in Table 34:
Table 34

Standard locations for action executables

Directory

Platform

independent

h1

HP-UX 11+

l2

Linux

p4

AIX

s5

Solaris

w4

Windows

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201

Requirements for action executable files

Executables that can run on multiple platforms, such as all UNIX, can be located in
the A subdirectory. A cell first looks for executables in the platform-specific directory,
and then in the independent directory (A). An executable also can be located
anywhere on a file system. In that case, the cell requires the path to the executable in
order to locate it.

Requirements for action executable files


Files are executable under different conditions, depending on the operating system.
On UNIX systems, the file's execute permission must be set, and the file must have an
UNIX executable file format. Also on UNIX, a text file is considered executable if it
begins with the characters #! followed by a path used to interpret the script. On
Windows platforms a file is executable if it has a suffix that corresponds to an
executable system. These suffixes are listed in the PATHEXT environment variable.

Defining a remote action


This section describes how to define a remote action in the KB of a cell.
For additional information on defining a remote action in the BMC IX Console, you
can refer to Chapter 9, Remote execution.

Remote action definitions


The following sections describe how to define a remote action, as well as how to
specify roles and arguments. This section also provides examples of remote actions.

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Remote action definitions

Common action rule syntax


Both internal and external remote actions are defined through an action rule. The
basic syntax of an action rule is shown in Figure 70.
Figure 70

Action rule syntax

action ActionName : { [ Role , Role , ... ] } [ Argument , Argument , ... ]


ActionCodeInternal
END
action ActionName [ Argument , Argument , ... ]
ActionCodeInternal
END
action ActionName : { [ Role , Role , ... ] }
ActionCodeInternalOrExternal
END
action ActionName
ActionCodeInternalOrExternal
END

Table 35 describes the variables of the action rule syntax.


Table 35

Action rule syntax variable descriptions (part 1 of 2)

Variable

Description

ActionName

ActionName is the name that is used to

represent the action in a console and to refer to


the action when performing it from a rule. For
example, an ActionName could be SendMail or
ModifyEvent.
For more information, see Specifying an action
name on page 204.
Role

[Optional.] Role specifies the permissions


required to perform the action. The use of roles
only applies when you are performing the
action from a console. An example of a role is
Service Administrators.
For more information, see Specifying roles on
page 204.

Chapter 8 Creating local and remote actions

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Remote action definitions

Table 35

Action rule syntax variable descriptions (part 2 of 2)

Variable

Description

Argument

[Optional.] Argument is used as label in a


console to request an actual value for the
argument from the user.
For more information, see Specifying arguments
on page 205.

ActionCodeInternal
ActionCode represents the code that defines the
ActionCodeInternalOrExternal actual internal or external action.
For more information, see ActionCode syntax for
external actions on page 205 and ActionCode
syntax for internal actions on page 206.

Specifying an action name


An action name can be a single name, or a composed name, consisting of two names
separated by a period. The name before the period is the action group name, and the
name after the period is the base name of the action. For example, the default KB
includes a group of actions called im_operations. A composed name of an action
within this group is im_operations.Acknowledge. If the group name is not
specified, it is considered to be the empty string (). Actions can be displayed in a
console by group. The action name can be displayed in its localized language instead
of the value in the KB.

Specifying roles
Roles (permissions) are optional. Roles for remote actions are specified as they are in
other types of rules. If you choose to provide roles, roles specify the permissions
required to perform the action. The use of roles only applies when you are
performing the action from a console. When performing the action from a rule, roles
are ignored.
Figure 71 provides an example of an action that is limited to the Service
Administrators role.
Figure 71

Example of a specified role

action ModifySlotValue : { ['Service Administrators'] }


mc_modslot [SlotName , NewValue ]
END

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Remote action definitions

Specifying arguments
Arguments are optional. If you choose to include action arguments, specify them as a
list, using the following format for each argument as shown in Figure 72.
Figure 72

Action argument syntax

ArgumentName
ArgumentName
ArgumentName
ArgumentName

:
:
(
(

SlotType ( $Variable )
SlotType
$Variable )
$Variable )

A standard slot type declaration is used to specify the type of the value that is
expected for the argument. This can be a single value or a list of single values
(LIST_OF). If no type declaration is provided, it defaults to STRING.
If a Variable is specified, the actual value of the argument is available in the action
code through that variable.
For an external action, the optional arguments are specified inside the ActionCode.
For more information, see ActionCode syntax for external actions.

ActionCode syntax for external actions


For external actions, the action code is one of four types:
s

an action with arguments that will be performed on an event that matches the
specified selection conditions

: Selection ActionProgram [ Argument , Argument , ... ]


s

an action without arguments that will be performed on an event that matches the
specified selection conditions

: Selection ActionProgram

an action with arguments that is performed on any event

ActionProgram [ Argument , Argument , ... ]

an action without arguments that is performed on any event

ActionProgram

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Remote action definitions

Selection specifies an optional condition (where-clause) on the events. It has the

same form as in other rules. The action will not be performed on an event that does
not match those conditions. The arguments are specified as above. However, for
external actions, any variables in the specification are ignored.
The ActionProgram is the name of the external program or script to be executed. If
this program or script is not available from the kb/bin directory, you must specify the
full path to the executable program.

ActionCode syntax for internal actions


For internal actions, the action code syntax is one of two types:
s

an action that is performed on any event

{ Call ; Call ; ... }

an action that is only performed on an event matching the specified selection


conditions

: Selection { Call ; Call ; ... } Selection { Call ; Call ; ... } ...

The action code can contain zero or one or more Selection criteria that specify
conditions on the event. If Selection is not defined, the action code applies to any
event. If a Selection is included, the event is evaluated against the selection
condition. Only the piece of code following the first matching selection is performed
on the event. If no selection conditions match, then no code is performed.
The action code itself is a sequence of calls, similar to other rules. Within these calls,
the actual values of the action arguments are available through the variables that are
specified in the argument list. For example, a call might be the following primitive to
retrieve the requestor of the action;
action_requestor( $REQ )

Another call might be the following function to retrieve the requestor of the action:
action_requestor()

An internal action can return a value consisting of a numeric return code and a return
text by calling the following primitive at the end of the internal action code:
action_return( ReturnCode , ReturnText )

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Remote action definitions

Performing an action from a rule


Actions can be performed by an operator from a console or from a rule. To perform an
action from a rule, the primitive in Figure 73 must be called.
Figure 73

Primitive to perform an action from a rule

perform( $EVENT , ActionName , [ $ARG1 , $ARG2 , ... ] , $RET_CODE , $RET_TEXT )


perform( $EVENT , ActionName , [ $ARG1 , $ARG2 , ... ] )

The action designated by ActionName is performed on the event that is represented


by $EVENT. Actual values for the action arguments must be of the declared type. The
first form retrieves the return value of the action. For an internal action, that is the
value returned with action_return. For an external action, the value will be 0 and
the empty string.

Examples of actions
The following sections provides examples of internal and external actions.

Close any event


The following example illustrates an internal action to close any event:
action CloseEvent : EVENT($E) { $E.status = CLOSED; } END

Assign an event owner to a specified value


The following example illustrates an internal action to assign an event owner to a
specified value:
action AssignEvent [To:STRING($D)] : EVENT($E) { $E.mc_owner = $D; } END

Modify an event slot value


This action can be defined as either an internal or external action. The internal action
yields better performance than the external action that performs the same function.
The following example illustrates an internal action that allows only users with the
Service Administrators role to modify an event slot value:
action ModifySlotValue : { ['Service Administrators'] }
[SlotName:STRING($SLTNM),NewValue:STRING($VAL)] : EVENT($E)
{ set_list_slotvalues([$E],[$SLTNM],[$VAL]); }
END

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Remote action execution results

The following example illustrates an external action that allows only users with the
Service Administrators role to modify an event slot value:
action ModifySlotValue : { ['Service Administrators'] }
mc_modslot [SlotName , NewValue ]
END

Remote action execution results


The standard cell action mechanism provides for results consisting only of the
standard output and error stream; you must implement other mechanisms. If the
result must be in a file, the external program can write the file and return the file path
in the standard output stream. The external program also can use a CLI to modify a
cell event or to send a new event to the cell containing the desired result.

NOTE
It is impossible to return an exit code from a .bat script on Windows operating systems
versions prior to Windows 2000. This is a Windows/DOS limitation. However, you can
circumvent this limitation. By definition, the exit code of the script is the exit code of the last
executed external program. You can write a small C program whose only function is to return
the argument it receives as the exit code, as shown in Figure 74. Call that program from the
script with an argument that specifies the desired exit code. This program should be placed in
the kb\bin\w4 directory.

Figure 74

Example of exit code that returns an argument

exitcode.c
int main( int argc , char *argv[] )
{
return( ( argc <= 1 ) ? 0 : atoi(argv[1]) );
}

To return 123 as the exit code, call the special program at the end of the script as:
Figure 75

Example of exit code that returns a specified value

exitcode 123

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Action execution variables

Action execution variables


All external action primitives have the same environment. All variables from the
initial cell startup environment are passed to the environment of external actions
launched from the cell. In addition, the variables listed in Table 36 are added by the
cell.
Table 36

Action execution variables

Variable

Description

<slot>

For every slot listed in SLOTS, a variable is defined with the name of the
slot and as value the slot value.

CELL_BUILD

build number of the cell

CELL_DATE

cell build date

CELL_NAME

name of the cell

CELL_RELEASE

release number of the cell

CLASS

class name of the event on which the action is performed

MCELL_HOME

cell home directory

PKG_NAME

name of package containing the rule that triggered the action


The variable is empty if the action was triggered by an operator.

REQUESTOR

identification of the requestor of the action


For a rule, it is package:rule and for an operator, it is user@host.

RULE_NAME

name of the rule that triggered the action


The variable is empty if the action was triggered by an operator.

SLOTS

list of colon-separated names of the events defined slots

The action execution trigger, such as rule name or user name, can be passed as an
environment variable.

Defining a remote action in a BMC Impact Manager cell


1 Place the script or executable files in their corresponding OS folders in the kb\bin
directory, as detailed in Table 34 on page 201.

2 Create an .mrl file to refer to the executable and define the action or add the file to
an existing .mrl file as explained in Defining multiple actions in one file on
page 193.

3 If you created a new <actions>.mrl file, update the .load file to reference the .mrl file
in the kb\bin directory.

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Defining a remote action in a BMC Impact Manager cell

4 Compile the Knowledge Base, using the mccomp command.


5 Restart the cell and test the remote action from the rules or from the BMC Impact
Explorer Console.

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Remote execution
Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Component descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Admin record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Action rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Action task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Credential record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Process summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with credential records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How IAS searches for credentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interactive remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GUI walkthrough: interactive remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining the remote action rule and task. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Work flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Authentication guidelines for automatic remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
GUI walkthrough: automatic remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining the remote execution policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supplemental manual procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual configuration of interactive remote execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual configuration of automatic remote execution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Properties files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ias.properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
centraladmin-strings.properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
remoteexecution.properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Executing reboot command via remote action results in timeout messages . . .
A script is deployed on a remote UNIX system but does not execute . . . . . . . .
PsExec is not supported on 64-bit Windows 2008 Server systems. . . . . . . . . . . .
Issues in high availability environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Background

Background
Remote execution refers to the process by which an action rule, which is defined on a
cell, invokes an action task, which is defined on the Impact Administration Server
(IAS). The action rule is written in MRL, and the action task is written in XML.
The action task initiates a command. This command is executed on the system where
IAS resides or on a specified remote system. If the command is executed on the IAS
system, then the BMC IAS user account executes the command. If it is executed on a
remote system, then a user account that impersonates the remote login credentials
executes the command.
Remote execution can be exercised in two ways: interactive remote execution and
automatic remote execution. You can configure remote execution manually by editing
files or through the GUI.
The walk-throughs starting on page 225 show how to configure an interactive remote
execution and an automatic remote execution by using the GUIs. A description of the
manual procedures follows the GUI walk-throughs.
If you are an advanced user and you want to start working immediately in the GUI,
without reviewing the background information, go to GUI walkthrough: interactive
remote execution on page 225 or GUI walkthrough: automatic remote execution
on page 237.

Audience
This section is addressed to experienced BMC IX administrators and to developers
who are familiar with Knowledge Base rules and policy definitions. Some experience
in XML development is helpful.
Developers can define MRL-based rules and XML-based tasks, both of which enable
users who belong to the appropriate user groups to launch remote executions
manually. In addition, developers can define remote execution policies that reference
rules which, when triggered by events, automatically perform remote executions.
The target application can be any application that resides on a UNIX or MS Windows
remote host. You can define the action to be taken in a batch file, shell script, or Perl
script, any of which is launched on the remote host. This batch file or script cannot
accept manual inputs when it is launched. Apart from batch files and scripts, users
can execute any executable file on a remote host.
The set of remote actions that are available for events is different from the set of
remote actions that are available for infrastructure management components.

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Component descriptions

Component descriptions
The current implementation is built on the following components.

Admin record
The Admin record is a special Type entry in the mcell.dir file of the cell from which
the remote execution is launched. It identifies the IAS instance name, authentication
credentials, and the host name and port of the server.
The Admin record entry is automatically inserted in the mcell.dir at installation. It is
referenced by the action rules in the cells KB. A sample default Admin record entry is
shown below:
<Type>
admin

<Name>
ias_Admin

<EncryptionKey>
0

IpAddress:Port>
localhost.domain:3084

The action rule references the information in the Admin record through its Name
value (ias_Admin in this example).
The Admin record consists of the following parameters:
s

Type with the label admin

Name with the IAS instance name. The default is ias_Admin. The instance name is
an arbitrary string that the admin_execute primitive, a required code component of
the action rule, uses to refer to the Admin record in the mcell.dir.

Encryption Key with the default value 0 or a specified user name and password.

Interactive or manual remote execution


The default value 0 is used by the interactive or manual remote execution process.
The 0 indicates that a specified user name and password are not required to launch
the remote action interactively. Instead the manual remote execution process retrieves
the user name and password of the login account of the current BMC IX session. So
the default BMC IX login user account user/user, which belongs to the Full Access
group, can manually execute remote actions provided the
s
s

action rule associates the Full Access group to the event and action
ias_user userid attribute in the credential record is set equal to user

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Action rule

Automatic remote execution


To enable automatic remote execution, you must specify an IAS user and password as
the Encryption Key value. The automatic remote execution process uses the specified
IAS user and password to authenticate the automatic execution. The specified IAS
user must also be specified in the ias_user userid attribute value of the credential
record.
s

IpAddress/Port that identifies the name of the host where IAS resides and the port
connection. The default port number is 3084.

To change the Admin record


1 Open the mcell.dir file in a text editor.
2 Enter the changes in the appropriate Admin fields, and save the file.
3 Restart the cell to initialize the changes.

Action rule
You define the MRL-based action rule in the
MCELL_HOME/etc/cellName/kb/bin/basicsolution_actions.mrl file on the cell. The
basicsolution_actions.mrl file is designed to hold action rules for both interactive and

automatic remote executions. In addition to referencing the information in the Admin


record of the mcell.dir file, the action rule can specify
s
s
s
s

user group or groups


the action task
the event type
the remote application or host

For interactive remote executions, the action rule calls the IAS with the user name and
password of the account that is logged into the BMC IX session. This is the account
that manually executes the action. For automatic remote executions, the action rule
retrieves the IAS credentials from the Admin record of the mcell.dir file. The action
rule calls the action task.

Remote execution policy


To set up automatic remote executions that are triggered by events, you must first
define a remote execution policy using the new remote execution policy feature of the
BMC IX Console. This policy refers to the action rule.

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Action task

The policy contains the definition of the event that triggers it. When the specified
event is received, it triggers the rule, which invokes the action rule that calls the
action task.

Action task
You define the action task in the
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/data/admin/actions/
UserDefinedActions.xml file on the IAS. It is an XML-based file that contains the

command which is executed on the remote host. The action task obtains the action
definition from the action rule.
When the action task is run, the IAS uses a search algorithm to determine which user
credentials to use to log into the remote system.

Credential record
Using the iadmin CLI, you define the XML-based credential record in the
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/conf/credential_repository.xml file on the IAS. It
identifies the IAS user or role that can impersonate the login credentials of the remote
host user.
The credential repository (credential_repository.xml) consists of credential records. A
credential record identifies the Impact Administration Server user (IAS user). The IAS
user can be an individual user account or a group ID such as Full Access. In effect, the
credential record enables impersonalization. It allows the IAS user to impersonate the
login credentials of the remote host user. The IAS user has the permission to execute
actions on remote systems.
Aside from identifying the IAS user, the credential record must specify what the IAS
user can access. The record must contain values for the application, the application
instance, the remote host name or the domain, and the login user account of the
remote system. The application and application instance can be designated by a
wildcard (*), meaning that IAS user can initiate remote actions against any
application or application instance on the specified remote system.
In addition, the credential record can contain other details. It can specify a
login_password on the remote system if one is required. For example, in public keybased authentication for your client/server communication, such as the Open SSH
protocol, an IAS credential entry is not required. However, if you rely on non-keybased authentication, you must supply a password in the credential repository.

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Credential record

The credential record can define an execution account (user name and password) for
the remote application. If the login user account is on an MS Windows system, then
the credential record provides for a login_user_domain that you must supply.
The credential_repository.xml file is located under
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/conf. A sample credential_repository.xml file is
shown below:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<ias_user_list xmlns="urn:bmc:schemas:impact"
xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
xsi:schemaLocation="urn:bmc:schemas:impact credential_repository.xsd">
<!-- Do not delete lines above this line -->
<ias_user userid="user">
<application>dummyApplication</application>
<applicationinstance>dummyApplicationInstance</applicationinstance>
<hostname_or_domain>dummyHostname</hostname_or_domain>
<login_user>dummyLogin</login_user>
<login_password encrypted="true">Wn1zFHPbbQ==</login_password>
<execute_user>dummyExeUser</execute_user>
<execute_password encrypted="true">MTsZdM8brZawoQ==</execute_password>
<login_user_domain>dummyDomain</login_user_domain>
</ias_user>
<ias_user groupid="Full Access">
<application>testApplication</application>
<applicationinstance>testApplicationInstance</applicationinstance>
<hostname_or_domain>pun-pcm-sun02</hostname_or_domain>
<login_user>abc</login_user>
<login_password encrypted="true">GB4VAhR0k2InIw5Q==</login_password>
<execute_user>xyz</execute_user>
<execute_password encrypted="true">GB4VAhR0kQ==</execute_password>
<login_user_domain>ADPROD</login_user_domain>
</ias_user>
</ias_user_list>

BMC recommends that you update the credential_repository.xml file using the iadmin
options discussed under Working with credential records on page 220.
Each credential record consists of the following elements:
Table 37

Elements of credential_repository.xml (part 1 of 2)

Element name

Description

ias_user_list

contains the two categories of IAS user: the individual IAS user ID (userid) or
the IAS group ID (groupid)

ias_user

specifies the account name of the user ID or the value of the group ID, either of
which can exercise the available remote actions. You can assign an individual or
group value to the ias_user.

userid

the name of the individual IAS user account that can exercise the remote action.
The userid is specified by the credentialId string in the iadmin syntax.

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Credential record

Table 37

Elements of credential_repository.xml (part 2 of 2)

Element name

Description

groupid

the name of the IAS user group that can exercise the remote action. The default
group ID values are defined in the group_roles.xml file under
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/conf. The groupid is also specified by
the corresponding credentialId string in the iadmin syntax if you specify

the group option.


If the user or users who belong to the group have rights to exercise the remote
action, then they can launch the remote actions even though their specific user
accounts have not been defined by the IAS_user element.
applicationname

name of the application on the remote system. It can be any alphanumeric value
or the asterisk wildcard.

applicationinstancename

name of the application instance. It can be any alphanumeric value or the asterisk
wildcard.

hostname_or_domain

host name of the remote system or domain in which the remote action will be
executed. If you enter the domain name, then all systems within the domain that
connect to the local BMC IX Console are eligible for remote execution.

login_user

user account that can log into the remote system

login_password

password associated with the user account. By default the password is encrypted.

execute_user

user account that can execute the specified application on the remote system. If
the login_user account has execute privilege, then leave the execute_user element
blank.

execute_password

password associated with the user account that can access the application on the
remote system. By default the password is encrypted.

login_user_domain

required for MS Windows accounts. Domain where the remote login user account
resides

Each credential record contains a unique combination of primary key values for
userid or groupid, hostname_or_domain, and login_user fields. Records with
duplicate primary key values are not permitted.

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Process summary

Process summary
Figure 76 on page 218 depicts an overview of the remote execution process:
Figure 76

Process overview: remote execution

Table 38 summaries the different stages in the process.


Table 38

Process description: remote execution (part 1 of 2)

Stage
1

218

Description
remote execution policy. Automatic remote execution only. The developer
defines a remote execution policy that calls the action rule and specifies the
event type which triggers it.

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Process summary

Table 38

Process description: remote execution (part 2 of 2)

Stage

Description

Action rule. Interactive and automatic remote execution. The developer writes
an action rule that defines the remote action to be performed. The action is called
through the input arguments of an admin_execute primitive.
Interactive remote execution requires an action_requestor primitive to retrieve
the IAS user account and password from the login IAS account. Automatic
remote execution accesses the IAS user name and password as defined in the
Admin record under the Encryption Key value.
Interactive remote execution can include role definitions for the user. Roles are
omitted in automatic remote execution.

Admin record. Interactive and automatic remote execution. The Encryption Key
value of the Admin record supplies the defined IAS login credentials for
automatic remote execution. The interactive remote execution process, however,
retrieves the login credentials from the user account of the BMC IX session. It
ignores the Encryption Key value defined in the Admin record.
The specific IAS user defined in the Admin record must also be defined in the
credential record to enable remote login.

action task. Interactive and automatic remote execution. The action task is linked
to the action rule by a task Id. The action task contains the command that
executes the task.

credential repository. Interactive and automatic remote execution. The credential


repository contains the impersonalized IAS user with the valid credentials for
accessing the remote host.
During a remote execution, after the action task is executed, IAS searches the
credential repository for matching credentials of the remote host. These
matching credentials are used to access the remote host. If IAS cannot locate
matching credentials, it sends an error message to the cell.

remote execution. Interactive and automatic remote execution. In interactive


remote execution, the user chooses the action from a dynamically populated
menu. The available actions depend on whether the users assigned group
matches the group definition of the action for the selected event.
In automatic remote execution, the specified event triggers the rule without user
intervention. The rule uses the IAS credentials in the Admin record to
authenticate the action.

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Working with credential records

Working with credential records


You define a credential record for each application on a remote system for which you
want a specific user to execute actions. You can use the iadmin command line
interface to with the following options to update credential records in the
credential_repository.xml file and to initialize any changes to the action task definitions
in the .xml files under the IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\server\data\admin\actions\
folder.
Table 39 on page 220 lists the iadmin options for the credential record.
Table 39

iadmin options for remote execution

Option

Description

-acr

adds a credential record to the credential_repository.xml

-mcr

modifies an existing credential record

-dcr

deletes a credential record

-lcr

lists the credential

-reinit actions

loads the action files after any additions or changes to the


action tasks defined in the .xml files under
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\server\data\admin\actions\

Guidelines
The asterisk (*) functions as a wildcard. It is a valid entry only for the
applicationname and applicationinstancename fields. It indicates that any value of
the applicationname or applicationinstancename field is acceptable.
The search algorithm does not support pattern matching. Your entry must match
exactly the underlying value.
Any alphanumeric value is valid for the applicationname and
applicationinstancename fields.
Enclose any password values in double quotation marks to ensure proper processing.
On UNIX systems, run the iadmin command without the bash shell to reinforce the
proper processing of the password value.

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Guidelines

The required fields in which you must enter a value are


s
s
s
s
s

credential Id
hostname_or_domain
applicationname (wildcard is permitted)
applicationinstancename (wildcard is permitted)
loginuser

To add a credential record


From the /bin subdirectory of your IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server directory,
execute the iadmin command using the -acr option, and follow the syntax in the
example.
iadmin -acr userorgroup=<user/group>:credentialId=<string>:
hostname_or_domain=<string>:applicationname=<string>:
applicationinstancename=<string>:login_user_domain=<string>:
loginuser=<string>:loginpassword=<string>:executeuser=<string>:
executepassword=<string>

Table 40 on page 221 lists the required fields for the -acr option. You must include
values for the required fields; otherwise the credentials record is not created.
Table 40

Required fields: adding a credential record

-acr field name

Description

credentialId

the user account (default) or the group Id value

hostname_or_domain

the host name of the remote system, as in


myremotecomputer123, or the domain name where it resides

applicationname

name of the application. You can enter an asterisk * to


bypass a specific application value.

applicationinstancename

name of the application instance. You can enter an asterisk


* to bypass a specific instance value.

login_user_domain

required when the login account belongs to an MS Windows


system

The userorgroup field is optional. If you leave the userorgroup field blank, the -acr
argument assumes that user is the selection, and the value you enter in the
credentialId field (required) is the user account. To specify a group Id value, set the
userorgroup field equal to group, and then specify the group value in the credentialId
field.
Using the iadmin command syntax, you enter password values in clear text. However,
the passwords are encrypted when they are added to the credential_repository.xml file.

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Guidelines

To modify a credential record


From the /bin subdirectory of your IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server directory,
execute the iadmin command using the -mcr option, following the syntax shown in
the example:
iadmin -mcr userorgroup=<user/group>:credentialId=<string>:
hostname_or_domain=<string>:applicationname=<string>:
applicationinstance=<string>:login_user_domain=<string>:
loginuser=<string>:loginpassword=<string>:executeuser=<string>:
executepassword=<string>

You can modify any of the fields, but you must enter required fields listed in Table 41
on page 222 to create a record.
Table 41

Required fields: modifying a credential record

-acr field name

Description

credentialId

the user account (default) or the group Id value. If you


specify a group Id value, you must set userorgroup equal to
group.

hostname_or_domain

the host name of the remote system, as in


myremotecomputer123, or the domain name where it resides
(domain).

applicationname

name of the application. You can enter an asterisk * to


bypass a specific application value.

applicationinstancename

name of the application instance. You can enter an asterisk


* to bypass a specific instance value.

To delete a credential record


From the /bin subdirectory of your IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server directory,
execute the iadmin command using the -dcr option, as in the following syntax
example.
iadmin -dcr userorgroup=<user/group>:credentialId=<string>:
hostname_or_domain=<string>:applicationname=<string>:
applicationinstance=<string>

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How IAS searches for credentials

To delete a record, you must specify values for the required fields listed in Table 42:
Table 42

Required fields: deleting a record

-acr field name

Description

credentialId

the user account (default) or the group Id value

hostname_or_domain

the host name of the remote system, as in


myremotecomputer123, or the domain name where it resides

applicationname

name of the application. You can enter an asterisk * to


include all values.

applicationinstancename

name of the application instance. You can enter an asterisk


* to include all values.

To list credential records


From the /bin subdirectory of your IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server directory,
execute the iadmin command using the -lcr option, as in the following example. You
do not have to specify any credential record parameters.
iadmin -lcr

How IAS searches for credentials


After the action task is invoked by the action rule, the IAS searches the credential
record for the corresponding remote login credentials in the following sequence:
1. IAS_USER + ApplicationName + ApplicationInstanceName + Host
2. IAS_USER_GROUP + ApplicationName + ApplicationInstanceName + Host
3. IAS_USER + ApplicationName + ApplicationInstanceName + Domain
4. IAS_USER_GROUP + ApplicationName + ApplicationInstanceName + Domain
5. IAS_USER + ApplicationName + * + Host
6. IAS_USER_GROUP + ApplicationName + * + Host
7. IAS_USER + ApplicationName + * + Domain
8. IAS_USER_GROUP + ApplicationName + * + Domain
9. IAS_USER + * + * + Host

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10. IAS_USER_GROUP + * + * + Host


11. IAS_USER + * + * + Domain
12. IAS_USER_GROUP + * + * + Domain
13. IAS_USER + * + ApplicationInstanceName + Host
14. IAS_USER_GROUP + * + ApplicationInstanceName + Host
15. IAS_USER + * + ApplicationInstanceName + Domain
16. IAS_USER_GROUP + * + ApplicationInstanceName + Domain
The wildcard * in the ApplicationName and ApplicationInstanceName fields
indicates any value.
If you are implementing automatic remote execution, the IAS searches the credential
records for an IAS_USER with the same value as the IAS user name defined under the
Encryption Key parameter of the Admin record. Therefore, to use the default Admin
record, you must modify the default Encryption Key value of 0 by changing it to a
specific IAS user name and password (see To change the Admin record on
page 214). Then you define in the credential record the IAS User with the credential Id
set equal to the value you specified in the Encryption Key value of the Admin record.

Interactive remote execution


This is remote execution that a user with the appropriate group/role assignment can
launch manually from a selected event in the Events View of the BMC IX Console. In
the BMC IX Events View, the user selects an event, right-clicks to open the pop-up
menu, and chooses Actions => Remote Actions to display a dynamically populated
list of available actions. Users can also execute interactive remote actions on multiple
events. To do so, the user selects multiple events (a maximum of 25) in the BMC IX
Events View, right clicks on those events, selects Actions => Remote Actions, and
executes an action from the list of displayed actions.
These actions may be collected into groups and listed under the group name
The action is available to the user if the
s

224

user shares a role that has been assigned to the action


event on which the user has right -clicked matches the WHERE condition set for
that action in the MRL-based rule

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GUI walkthrough: interactive remote execution

If the action is unavailable to a specific user group/role, then the menu option is not
displayed to the user with that specific user group/role.
As a developer, to implement interactive remote execution, you create an MRL-based
action rule on the cell and a corresponding XML-based action task on the Impact
Administration Server.

GUI walkthrough: interactive remote execution


You can add an action rule and action task simultaneously by using the Create
Remote Actions dialog box.
To modify an existing action rule or task, you must do so by manually editing the
files. To delete an action rule or task, you must manually remove the files from the
target directory. Then recompile the cells KB and restart the cell, and next reload the
Impact Administration Server by running the iadmin -reinit actions command. Refer
to the manual procedures described under Defining the action rule for the IAS or
remote system on page 242 and Defining the action task for the IAS or remote
system on page 246.

Before you begin


Ensure that
s

the cell on which you are defining the action rules is registered with the Impact
Administration Cell and is visible in the Infrastructure Management tab

you can ping the system on which the cell resides from the BMC IX system

if the cell resides on a UNIX system, the SSH server is running

This interactive procedure is divided into three parts:


s
s
s

defining the rule and the action


adding event criteria
specifying timeout intervals, login credentials, and deployment options

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Defining the remote action rule and task


1 From any view in the BMC IX Console, choose Tools => Create Remote Actions... .
The Create Remote Actions dialog box is displayed.
Table 43

Create Remote Actions dialog

2 Complete the following fields using the guidelines in Table 44 on page 226:
Table 44

Data fields (part 1): Create Remote Actions dialog (part 1 of 2)

Field

Description

Action Name

name that describes the action to be performed. This is the


label that appears on the Action=>Remote Actions menu.
Each action name must be unique. Duplicate action names
will result in KB compilation errors. If you are unsure
whether the action name is unique, review the existing action
names in the basicsolutions_actions.mrl file, as in the
following example:
action 'Sample'.'Sample - ipconfig command on
IAS':

Action Group

226

name of the group to which the customized action belongs.


You can group similar actions under the same group name.
You cannot nest groups, however.

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Table 44

Data fields (part 1): Create Remote Actions dialog (part 2 of 2)

Field

Description

Command

string that contains the command to be run on the IAS or


remote system
If the command string includes double quotation marks, as in
the ping command ping {$mc_host}, then the forward
slash is added to the command in the action_name.xml file
under the
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/data/admin/actions

directory: ping \{$mc_host}\.


You must manually edit the action_name.xml file to remove
the slash characters from the command string. After saving
the action_name.xml file, return to the Infrastructure
Management tab, select the IAS instance object, right-click to
open the pop-up menu, and choose Action => Reload.
If the command string includes a hard-coded path, then
always specify the path name using the UNIX style forward
slash /, as in c:/Program Files/BMC Software/Test1.exe,
even if the target systems is Windows.
User Access Roles

rolesFull Access, Service Administrators, Read Only, and


so forththat have permission to execute this action. You can
choose one or more roles.
Note: The roles that are listed are the ones available on the
Impact Administration Server to which your BMC IX
Console is currently connected.

Run Location

system on which the action is run. It can be any remote


system that can be pinged from the Impact Administration
Server, or the local system where the Impact Administration
Server resides.
If you select Remote, you are able to deploy scripts to the
remote system.

Operating System on Run


Machine

specifies the operating system where the action is to be


executed. This can be the operating system of the remote
machine or the operation system of the machine where the
Impact Administrator Server resides.

Impact Manager (Cell)

name of the cell that receives the event associated with the
action. The action rule is defined on this cell.

Impact Administrator Server

the name of the Impact Administrator Server instance where


the action task is defined

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Defining the remote action rule and task

Adding event criteria


Through the Event Criteria Formula field of the Create Remote Actions dialog box,
you enter event criteria in a separate dialog box called Add Event Criteria, shown
below:
Figure 77

Add Event Criteria

When you define the event criteria, you are building a selector that acts as a filter for
the incoming event, which is associated with the action rule and action task. You can
define the selector, and consequently the event, broadly or narrowly. If the event does
not satisfy the criteria, then the action rule and action task are not available.
You should be familiar with Master Rule Language and Baroc class definitions before
developing elaborate event selectors. See the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base
Development Reference Guide.

The event criteria are essentially the Master Rule Language (MRL) event definition.
You specify the event class, slot values, and operators of the event definition.
For interactive remote execution, this is the definition that the incoming event must
satisfy before the action rule invokes the remote action.

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NOTE
Automatic remote execution requires a two-step validation. First, an event policy
automatically calls a specified action rule provided it satisfies the event criteria of the policy.
Second, the action rule, which you define in the Create Remote Actions dialog, invokes the
remote action provided it meets the event criteria that you have defined in the Add Event
Criteria dialog box.

Completing the fields in the Add Event Criteria dialog is self-explanatory. However,
you can refer to Table 45 on page 229 for general guidelines.
Table 45

Add Event Criteria descriptions

Field/Control button

Description

Description

optional. Free-form text field in which you can provide a


description of the event. The Description field can be used to
classify the selectors.

Event Class

drop-down list of event classes and subclasses, which you


can select in the Class Chooser dialog

Slot

drop-down list of available slots which you can specify

Operator

drop-down list of available operators that link the slots to the


value strings

Value

text field in which you specify a value for the slot

Insert

control button. Places the slot-operator-value string in the


display area, where you can review and edit. When placing
multiple slot-value combinations, the default connector is
AND. You can specify others from the drop-down list.

Edit

control button. Displays the selected slot-value combination


in the editable fields above the display area

Delete

control button. Removes the selected object from the display


area

Group

control button. Adds parentheses around the selected object


to indicate the order and the logic of the operation. You can
create nested objects using the Group button

Move

control button. Moves the placement of the selected object to


the left or right

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Specifying timeout intervals, login credentials, and


deployment options
1 Complete the remaining fields using the guidelines in Table 46 on page 230.
Table 46

Data fields (part 2): Create Remote Actions dialog

Field

Description

Time Out (Milliseconds)

interval in milliseconds before the action is canceled. The


action can be canceled if the Impact Administration Server
did not receive a response before the customized or default
timeout interval.

Use Stored Login Credentials Boolean indicator (True or False) that tells whether you
execute the action using either of the following:
s
s

the user credentials of the remote host system (the login


user and login password of the credential record) = True
public key authentication = False (default)

If you choose False (default), then your public key account on


the system should be sufficient to launch the action. The
routine does not search the credential_repository.xml file for
login credentials.
If you choose True, then the routine uses the remote systems
account information as defined in the
credential_repository.xml file (login_user and
login_password).
Reminder: For interactive remote execution, you do not need
to modify the default Encryption Value of 0 in the Admin
record of the mcell.dir file. For automatic remote execution,
you must specify an IAS user name and password in the
Admin record.
Deploy

Boolean indicator (True or False) that tells whether you are


going to deploy a script from the IAS system to the remote
system and then execute the script through a
RunRemoteTask command.
The default is False, indicating that no script is deployed.
You can only deploy a script when the selected Run Location
option is Remote. You cannot deploy a script on a remote
system when the Run Location option is Local (IAS System).

Script To Deploy (optional)


Script Path on Destination
Machine

230

name of script or .bat file


file path of the script on the system where it will be executed

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Defining the remote action rule and task

TIP
You cannot enter parameterized actions through the Create Remote Actions dialog.
(Parameterized actions refer to the values of the Args input parameter from the
admin_execute() primitive.) To enter values, such as true or all, for the Args parameter,
you must manually edit the basicsolution_actions.mrl file. You must then reference the Args
values (with variables such as $[2], $[3], and so forth) by manually editing the corresponding
action_name.xml file. Refer to the manual procedures under Defining the action rule for the
IAS or remote system on page 242 and Defining the action task for the IAS or remote
system on page 246 for more information.

2 Click Add Actions.


A dialog box opens informing you of the next steps. To enable the action rule,
recompile the cells KB and restart the cell. To enable the action task, reload the
XML action task files of the Impact Administration Server.
You can perform both actions in the Infrastructure Management tab of the
Administrator view.
Before you begin, open the Infrastructure Management model, and drill down to
the cell server instance and, if necessary, the IAS instance.

Recompiling the cells KB


1 Right-click on the cell server icon to open the pop-up menu, and choose Actions.
NOTE
The available actions may be slow to display. If they do not display at first, repeat the rightclick action.

2 Choose Recompile Knowledge Base.

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Defining the remote action rule and task

3 Click Recompile in the acknowledgment dialog.

4 In the User Credentials dialog, enter the user credentials for the local or remote
system, and click OK.
A logging window opens and the recompilation process starts. When it is
complete, scroll down to the end of the log to see if it is successful.

5 Optional. To view the action rule, open the


MCELL_HOME/etc/cellName/kb/bin/basicsolution_actions.mrl file in a text editor.

Scroll to the bottom of the file and you see the action rule that you have just
created, as in the following example:
action 'Example group'.'Example - ipconfig command on IAS':
{ [Full Access] }
:EVENT($EV) where [$EV.msg contains 'Example ipconfig command' ]
{
action_requestor($UID,$PWD);
admin_execute(ias_admin,$UID,$PWD,$EV,Example__ipconfig_command_on_IAS,["false", "Example__ipconfig_command_on_IAS"],YES);
}
END

6 To restart the cell server process, right-click the selected cell object to open the popup menu, and choose Actions=>Restart Cell Server Process.

Reloading the Impact Administration Server


1 Right-click on the IAS instance icon to open the pop-up menu, and choose Actions.
2 Choose Reload.
The Reload Actions dialog opens.

3 Click Reload Actions.


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4 In the User Credentials dialog, enter the user credentials for the local or remote
system, and click OK.
A logging window opens and the reloading process starts. When it is complete,
scroll down to the end of the log to see if it is successful. If it is successful, you
should see an exit code of 0.

5 To view the action task, go to the


IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/data/admin/actions directory. Locate the XML

file with the action name. In this example, it is


Example_ipconfig_command_on_IAS.xml. Open your XML file in a text editor, as
in the following example:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1" ?>
<!DOCTYPE root SYSTEM "DiagnosticUtil.dtd">
<root name="Example_-_ipconfig_command_on_IAS">
<phases>
<phase name="phase.PhaseImpl" >
<operations>
<operation name="operation.OperationImpl" >
<tasks>
<task name="task.RunTask" id="Example_-_
ipconfig_command_on_IAS" timeout="60000" deploy="false">
<input>
<param name="os">windows</param >
<param name="cmd"><![CDATA[cmd /C ipconfig]]></param>
</input>
</task>
</tasks>
</operation>
</operations>
</phase>
</phases>
<reporters>
<reporter name="report.CasTaskReporter"></reporter>
</reporters>
</root>

NOTE
Alternatively, to reload the BMC Impact Administration Server, you can open a command
prompt or terminal window, and enter the iadmin -reinit actions command. See also
Reinitializing the .xml files on page 249.

Adding credentials required to run the remote execution


Here you specify a credential record to run the remote execution. See Credential
record on page 215 and Working with credential records on page 220 for general
information on credential records.

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From the /bin subdirectory of your IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server directory,


execute the iadmin command using the -acr option, and follow the syntax in the
example.
iadmin -acr userorgroup=<user/group>:credentialId=<string>:
hostname_or_domain=<string>:applicationname=<string>:
applicationinstancename=<string>:login_user_domain=<string>:
loginuser=<string>:loginpassword=<string>:executeuser=<string>:
executepassword=<string>

See To add a credential record on page 221 for the procedure.

Viewing action results in the Action Results window


You can view the results of the execution attempts in the Action Results window.
After you have recompiled the cells KB, restarted the cell, and reloaded the Impact
Administration Server, the cell receives an event with the message Remote action
creation through GUI tool.

1 From the Events View, select an event, such as Remote Action Created through
GUI Tool, and right-click to open the pop-up menu.

2 Choose Actions=>Remote Action Results... .


The corresponding Remote Action Results window opens. It lists one event with a
results message similar to the following:
Your request for creating an action xml file
C:\PROGRA~1\BMCSOF~1\Impact\server\data\admin\actions\aaa.xml went
through successfully.

3 View the data in the Output, Errors, and Details tabs.


4 Optional. Export the Output, Error, or Detail data to a separate file by choosing
Export.

Sending and viewing a test event


You can use the mposter command to send a test event that determines whether the
actions are available.

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From the MCELL_HOME path, enter an mposter command syntax such as in the
following example:
mposter -n cellName -a EVENT -r MAJOR -m Example ipconfig command on IAS -b mc_host=IAS
host name

To view the test event


1 In the Events View, select the test event with the specified event message.
2 Right-click to open the pop-up menu, and choose Actions => Remote Actions.
You should see a folder with the specified Action Group name.

3 Choose the Action Group name folder, and select the command.
When you execute a remote action on an event, the event is updated with a greencolored remote action result icon, as shown in Figure 78:
Figure 78

Remote action result icon

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Automatic remote execution

Automatic remote execution


Automatic remote execution occurs without user intervention. When an event that
matches specified criteria is received, it triggers a specially defined policy that calls
the action rule which invokes the action task that runs on the remote system. Roles
are omitted when you implement automatic remote execution.
As a developer tasked with implementing automatic remote execution, you define a
remote execution policy that will be triggered by an event. You always define the
policy through the Remote Action Policy GUI. You must also define the MRL-based
action rule that the policy calls and the XML-based action task that the action rule
invokes.

Work flow
Figure 79 outlines the major steps in implementing automatic remote execution.
Figure 79

236

Automatic remote execution

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Authentication guidelines for automatic remote execution

Authentication guidelines for automatic remote execution


Specify an IAS user and password as the Encryption Key value in the Admin
record of the cells mcell.dir file, and restart the cell. (See To change the Admin
record on page 214.) The routine uses the specified IAS user and password to
authenticate the automatic execution.
Using the iadmin command, enter this specified IAS user as the ias_user userid
attribute value in the credential_repository.xml file. (See To add a credential
record on page 221.)

GUI walkthrough: automatic remote execution


In this procedure you are defining an action rule and concomitant task to be invoked
automatically by a remote execution policy.

1 From any view in the BMC IX Console, choose Tools => Create Remote Actions... .
The Create Remote Actions dialog box is displayed.

2 Following the guidelines described in Table 44 on page 226, Table 45 on page 229,
and Table 46 on page 230, complete the Create Remote Actions fields.

3 Recompile the cells KB and reload the configuration files under the Impact
Administration Server.
The remote action rule that you define is available to be invoked by the remote
execution policy, along with the default remote actions such as ping
mc_host_address, traceroute to mc_host_address, and others.

4 Optional. Send a test event that satisfies the selector criteria to ensure that the
associated action is available on the dynamic menu.

Defining the remote execution policy


NOTE
Refer to Chapter 10, Event management policies,for descriptions and procedures related to
the event management policy mechanism.

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237

Defining the remote execution policy

In this procedure you are defining a policy that will automatically call a specified
action rule provided the incoming event satisfies the remote execution policys event
criteria. The associated action rule, in turn, invokes the remote action provided the
same event satisfies its event criteria.

TIP
The event criteria that you define for the remote execution policy and the event criteria
defined for the action rule in the Create Remote Actions dialog must be highly correlated.
Otherwise the action rule is not invoked.

Before you begin


If an appropriate selector definition does not already exist, use the Edit => Selectors
=> New Selector... menu option to define the event criteria for the incoming event. Be
sure that the selectors event criteria correlate with the event criteria of the selector
you defined for the action rule in the Create Remote Actions dialog.
Follow these steps to define a policy:

1 In the BMC IX Console, go to the Administration tab, and select the Event
Management Policies view.

2 Choose the Remote Action Policy type under the By Policy Type folder.
The Remote Action Policy definition window is opened, as shown in Figure 80 on
page 239:

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Figure 80

Remote Action Policy definition window

3 Choose Edit => New Policy, and choose an event selector for the new policy in the
Selector Chooser dialog window.
You can use a default or a custom selector.

4 Enter the policy details in the Remote Policy Details subtab:


A Enter a short name for the policy
B Enter a meaningful string description.
C Ensure that the Enabled check box is selected.
D Specify the Activation schedule.
E Select a defined action rule from the Action Name drop-down list. The rule that
you select should have event criteria that correlate with the event criteria of the
policy.

5 Click OK.

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239

Supplemental manual procedures

Supplemental manual procedures


These procedures tell you how to manually define and configure remote execution
action rules and action tasks.

Manual configuration of interactive remote execution


The manual configuration process requires that you edit the action rules and action
tasks in their respective files.

Action rules and action tasks


You write the action rule in the
MCELL_HOME/etc/cellName/kb/bin/basicsolution_actions.mrl file, and you define the

corresponding action task on the IAS in the


IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/data/admin/actions/UserDefinedActions.xml file.

The action task file is created under the action name at


IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/data/admin/actions/.

The action rule and the action task are cross-referenced. The admin_execute primitive
of the action rule includes in its arguments the task Id value of the action task. The
task Id value links the action rule on the cell with the action task on IAS.
The action rule defines the roles, the action, and the target of the action task.
When defining interactive action rules, you can specify whether they call tasks that
are run on the system where IAS resides or a remote system(s). The action task called
RunTask is executed on the IAS system. The action task called RunRemoteTask is
executed on the remote system(s). Table 47 shows the correspondence between the
target system of the rule and the task name.
Table 47

Rule and task correspondence

Rule for ...

Task name

IAS system

RunTask (local)

remote system

RunRemoteTask (remote)

Work flow: manually configuring interactive remote


execution
Figure 81 on page 241 outlines the major steps in implementing interactive remote
execution.
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Figure 81

Interactive remote execution

Specifying the IAS user account and group


NOTE
You can use the default BMC IX login account of user/user provided the rule that you define
is associated with the Full Access group and the ias_user userid attribute in the credential

record is set equal to user.


In interactive remote execution, the IAS user who is logged into the session can
execute the remote action provided the user belongs to the group specified in the
action rule. Therefore, when setting up your IAS user for interactive remote execute,
ensure that the group ID in the user definition corresponds to the group definition in
the action rule.
When adding a user entry, enter a plain-text password with the <password
encrypted> element set equal to false. When the file is initialized, the password
becomes encrypted and the <password encrypted> element is changed to true.
From the /bin subdirectory of your IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server directory,
execute the iadmin command using the -aru option, as in the following example:
iadmin -aru loginId=IAS_user:password=IAS_user:usergroups=Full
Access:description:Full Access User Group

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This user account should be the one to log into the BMC IX session to launch the
actions. In this example, the ias_user userid attribute in the credential record should
be set equal to user.

Defining the action rule for the IAS or remote system


You can define action rules that launch actions on the system where IAS resides or on
remote systems.
To write the action rule, you open the
MCELL_HOME/etc/cellName/kb/bin/basicsolution_actions.mrl file in a text editor.

NOTE
Refer to the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide for information
on rule language. See especially Appendix B, Master Rule Language (MRL) Reference, for
more information about the admin_execute command.

Example: action rule for IAS


In the following example, the action rule defines a lookup command on the IAS
system.
action 'Sample - ipconfig command on IAS':
{
['Service Administrators','Full Access']
}
:EVENT($EV) where [$EV.msg contains 'sample ipconfig command']
{
action_requestor($UID,$PWD);
#First argument to determine if to be searched in Credential
Repository. Valid values are true/false
admin_execute(ias_Admin,$UID,$PWD,$EV,sample_runtask_task,["true"],
YES);
}
END

The action description Sample - ipconfig command on IAS is the text of the menu
option that displays on the dynamic menu in the BMC IX Console.
The name of the action task, sample_runtask_task, is contained in the list of
arguments of admin_execute (). This action rule calls a corresponding RunTask
definition. See Example: RunTask action for IAS system on page 246.

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Example: action rule for remote system


The next example shows the same action rule, but it is to be executed on a remote
system, not on the IAS system.
action 'Sample - ipconfig command on remote host':
{
['Service Administrators','Full Access']
}
:EVENT($EV) where [$EV.msg contains 'sample remote ipconfig command']
{
action_requestor($UID,$PWD);
admin_execute(ias_Admin,$UID,$PWD,$EV,sample_runremotetask_task,
["true","all"],YES);
}
END

The action description Sample - ipconfig command on remote host is the text of the
menu option that displays on the dynamic menu in the BMC IX Console. The name of
the action task, sample_runremotetask_task, is contained in the list of arguments of
admin_execute (). This action rule calls a corresponding RunRemoteTask definition.
See Example: RunRemoteTask action for remote system on page 248.

Associating actions with groups


When defining the action rule, you have the option of associating the action names
with a specified group name. Both the group name and the associated action names
will display on the dynamic menu.
To define a group and associate it with an action, simply define the group name
before the action description as in the following example:
action Sample.Sample - ipconfig command on remote host:

In the dynamic menu, you would choose the group (Sample) and then select the
corresponding action (Sample ipconfig command on remote host).

Differences in rules between IAS system and remote system execution


The chief differences between the rules for running the action on the IAS system and
on a remote system are
s
s
s

the names of the menu options and the action tasks


the associated event messages
the additional argument for the underlying ipconfig command (all) of the
sample_runremotetask_task action

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Similarities in rules for IAS system and remote system execution


Both action rule examples specify the groups Full Access and Service Administrator,
indicating that only users assigned to these specified groups can execute this action. If
you do not specify a group, then members of any group can perform the action. Your
IAS user account should be assigned to the groups specified in the action rule.
In both action rule examples, the admin_execute primitive is calling the default
Admin record in the mcell.dir file:
<Type>
admin

<Name>
ias_Admin

<EncryptionKey>
0

IpAddress:Port>
localhost.domain:3084

In its input arguments, the admin_execute primitive is calling the Name argument
ias_Admin to link the record with the rule. Because this is an interactive execution, it
ignores the Encryption Key value. Instead, the action rule uses the action_requestor
primitive to retrieve the login credentials of the user account for the BMC IX session:
action_requestor($UID,$PWD);

In interactive execution, any IAS user account that is logged into the BMC IX session
and that belongs to the designated group and role can exercise the action.
The admin_execute command for the interactive action contains seven input
arguments that tell IAS how to process the action. The arguments are listed below in
Table 48 on page 244:
Table 48

Input arguments: admin_execute (part 1 of 2)

Argument

Description

Name

the name of the IAS instance as specified in the Admin record


of the cells mcell.dir
Example: ias_Admin

User

IAS user account


Example: $UID (a pointer to the user ID)

Passwd

IAS user account password


Example: $PWD (a pointer to the password)

Object

object handle of the target event or data object


Example: $EV

Action

name of the action task


Example: sample_runtask_task

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Table 48

Input arguments: admin_execute (part 2 of 2)

Argument

Description

Args

optional. list of arguments that accompany the action


Example: [true, all]
In this example, the first argument value true indicates that
IAS should search the credential repository for a matching
record. The value all indicates that the underlying ipconfig
command shows all detailed information.
Note: You can only enter arguments by manually editing the
basicsolution_actions.mrl file. You cannot update the Args
input field through the GUI.

ActEvent

Boolean YES/NO indicator that tells whether an


MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT event is generated as a result
of the action. If ActEvent is set equal to YES, then when the
action ends, the output is saved to the action result event.
Example: YES
The MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT event consists of the
return code and the standard output and error streams
produced by the external program. The literal streams are
included in the action result event if they are not too large.
Otherwise, they are stored in a file. Its reference name is
stored in the action result. The size limit is set with the
configuration parameter ActionResultInlineLimit, which has
default value of 4KB. For information about this parameter,
see BMC Impact Solutions Infrastructure Administration Guide.

After you write the action in the basicsolution_actions.mrl file, save the file and
compile the KB using the mccomp command. Restart the cell.

For advanced users


You have the option of creating customized .mrl files with action rule definitions. You
do not have continually add action rules to the basicsolution_actions.mrl file.
You can
1. create a new custom_name.mrl file
2. define the MRL-based action rules in the file
3. add the custom_name.mrl file to the .load file of the ..kb/bin directory
4. compile the KB

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5. restart the cell

TIP
Keep in mind that there are different variants of the admin_execute command. They are
distinguished by the number of input arguments they take.
For interactive remote execution, we use a version of admin_execute that holds seven input
arguments.
For automatic remote execution, we use a version admin_execute that holds five input
arguments, omitting the IAS user account and password, because it retrieves it from the
Admin record, not the login session.

Defining the action task for the IAS or remote system


Similar to writing action rules, you can define action tasks that launch actions on the
system where IAS resides or on remote systems.

WARNING
The Impact Administration Server reads all the XML files from the
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/data/admin/actions directory. To prevent data
conflicts, do not keep a backup action task XML file or any unwanted XML file in this
directory.
To write the corresponding action task, open the
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/data/admin/actions/UserDefinedActions.xml file in

a text editor.
Example: RunTask action for IAS system
A sample RunTask action for the action rule sample_runtask_task to be executed
on the IAS system is shown below:
<!--RunTask sample-->
<task name="task.RunTask" id="sample_runtask_task">
<input>
<param name="os">windows</param>
<param name="cmd"><![CDATA[cmd /C ipconfig]]></param>
</input>
</task>

The task id sample_runtask_task is the same value that the corresponding action
rules admin_execute primitive calls in its Action parameter:
admin_execute(ias_Admin,$UID,$PWD,$EV,sample_runtask_task,["true"],
YES);

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Refer back to Example: action rule for IAS on page 242 for the action rule definition
that is linked to this action task.
The RunTask uses the following command string to execute the action on the IAS
system:
<param name="cmd"><![CDATA[cmd /C ipconfig]]></param>

The parameters describing the action task are listed below in Table 49:
Table 49

Parameters: action task

Parameter

Description

name

required. Identifies the type of task. Valid values are


RunRemoteTask and RunTask.
A RunRemoteTask is executed on a remote system, not the
IAS system. For example, the tasks defined in the
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/data/admin/actions/I
mpactManager.xml file are the default RunRemoteTasks.
A RunTask is executed on the IAS system.
The authentication protocols of each task type may be
different.

id

required. The name of the task as defined in the


admin_execute action rule. The id value links the task with
the rule.

os

required. Specifies the operating system of the remote host


where the designated action task (the id value) is to be
executed. Valid values are windows, SOLARIS, LINUX, AIX,
HPUX, and all.
If you specify all, you indicate that the same action is to be
executed on different operating systems. The all selection
uses the SSH protocol by default.
To change communication protocol, edit the
all.execute.command parameter of the
../conf/resources/centraladmin-strings.properties file.

cmd

specifies the command that executes the action. You can


include parameters within curly brace { } delimiters.
Note: You can only add references to arguments (entries in
the Args input field of the corresponding
basicsolution_actions.mrl file) by manually editing the
UserDefinedActions.xml file. You cannot add variables such
as $[2], $[3], and so forth through the GUI.

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Before launching the command on the IAS system, the server searches for matching
credentials in a credential record similar to the following example:
<ias_user userid="user">
<application>*</application>
<applicationinstance>*</applicationinstance>
<!-- IAS host name -->
<hostname_or_domain>abc-mno-win03</hostname_or_domain>
<login_user>gnagarka</login_user>
<login_password encrypted="true">Wn1zFHPbbQ==</login_password>
<!-- Windows machine so we do not need the execute_user but do
require the login_user_domain
<execute_user/>
<execute_password encrypted="false"/>
<login_user_domain>PDAROD</login_user_domain>
</ias_user>

Example: RunRemoteTask action for remote system


The next example is a RunRemoteTask action that corresponds to the action rule
'Sample - ipconfig command on remote host' to be executed on the remote
system:
<!--RunRemoteTask with dir command sample-->
<task name="task.RunRemoteTask" id="sample_runremotetask_task">
<input>
<!-- Remote machine OS is windows-->
<param name="os">windows</param>
<!-- Second argument in the admin_execute() is c:\ so the command
below will list that dir -->
<param name="cmd"><![CDATA[[cmd /C ipconfig /${2}]]></param>
</input>
</task>

The task id sample_runremotetask_task is the same value that the corresponding


action rules admin_execute primitive calls in its Action parameter:
admin_execute(ias_Admin,$UID,$PWD,$EV,sample_runremotetask_task,
["true","all"],YES);

Refer to Example: action rule for remote system on page 243 for the action rule
definition that is linked to this action task.
The RunRemoteTask uses the following command string to execute the action on the
remote system:
<param name="cmd"><![CDATA[[cmd /C ipconfig /${2}]]></param>

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In this example, the RunRemoteTask uses the variable ${2} to reference the second
argument (all) that the admin_execute primitive passes in its Argument parameter.
Before executing the command on the remote system, the server searches for
matching credentials in a credential record similar to the following example:
<ias_user userid="user">
<application>*</application>
<applicationinstance>*</applicationinstance>
<!-- remote unix host name -->
<hostname_or_domain>abc-mno-sun02</hostname_or_domain>
<login_user>joeuser</login_user>
<login_password encrypted="true">Wn1zFHPbbQ==</login_password>
<!Because the login user joeuser has access to execute the command,
we dont need execute credentials
<execute_user/>
<execute_password encrypted="false"/>
<!-- Not required in case of UNIX machine -->
<login_user_domain/>
</ias_user>

Reinitializing the .xml files


After updating the UserDefinedActions.xml file, run the iadmin -reinit actions
command from the /bin subdirectory of your IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server
directory to reinitialize the .xml files in the ../actions subdirectory.
iadmin -reinit actions

Testing the RunTask action


To test this action task and its corresponding action rule, you can send an event using
the mposter command as in the following example:
mposter -n cellName -a EVENT -r MAJOR -m sample ipconfig command -b
mc_host=IAS host name

Testing the RunRemoteTask action


To test this action task and its corresponding action rule, you can send an event using
the mposter command as in the following example:
mposter -n cellName -a EVENT -r MAJOR -m sample remote ipconfig command -b
mc_host=remote host name

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For advanced users


You can create a unique XML file to define your action tasks. You do not have to
continually add action tasks to the UserDefinedActions.xml. In the
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/data/admin/actions subdirectory, create an XML
file with a unique node (root element).
Each unique XML file must have its unique value for the root name attribute. For
example, the UserDefinedActions.xml file contains this root name definition:
<root name="UserDefinedActions">

When you create a unique XML file for your action tasks, specify a unique value for
its root name:
<root name="myCustomDefinedActions">

After you define the root name value and add the action tasks, run the iadmin -reinit
actions command to load the custom file to IAS.

Launching the action


1 In the BMC IX Console Events View, select an event in the event list, right-click to
open the pop-up menu, and choose Actions=>Remote Actions to display a list of
available actions.
If the users role corresponds to the role assigned to the action rule, then the remote
action item should be displayed.

2 Click the remote action item in the menu.


Result
The action rule, using the action_requestor primitive, obtains the credentials of the
logged-in IAS user. The action rule triggers the action task, which causes the IAS
server to search the credential record for a match with the login information to
connect to the remote host. The action task initiates the command on the remote
system.
You can choose Actions => Get Remote Results to view results and logging
information. If successful, the MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT event contains an Exit code of
0 and the command output in its output_val slot. If unsuccessful, the
MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT event contains a specific Exit code and error output in the
error_val slot.

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Manual configuration of automatic remote execution


When you manually configure automatic remote execution, you edit the action rule
and action task in the respective files. You define the remote execution policy through
the Remote Action Policy definition window (see Remote execution policy on
page 214).

Defining the action rule (manual)


In automatic remote execution, the action on the event is performed upon receipt of
the event without user intervention. To enable automatic execution, the action rule
must supply a standard set of IAS user name and password credentials. The action
rule gathers the IAS user name and password from the Encryption Key value of the
Admin record:
<Type>

<Name>

<EncryptionKey>

IpAddress:Port>

admin

ias_Admin

ixs_internal_admin/IAS$Admin$

localhost.domain:3084

For an automatic remote execution, the action rules admin_execute primitive calls
the IAS user name and password through its Name argument, which specifies the
IAS instance name of the Admin recordias_Admin in this example:
admin_execute(Admin,$EV,Task_stopWinCell,[$E.mc_origin_key],YES)

For automatic remote execution, the admin_execute has only five input arguments. It
does not call the user name and password arguments because it uses the credentials
supplied by the Admin record. Also, the action rule does not need to call IX login
credentials, so the action_requestor primitive is omitted:
action 'stop_cell_on_windows' : EVENT($E)
{
admin_execute(Admin,$EV,Task_stopWinCell,[$E.mc_origin_key],YES);
}
END

In this example, the event slot $E.mc_origin_key holds the name of the MS Windows
cell to be terminated.

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Properties files

Defining the action task (manual)


The action task is defined the same for both interactive and automatic execution:
<task name="task.RunRemoteTask" id="Task_stopWinCell" >
<input>
<param name="os">windows</param>
<param name="cmd"><![CDATA["D:\Progra~1\BMCSOF~1\Impact\server\
bin\mkill" -v -n ${1}]]></param>
</input>
</task>

The action task uses the variable ${1} to reference the first argument that the
admin_execute primitive passes in its Argument parameter. In this example, the
admin_execute primitive passes the value of the $E.mc_origin_key slot. This value is
the target cell for the mkill command to stop in the command string of the action task.

Properties files
When defining remote execution tasks, you may need to configure values in the
following properties files that reside on IAS:
s
s
s

..\conf\ias.properties
..\conf\resources\centraladmin-strings.properties
..\conf\resources\remoteexecution.properties

After editing any of the .properties file, restart the IAS.

ias.properties
The ias.properties file specifies the event slot names, key name values, and other
configuration items of remote execution under the stanza Properties for remote
execution.
Table 50

Remote execution properties in ias.properties (part 1 of 2)

Property name

Description

com.bmc.sms.ixs.remoteexecution.
hostname_slot

specifies the event slot name that contains the host name value.
The default is mc_host.

com.bmc.sms.ixs.remoteexecution.
instance_slot

specifies the event slot name that contains the instance. The
default is mc_object.

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centraladmin-strings.properties

Table 50

Remote execution properties in ias.properties (part 2 of 2)

Property name

Description

com.bmc.sms.ixs.remoteexecution.
application_slot

specifies the event slot name that contains the application. The
default is mc_object_class.

com.bmc.sms.ixs.remoteexecution.
domain_slot

specifies the event slot name that contains the domain value.
The default value is mc_location.

com.bmc.sms.ixs.remoteexecution.ias_
user_key

specifies the key name that contains the name of the user. The
default value is ias_user. Not yet implemented

com.bmc.sms.ixs.remoteexecution.ias_
user_password_key

specifies the key name that contains the password. The default
value is ias_user_password. Not yet implemented

com.bmc.sms.ixs.remoteexecution.action_
context_key

specifies the root element in the action.xml file. You enter the
root element in the Action Name field of the Create Remote
Actions dialog box. The default value is 2.

com.bmc.sms.ixs.remoteexecution.search_
credential_repository_key

indicates the argument number (1, 2, 3, and so forth) or slot


name

com.bmc.sms.ixs.remoteexecution.search_
in_credentialrepository

If the client does not send the key, then this parameter
determines whether to search in the credential repository. Valid
values are true and false.

com.bmc.sms.ixs.dataparser.
allowHostVerification

Boolean true/false indicator that tells whether host verification


is done when you add a record to the credential_repository.xml
file. The default value is set equal to true, meaning that host
verification is required.

centraladmin-strings.properties
The centraladmin-strings.properties file defines the default communication protocols
for the different operating systems. Use caution when editing this file to change the
default protocols. Refer to the file comments for editing guidelines.

remoteexecution.properties
The remoteexecution.properties file defines the timeout values and default ports for the
SSH, FTP, SCP, and Telnet protocols. Refer to Table 51 on page 253.
Table 51

Remote execution port and timeout properties (part 1 of 2)

Parameter

Description

ssh_port

port number for SSH network protocol. The default port


number is 22.

telnet_port

port number for Telnet network protocol. The default port


number is 23.

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Table 51

Remote execution port and timeout properties (part 2 of 2)

Parameter

Description

ftp_port

port number for File Transfer Protocol (FTP) network


protocol. The default port number is 21.

scp_port

port number for the Secure Copy (SCP) network protocol.


The default port number is 22.

authenticationtimeout

authentication timeout interval in milliseconds. The default


value 0 indicates that the parameter uses the default timeout
interval of the specified network protocol.

connectiontimeout

connection timeout interval in milliseconds. The default


value 0 indicates that the parameter uses the default timeout
interval of the specified network protocol.

Troubleshooting tips
Executing reboot command via remote action results in
timeout messages
When you execute the reboot command on a remote system, you may receive a
timeout message on an action result event even though the remote system was
rebooted successfully.
For example, if you execute a reboot action without specifying the execute_user
parameter in the credential_repository.xml, the remote system is rebooted, but the
Impact Administration Server does not receive a response from the remote system.
Because it does not receive any response, it displays a timeout message, such as exit
code 111: Timeout occurred while reading commands output.
If you execute a reboot action by specifying the execute_user parameter in the
credential_repository.xml, the remote system is rebooted, but the Impact
Administration Server also does not receive a response from the remote system. The
server cannot determine whether the lack of a response is due to a timeout or some
other failure such as loss of a network connection. In this context, it displays a
message, such as exit code 1007: Encountered error while waiting for
system response. May be timed out.

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A script is deployed on a remote UNIX system but does not execute

A script is deployed on a remote UNIX system but does not


execute
When the BMC Impact Administration Server resides on a Windows system and you
want to deploy and execute a script on a remote UNIX system, you will encounter
permission problems.
After you select one of the UNIX scripts from
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/data/admin/scripts directory, you can deploy
it on the specified remote UNIX system. However, the RunRemoteTask action fails
when it tries to execute the script if the script does not have the execute permission.
To successfully execute the script, you must add the execute permissions to the
command string using the chmod command.
The resultant XML action file under
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME/server/data/admin/actions would have a command string

similar to the following example:


<param name="cmd"><![CDATA["chmod 755 /opt/unix.sh;
/opt/unix.sh"]]></param>

PsExec is not supported on 64-bit Windows 2008 Server


systems
To implement remote execution on 64-bit Windows 2008 Server systems, use the
Open SSH protocol.

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Issues in high availability environments

Issues in high availability environments


When remote execution is implemented in high availability environments where
there are primary and secondary cell servers, you can encounter issues under these
two scenarios:
1. A remote action is defined and executed on the target cell server during a failover
from one cell server to another when the switch from one server to the other occurs
before the BMC Impact Administration Server completely executes the action. In
this case, the result of the remote action execution is not available on the
corresponding primary or secondary server to which the switch is made.
2. The action that you define in the Create Remote Actions dialog applies only to the
cell server specified in the dialog. The action definition is not automatically
duplicated on the corresponding primary or secondary server of the high
availability pair. You must manually add the action definition parameters to the kb
of the other cell server.

To duplicate the action definition in a high availability environment


1 In a text editor, open the
MCELL_HOME/etc/cellName/kb/bin/basicsolution_actions.mrl file of the cell server

specified in the Create Remote Actions dialog.

2 Copy the action definition parameters that you created through the Create Remote
Actions from the basicsolution_actions.mrl file.

3 Open the MCELL_HOME/etc/cellName/kb/bin/basicsolution_actions.mrl file of the


other cell server in the high availability pair, and paste the action definition at the
bottom of the file.

4 Close and save the file.


5 Recompile the cells KB using the mccomp -n cellName command.
6 Restart the cell.

Excluded character in action group name


When creating an action group name (refer to Associating actions with groups on
page 243 or Table 43 on page 226), do not use the dot (.) character as part of the name.
The reason why is that the dot (.) character acts as the separator between the group
name and the action name.

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Chapter

10

10

Event management policies


This chapter describes the components of event management policies and explains
how to implement them. It contains the following topics:
Event management policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Out-of-the-box event management policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
How event management policies work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Event management policy workflow overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Event selectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
Event selector groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
Event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Timeframes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
Evaluation order of event policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
External enrichment data sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
How dynamic data enrichment event management policies work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
How to create a new local timeframe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
How to add a notification service (notification policies only). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment
source file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
Creating new standard event management policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Creating a new standard blackout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
Creating a new component based enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
Creating a new closure policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
Creating a new correlation policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
Creating a new enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
Creating a new escalation policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
Creating a new notification policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
Creating a new propagation policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
Creating a new recurrence policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Creating a new remote action policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
Creating a new suppression policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
Creating a new threshold policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
Creating a new timeout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Enabling and disabling out-of-the-box standard event management policies . . . . . 322
Creating a new dynamic data enrichment event management policy. . . . . . . . . . . . 324
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Event management policy types

Enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event management policies . . . 334


Enabling a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
Enabling a dynamic data enrichment location policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
Enabling a dynamic data enrichment service contact policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation policy . . . . 346
Importing dynamic data enrichment source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Verifying that the policy is running. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Editing event selection criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Deleting an event selector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Trouble-shooting event management policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Problem: The policy is not running . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Problem: The notification policy is configured to generate a notification email,
but no email is being sent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
Problem: I receive an invalid data error when running a dynamic data
enrichment policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
Problem: I receive an error message when running a dynamic data enrichment
blackout policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
Problem: I have several thousand data records displayed in the Dynamic Data
Editor tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Trouble-shooting tools for dynamic data enrichment policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355

Event management policy types


Event management policy types provide a base policy definition that allows you to
quickly create certain types of policies. Policy types allow you to quickly set up
routine event management processes.
Table 52 on page 258 describes the standard event management policy types.
Table 52

Standard event management policy types (part 1 of 2)

Policy name

Definition

Blackout

specifies which events the receiving cell should classify as


unimportant and process no further but log for reporting purposes
A blackout event management policy might specify that the cell
ignore events generated from a successful logon to an internal
system.

Closure

closes a specified event in response to receipt of a separate event

Component Based
Enrichment

enriches the definition of an event associated with a component by


assigning selected component slot definitions to the event slots

Correlation

relates one or more cause events to an effect event, and can close the
effect event
The cell maintains the association between these cause-and-effect
events.

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Table 52

Standard event management policy types (part 2 of 2)

Policy name

Definition

Enrichment

adds values for specific event slots if those slots are empty as received
from the event source
An enrichment event management policy can also reformat slots or
normalize slot values.

Escalation

raises or lowers the priority level of an event after a specified period


of time
A specified number of event recurrences can also trigger escalation of
an event. For example, if the abnormally high temperature of a
storage device goes unchecked for 10 minutes or if a cell receives
more than five high-temperature warning events in 25 minutes, an
escalation event management policy might increase the priority level
of the event to critical.

Notification

sends a request to an external service to notify a user or group of


users of the event
A notification event management policy might notify a system
administrator by means of a pager about the imminent unavailability
of mission-critical piece of storage hardware.

Propagation

forwards events to other cells or to integrations to other products

Recurrence

combines duplicate events into one event that maintains a counter of


the number of duplicates

Remote action

automatically calls a specified action rule provided the


incoming event satisfies the remote execution policys event
criteria
See also Chapter 9, Remote execution, for more information.

Suppression

specifies which events that the receiving cell should delete


Unlike a blackout event management policy, the suppression event
management policy maintains no record of the deleted event.

Threshold

specifies a minimum number of duplicate events that must occur


within a specific period of time before the cell accepts the event
For events allowed to pass through to the cell, the event severity can
be escalated or de-escalated a relative number of levels or set to a
specific level. If the event occurrence rate falls below a specified level,
the cell can take action against the event, such as changing the event
to closed or acknowledged status.

Timeout

changes an event status to closed after a specified period of time


elapses

It is also possible to define custom policy types that allow you to do specialized event
processing not supported by the out-of-the-box policy types.

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Out-of-the-box event management policies

For more information about creating user-defined policy types, see Chapter 12,
User-defined policies.

Out-of-the-box event management policies


Several event management policies are included with the product that enable you to
interactively set up routine event processing quickly. Standard event management
policies that are provided out-of-the-box include:
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

PATROL_Portal_Closure
Apache_Login_Failed_Repeats
Blackout_Suppression
Adapter_Start_Stop_Closure
Client_Stop_Closes_Start
Sample_Component_Based_Enrichment_Policy
Sample_Intelligent_Incident_Service_Policy
Event_Reporting_Propagation
Event_Propagation_To_Remedy_Help_Desk

Dynamic data enrichment policies that are provided out-of-the-box include:


s
s
s
s

Location_Enrichment
Service_Contact_Enrichment
PATROL_Message_Translation
Dynamic_Blackout

To use these out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies, you must enable the
policy, import useful data into the sample .csv files and then import the data into the
cell using the policy mechanism. For instructions on creating dynamic data
enrichment policies, see Creating a new dynamic data enrichment event
management policy on page 324.
Table 53 lists the out-of-the-box policies and indicates whether or not each out-of-thebox policy is enabled by default.
Table 53

Out-of-the-box policies (part 1 of 2)

Policy type

Policy name

Description

Enabled?

Closure

PATROL_Portal_Closure

closes previous Portal events for the


same managed object

Yes

Adapter_Start_Stop_Closure

closes previous events for the same


adapter instance

Yes

Client_Stop_Closes_Start

Client Stop events close Client Start


events and then close themselves

Yes

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Out-of-the-box event management policies

Table 53

Out-of-the-box policies (part 2 of 2)

Policy type

Policy name

Description

Component Based
Enrichment

Sample_Component_Based_
Enrichment_Policy

enriches events by filling selected event No


slots with the slot values of the
component type

Dynamic Blackout

Dynamic_Blackout

suppresses events that meet a specified No


criteria during a specified time period

Dynamic Enrichment Location_Enrichment


Service_Contact_Enrichment

Enabled?

appends the location of a server to an


event

No

appends contact information for a


server administrator to an event. For
example, contact information may
include the name of the administrator
for that server and his or her telephone
number.

No

No
PATROL_Message_Translation replaces the text of existing PATROL
event messages with messages that can
be more easily understood by operators
in your enterprise.
Intelligent Incident
Service

Sample_Intelligent_Incident_
Service_Policy

sample policy for creating Intelligent


Incidents for Remedy Helpdesk

No

Propagation

Event_Propagation_To_Remedy propagates events to Remedy Helpdesk No


_Help_Desk

Recurrence

Apache_Login_Failed_Repeats

handles repeating Apache Login Failed No


events

Patrol_Portal_DeDup_Policy

handles repeating Portal events for the


same managed object

Yes

Suppression

Blackout_Suppression

suppresses Blackout events

No

Timeout

PATROL_Portal_Timeout

times out OK Portal events

Yes

For instructions on using these out-of-the-box policies, see Creating new standard
event management policies on page 282 and Creating a new dynamic data
enrichment event management policy on page 324.

NOTE
The BMC Impact Integration for PATROL product can detect duplicate events and can
correlate events that come from the same origin. The rules for detecting duplicated events are
located in the MCELL_HOME/server/etc/cellName/kb/rules/bii4p.mrl file. See the
patrol_duplicates and the correlate alarm_and_ra definitions. You can use the
new patrol_duplicates rule to delete duplicate events and the correlate alarm_and_ra rule to
close a current event after a subsequent event arrives from the same origin.
BMC Impact Integration for PATROL does not provide a policy for these events.

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How event management policies work

How event management policies work


All event management policies must include the following components:
s
s
s
s

event selector
process(es)
timeframe(s)
evaluation order

Each event management policy defines selection criteria that is applied to incoming
events to determine which events are processed. A timeframe determines when the
policy is active or inactive. The evaluation order determines which policies are
implemented first if there is a conflict.
In addition to these components, dynamic data enrichment policies also require a
dynamic data enrichment source file, for more information on how dynamic data
enrichment policies interact with dynamic data enrichment source files, see How
dynamic data enrichment event management policies work on page 267.

Event management policy workflow overview


Figure 82 illustrates the workflow for creating and implementing an event
management policy.
Figure 82

Event management policy definition workflow

Repeat this operation each time the enrichment file has changed to ensure the latest contents are available to
the cell.

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Event selectors

Event selectors
An event selector is the component of an event management policy that selects one or
more events to which an event management policy applies. Rather than specifying a
particular event to process, as a rule does, a selector specifies a list of event selection
criteria (also called an Event Condition Formula (ECF)). When an incoming event
meets any of the specified event selection criteria, the cell applies the associated event
management policy to the event. See Event selection criteria on page 264 for more
information.
Table 54 lists the out-of-the-box event selectors.
Table 54

Out-of-the-box event selectors

Event selector
Group
Event selector

Events selected

Default

Adapter_Start_Stop

Adapter starting and stopping events

Default

Apache_Login_Failed

Apache web server login failed events

Default

Client Stop

client stop events

Default

PATROL_Portal_OK_Events OK severity events coming from PATROL


Portal

Default

PATROL_Portal_Events

events coming from PATROL Portal

None

All_Events

all events

None

Blackout_Events

all blacked-out events

None

PATROL_Events

events coming from PATROL agents

You can create custom event selectors. For information about creating event selectors,
see How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria on page 278.

NOTE
The maximum number of selectors that can display in the BMC IX Administrator view is 2500.
The BMC IX Administrator view will display 1024 selectors if you set the query_size
parameter in the IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\server\conf\ix.properties file to less than
100 (< 100) or greater than 2500 (> 2500).

Event selector groups


An event selector group, created when an event selector is defined, allows you to
organize event selectors. For example, you could create event selector groups that
classify event selectors by the severity of events. You could create one event selector
group for major severity events and one for minor severity events.

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Event selection criteria

Event selector groups appear as folders in the By Selector subtree in the Event
Management Policies navigation pane. The names of event selectors which belong to a
group are displayed as group.event_selector_name in the selectors lists in the list pane
and in the By Event Class subtree. The name also is displayed in a separate field in the
Selector Details tab.
Figure 83 shows an event selector group called Default that has the Adapter Start Stop
event selector highlighted. Notice that details about the highlighted event selector
appear in the Selector list in the right pane of the Administration View.
Figure 83

Event selector group name

event selector group name

Event selectors do not have to belong to a group. Event selectors that do not belong to
a group are displayed directly under the By Selector subtree.

Event selection criteria


Event selection criteria tells a cell to which incoming events to apply the associated
event policies. By using selection criteria to choose events rather than creating a single
event management policy for each event type, event selection criteria perform the
event management policy equivalent of dynamic data for rules. One event
management policy using event selection criteria that spans a range of event types
can be easier to maintain than a separate rule for each of many event types.
The BMC Impact Explorer interface allows you to interactively create syntactically
accurate event selection criteria expressions without the need for specific syntax
knowledge because the editor verifies that the expression has the correct syntax.
For more information see, How to create an event selector and specify event
selection criteria on page 278.

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Timeframes

Timeframes
Timeframes allow you to specify when the event management policy is active. For
example, during scheduled database maintenance periods, you might want to
activate an event suppression policy for maintenance-related events to reduce
unnecessary event accumulation.
For events to be impacted by a timeframe setting, the timeframe must be active for the
entire time that is specified in the policy.

EXAMPLE
An escalation policy is defined to escalate an event to priority level 1 (escalated one level) after
10 minutes. Events are generated. No event will be escalated for at least 10 minutes. Five
minutes after the policy is enabled, the policy is disabled. Even though the policy was active at
the beginning of the 10 minute period, no event is impacted by the policy because it is not
active at the end of the 10 minutes.
An escalation policy is defined to escalate an event priority after 30 minutes with an active
timeframe from 4:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. At 4:45 P.M. Events are generated. The active time
period expires at 5:00 P.M. Events generated at 4:45 P.M. are not impacted by the policy
because the timeframe is not active at 5:15 P.M.

Table 55 describes the types of timeframes you can use in an event management
policy.
Table 55

Timeframe types and descriptions

Type
local timeframe

Icon

Description
Local timeframes are used for event policies only. They are
maintained in the cell and are only visible to a single cell.
You create local timeframes from the Administration View of the
BMC Impact Explorer, as described in How to create a new local
timeframe on page 270.

global timeframe

Global timeframes are used for event policies and service model
components. They are maintained in the CMDB and are visible to
all cells in an environment.
You create global timeframes in the Service Model Editor. For
instructions, see the BMC Impact Solutions Service Modeling and
Publishing Guide.

The following timeframe definitions are provided out-of-the-box:


s
s

Weekdays
Weekend

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Evaluation order of event policy types

Evaluation order of event policy types


BMC Impact Managers evaluate event policies of different types based on the order of
the rule phase in which the event management policy executes. The standard rule
phases and their associated event policy types are shown in Table 56.
Table 56

Evaluation order of event policy types

Evaluation order

Rule phase

Event policy type

refine

blackout
enrichment
dynamic blackout
dynamic enrichment
timeout (initialization)

filter NOPASS

suppression

regulate

threshold1

threshold

threshold1
escalation

new

closure
recurrence

abstract

no related event management policy

correlate

correlation

execute

timeout (arm)
notification

propagate

propagation

10

delete

no related event management policy

11

timer

timeout (execute)
escalation

Unlike other event policies, cells evaluate threshold event policies in two distinct phasesthe
first phase for the hold threshold and the second phase for the pass through threshold.

WARNING
Although event policies of different types are evaluated according to their associated rule
phase, event policies of the same type do not have an evaluation order. For example, if event
selectors for two event policies of the same type select the same event, the cell evaluates the
event according to one event management policy and ignores the other event management
policy.
To prevent omission of event management policy evaluation, you must create mutually
exclusive event selection criteria for two event policies of the same type. With the exception of
dynamic blackout, dynamic enrichment, notification and propagation event policies, two or
more policies of the same type should not execute against the same event. In the case of
exceptional event policies, the cell evaluates all event policies of those four types, even if their
selectors reference the same event.

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How dynamic data enrichment event management policies work

How dynamic data enrichment event


management policies work
Dynamic data enrichment policies require the same components as standard event
management policies. However, dynamic enrichment policies allow you to import
external enrichment data into the policy, rather than having to enter it manually.
First, you must either export data from a data source (such as an asset database) or
manually enter information into the enrichment file (.csv).
Once the data enrichment source file contains the data required, you can use the
policy to import the data into BMC Event Manager for use in the enrichment process.
Figure 84 illustrates the dynamic data enrichment flow.
Figure 84

Flow of data required to implement a dynamic data enrichment policy

External enrichment data sources


An external enrichment data source can provide additional information about an
event that is not available from the technology from which the event originates. An
example of an external enrichment data source is a database such as an asset data
store. Information from the database must be manually exported into a flat delimited
file, so that BMC Event Manager can access the information. The recommended
format to export the data to is a .csv file.
BMC provides some sample policies and associated enrichment data sources in the
MCELL_HOME\Mastercell\console\etc\samples directory.
Dynamic data enrichment policies can also use data included in BMC PATROL
Enterprise Manager (PMEP) files if you are migrating from BMC PATROL Enterprise
Manager to the BMC Event Manager solution.

Dynamic data enrichment source files


A dynamic data enrichment source file must contain at least one match field and at
least one output field.

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External enrichment data sources

A match field is the lookup or key field which the dynamic data enrichment policy
uses to identify the incoming event. You may use multiple match fields to identify an
incoming event.
An output field identifies the type of enrichment information that is to be added to the
event.
Once the policy has matched the event data of the match field(s) with the data in the
enrichment file, it will add the associated enrichment data from the enrichment file
into the output field identified in the policy.

WARNING
It is critical that the policy definition and the data enrichment source file contain the exact
same number of match fields and output fields in the same order. If the match fields and
output fields in the enrichment file and the policy do not match, the policy will not run.
For example, if you are using the contact.csv file that is included with the product, you must
select the Host Class, Host, Object Class, and Object slots as the Match Fields and the
Service and Owner slots as the Output Fields to correspond to the slots in the contact.csv file.

Wildcards are supported for pattern matching which allows for more generic policy
rules to be written.

Sample dynamic data enrichment source files


Table 57 lists the product-supplied dynamic data enrichment source files that are
located in the MCELL_HOME\Mastercell\console\etc\samples directory. These sample
files provide commonly needed enrichment information.
You can use these files as a guide to create your own dynamic data enrichment source
files or you can modify and use these sample files.
Table 57

Dynamic data enrichment source files (part 1 of 2)

Data source file

Policy name

Description

location.csv

Location_Enrichment

appends the location of a server to an event

contact.csv

Service_Contact_Enrichment

appends contact information for a server


administrator to an event. For example, contact
information may include the name of the
administrator for that server and his or her
telephone number.

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External enrichment data sources

Table 57

Dynamic data enrichment source files (part 2 of 2)

Data source file

Policy name

Description

TextTranslation.csv PATROL_Message_Translation

Dynamic_Blackout

blackout.csv

replaces the text of existing PATROL event


messages with messages that can be more easily
understood by operators in your enterprise. This
file includes predefined message translations
that will be immediately useful in your
enterprise. For more information, see Using the
sample PATROL messaging text translation
dynamic data enrichment source file on
page 276.
suppresses events that meet a specified criteria
during a specified time period.

For information on creating and using dynamic data enrichment source files, see
How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file on page 274.

PMEP files
PMEP files are BMC PATROL Enterprise Manager (PATROL Message Enhancement
Processor) enrichment configuration files. In BMC PATROL Enterprise Manager,
PMEP provided a similar dynamic data enrichment capability. If you are migrating
from BMC PATROL Enterprise Manager to BMC Event Manager (BEM), you can
continue to use the PMEP files in the BEM environment.
Depending on your requirements, you can use one or more of the following
configuration files shown in Table 58.
Table 58

Enrichment configuration files

File

Description

Blackout.cfg

Provides event suppression for specified time periods when matching


criteria are met

Location.cfg

Provides a name that identifies the location (or server) from which the
PATROL Agent events are being sent to Agent Connection. The name
is added to the ObjectLocation field when matching criteria is met

ServiceContact.cfg

Provides the Business Service Views or Application Groups to which


the events belong. The support staff that are responsible for correcting
the problem are identified by an event and any trouble ticket
information will be included in an event when matching criteria is
met. Service information is added to the Service field; contact
information is added to the ObjectStaff field and concatenated into
the ObjectLocation field and trouble ticket information is
concatenated into the ObjectLocation field

TextTranslation.cfg

Provides modifications to text in the FreeText field when matching


criteria is met

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How to create a new local timeframe

In data event policies, your PMEP file selection will populate the event class and
match fields with predefined values.
Figure 85 lists the default PMEP event classes and slot values.
Figure 85

Default PMEP event classes and slots

# PMEP Text Transaclation


pmep.text.eventclass=PATROL_EV
pmep.text.match_fields=mc_object_class,mc_parameter,p_class
pmep.text.output_fields=msg
# PMEP Service Contact
pmep.service.eventclass=EVENT
pmep.service.match_fields=mc_host_class,mc_host,mc_object_class,mc_object
pmep.service.output_fields=mc_service,administrator,mc_notes
# PMEP Location
pmep.location.eventclass=EVENT
pmep.location.match_fields=mc_host
pmep.location.output_fields=mc_location
# PMEP Blackout
pmep.blackout.eventclass=EVENT
pmep.blackout.match_fields=mc_host_class,mc_host,mc_object_class,mc_object,mc_paramemter

How to create a new local timeframe


NOTE
Global timeframes are created in the Service Model Editor. For instructions, see the BMC
Impact Solutions Service Modeling and Publishing Guide.

Local timeframes allow you to specify periods of time that determine when an event
management policy will or will not run. You can set up a single timeframe that can
apply to multiple policies.
For example, if you have several policies that you do not want to run on weekends,
you can set up a timeframe from 12:00AM to 12:00 AM on both Saturday and Sunday
and call that timeframe Weekend. You can then apply the timeframe Weekend to all
policies that you do not want to run on weekends.
If you do not specify a timeframe for a policy, the policy will run continuously. For a
list of timeframes that are included out-of-the-box, see Timeframes on page 265.

NOTE
Timeframes are required for blackout policies.

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How to create a new local timeframe

To define an event management policy timeframe


1 From the toolbar of the Administration View, click the View/Update Timeframes
button

The Timeframes window is displayed, as shown in Figure 86.


Figure 86

Timeframes

2 From the Timeframes toolbar, click the New Timeframe button.


The Timeframe Edit dialog is displayed.

3 Enter or modify the appropriate information in the fields available in the


Timeframe Edit dialog as described in Table 59.

Table 59

Timeframe Edit dialog options (part 1 of 2)

Field

Description

Name

Name of the timeframe

Description

Description of the timeframe

Start, End, and


Duration

Period when the timeframe begins and ends, and the duration of the
timeframe. Changing the duration will change the value in the End
field, and vice-versa.
The individual time zone of cell will be used in timeframe
calculations.

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How to add a notification service (notification policies only)

Table 59

Timeframe Edit dialog options (part 2 of 2)

Field

Description

Recurrence pattern

Schedules how often the timeframe will recur. Changing the selection
in the left side list will change the options available on the right side.
Besides the Daily, Weekly, Monthly, and Yearly timeframe options,
you can select individual dates that are part of the timeframe by
selecting Date List and choosing dates from the displayed calendar.

Range of recurrence

When you have selected a Daily, Weekly, Monthly, or Yearly


timeframe option, you can choose the starting and ending date range
for the recurrence.
Optionally, instead of choosing an end date, you can enter the number
of recurrences for the timeframe.

4 To create additional timeframes, click Save and repeat this procedure starting with
step 2.

5 To close the editor, click Close.

How to add a notification service (notification


policies only)
Before you can create or enable a standard notification event management policy (as
described in Creating a new notification policy on page 304), you must add a
notification service. A BASIC_EMAIL notification service that sends an email
notification to a specified user or group of users when selected events occur is
provided by default.

To add a notification service


1 On the Administration View, choose the Dynamic Data Editor tab.
2 In the Dynamic Data Editor tree, expand the server for which you want to add
notification.

3 Expand the Data section, and then expand the Cell Data section.
4 Select Notification Service.
The available notification services are listed in the Notification Service tab in the
right pane of the Administration View.

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5 Click the Add data instance icon

A New notification service tab is displayed.

6 On the New tab, in the Name field, enter a unique name for the service.
7 In the Type field, choose one of the following notification service types:
s

Commandthe notification service is implemented using a command or script

Gatewaya gateway to an external notification service will be used

8 In the Service field, enter the appropriate information based on the notification
service type:
s

Commandenter the command or script used to initiate notification. For


example, the script for the default BASIC_EMAIL notification service is
mc_sendmail.

NOTE
If the notification service will be executed using a script, the script must be located in the
kb/bin/platform directory of the cell Knowledge Base.

Gatewayenter the name of the destination gateway. This gateway must be


referenced in the directory file of your cell (mcell.dir).

9 [Optional.] In the available_targets field, within the square brackets enter a commaseparated list of predefined users that you want to receive the notification. The list
must be known to the notification service. If no predefined list exists, any target
string may be entered (such as an email address).

10 Click OK.

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How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file

How to create and edit a dynamic data


enrichment source file
NOTE
Dynamic data enrichment source files are not required for standard event management
policies. You only need a dynamic data enrichment source file if you are creating a dynamic
data enrichment policy.

Before you enable a dynamic enrichment policy, you must import or enter the data
that you want to use for enrichment into a data file. You can import the enrichment
data into any delimited flat file; however, BMC Software recommends importing the
data into a .csv file and using Microsoft Excel to view and manipulate the contents of
the file. The spreadsheet format of Microsoft Excel makes it easier to view and
manipulate the information in the file.
You can use the sample data enrichment files provided with the product as a guide to
set up your own data enrichment source files. The sample files are located in the
%HOME%\Mastercell\console\etc\samples directory. For a list of sample files
provided with the product, see Sample dynamic data enrichment source files on
page 268.

Before you begin


If you will be referencing a timeframe in your dynamic data enrichment source file,
you must ensure that the timeframe that you will be referencing already exists. If the
timeframe you want to reference does not exist, you must define it as described in
How to create a new local timeframe on page 270.

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To create a dynamic data enrichment source file


1 In Microsoft Excel, create a new file and save it as type .csv.
2 In each column of the spreadsheet, enter information that corresponds to each
match value and output value that will be included in your dynamic data
enrichment policy.

WARNING
It is critical that the policy definition and the data enrichment source file contain the exact
same number of match fields and output fields in the same order. If the match fields and
output fields in the enrichment file and the policy do not match, the policy will not run.
For example, if you are using the location.csv file that is included as a sample with the
product, this file has two columnsmc_host and mc_location. If you are creating a
dynamic data enrichment location policy that uses the location.csv file as the data
enrichment source file, you must select the Host slot as the Match Field and the Location
slot as the Output Field to correspond to the columns in the location.csv file.

3 Save and close the file.


To edit a sample dynamic data enrichment source file
1 Open one of the sample data source files included with the product located in the
%HOME%\Mastercell\console\etc\samples directory.

2 Import or enter information specific to your enterprise.


Figure 87 shows an example of an edited location.csv file.
Figure 87

Example edited location.csv file

# This enrichment file is used to add an extra field "mc_location" to an event.


# This can be useful to group together or understand the physical location of IT
components to help with event assignment and resolution.
# mc_host, mc_location
Texan1, Houston
Texan2, Houston
Cowboy*, Dallas

The location for hosts Texan1 and Texan2 is listed as Houston. The location for all
hosts beginning with Cowboy (for example, Cowboy1, CowboySmith,
CowboyAikman) is listed as Dallas.

3 Save and close the file.


4 The data enrichment source must be imported into the policy each time you
modify the .csv file. For instructions on importing dynamic data enrichment data
source, see Importing dynamic data enrichment source on page 350.
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Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment source file

Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic


data enrichment source file
The sample PATROL messaging text translation data enrichment source file,
TextTranslation.csv, provided in the %HOME%\Mastercell\console\etc\samples
directory is prepopulated with over two hundred translations for messages from the
following Knowledge Modules:
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

BMC SQL-BackTrack NetWorker OBSI Module


PATROL KM for CONTROL-M
PATROL KM for UNIX and Linux
PATROL KM for Microsoft Windows Servers
PATROL KM for Netware
PATROL KM for Sybase
PATROL KM for Internet Server Manager
PATROL KM for Oracle
BMC Performance Manager for Microsoft Windows Terminal Services

If you are integrated with PATROL, you can gain instant value by enabling this policy
and importing the data from TextTranslation.csv into the cell as described in Enabling
a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation policy on page 346. This
policy allows you to reword ambiguous event messages into messages more easily
understood by the IT operators handling the events in Impact Explorer.
The sample policy, TextTranslation.csv, will translate PATROL event messages coming
from either BMC Impact Integration for PATROL 3.0 or BMC Impact Integration for
PATROL 7.0.

Overview of the PATROL messaging text translation

dynamic data enrichment source file


Figure 88 on page 277 shows some sample rows included in the TextTranslation.csv
file.

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Figure 88

Sample rows in the TextTranslation.csv file

The first three columns are match fields for incoming events. The first column
contains the object class or application class of the KM. The second column contains
the parameter. The third column contains the origin class.
The last column is the output field or the message that should be displayed when an
event matching the criteria in the first three columns is received.
For example, in the first row, the cell will look for an event coming from the
CPUCpuUtil parameter of the CPU application class. When the cell receives that
event, it will display the message:
CPU Utilisation is at 97%

or whatever number the CPU utilization percentage is at that time.


Many of the messages in the sample file contain slots that will be populated with
values from the parameter. For information on the syntax for using slots in a text
message see, Editing the PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data
enrichment source file.

Editing the PATROL messaging text translation

dynamic data enrichment source file


You can also add to and edit the TextTranslation.csv file, if required. For example, you
might want to translate the messages included in the file into your native language.
Or, you might want to include messages related to a KM that is not already included
in the file.
One of the most powerful features of the text translation file is the ability to include
CORE_EVENT base event class slots that will allow you to dynamically populate the
message with information from parameters or other BMC Impact Manager
components. This feature allows you to create messages that are very meaningful.

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Figure 88 on page 277 shows some actual messages in the TranslationText.csv file that
include variables. For example,
Figure 89

Variable syntax example

FILESYSTEM

FSCapacity

Filesystem %mc_object% is %mc_parameter_value%\% full

This message includes the %mc_object% and %mc_parameter_value% variables. This


syntax in the enrichment source file allows you to substitute the value of the slot you
have referenced into the event message.
To insert a slot value into a message, use the following syntax:
Message text %<slot_name>% message text

If you need to include a % sign in the actual message text, you must precede the %
character with a back slash (\). For example, in Figure 89 the desired text message
includes a % character. The syntax for the message is %mc_parameter_value%\%
full.

If the value of mc_object is D: and the value of mc_parameter is 97 the reworded


message would be:
Filesystem D: is 97% full.

For a list of CORE_EVENT base event class slots that you can use in text messages,
see BMC Impact Solutions: Knowledge Base Development.

How to create an event selector and specify


event selection criteria
An event selector is the component of an event management policy that selects one or
more events to which an event management policy applies using specified event
selection criteria. When an incoming event matches any of the specified event
selection criteria, the cell applies the associated event management policy to the
event.

Before you begin


s

278

Unless you want the event management policy to run continuously, you must
define a timeframe as described in How to create a new local timeframe on
page 270.

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria

[For dynamic data enrichment policies only.] Create a data enrichment source file as
described in How to create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file on
page 274.

To create an event selector and specify event selection criteria


1 From the Administration View, select the Event Management Polices tab.
2 Select a valid node (non-cell group) from the navigation pane.
Valid nodes for event selector creation are all visible nodes except the top-level cell
group node. When the Add Event Selector button in the toolbar becomes active, this
is an indication that valid node is selected.

3 On the Administration View toolbar, click the Add Event Selector button

The Selector Details tab, shown in Figure 90, is displayed.


Figure 90

Selector Details tab

4 In the Selector Name field, type the event selector name.


5 In the Group field, type an event selector group name.
The event selector that you create in the next step will belong to the event selector
group that you enter. If you enter a name of an event selector group that does not
exist, that group will be created.

6 To the right of the Base Event Class field, click the

button to display an event


class chooser dialog box (shown in Figure 91) from which to choose the event class.

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Figure 91

Class Chooser dialog box

7 Select an event class from the tree and click OK to accept the class.
For more information about event classes, see the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge
Base Development Reference Guide.

8 In the Description field, type an optional description for the event selector.
9 Click Add to add event selection criteria to this event selector.
The Add Event Criteria editor is displayed.

10 From the Add Event Criteria editor, type a description for the event selection criteria
in the Description slot.

11 In the Event Class field, use one of the following methods to select an event class on
which to base the event selection criteria:
s

Accept the default event class in the Event Class field.

Change the class by clicking the browse button. The Class Chooser dialog box is
displayed, select a class and click OK.

NOTE
You cannot change the event class specified in an ECF to any class that is not at the same
level or below the event class already specified in the ECF. If the ECF contains slots in the
current class that are not in the new class, you cannot change to the new class, even when it
occurs in the hierarchy rooted in the base event class.

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12 In the Selection Definition section, shown in Figure 92, create an expression that is
used to determine whether an event of the selected class is processed by the policy
by choosing a Slot, Operation, and Value.
Figure 92

Selection Definition section of the Add Event Criteria editor

The example expression in Figure 93 tests events for Windows security messages
containing logon and logoff messages. You might use this expression as part of an
event selector for implementation in an event blackout policy that hides these
security events from display but maintains their history.
Figure 93

Example event selection criteria expression

For a list and definitions of EVENT slots available for selection, see the event and
data classes appendix of the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development
Reference Guide. For a list and definitions of the operators available for each slot, see
the section on operators in the Master Rule Language (MRL) appendix of the BMC
Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide.

13 Click OK to save the expression and close the Add Event Criteria editor.
The event selection criteria is displayed in the Event Selection Criteria section of the
Selector Details tab, as shown in Figure 94.
Figure 94

Completed event selection criteria in Selector Details tab

14 To add more event selection criteria, click Add and repeat step 10 through step 13.
15 Click OK to save the event selector and its event selector group.
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Creating new standard event management policies

Creating new standard event management


policies
This section provides instructions for creating new standard event policies based on
default event management policy types.
If you want to create an event management policy based on a custom policy type, see
Chapter 12, User-defined policies.

Before you begin


s

Unless you want the event management policy to run continuously, you must
define a timeframe as described in How to create a new local timeframe on
page 270.

Define an event selector and specify event selection criteria as described in How
to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria on page 278.

Table 60 lists each standard event management policy type and the page number of
the procedure for each type.
Table 60

Standard event management policy types and procedures

To create this event policy...


Blackout

To create new a standard blackout policy on page 283

Component Based
Enrichment

To create a new component based enrichment policy on


page 285

Closure

To create a new closure policy on page 290

Correlation

To create a new correlation policy on page 293

Enrichment

To create an enrichment policy on page 296

Escalation

To create an escalation policy on page 300

Notification

To create a new notification policy on page 305

Propagation

To create a new propagation policy on page 308

Recurrence

To create a new recurrence policy on page 311

Suppression

To create a new suppression policy on page 314

Threshold

To create a new threshold policy on page 316

Timeout

282

See...

To create a new timeout policy on page 320

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Creating a new standard blackout policy

Creating a new standard blackout policy


A blackout policy specifies a period of time during which incoming events that match
the event specification criteria will be ignored. All ignored events are logged.
An example of a blackout event management policy might have the cell ignore events
generated from a successful logon to an external system.

To create new a standard blackout policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Blackout Policy.


3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Blackout Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration
View as shown in Figure 95 on page 284.

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Figure 95

Blackout Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.


7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable
the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.
To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

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B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 Click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new component based enrichment policy


A component based enrichment policy enables you to enhance the event definition of
an incoming event that is already associated with a component through an
mc_smc_id or mc_smc_alias match. When you define the component based policy,
you assign specified slot values from a standard list of component slots
(BMC_BaseElement class) to matching slots in the associated event definition.
Whenever an event that matches the selection criteria is received, its definition is
automatically enriched by the specified component slot values.

To create a new component based enrichment policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Component Based Enrichment Policy.
3 Click the Add Event Policy button

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A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The event selector controls which events are processed by the policy and,
consequently, which event slots are displayed in the Event fields list.
The Component Based Enrichment Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane
of the Administration View as shown in Figure 96 on page 287.

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Figure 96

Component Based Enrichment Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.


7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable
the policy later.

8 Assign a numerical value to the policy in the Execution Order combo box.
The numerical value indicates the order in which policies are automatically
executed. Policies are executed in ascending chronological order. A policy with the
lowest numerical value is executed first while the policy with the highest
numerical value is executed last. During the execution phase, policies with higher
numerical values always overwrite the preceding policies with lower numerical
values.

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EXAMPLE
You have defined four component based enrichment policies and have assigned each a
unique numerical value (1, 2, 3, or 4) in the Execution Order combo box. The policy
assigned the value 1 is executed first, followed in ascending numerical order by policies
assigned the values 2, 3, and 4. During the execution sequence, the policy with the value 2
overwrites the policy with the value 1; the policy with value 3 overwrites the policy with
value 2; and the policy with value 4 overwrites the policy with value 3.

You should assign higher numerical values to policies that you want to execute last and
lower values to policies that you want to execute first.

9 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.
To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

10 In the Component Based Event Enrichment Details tab, assign the component slots
to the matching event slots in the Match the Component and Event Slots section.

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Consider these guidelines before you make the assignments:


s

The list of event slots is dynamic insofar as it depends on the base event class
you chose in the selector. The list that you see always contains a subset of the
CORE_EVENT class. It also contains any additional slot or slots derived from
the subclass you specified as the base event class.
The list of component slots is static. The component slots are derived from the
BMC_BaseElement class.
You can view and edit a list of excluded event and component slots in the
MCELL_HOME\data\ix\configurationItemPolicies\
configurationItemEnrichment.slotFiltering.properties file. You can specify event

and component slots to be excluded in the appropriate field:


excluded.event.slots and excluded component.slots. Add or update the slots
using a comma-separated list.

NOTE
After updating and saving the configurationItemEnrichment.slotFiltering.properties file,
restart the BMC Impact Administration Server to initialize the changes.

The component slot value overwrites any current value in the matching event
slot.
You must match slots of similar types: STRING with STRING, INTEGER with
INTEGER, BOOLEAN with BOOLEAN, and so forth.

NOTE
The table does not support the assignment of LIST or LIST OF slots.

To make the assignment, select a slot name in the Event fields column and, using
the arrow button, move it to the Assignment Table, where you match it with a slot
in the Component fields column.

11 Click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined component based enrichment policy, and
it is displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

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Creating a new closure policy

Creating a new closure policy


An closure policy closes a specified event when a separate specified event is received.

To create a new closure policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Closure Policy.


3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Closure Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration
View as shown in Figure 97 on page 291.

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Figure 97

Closure Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.


7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable
the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.

To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation


Timeframes.
The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

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Creating a new correlation policy

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 Click Edit Event Criteria.


The Add Event Criteria window is displayed.

10 In the Add Event Criteria window, specify event selection criteria for the event type
that you want to close and click OK.

11 To close only matching events that occur within a certain timeframe, check the
Close Events with Age Less Than check box and specify an amount of time. If the
Close Events with Age Less Than check box is not checked, there is no limit on the

time between the closed event and the closing event.

12 To suppress the closing event, check the Suppress the Closing Event check box.
13 To save the completed event closure policy, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the specified event selector.

Creating a new correlation policy


A correlation policy relates one or more cause events to an effect event. If desired, this
policy can close the effect event. The cell maintains the association between these
cause-and-effect events.

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To create a new correlation policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Correlation Policy.


3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Correlation Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the
Administration View, as shown in Figure 98 on page 294.

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Creating a new correlation policy

Figure 98

Correlation Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 To enable the event management policy immediately, select the Enabled check box.
If you do not want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog
box and enable the policy later.

7 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.

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8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.

To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation


Timeframes.
The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 Complete a separate Cause Event tab as appropriate for each cause event that you
want to define.
Table 61 describes each of the controls in the Cause Event tabs.
Table 61

Cause Event tab controls (part 1 of 2)

Field name

Description

Enable check box

Select this check box to relate the cause events to the effect
events; this information is stored in the cell.

Edit Event Criteria button

Click this button to specify the selection criteria for the


cause event.

Correlation Timespan check


box

Select this check box and enter a time limit within which
the cause event must occur to produce the effect event.

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Table 61

Cause Event tab controls (part 2 of 2)

Field name

Description

Close Effect Event radio


buttons

Choose one of the following radio buttons to specify


the circumstances under which the effect event will
be closed:
s

De-escalate Effect Event


check box

On Cause Event Closurewhen the cause event


closes, the effect event is closed also

Escalate Cause Event check


box

Upon Correlationas soon as events are associated


(cause and effect), the effect event is closed

On Its Ownclosing the cause event has no


consequence to the effect event

select this check box to escalate the cause event to the


specified priority level
select this check box to de-escalate the effect event

10 To save the completed event correlation policy, click OK.


BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new enrichment policy


An enrichment policy adds values for specific event slots if those slots are empty
when the event is received from the event source. An enrichment policy can also
reformat slots or normalize slot values.

To create an enrichment policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Enrichment Policy.


3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.

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The Enrichment Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the
Administration View, as shown in Figure 99.
Figure 99

Enrichment Policy Details tab

5 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.


6 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable
the policy later.

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7 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time that the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.

To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation


Timeframes.
The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

8 Enable the following check boxes as necessary to assign appropriate settings:


s

Event Prioritythe relative priority to assign to the event (1 is a high priority)

Event Categorythe classification to assign to the event; categories include

s
s
s

298

availability
capacity
configuration
operational
performance
recovery
security
SLM (service level management)
message text format
Object Typethe object type against which the event applies, such as a server
Location to Setthe physical location of the object, such as a city
Services to Setthe service that the event is associated with

BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

Creating a new escalation policy

9 In the Message Text Format box, define the message slot enrichment for the event:
A From the list of available event slots in the Event Slot box, select an event slot to
which to add enrichment information and click Insert.

B To insert a a slot value into the message, either type the slot name surrounded
by % characters or select the slot name from the Event Slot list and click Insert.
The box is a standard text box. You can position the cursor and type or insert
text and slot references in any order. The Event Slot list and Insert button are
provided as a convenience so you do not have to remember the valid slot names.
The resulting string of characters in the Message Text Format box, %<slot name>%,
whether typed or inserted, is used as a template to create the message (msg slot)
for the event.
Repeat steps A and B to add more enrichment information to the event slot, if
necessary.

NOTE
The hidden and list of slots are not available for message enrichment.
To avoid unpredictable results when adding a text message, use no more than one set of
quotation marks.

10 To save the completed event enrichment policy, click OK.


BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new escalation policy


An escalation policy raises or lowers the priority level of an event after a specified
period of time. A specified number of event recurrences can also trigger escalation of
an event.
For example, if the abnormally high temperature of a storage device goes unchecked
for 10 minutes or if a cell receives more than five high-temperature warning events in
25 minutes, an escalation event management policy could increase the priority level
of the event to critical.

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To create an escalation policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Escalation Policy and click OK.
3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Escalation Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the
Administration View, as shown in Figure 100 on page 301.

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Figure 100 Escalation Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.


7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable
the policy later.

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8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.

To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation


Timeframes.
The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 In the Time Escalation section, shown in Figure 101 on page 303, use the Timespan
Before Priority is Escalated selectors to enter the number of a specified period of

time that must elapse before an event is escalated. The default time period is
seconds, but this time period can be changed to minutes, hours, or days by selecting

one of these time periods from the drop list.

NOTE
You can set Time Escalation or Rate of Event Arrival (step 13 through step 15 on page 304),
or both. To set only one, leave the fields of the other set to zero.

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Figure 101 Time Escalation Controls

10 Choose one of the following radio buttons to determine how the priority of the
event will be escalated after the specified time has elapsed:
s

Levels to Escalate/De-escalate Priority ByChoose this radio button to escalate or

de-escalate the event by a specified number of levels after the time period
specified by the Timespan Before Priority is Escalated selector has elapsed. Enter
the number of levels that the event is to be escalated.
s

Set Priority to This ValueChoose this radio button to set the event to a specified
priority level after the time period specified by the Timespan Before Priority is
Escalated selector has elapsed. Choose the priority level from the drop list.

11 (optional) To prevent the event from being escalated after it has been
acknowledged, select the Do not Escalate if Acknowledged check box.

12 (optional) To prevent the event from being escalated after it has been assigned,
select the Do not Escalate if Assigned check box.

13 In the Rate of Event Arrival section, shown in Figure 102 on page 304, in the Number
of Events Needed for Escalation selector, enter the number of events that must occur

before the event is escalated.

NOTE
You can set Time Escalation (step 9 through step 12) or Rate of Event Arrival, or both. To
set only one, leave the fields of the other set to zero.

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Figure 102 Rate of Event Arrival Controls

14 In the Timespan in which Events Must Arrive selector, enter the time in which the
events must arrive before the event is escalated or the event priority is changed.

15 Choose one of the following radio buttons to determine how the priority of the
event will be escalated after the number of events have arrived within the specified
timespan:
s

Levels to Escalate Causal Event PriorityChoose this radio button to escalate the

causal event by a specified number of levels after the number of events specified
Number of Events Needed for Escalation selector have occurred within the time
period specified by the Timespan in which Events Must Arrive selector. Enter the

number of levels that the event is to be escalated.


s

Set Priority to This ValueChoose this radio button to set the event to a specified
priority level after the number of events specified Number of Events Needed for
Escalation selector have occurred within the time period specified by the
Timespan in which Events Must Arrive selector. Choose the priority level from the

drop list.

16 To save the completed event escalation policy, click OK.


BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new notification policy


A notification policy sends a request to an external service to notify a user or group of
users that the event has occurred.
For example, a notification event management policy might notify a system
administrator about the imminent unavailability of a mission-critical piece of storage
hardware.

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Before you begin


You must add a notification service as described in How to add a notification service
(notification policies only) on page 272.

To create a new notification policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Notification Policy and click OK.
3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Notification Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the
Administration View, as show in Figure 103 on page 306.

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Figure 103 Notification Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.


7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable
the policy later.
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8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.

To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation


Timeframes.
The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 From the Notification Service drop list, select the service to use as the notification
mechanism. The default service is email.

10 In the Add field, type the name of a person or group to notify. Click Add to add the
name to the Notify slot. Add more names or groups if necessary.

11 From the Event Status that will Notify Users list, choose the event status that you
want to trigger the notification.

12 In the Notification Text field, enter the notification message. If desired, you can use
the Event Slot drop list to choose event slots to add to the notification message.
Click the Insert button to insert the slots into the message. Enter a space before and
after each slot that you add.

13 (optional) Select the Auto Acknowledge check box to automatically acknowledge the
event.

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14 (optional) Select the Auto Assign check box to automatically assign the event to the
user you select from the list.

15 To save the completed event notification policy, click OK.


BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new propagation policy


A propagation policy forwards events to other cells or to integrations to other
products.

To create a new propagation policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Propagation Policy and click OK.
3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Propagation Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the
Administration View, as shown in Figure 104 on page 309.

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Figure 104 Propagation Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description box, type a description of the event management policy.


7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable
the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.
To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:

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Creating a new recurrence policy

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 In the Propagate to all of list, choose one or more cells (Impact Managers).
Figure 105 Propagation cell list

10 In the Propagate to one of list, select one or more cells (Impact Managers).
11 To save the completed event propagation policy, click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new recurrence policy


A recurrence policy combines duplicate events into one event that maintains a
counter of the number of duplicates.

NOTE
All of the dup_detect slots on the incoming event must be the same for all events that match
the selector or the recurrence policy will not function.
Because PATROL integration has dup_detect set on the mc_origin_key and these keys are
unique, recurrence policies will not operate as expected for PATROL integration events.

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To create a new recurrence policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Recurrence Policy and click OK.
3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Recurrence Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the
Administration View, as shown in Figure 106 on page 312.

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Figure 106 Recurrence Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name box, type a unique alphanumeric name (with no spaces) for the
event management policy.

6 In the Description box, type a description of the event management policy.


7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable
the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.
To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

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B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 If you want to define a time window for events that are considered to be recurring,
check the Recurring Events Must Arrive Within this Timespan check box and set the
maximum time after the initial event within which an event must arrive to count
toward recurrence. If the box is not checked, there is no limit on the time between
duplicate events that are counted as recurring.

10 In the Slot Updates section, select any original event values that you want updated
by the latest recurrent event values.

11 To save the completed event recurrence policy, click OK.


BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new remote action policy


See Chapter 9, Remote execution, for the procedure.

Creating a new suppression policy


A suppression policy specifies the events that the receiving cell should delete. Unlike
a blackout event management policy, the suppression event management policy
maintains no record of the deleted event.

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To create a new suppression policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Suppression Policy.


3 Click the Add Policy button

The Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Suppression Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the
Administration View, as shown in Figure 107.
Figure 107 Suppression Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

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6 In the Description box, type a description of the event management policy.


7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable
the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.

To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation


Timeframes.
The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 Click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

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Creating a new threshold policy


A threshold policy specifies a minimum number of duplicate events that must occur
within a specific period of time before the cell accepts the event. For events allowed to
pass through to the cell, the event severity can be escalated or de-escalated a relative
number of levels or set to a specified level. If the event occurrence rate falls below a
specified level, the cell can take action against the event, such as changing the event to
closed or acknowledged status.

To create a new threshold policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Threshold Policy.


3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Threshold Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the
Administration View as shown in Figure 108 on page 317.

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Figure 108 Threshold Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.


7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable
the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.
To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.
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B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 For the Number of Duplicate Events Received slot, supply a numeric value and an
associated time measurement to specify the threshold above which an event is
accepted.

10 Select one of the following radio buttons (The threshold-specific options displayed
on the tab change depending on which button you select.):
s

Hold Events Until Threshold is MetSelect this option to prevent creation of any

specified event until the number of events exceeds the threshold within the
specified time period.
If you select Hold Events Until Threshold is Met, the options shown in Figure 109
are displayed. Specify whether to include allowing the last, first, highest, or
lowest severity event to pass and whether to acknowledge or close the passed
event when incoming (new) events fall below a specified low threshold rate.
Figure 109 Hold Events options

318

Pass Events throughselect this option to create all events when they meet the
required threshold rate.

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If you select Pass Events through, the options shown in Figure 110 are displayed.
Figure 110 Pass Events Through options

Choose one of the following radio buttons to determine how the severity of the
event will be escalated or de-escalated:
s

Levels to Escalate/De-Escalate Event Severity ByChoose this radio button to

escalate or de-escalate the severity of the event by a specified number of


levels after the number of events specified Number of Duplicated Events
Received selector have occurred within the time period specified by the
Timespan in which Events the Must Arrive selector. Enter the number of
severity levels that the event is to be escalated.
s

Set Severity to This ValueChoose this radio button to set the event to a
specified severity level after the number of events specified Number of
Duplicated Events Received selector have occurred within the time period
specified by the Timespan in which Events the Must Arrive selector. Choose the

severity level from the drop list.

NOTE
From the Set Severity to This Value drop list, choose Critical, Non-critical, Minor,
Warning, or OK. Do not choose Unknown, as it is considered a status rather than a
severity.

11 To save the completed event threshold policy, click OK.


BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Creating a new timeout policy


A timeout policy changes an event status to closed after a specified period of time
elapses.

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To create a new timeout policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Timeout Policy.


3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Timeout Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the Administration
View as shown in Figure 111 on page 321.

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Figure 111 Timeout Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.


7 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable
the policy later.

8 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.

To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation


Timeframes.
The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes check boxes are enabled.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

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Enabling and disabling out-of-the-box standard event management policies

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

9 In the Timeout Event After field, enter a number of time periods that must elapse
before an event will time out. The default time period is seconds, but this time
period can be changed to minutes, hours, or days by selecting one of these time
periods from the drop list.

10 To save the completed event timeout policy, click OK.


BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

Enabling and disabling out-of-the-box


standard event management policies
This section provides instructions for enabling and disabling out-of-the-box standard
event management policies.
For a list of out-of-the-box event management policies, see Out-of-the-box event
management policies on page 260.
For instructions on enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies, see
Enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event management policies on
page 334.

To enable or disable a standard event management policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select the policy type for the out-of-the-box
standard event policy that you want to enable.

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Out-of-the-box standard event policies are included under the following policy
types:
s
s
s
s

Closure Policy
Recurrence Policy
Suppression Policy
Timeout Policy

A list of out-of-the-box standard event management policies of that policy type are
displayed in the right pane of the Administration View as shown in Figure 119.
Figure 112 List of event management policies

3 From the list of event management policies, select the policy that you want to
enable.
The Details tab for that policy is displayed in the details pane of the Administration
View.

4 On the BMC Impact Manager toolbar, click the Update Policy button

to enable

the Details tab to be edited.

5 Enable or disable the policy by selecting or deselecting the Enabled check box.
6 Click OK.
BMC Impact Explorer saves the defined event management policy, and it is
displayed in the list of event policies for the selected event selector.

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Creating a new dynamic data enrichment


event management policy
This section provides instructions for creating a new dynamic data enrichment event
management policy (page 324) and for creating a new dynamic enrichment blackout
policy (page 329).

Before you begin


s

Ensure that the timeframe referenced in your dynamic data enrichment source file
exists. If it does not exist, you must define the timeframe as described in How to
create a new local timeframe on page 270.

Determine which event selector you want to apply to your dynamic data
enrichment policy. If none of the out-of-the-box event selectors are appropriate for
your policy, define an event selector and specify event selection criteria as
described in How to create an event selector and specify event selection criteria
on page 278.

Create a data enrichment source file as described in How to create and edit a
dynamic data enrichment source file on page 274.

To create a new dynamic data enrichment policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Enrichment Policy.


3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

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4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab, shown in Figure 113 on page 325, is
displayed in the details pane of the Administration View.
Figure 113 Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.
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6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.


7 To enable the policy immediately, select the Enabled check box. If you do not want
to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the
policy later.

8 In the Execution Order field, if more than one policy exists, specify the order of
execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be
one greater the largest current execution order.
If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

9 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.
To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

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10 If you do not want to accept the default event class, you can select an event class by
clicking
in the Event Class field of the Match Fields section, selecting a new event
class, and clicking OK.
The Event Class determines what slots are available in the Available Event Fields
column.

11 In the Class Chooser dialog box, select an event class and click OK.
12 In Available Event Fields column, select the slots that correspond to the match fields
in your dynamic data enrichment source file. Use the left arrow button to move
those slots into the Match Fields column. You may select and move multiple slots at
the same time.

13 In Available Event Fields column, select the slots that correspond to the output
fields in your dynamic data enrichment source file. Use the right arrow button to
move those slots into the Output Fields column. You may select and move multiple
slots at the same time.

WARNING
It is critical that the policy definition and the data enrichment source file contain the exact
same number of match fields and output fields in the same order. If the match fields and
output fields in the enrichment file and the policy do not match, the policy will not run.
For example, if you were creating a file similar to the location.csv file that is included with
the product, you must select the Host slot as the Match Field and the Location slot as the
Output Field to correspond to the slots in the location.csv file.

14 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event, if necessary.

15 In the Match Table section, in the Type field, accept the default.
NOTE
Typically, you do not need to the change the value of the Type field. You can override the
default; however, you must use a unique tag within the given match table.

16 In the Match Table section, in the Tag field, accept the default.
NOTE
The Tag field uniquely identifies the match table that will be used by the policy instance.
You do not need to the change the value of this field. You can override the default; however,
you must use a unique tag within the given match table.

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17 In the Match Table section, in the Data File field, do one of the following actions:
s
s

Type the path to the enrichment data source.


To browse for the enrichment data source, click

1. In the File Chooser dialog box, select the dynamic data enrichment source file
appropriate for your policy. For more information, see External enrichment
data sources on page 267.
2. Click OK.

18 In the Match Table section, in the File Format field, select one of the following radio
buttons to specify the type of data enrichment file to import:
s

Data file with this separatorChoose this radio button to import a flat, delimited
file, such as a .csv file. Enter a separator to delimit the data column in the file.

For example, if you are using a .csv file, enter a comma (,) as the separator.
s

PMEP fileChoose this radio button to import a PMEP table and select the
appropriate PMEP format for your policy from the drop list:

Blackout
Blackout CSV
Location
Location CSV
Service
Service CSV
Text
Text CSV

NOTE
If you select the PMEP file button, the Event Class, Match Fields, and Output Fields
are autopopulated with predefined values and become read-only.

19 Click OK.
If this is the first time a policy is saved, the following confirmation dialog box is
displayed:
Figure 114 Import confirmation

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20 Click Yes.
A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in
the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the
right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the
left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

21 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in Importing dynamic data enrichment source on page 350.

To create a new dynamic data enrichment blackout policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Blackout Policy.


3 Click the Add Policy button

A Selector Chooser dialog box is displayed.

4 From the Selector Chooser dialog box, choose the event selector that you want to
use for this policy and click OK.
The Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the
Administration View, as shown in Figure 115 on page 330.

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Figure 115 Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab

5 In the Policy Name field, type a unique alphanumeric name for the event
management policy. The name must contain no spaces.

6 In the Description field, type a description of the event management policy.

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7 To enable the policy immediately, select the Enabled check box. If you do not want
to enable the policy at this time, you can return to this dialog box and enable the
policy later.

8 In the Execution Order field, if more than one policy exists, specify the order of
execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be
one greater the largest current execution order.
If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

9 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.
To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

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10 If you do not want to accept the default event class, you can select an event class by
clicking
in the Event Class field of the Match Fields section, selecting a new event
class, and clicking OK.
The event class determines what slots are available in the Available Event Fields
column.

11 In the Class Chooser dialog box, select an event class and click OK.
12 In Available Event Fields column, select the slots that correspond to the match fields
in your dynamic data enrichment source file. Use the left arrow button to move
those slots into the Match Fields column. You may select and move multiple slots at
the same time.

13 In Available Event Fields column, select the slots that correspond to the output
fields in your dynamic data enrichment source file. Use the right arrow button to
move those slots into the Output Fields column. You may select and move multiple
slots at the same time.

WARNING
It is critical that the policy definition and the data enrichment source file contain the exact
same number of match fields and output fields in the same order. If the match fields and
output fields in the enrichment file and the policy do not match, the policy will not run.
For example, if you were creating a file similar to the location.csv file that is included with
the product, you must select the Host slot as the Match Field and the Location slot as the
Output Field to correspond to the slots in the location.csv file.

14 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event, if necessary.

15 In the Match Table section, in the Type field, accept the default.
NOTE
Typically, you do not need to the change the value of the Type field. You can override the
default; however, you must use a unique tag within the given match table.

16 In the Match Table section, in the Tag field, accept the default.
NOTE
The Tag field uniquely identifies the match table that will be used by the policy instance.
You do not need to the change the value of this field. You can override the default; however,
you must use a unique tag within the given match table.

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17 In the Match Table section, in the Data File field, do one of the following actions:
s
s

Type the path to the enrichment data source.


To browse for the enrichment data source, click,

1. In the File Chooser dialog box, select the dynamic data enrichment source file
appropriate for your policy. For more information, see External enrichment
data sources on page 267.
2. Click OK.

18 In the Match Table section, in the File Format field, select one of the following radio
buttons to specify the type of data enrichment file to import:
s

Data file with this separatorChoose this radio button to import a flat, delimited
file, such as a .csv file. Enter a separator to delimit the data column in the file.

For example, if you are using a .csv file, enter a comma (,) as the separator.
s

PMEP fileChoose this radio button to import a PMEP table and select the
appropriate PMEP format for your policy from the drop list:

Blackout
Blackout CSV
Location
Location CSV
Service
Service CSV
Text
Text CSV

NOTE
If you select the PMEP file button, the Event Class, Match Fields, and Output Fields
are autopopulated with predefined values and become read-only.

19 Click OK.
If this is the first time a policy is saved, the following confirmation dialog box is
displayed:
Figure 116 Import confirmation

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20 Click Yes.
A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in
the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the
right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the
left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

21 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in Importing dynamic data enrichment source on page 350.

Enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data


enrichment event management policies
This section provides instructions for enabling out-of-the-box dynamic data
enrichment event management policies.

Before you begin


You must export data from an external enrichment data source into the dynamic data
enrichment source files provided with the product before you can enable any of the
out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies. For more information see, How to
create and edit a dynamic data enrichment source file on page 274.
The dynamic data enrichment source file for the PATROL Message Text Translation
policy (TextTrans.csv) is the only out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment source file
that includes valid data. You can enable PATROL Message Text Translation policy
without exporting data into TextTrans.csv. For more information about TextTrans.csv,
see Using the sample PATROL messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment
source file on page 276.
Table 62 lists each out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event management policy
type and the page number of the procedure for each type.
Table 62

Out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment event policy types and procedures

To enable this event policy...

See...

Dynamic blackout

Enabling a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy on page 335

Dynamic location enrichment

Enabling a dynamic data enrichment location policy on page 338

Dynamic service contact enrichment Enabling a dynamic data enrichment service contact policy on
page 342
Dynamic PATROL message
translation

334

Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation


policy on page 346

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Enabling a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy

Enabling a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy


A dynamic data enrichment blackout policy specifies external schedules that initiate
event blackout.

Before you begin


For the dynamic blackout policy to work, you must define the timeframes referenced
in the enrichment source file (blackout.csv). If any of the timeframes referenced in the
enrichment source file have not been created in BEM, then the policy will not run.
For instructions on defining timeframes, see How to create a new local timeframe
on page 270.

To enable a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Blackout Policy.


The Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab is displayed in the details pane of the
Administration View, as shown in Figure 117 on page 336.

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Figure 117 Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab

3 On the BMC Impact Explorer toolbar, click the Update Policy button
the Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab editable.

4 On the Dynamic Blackout Policy Details tab, select the Enabled check box.

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5 In the Execution Order field, if more than one policy of this type exists, specify the
order of execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be
one greater the largest current execution order.
If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

6 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active and/or inactive (when enabled) by
performing the following actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.
To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes timeframe lists are
displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

7 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event to assist with trouble-shooting an event.

8 Click OK.
A confirmation dialog box is displayed, asking if you want to import data now, as
shown in Figure 118 on page 338.

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Figure 118 Import Data Confirmation dialog box

9 Click Yes.
A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in
the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the
right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the
left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

10 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in Importing dynamic data enrichment source on page 350.

Enabling a dynamic data enrichment location policy


The dynamic enrichment location policy adds location information to an event.
Some examples of uses for a dynamic enrichment location policy include:
s

Provides information to IT Operations so that they know which area/datacenter


the problematic technology is located in and can direct engineers more quickly to
the problem.

Allows IT Operations to build views in Impact Explorer of specific areas/data


centers and understand at a glance where the problems are.

Allows IT Operations to view reports in BMC Impact Reporting based on location.


For example, they can identify which locations which are generating the most
events.

If you are integrating with a service desk the location identifier can be passed
along with the rest of event, providing more useful information to the engineer
that will be assigned to handle the incident.

To enable a dynamic data enrichment location policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Enrichment Policy.


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A list of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies are displayed in the right
pane of the Administration View as shown in Figure 119.
Figure 119 List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies

3 From the list of out-of-the-box dynamic enrichment policies, select


Location_Enrichment.

The Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab, shown in Figure 120 on page 340, is
displayed in the details pane of the Administration View.

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Figure 120 Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab

4 On the BMC Impact Explorer toolbar, click the Update Policy button
the Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab editable.

5 To enable the policy, select the Enabled check box.

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6 In the Execution Order field, if more than one of this type of policy exists, specify
the order of execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be
one greater the largest current execution order.
If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

7 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.
To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

8 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event, if necessary.

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9 Click OK.
If this is the first time a policy is saved, the following confirmation dialog box is
displayed:
Figure 121 Import confirmation

10 Click Yes.
A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in
the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the
right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the
left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

11 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in Importing dynamic data enrichment source on page 350.

Enabling a dynamic data enrichment service contact policy


The dynamic enrichment location policy adds contact information related to the
originating technology to an event.

For example, you can add a server administrators name and telephone number to all
events originating from a particular server

To enable a dynamic data enrichment service contact policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Enrichment Policy.


A list of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies are displayed in the right
pane of the Administration View as shown in Figure 122 on page 343.

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Figure 122 List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies

3 From the list of out-of-the-box dynamic enrichment policies, select


Service_Contact_Enrichment.

The Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab, shown in Figure 123 on page 344, is
displayed in the details pane of the Administration View.

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Figure 123 Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab

4 On the BMC Impact Explorer toolbar, click the Update Policy button
the Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab editable.

5 To enable the policy, select the Enabled check box.

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6 In the Execution Order field, if more than one type of this policy exists, specify the
order of execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be
one greater the largest current execution order.
If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

7 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.
To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

8 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event, if necessary.

9 Click OK.

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If this is the first time a policy is saved, the following confirmation dialog box is
displayed:
Figure 124 Import confirmation

10 Click Yes.
A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in
the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the
right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the
left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

11 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in Importing dynamic data enrichment source on page 350.

Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text


translation policy
If you are integrated with PATROL, the dynamic data enrichment PATROL message
translation policy allows you to substitute existing PATROL messages with messages that
are meaningful to your enterprise.
For example, you can use the PATROL message translation policy to change this message:
NT_CPU.CPU_0.CPUprcrUserTimePercent parameter CPUCputil triggered on
90 <= 97 <= 100

to the following, more comprehensible message:


CPU Utilization is at 97%

NOTE
A sample dynamic data enrichment service contact policy data source file,
TextTranslation.csv, is provided in the %HOME%\Mastercell\console\etc\samples
directory. The TextTranslation.csv file includes translations for many common messages that
will be useful in your enterprise. If you are integrated with PATROL, BMC Software
recommends that you take advantage of the data that is already included in this sample file.
For information about using the TextTranslation.csv file, see Using the sample PATROL
messaging text translation dynamic data enrichment source file on page 276.

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Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation policy

To enable a dynamic data enrichment PATROL message translation policy


1 From the Event Management Policies tab of the Administration View, expand the By
Policy Type folder.

2 Under the By Policy Type folder, select Dynamic Enrichment Policy.


A list of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies are displayed in the right
pane of the Administration View as shown in Figure 125.
Figure 125 List of out-of-the-box dynamic data enrichment policies

3 From the list of out-of-the-box dynamic enrichment policies, select


PATROL_Message_Translation.

4 Click the Update Policy button

The Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab, shown in Figure 126 on page 348, is
displayed in the details pane of the Administration View.

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Figure 126 Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab

5 To enable the event management policy, select the Enabled check box. If you do not
want to enable the event management policy at this time, it can be enabled later.

6 In the Execution Order field, if more than one policy exists, specify the order of
execution.

NOTE
When a new policy is created, the number shown in the Execution Order field should be
one greater the largest current execution order.
If two policies have the same execution order, they will run in indeterminate order.

7 In the Policy Activation Timeframes section, define the periods of time the event
management policy should be active (when enabled) by performing the following
actions:

A Select one of the following choices:


s

348

To make the event management policy active continuously, select Always


Active.
To specify when the policy is active or inactive, select Define Activation
Timeframes.

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Enabling a dynamic enrichment PATROL message text translation policy

The Active Timeframes and Not Active Timeframes lists are displayed.

B If you selected Define Activation Timeframes, depending on how you want to


define the timeframe for your policy do one or both of the following:
s

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be active, select the
Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its scrollable
list.

To specify the periods of time when the policy should be inactive, select the
Not Active Timeframes check box and one or more timeframes from its
scrollable list.

NOTE
You can select both check boxes to create active and inactive time periods. However, the
inactive time period takes precedence over the active time period.

8 (optional) In the Match Fields section, activate the Match Tracing check box to add
diagnostic notes to the event, if necessary.

9 Click OK.
If this is the first time a policy is saved, the following confirmation dialog box is
displayed:
Figure 127 Import confirmation

10 Click Yes.
A green check mark should be displayed in the Enable column next to the policy in
the event management policies list. (You may need to scroll the window to the
right to see the Enable column.) The policy also should show up in the tree in the
left pane of the BMC Impact Explorer window.

11 Import the data from the dynamic data enrichment source enrichment file as
described in Importing dynamic data enrichment source on page 350.

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Importing dynamic data enrichment source


Before a dynamic data enrichment policy can take effect, the data in the dynamic
data enrichment source file must be imported.

1 Ensure that the policy is enabled.


2 Select Import tab.
The Import tab is displayed as shown in Figure 128.
Figure 128 Import tab

Table 63 describes the uneditable fields of the Import tab. These fields are for your
information only.
Table 63

Import tab uneditable fields

Field

Description

Data File

Path to the enrichment data source

File Format

Type of file used by the policy

Last Action

Last time an import (replace or merge) was completed.

3 In the field opposite the Import button, select whether you want to Replace the
existing data in the cell or Merge new data with existing data in the cell.

4 Click Import.
The data is imported from the file into the cell.

5 Verify that the information has been uploaded by ensuring that the Last Action
information in the Import tab shows a completed upload message.

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Verifying that the policy is running

Verifying that the policy is running


To verify that the policy is running,

1 Send an event that should trigger the policy


2 Access the History tab, scroll down to the Operations Log and verify that your
policy has executed.
Figure 129 shows the History tab for a successfully executed dynamic data enrichment
policy.
Figure 129 History tab showing executed dynamic data enrichment policy

Editing event selection criteria


If you need to edit event selection criteria that you have already defined, follow these
steps:

1 From the event management policy tab navigation tree, select an event selector.
2 Click the Update Event Selector button

3 From the Event Selection Criteria section of the Selector Details tab, select an event
selection criteria in the list and click Edit.
The Edit button remains inactive until you select an event selection criteria.

4 Use the Edit Event Criteria editor to make the necessary changes to the description,
event class, or expression.

5 To save the edited event selection criteria, click OK.


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Deleting an event selector

6 From the Selector Details tab, click OK to save the edited event selection criteria and
the event selector.

Deleting an event selector


If you need to delete an event selector that you have defined, follow these steps:

1 From the event management policy navigation tree, select the appropriate event
selector.

2 Click the Delete Event Selector button

The Delete Confirmation dialog box is displayed.

3 Click Yes.
The event selector is deleted.

Trouble-shooting event management policies


This section lists some common problems encountered with event management
policies and some tools to assist you trouble-shoot problems not listed here.

Problem: The policy is not running


If the policy is not running, try the following:
s

Access the Policy Details tab for the policy and ensure that the Enabled check box is
selected.

(Dynamic data enrichment policies only) Access the Policy Details tab for the policy
and ensure that the Match Fields and Output Fields contain the exact same number of
match fields in the same order as the associated data enrichment source file.

352

(Dynamic data enrichment policies only) Ensure that you have imported the data from
the data enrichment source file into the cell using the Import tab.
For policies that use a schedule, check to see if CellEventEnable=No is set in
mcell.conf. If it is then change it to CellEventEnable=Yes.

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Problem: The notification policy is configured to generate a notification email, but no email is being sent

Problem: The notification policy is configured to generate a


notification email, but no email is being sent
When the product is installed, part of the installation process locates the SMTP server.
If an SMTP server is not installed before the product installed, the email notification
will not be able to send an email. If you installed an SMTP server after the product
was installed, from the product installation directory C:\Program Files\BMC
Software\Impact\server\etc\<cell-name>\kb\bin\w4, run the smail.exe utility:
smail.exe -install server_address -f sender_name

where server_address is the name of your mail server and sender_name is the
name that you want to appear in the From line of the notification email.
For example,
smail.exe -install mail.bmc.com -f BMC Technical Support

Problem: I receive an invalid data error when running a


dynamic data enrichment policy
Access the Policy Details tab for the policy and ensure that the Match Fields and Output
Fields contain the exact same number of match fields in the same order as the associated data
enrichment source file.

Figure 130 on page 354 shows an example error message generated by dynamic data
enrichment policy that has a mismatch between the match and output fields defined
in the policy and the number of columns included in the enrichment data source file.

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Problem: I receive an error message when running a dynamic data enrichment blackout policy

Figure 130 Invalid data error: dynamic enrichment policy

Problem: I receive an error message when running a dynamic


data enrichment blackout policy
Ensure that the timeframe defined in the data source enrichment file actually exists.
For information on creating valid timeframes, see How to create a new local
timeframe on page 270.
Figure 131 shows an example error message generated by dynamic blackout policy
that has an invalid timeframes.
Figure 131 Invalid timeframe error: dynamic blackout policy

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Problem: I have several thousand data records displayed in the Dynamic Data Editor tab

Problem: I have several thousand data records displayed in


the Dynamic Data Editor tab
If your Match Table contains several thousand data records (testing has noted 7500),
then when you try to execute a copy, paste, export, or print action, you can encounter
poor response times from the BMC IX Console and find message buffer full
exceptions in the trace files.
To overcome this limitation, you can uncomment out the five sizing properties in the
IMPACT_SOLUTIONS_HOME\console\etc\ix.properties file.
#data_handle_method_new=true
#IX will handle below specified chunk size data at a time. Default
data chunk size is 100
#data_handle_chunk_size=100
#sleep interval (in milliseconds) between the specified chunk size
data handling. Default Sleep interval is 500 milliseconds
#data_handle_sleep_interval=500
#IX will handle specified chunk size data at a time while paste
action. Default data chunk size is 25
#data_paste_chunk_size=25
#sleep interval (in Milliseconds) between the specified paste chunk
size data handling. Default Sleep interval is 1000 milliseconds
#data_paste_sleep_interval=1000

After modifying the ix.properties file, you must restart the BMC IX Console.

Trouble-shooting tools for dynamic data enrichment policies


You can use the following methods to trouble-shoot the dynamic data enrichment
policies that you have defined:
s

Enable the Match Tracing check box in the Dynamic Enrichment Policy Details tab to
to add diagnostic notes to the event.

Access the History tab and check the Operations Log to determine which dynamic
data enrichment policy added the information into the event.

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Chapter

11

11

Dynamic data editor


This chapter describes the Dynamic Data Editor. It contains the following topics:
Dynamic data definition using the Dynamic Data Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigating the Dynamic Data Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigation pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toolbar functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filtering and sorting the Data List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filtering slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sorting data fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with data instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Extended Details tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internals tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data instance context menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a new data instance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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360
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363
364
365
365
365
365
367
368

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Dynamic data definition using the Dynamic Data Editor

Dynamic data definition using the Dynamic


Data Editor
Dynamic data is contextual reference data that is stored in the event repository and
updated whenever the context changes while the cell is running. Its function is
similar to a global variable. You use the Dynamic Data Editor to define data class
instances for use in event management rules or service models. To define the data
instances, you must first define a data class. See BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base
Development Reference Guide for additional information about dynamic data.

Navigating the Dynamic Data Editor


You can use the Dynamic Data Editor to add a dynamic data instance to use as a
contextual variable in MRL rules and policies (Adding a new data instance on
page 365).
This section discusses the basics of how to navigate the Dynamic Data Editor.

Navigation pane
In the Dynamic Data Editor tab on the Administration View you can view the data
classes for a cell in a hierarchical tree, as illustrated in Figure 132 on page 359.

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Navigation pane

Figure 132 Dynamic Data Editor Navigation Pane

Table 64 lists the parts on the Administration Tab Navigation pane.


Table 64

Administration tab navigation pane

Name

Description

Dynamic Data Editor tab

identifies the dynamic data editor

cell group icon

identifies a cell group

cell icon

identifies a cell

DATA class

root class to which all data classes belong

DATA subclass

data class defined as a subclass of the root class


DATA
Data subclasses comprise the dynamic data tables in
the current cell.

view selection tabs

access to the events, services, or administration


portions of the console

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Toolbar functions

Toolbar functions
Figure 133 describes the toolbar buttons available in the Dynamic Data Editor.
Figure 133 Dynamic Data Editor toolbar
Hide
Navigation

Add data
instances

Hide
Details

Hide
Data List

Refresh
Current Data
List

Update data
instance

Copy and add


data instances

Delete data
instances

Copy data
instances

Paste data
instances

Export data
instances

Print data
instances

Filtering and sorting the Data List


The Data List of the Administration View in BMC Impact Explorer provides an
interface to assist you in working with a cells dynamic data. From the Data List, you
can
s
s

filter slots
sort data

Filtering slots
The Slot Quick Filter allows you to filter the displayed data list according to specified
slot criteria.

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Filtering slots

1 Click on the Slot Quick Filter button

or the down arrow to its right to display


the Slot Quick Filter dialog box, shown in Figure 134, in which you set the filter
criteria.

Figure 134 Slot Quick Filter dialog box

2 From the Slot list, select the slot name.


3 From the Operator list, select the specific operator with which the filter acts.
4 In the Value box, enter the value with which you want to filter the Data List.
5 Click OK.
The filter you specified appears in place of the Slot Quick Filter button and the data
instances that meet the criteria are displayed in the Data List, as shown in
Figure 135 on page 362.
For illustration purposes, the Data List is filtered by Slot name equals Brussels.

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Filtering slots

Figure 135 Unfiltered data list


Unfiltered Data List:

To toggle the quick filter on and off, click on the Slot Quick Filter button or on the
filter specifications currently displayed in place of the icon.

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Sorting data fields

Sorting data fields


You can sort fields in the Data List using two methods: a multiple column sort order
or single-click on a column to sort immediately by that column.

To sort using multiple column sorting


Designating multiple columns for a sorting order is useful in resolving sort order
conflicts in the data list. Multiple column sorting functions as the following
illustrates. Set a multiple column sort order for a maximum of three columns with
these steps.

1 Right-click on a column head to display the Slot Order Indicator.


2 Select the order position desired for that column.
The Slot Order Indicator permits you to select a column as having no influence on
the sort order, or as first, second or third in the order.

NOTE
When you select the first column to include in your sort order the only options available in
the Slot Order Indicator are None and First. After you designate a column as first in the sort
order, the option Second is available in the Slot Order Indicator when you right-click on the
second column. The Third option is available when you have designated a column as
Second in the sort order.

3 Right-click next on the column you want to include in the sort order.
4 Select the order position desired for that column.
5 Repeat if you want to establish a third column in the sort order.
An alternative method of multiple-column sorting is to press the Ctrl key and singleclick on a header to add that column as the next column in the sort order. That is,
pressing Ctrl and single-clicking on a column sets it as the first in the sort order,
pressing Ctrl and single-clicking on the next column sets it as the second in the sort
order, and the third column is set as the third in the sort order by again pressing the
Ctrl key and single-clicking on the column header.

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Working with data instances

Currently only three columns can be included in the sort order. Pressing the Ctrl key
and single-clicking on a fourth column will designate it as third in the sort order in
place of the column previously designated as third. Also, pressing the Ctrl key and
single-clicking on a column that is part of a sort order will remove it from the sort
order.
The remaining columns in the designated sort order will reposition in the sort order
to replace the one that has been removed. For example, if you press the Ctrl key and
single-click on the column previously designated as first in the sort order, it will be
removed from the order and the two remaining will move from second to first and
from third to second in the new sort order.
Remember the following facts about sorting:
s

Only if there is a sorting conflict in the First sort column will the sorting be
resolved by use of the Second sort column.

The sorting will extend to the Third sort column only if there is a sorting conflict in
the Second sort column.

Establishing a multiple column sort simply ensures that any sorting conflicts that
may arise can be resolved to the third column level.

If you have established a multiple sort order in the Data List, clicking on one of the
sort order columns toggles that columns display between ascending and descending
order, as indicated by the small arrow next to the sort order number in the column
head.

To sort using single-click sorting


Sorting also can be done by single-clicking on the column you want to use as the basis
of your Data List sort. Even if a multiple sort order has been established, as in the
preceding section, you can click on any column that is not part of the designated
multiple sort order to reset sorting. This action establishes single column sorting and
the column on which you clicked is designated as the First, and only, column in the
new sort order.

Working with data instances


From the Administration View, you can edit and manipulate a cells dynamic data
instances. All classes that are visible in the Administration View are subclasses of the
base data class DATA and MC_SM_DATA. Subclasses of MC_SM_DATA are shown in the
navigation pane, but data instances are not shown for these classes. Each cells data
class definitions reside in its Knowledge Base.

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Extended Details tab

To define data instances in the Administration View for a custom data class, you must
first define that data class in the KB of the cell. For further information, see the BMC
Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide.

Extended Details tab


The Extended Details tab displays extended details of a selected data instance.

Internals tab
The Internals tab displays the internal data as defined on the base DATA class.

Data instance context menu


The Data List of the Administration View in BMC Impact Explorer provides an
interface to assist you in working with a cells dynamic data. Right-click on a data
instance in this pane to display the pop-up context menu. Discussion here focuses on
the New, New Copy, Edit, and Delete pop-up context menu options.

Adding a new data instance


This section describes how to create a new data instance.

To create a new data instance


1 Right-click on a data instance.
2 Select the New pop-up menu option to display the New tab in the Details pane of
the Administration View.
The fields on the New tab are the slots for which data information can be entered
for this new data instance. The fields with a white background can be edited; fields
with an asterisk are required.
The unique data identifier slot (mc_udid) has a white background and is empty.

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Adding a new data instance

NOTE
The mc_udid slot information is assigned by the cell and BMC Software recommends that
you allow the cell to assign this value rather than entering one of your own.

The cell assigns a valid value for this slot. The slot fields that are dimmed will be
completed automatically by the cell. The only exception to this is the list associated
with the Type field that permits you to select from specified options, as shown in
Figure 136.
Figure 136 Type field list

3 Click OK to complete the new data instance and close the New tab.
The success or failure of your attempt to create a new data instance will be
reflected in the message bar at the bottom of BMC Impact Explorer window.
Figure 137 illustrates a notification of a failed attempt to create a new data instance.
Figure 137 Message bar

To create a new data instance with the New Copy option


Unlike the New menu option, the New Copy option requires you to right-click on a
selected data instance in the Data List of the Administration View to display a New
tab in the Details pane of the Administration View in BMC Impact Explorer window,
as shown in Figure 138 on page 367. Note that certain of the editable fields contain
slot information that is copied from the selected data instance in the Data List.

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Editing slots

Figure 138 New data instance created with the New Copy option

The New Copy menu option provides the same selection in the type field list as the
New menu option, as shown in Figure 139.
Figure 139 Type field List

When you have entered or edited the appropriate slot information, click OK to create
the new data instance and close the New tab. The success or failure of your attempt to
create a new data instance is reflected in the message bar of BMC Impact Explorer
window.

Editing slots
A class definition consists of one or more slots. Each slot has a data type and can have
specific attributes called facets that can control the values that the slot can have or
control aspects of a class instances processing. A class that is a subclass to another
class inherits all the slots of the parent class.
The Edit pop-up menu option allows you to update the selected data instance of the
current data list in the Data List display pane.

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Exporting data

1 Select and right-click on the data instance to display the Edit tab in the Details pane
of BMC Impact Explorer window.
The Edit tab contains the slot value information of the selected data instance. Fields
that can be changed have a white background.

2 To save the edited information and close the Edit tab, click OK.

Exporting data
From the Data List in the Administration View, you can export a data instance as a file
with a specified file name, in a format selected from a list, and containing all or only
the visible slot information available for the data instance. Multiple data instances can
be exported to the same file at the same time. Do this by selecting all the data
instances your want included to begin the export process.

1 Select a data instance and select the File => Export menu option or click on the
Export toolbar button to display the Export Policies dialog box, as shown in
Figure 140.

Figure 140 Export Data dialog box

2 In the Format list, select the format for the export file, as shown in Figure 141.
Figure 141 Export Data dialog boxSelecting the data format

3 With the Visible Slots and All Slots option buttons, select whether you want to
include only the visible slots or all slots in the file.
If you select All Slots, the Filter for Importing check box is available.

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Exporting data

4 In the To File box, accept the default or specify the file name and location for the
export file.

5 Click OK to create the export file and close the Export Data dialog box.
For illustration purposes, in Figure 142, the export file mcdata.csv containing
information on all the slots for the selected data instance is created in
C:\Documents and Settings\zane\My Documents.
Figure 142 Contents of mcdata.csv

Figure 143 illustrates an export file containing four data instances.


Figure 143 Export file containing four data instances

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Chapter

12

12

User-defined policies
This chapter describes how to create and how to implement user-defined policy
types. This chapter presents the following topics:
Understanding user-defined event policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding event processing rules (MRL) for policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Format of event processing rules for policy types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How a rule for a policy type is processed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sources of information about rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User-defined event policy type creation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating user-defined policy types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining the policy data class for a new policy type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining presentation names for a new policy type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating the event processing rule(s) for a new policy type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 12

User-defined policies

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372
372
373
373
374
374
374
376
377

371

Understanding user-defined event policy types

Understanding user-defined event policy


types
Predefined policy types cannot cover all requirements of different BMC Impact
Solution implementations. To support specialized event processing, you can also
define and implement custom event policy types to do specialized event processing
not supported by the predefined policy types. For instructions on creating event
policy types, see User-defined event policy type creation on page 374.

Understanding event processing rules (MRL)


for policy types
This section describes the form of policy type rules and discusses how they work.

Format of event processing rules for policy types


A typical event processing rule for a user-defined policy type has this form:
<rule-phase> rule-name:
using_policy
{
<POLICY_TYPE> ($POL) where [ ($POL.enabled == 1) AND
(($POL.active_timeframes == [] OR
tf_active($POL.active_timeframes)) AND
NOT tf_active($POL.except_timeframes)) ]
}
$POL.selector_ecf ($EV) where [ <other conditions> ]
{
<actions>;
opadd($EV, $POL.name, "action name", "");
} END

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How a rule for a policy type is processed

How a rule for a policy type is processed


The processing of a rule for a policy type is a follows:
1. The using_policy clause finds the applicable policy, that is, the instance of the
user-defined policy class (derived from IM_POLICY).
These class definitions describe the slots available in a policy class:
MC_DATA_CLASS :
POLICY ISA CORE_DATA
DEFINES {
name
: STRING, key = yes, read_only = yes;
description
: STRING;
enabled
: INTEGER, default = 1;
}; END
MC_DATA_CLASS:
IM_POLICY ISA POLICY
DEFINES {
active_timeframes : LIST_OF STRING;
except_timeframes : LIST_OF STRING;
selector_name
: STRING;
selector_class
: STRING;
selector_ecf
: ECF EVENT;
ordinal
: INTEGER, default=0;
}; END

2. The tf_active calls evaluates timeframes for the policy.


3. The selector ECF selects the event to process.
4. The actions implement the policy and the opadd call adds an entry to the
operations log of the event.

Sources of information about rules


You can get more information about rules for policy types and how to create them
from these sources
For...

See...

examples of rules for policy types

the pre-defined policies in .../kb/rules/im_internal.mrl.

definitions of the MRL constructs


and primitives for policy rules

BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development


Reference Guide

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User-defined policies

373

User-defined event policy type creation

User-defined event policy type creation


If you want to create a new user-defined event policy to perform specialized event
processing, first, you must define a new event policy type. An event policy type is a
data class, derived from that defines the distinct type of event processing to be
performed.

Creating user-defined policy types


To define a new user-defined policy type, you must do the following things.
Table 65

Policy Type Creation process

Step

Task

Topic

Define a new policy data class that describes


the policy type and copy it to the Knowledge
Base of each BMC IM instance to use the userdefined policy.

Defining the policy data class for


a new policy type on page 374

Define the presentation names that you want to Defining presentation names for a
appear in user interfaces for the policy type in a new policy type on page 376
BMCIX.properties configuration file.

Creating the event processing


Create a new rule that defines the event
rule(s) for a new policy type on
processing done by the policy type and
copy it to the Knowledge Base of each BMC page 377
IM instance to use the policy.

Defining the policy data class for a new policy type


To create a new policy type, first you must define a data class derived directly from
the IM_BASE_CUSTOM_POLICY base class. This policy data class describes the
policy types data. It also provides the template of data fields (slots) used by BMC IM
to generate the BMC IX Custom Policy Details panel in which users specify the
processing details for a policy of that type.

To define a new policy data class


1 Using a text editor, open the appropriate BAROC language file in the Knowledge
Base.
Because the IM_BASE_CUSTOM_POLICY base class is defined in
.../kb/class/im_policies.baroc file, you must define the new policy type in a separate
file that is loaded for compilation after .../kb/class/im_policies.baroc file (it is listed
after the im_policies.baroc in the .../kb/class/.load file list).
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Defining the policy data class for a new policy type

2 Define the new policy data class derived directly from the
IM_BASE_CUSTOM_POLICY base class.

A Create the new class slots. You can create slots of these types:
s
s
s
s

ENUMERATION
INTEGER
STRING
LIST OF

No other slot types are supported in custom event policies.

B Define the class slots in the order that you want them to appear in the BMC IX
Custom Policy Type panel.
The BMC IX Custom Policy Details panel created from the policy type will have
a field for each slot added to the IM_BASE_CUSTOM_POLICY class. The
interface fields appear in the same order as the slots are defined in the class
definition.
See the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide for
detailed information on creating new classes.

3 Save the edited file after defining the new policy type (data class).
4 Add and entry for the new file that you created to the compiler load list in the
.../kb/class/.load file after the entry for the ../kb/class/im_policies.baroc file, which

contains the base policy data class that the new policy type references.

5 Recompile the BMC Impact Manager instances Knowledge Base (KB) after
defining the new policy data class.
For more information on compiling a KB, see Compiling a Knowledge Base in
the BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base Development Reference Guide.

6 Finally, you must copy the changed KB to every BMC Impact Manager instance
(cell) that will use the new policy.

Verifying that you created the class successfully


If you created the class successfully, you should be able to see it in the By Policy list
and the Custom Policy Details panel.

Where to go from here


Next, define user-friendly presentation names to appear in the user interface for the
policy type and its slots.
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Defining presentation names for a new policy type

Defining presentation names for a new policy type


If you want user-friendly presentation names to appear in the user interface for the
policy type and its slots instead of the internal names, you must:
s
s

define presentation names for the policy type in a resource file


list the resource file for the policy type in the BMC IX.properties file

To define presentation names for a policy type


1 Create a resource file for the policy type to list the policy type and each slot with its
assigned presentation name. The resource file name must have the .properties file
extension.

2 Edit the resource file to add an entry for each presentation name assignment.
A To define the presentation name (label) for the policy type, add a line with the
following format to the resource file:
CLASS.<policy type name>=<policy type presentation name> Policy

B To define the presentation name (label) used for a slot, add a line with the
following format to the resource file.:
SLOT.<policy type name>.<slot name>=<slot presentation name>

3 Place the resource file in the .../console/lib/lang/kbinfo directory.


A Add the base name of the resource file to the value of kb_info_resources
parameter in the BMC Impact Explorer .../console/etc/ix.properties file using this
format:
kb_info_resources=<resource file name>,kb_core_resource,
kb_deprecated_resource

The defined presentation names will display in the BMC Impact Manager Event
Management Policies tree, the Policy Type picker window, and in the Policy List
panel. Any slot or policy type for which a presentation name is not defined displays
its internal name.
The event policy details tab for all user-defined policy types is Custom Policy Details.

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Creating the event processing rule(s) for a new policy type

Creating the event processing rule(s) for a new policy type


Before you can define an event policy based on the user-defined policy type that you
created, you must:
s

create a new Knowledge Base rule or rules to define the event processing done by
the policy type

copy the rule or rules to the Knowledge Base of each BMC IM instance on which
the user-defined policy will run

Event processing rule requirements


The event processing rule or rules that you define for the new user-defined policy
type must:
s
s

do dynamic selection (use the using_policy clause)


reference the policy data class that describes the new policy type

To create the event processing rule for a new policy type


1 , Add a new file in the .../kb/rules directory, for example, my_policies.mrl, for the
new event processing rule or rules for the new policy type.

2 Edit the policy MRL file and write the event processing rule for the appropriate
rule phase.
For more information, see
s
s
s

Evaluation order of event policy types on page 266


Understanding event processing rules (MRL) for policy types on page 372
See the MRL for the pre-defined policy types in ...\kb\rules\im_internal.mrl file.

3 Add the file name for the new rule or rules to the compiler load list in the
.../kb/rules/.load file.

4 Compile the BMC Impact Manager instances Knowledge Base (KB) after defining
the rule for the policy type.
For more information on compiling a KB, see BMC Impact Solutions Knowledge Base
Development Reference Guide.

5 Copy this KB change to every BMC Impact Manager instance (cell) that will use a
policy based on the new policy type.

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Creating the event processing rule(s) for a new policy type

The definition of the policy type is complete and users can now create policies based
on it in the Custom Policy Type panel.

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Index
Symbols
$, in variable name 57
.dtd files 191
.load files 56
.loadwic files 56
.mrl files 56
.pkg files 56
.wic files 56
.xact files 79
.xml files 190

A
A directory 201
Abstract rules
When clause 67
Acknowledge
event icon 154
event operation 154
Acknowledged (ACK) event status icon 108
action blocks 57
action definitions
local 191
remote 202
Action tag 192
ActionGroup tag 192
ActionResultInlineLimit parameter 201
actions
adding buttons to toolbar 198
defining in a cell 209
definitions 190
deleting 200
described 190
directory 201
execution results 208
execution variables 209
file naming guidelines 190, 202
for AIX 201
for HP-UX 201
for Linux 201
local, defining 190
MRL syntax 202
remote, defining 202
reorder action buttons in toolbar 199
responding to an event 156

result events 201


return code limitation for Windows 208
roles 202
Solaris executables 201
Windows executables 201
Actions.dtd file 191
Actions.xsd file 191
adding
buttons to local action toolbar 198
cell to MetaCollector 121
Admin record 213
Administration View
creating new data instance 365
edit menu 367
exporting data 368
menu, context 365
Slot Quick Filter 360
sort multiple columns 363
sort, single-click 364
alias formulas
conditional operators 165
functions in 167
ALL keyword
Using clause 65
annotating events 156
Argument tag 194
Assign To (event operation) 154
Assigned event status icon 108

B
Basic Information option of default filters 122
bii4p_collectors.mrl file 98
bin directory 201
Blackout
event status icon 108
blackout policy (standard), creating 283
blackout policy, creating 283, 285, 322
Blackout.cfg 269
BMC Impact Administration server
configuration files 255
BMC Impact Explorer
action definitions 190
configuring local actions 197
Event Groups, described 139

Index

379

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
BMC Impact Manager
roles 91
BMC Portal
defining roles for collectors 96
BMC Software, contacting 2
Body clause
in rules 69
syntax 70
braces
to delimit action blocks 57
brackets
required for primitive arguments 57

C
catchall_collector.mrl file 96
cell groups
icon 25
cell names
spaces in 56
CELL_BUILD variable 209
CELL_DATE variable 209
CELL_NAME variable 209
CELL_RELEASE variable 209
cells
defining actions 209
icon 25
importing data into 269
sending events to 79
viewing event list 115
character case
for MRL 57
Class Chooser dialog box 125, 130
class slot 183
CLASS variable 209
class_name slot 85
clauses
Body 69
conditions for Using 64
Unless 66
Using 63
When 67
Where 60
Close event
icon 155
operation 155
Closed event status icon 108
closure policy, creating 290
collector keyword 89
collectors
bii4p_collectors.mrl 98
catchall_collector.mrl 96
color affected by status and severity 112
creating 88
defaults for event management 96
defaults for service impact management 99

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directory 88
dynamic 144
event count affected by status 113
expression 90
icon 25
mc_bylocation_collectors.mrl 97
mc_bystatus_collectors.mrl 97
mc_evr_collectors.mrl 99
MCxP 98
MCxP collector set 98
naming 89
permissions 89, 92
roles 89, 91
security 91
self_collector.mrl 96
setting color in navigation tree 112
static 93, 143
syntax 88, 90
viewing event list 115
Collectors tab (Events View navigation) 25
color
affected by event severity 108
affected by status and severity 112
event status icon 108
commands
mccomp 79
msend 79
compiling
rules 79
complex logic in creating filters 126
component based enrichment policy 285
component based enrichment policy, excluding slots 289
component service
setting maintenance model manually 159
setting status manually with remote action 159
Components
subtab (Impact Manager Info dialog box) 27
condition operators
for Where clauses 61, 62
conditional operators in alias formulas 165
conditions
for Using clause 64
configuring
event Help 29
Events tab display settings 110
local actions 197
connecting to event sources 162
console
adding action buttons to toolbar 198
dynamic data 364
exporting data 368
Help, viewing 30
settings, default configuration 27
Slot Quick Filter 360
sort data fields 363
sort, single-click 364
toolbar

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
reorder actions 199
console toolbar
adding local action buttons 198
conventions
for MRL 56
copying event information 161
Correlate rules
When clause 67
correlation policy, creating 292, 293
Create clauses
in collectors 89
creating
collectors 88
filter groups 127
local filter 124
customer support 3
customizing
event Help 29
Events tab display settings 110

D
Dashboard view
about SIEM dashboard 25
copying CIEM dashboard 175
creating CIEM dashboard 168
deleting CIEM dashboard 176
editing CIEM dashboard 174
data
creating new instance 365
defining indexes for 64
dynamic 72, 364
exporting 368
importing 269
retrieving in rules 59
sorting 363
data classes
event relations 182
MC_EVENT_RELATION 180, 182
Data instance menu 365
data instances
retrieving with Using clause 63
declaring variables 71
Decline Ownership
event operation 155
icon 155
default filters
Basic Information option 122
in Event Sources list 23, 121
SMC Impact Events option 123
SMC Information option 122
SMC Status History Events option 123
Supervisor Information option 122
defining
dynamic collectors 94
indexes 76

local actions 190


remote actions 202
remote actions in cells 209
static collectors 93
Delete clauses
in collectors 89
deleting
a filter 127
actions 200
event alias associations 168
filter group 128
demonstration of event relations 186
deprecated slots 86
details pane (Events View) 23
directories
A 201
bin 201
collector 88
for actions 201
h1 201
l2 201
p4 201
s5 201
w4 201
dynamic blackout policy, enabling 335
dynamic collectors 144
defining 94
roles 95
specifying 89
dynamic data 364
retrieving in rules 63
using in rules 72
dynamic data enrichment policies
blackout 335
creating new 324
dynamic enrichment policy, creating 338
dynamic Help 29

E
ECF (event condition formula) 264
ECFs
in actions 202
in collectors 90
Where clause 60
Edit Configuration dialog box
event count 114
Events View subtab 111
Help Info subtab 29
severity 113
Edit Event View dialog box 125
Edit Filters icon 124
edit menu 367
Edit Toolbar Actions dialog box 198
editing
event alias associations 167

Index

381

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
local filter 126
slot orders 130
END keyword 57
enrichment policy, creating 296
error_code slot 85
error_column slot 84
error_goal slot 85
error_line slot 84
error_message slot 84, 85
error_source slot 85
errors
in event processing 85
escalation policy, creating 299, 300
evaluation order of policies 266
event alias associations
deleting 168
editing 167
event collectors
described 138
event condition formula 264
Event Condition Formulas, See ECFs
event count
affected by status 113
in Events View navigation 25
Event Count field 112
Event Details window 116
event groups
described 138
granting access 151
viewing event list 115
Event Groups tab 25
event management
collectors 96
event management policies
closure 290
component based enrichment 285
correlation 292
enabling and disabling 322
escalation 299
execution order 287
notification 304
propagation 308
recurrence 310
remote action policy 259, 313
standard blackout 283
suppression 313
threshold 316
timeout 319
Event Operation Confirmation check box 112
event policy
evaluation order 266
types of 258
event priority
icons 109
setting 155
understanding 109
event processing

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errors 85
event relations
data class 182
definition example 184
demonstration 186
icons 103
illustrated 182
mechanism 180
primitives 184
slots 181
event relationships, exploring 160
event selection clauses
described 60
event selectors
defined 263, 278
groups 263
maximum number 263
event severity
icons 109
levels 109
event slot 85
Event Sources list
effect on event list 102
location in Events View 23
using 115
event status
icons 108
understanding 108
event_text slot 84
events
acknowledging 154
annotating 156, 160
assigning to an individual 154
closing 155
copying event data 161
copying event information 161
declining ownership 155
defining indexes for 64
event details 116
for action results 201
MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT 201
MC_CELL_PARSE_ERROR 84
MC_CELL_PROCESS_ERROR 85
MC_CELL_UNDEFINED_CLASS 85
referencing a particular slot in rules 57
relating 179
reopening 155
reopening in event list 155
responding with an action 156
retrieving with Using clause 63
selecting in rules 60
sending to a cell 79
setting the priority 155
sorting 129
sorting fields 131
taking ownership 154
undefined 84

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
viewing details 116
events list
current operator information 107
default columns 102
elements 102
location in Events View 23
organizing 120
refreshing 117, 118
selecting the type to view 115
slot orders, editing 130
viewing 114
Events View
configuring display settings 110
customizing display settings 110
illustrated 22
location of elements 22
navigation pane 24
overview 21
subtab (Edit Configuration dialog box) 111
events, sorting 363
Execute rules
When clause 67
Explore Event Relationships icon 160
exploring relationships 160
exporting data 368
expressions
in collectors 90
external data sources 267

filtering
events, by severity 124
events, by slot name 123
events, overview 121
filters
associating a slot order 131
creating global 125, 130
creating local 124
default 23, 122
deleting 127
editing 126
filter groups 127
global 121
local 124
organizing 127
severity quick filter 124
slot quick filter 123
using complex logic 126
flexibility for event assignment
ldap_configuration.xml 135
procedure 133
user groups 133
user_definitions.xml 135
functions
in alias formulas 167
in Body clause 69

General subtab (Impact Manager Info dialog box) 27


generic event relations mechanism 180
global filters 125, 130
global records
syntax 74
using in rules 74

files
.dtd 191
.load 56
.loadwic 56
.mrl 56
.pkg 56
.wic 56
.xact 79
.xml 190
Actions.dtd 191
Actions.xsd 191
bii4p_collectors.mrl 98
catchall_collector.mrl 96
LocalActions.dtd 191
LocalActions.xsd 191
mc_bylocation_collectors.mrl 97
mc_bystatus_collectors.mrl 97
mc_evr_collectors.mrl 99
MRL 56
naming guidelines for actions 190, 202
self_collector.mrl 96
filter groups
creating 127
deleting 128
renaming 128

H
h1 directory 201
hashed indexes
described 76
Help
for events, configuration 29
for events, customizing 29
icon for event Help 30
viewing 30
Help Info subtab 29
HP-UX
actions executables 201
hyperlinked URI 162

I
icons
Acknowledge Event 154

Index

383

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
cell 25
cell group 25
Close event 155
collector 25
Collectors tab 25
Decline Ownership 155
Edit Filters 124
Event Groups tab 25
event Help 30
event priority 109
event relations 103
event severity 109
event status 108
Explore Event Relationships 160
Icon Search for locating file for new action button 199
MetaCollectors tab 25
New Basic Filter 125
New Slot Order 129
Refresh 28
Reopen Event 155
Set Priority 155
severity level indicator 25
severity quick filter 121
slot quick filter 121
Take Ownership 154
icons versus text for columns in event list 112
if-then-else construct 70
image views, defined 141
Impact Manager Info dialog box
Components subtab 27
General subtab 27
Workload subtab 27
importing data 269
indexes
defining 76
defining on events and data 64
in Using clause 77
using in rules 76
Information Display Selection tabs (Events View) 22
instances
of interface classes 75
querying 64
interactive configuration
action task 240
interfaces
instances 75
syntax in rule 75
using in rules 75

K
Keep Severity Color on Close check box 111

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L
l2 directory 201
limit for literal strings 57
Line Color Severity check box 108, 111
Linux platform
action executables 201
literal strings
character length limit 57
single quotes 56
local actions
accessing results of 158
adding toolbar buttons for 198
configuring 197
defining 190
described 190
responding to an event 157, 194
roles 192
syntax 192
tags 193
XML tags 192
local filters 121, 124
LocalActions.dtd file 191
LocalActions.xsd file 191
Location.cfg 269
Logfile Adapter
.baroc file 39
MAP file 37
mcxa.conf file 36
sample log file 34
sample policy 40
sample rule 40
test events 45
walk-through procedure 34

M
mc_bylocation_collectors.mrl file 97
mc_bystatus_collectors.mrl file 97
MC_CELL_ACTION_RESULT event 201
MC_CELL_PARSE_ERROR
event 84
slots 84
MC_CELL_PROCESS_ERROR
event 85
slots 85
MC_CELL_UNDEFINED_CLASS
event 85
slots 85
MC_EVENT_RELATION data class 180, 182
mc_event_relations slot 182
mc_evr_collectors.mrl file 99
mc_relation_source slot 182
mc_tool_uri parameter 162
mccomp command 79
MCELL_HOME action execution variable 209

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
mcxa.conf file 36
MCxP collector set 98
menu, editing 367
MetaCollector, event
described 139
MetaCollectors
adding a cell 121
creating 120
viewing event list 115
MetaCollectors tab (Events View navigation) 25
modifying
slot orders 130
MRL
character case 57
conventions 56
END keyword 57
files 56
syntax 57
syntax for actions 202
variable names 57
msend command 79

N
naming
collectors 89
New Basic Filter icon 125
new data instance, creating 365
New Slot Order icon 129
newline characters
in slot values 57
notification policy, creating 304, 305

O
online Help 30
Open event status icon 108
organizing
events in the event list 120
filters 127

P
p4 directory 201
Pending Events indicator (Events View) 23
permissions
for collectors 89, 92
PKG_NAME variable 209
PMEP files 269
policies
Blackout 283, 322
Closure 290
component based enrichment 285
Correlation 292
creating new dynamic data enrichment 324

dynamic data enrichment blackout 335


Dynamic Enrichment 338
enabling dynamic data enrichment dynamic data
enrichment policies
enabling out-of-the-box 334
enabling standard out-of-the-box 322
Enrichment 296
Escalation 299
evaluation order 266
new closure 290
new correlation 292
new escalation 299
new notification 304
new propagation 308
new recurrence 310
new standard blackout 283
new suppression 313
new threshold 316
new timeout 319
Notification 304
Propagation 308
Recurrence 310
Suppression 313
Threshold 316
Timeout 319
policy type, user-defined
creating presentation names for 376
creating processing rules for 377
creating, task overview 374
defining policy data class for 374
presentation names
defining for a new policy type 376
primitives
argument syntax 57
for event relations 180, 184
in Body clause 69
priority. See event priority
product support 3
Propagate rules
When clause 67
propagation policy, creating 308

Q
query clause, in rules 59
quick filters
severity 121
severity quick filter 124
slot quick filter 121, 123
quotation marks
for literal strings 56

R
recurrence policy, creating 310, 311

Index

385

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Refine rules
using interfaces in 75
Refresh icon 28
refreshing the event list
automatically 117
manually 118
related events
described 179, 180
relation definition
described 180
relation type
described 180
relations, event
icons 103
remote actions
accessing results of 157
defining 202, 209
described 190
responding to event 156
remote execution
action group 226
action name 226
action rule 214, 219, 240, 242, 251
action task 215, 219, 246, 252
Add Event Criteria dialog 228
Admin record 213, 219
automatic 212, 214, 236, 237, 251
Create Remote Actions dialog 226
credential records 215
working with 221
credential_repository.xml 215
definition 212
Event Criteria Formula 228
iadmin commands 220
interactive 212, 213, 224, 240
policy 214, 238
process summary 218
properties files 252
Remote Action Policy window 238
RunRemoteTask 240, 249
RunTask 240, 249
script deployment 230
test event 234
troubleshooting 254
user access roles 227
removing
actions 200
filter group 128
renaming a filter group 128
Reopen Event
icon 155
operation 155
reopening events 155
REQUESTOR variable 209
results
from actions 201, 208
of a local action 158

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BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

of a remote action 157


return codes
from action results 201
roles
collector access 89
in actions 202
in BMC Impact Manager 91
in collectors 91
in dynamic collectors 95
in local actions 192
rule phases 266
RULE_NAME variable 209
rules
body 59
Body clause 69
compiling 79
ending 57
global records 74
if-then-else construct 70
query clause 59
querying instances 64
retrieving data 59
selecting events 60
syntax 57
testing 79
tracing 79
Unless clause 66
Using clause 63
using dynamic data 72
using indexes 76
using interfaces 75
using variables in 71
When clause 67
Where clause 60
writing 56

S
s5 directory 201
security
for collectors 91
selection criteria
in rules 60
self collectors
file 96
self keyword 89
self_collector.mrl file 96
sending
events to a cell 79
service component
maintenance mode, setting manually with a remote
action 159
status, setting manually with a remote action 159
service impact management
collectors 99
ServiceContact.cfg 269

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Set Priority
event operation 155
icon 155
severity
effect on color of collector 112
effect on event status icon 108
keeping color on close 111
level indicator (Events View navigation) 25, 109
quick filter 121
setting color in collector tree 112
setting color in event list 111
single quotes
for cell names 56
for literal strings 56
slot assignments
in Body clause 69
slot orders
associating with a filter 131
creating 129
described 102
editing 130
Slot Quick Filter 360
slot quick filter 121, 123
slot values
newline character 57
slots
class 183
for event relations 181
MC_CELL_PARSE_ERROR 84
MC_CELL_PROCESS_ERROR 85
MC_CELL_UNDEFINED_CLASS 85
mc_event_relations 182
mc_relation_source 182
referencing in rules 57
type 183
SLOTS variable 209
SMC
Impact Events option of SMC Events filter 123
Information option of default filters 122
Status History Events option of SMC Events filter 123
SNMP Adapter
.baroc file 52
configuring 48
MAP file 51
publishing MIB files 49
test events 53
Solaris platform
action executables 201
sorted indexes
described 76
sorting 363, 364
sorting events
creating new slot order 129
multiple columns 132
single column 131
source event
described 180

spaces
in cell name 56
static collectors 143
defining 93
static Help 29
status
affects color of collector 112
affects event count for collector 113
contribution to event count 112
event icons 108
service component, setting manually with remote
action 159
string length 57
strings
character limit 57
subcollector node 141
Supervisor Information option of default filters 122
support, customer 3
suppression policy, creating 313, 314
syntax
for Body clause 70
for collectors 88, 90
for global records 74
for interface rule 75
for local actions 192
for rules 57
for variables 71

T
Take Ownership
event operation 154
icon 154
technical support 3
testing
rules 79
TextTranslation.cfg 269
threshold policy, creating 316
timeframes
creating 271
Timeframes window 271
timeout policy, creating 319, 320
toolbar
adding action buttons to 198
deleting an action 200
in dynamic data editor 360
reordering actions 199
tracing
rules 79
transaction logs
viewing 79
type slot 183

Index

387

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

U
undefined events 84
Unless clauses
in rules 66
Using clauses
ALL keyword 65
conditions 64
in rules 59, 63
indexes in 77

V
variables
action execution 209
CELL_BUILD 209
CELL_DATE 209
CELL_NAME 209
CELL_RELEASE 209
CLASS 209
declaring 71
MCELL_HOME 209
naming 57
PKG_NAME 209
REQUESTOR 209
RULE_NAME 209
SLOTS 209
syntax 71
using in rules 71
View Manager Info menu command 27
View Selection tabs
Events View 22
Events View navigation 25
viewing
cell performance data 27
cell properties 27
event details 116
event list 115
Help for a console window or dialog box 30
Help in console 30
transaction logs 79
types of event lists 115

W
w4 directory 201
When clauses
in rules 67
Where clauses
condition operators 61, 62
in collectors 90
in rules 60
widgets, defined 141
Windows
action executables 201

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BMC Impact Solutions Event Management Guide

return code execution limitation 208


Workload subtab (Impact Manager Info dialog box) 27
writing rules 56

X
XML
tags 193
tags for local actions 192

Notes

*97714*

*41779*
*41779*
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