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WRESTLING

SYLLABUS

^

by STAN DZIEDZIC Technical demonstration by the NATIONAL WRESTLING STAFF

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

by STAN DZIEDZIC Technical demonstration by the NATIONAL WRESTLING STAFF

A publication of Leisure Press. P.O. Box 3, West Point, N.Y. 10996 Copyright © 1983 by Leisure Press All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system now known or to be invented, without permission in writing from the publisher, except by a reviewer who wishes to quote brief passages in connection with a written review for inclusion in a magazine, newspaper, or broadcast.

Library of Congress Card Number: 81-85635 ISBN: 0-88011-014-7

Cover, book design, and typesetting by Diana J. Goodin

G>

LEISURE PRESS P.O. BOX 3 WEST POINT, N.Y. 10996

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Contributing Technicians

 

6

Acknowledgement

9

Introduction

10

Preface

11

Foreword

13

1

Mastering Wrestling Technique

14

2

• Strategy

 

17

3

Tactics by Ed Yarovinsky

19

4

• Stance

25

5

• Motion

29

Breaking Opponent's Balance

31

7

The Tie-Up and Breaking of the Tie-Up

33

8

• Breakdowns from Behind

61

9

Low Single Leg

103

10

• Creating

Favorable Conditions for the Single Leg

133

11

Finishes

to the Single Leg Takedown

143

CONTRIBUTING TECHNICIANS

— MEMBERS OF THE AAU NATIONAL WRESTLING COACHING STAFF

DON BEHM:

GENE DAVIS:

AUTHOR, STAN DZIEDZIC:

NAAU Champion—1973, 1974 (Most Outstanding Wrestler—1973) Tbilisi Champion—1970 Pan American Champion—1971 World Silver Medalist—1969, 1971 Olympic Silver Medalist—1968 USA/AAU Elite Freestyle Coach—1982

NCAA Champion—1966 NAAU Champion—1971, 1974, 1975 Olympic Bronze Medalist—1972 USA/AAU Junior World Coach—1973 USA/AAU Pan American Coach—1979 USA/AAU Senior World Coach—1981 Head Wrestling Coach—Athletes in Action

NCAA Champion—1971 NAAU Champion—1974, 1976, 1977 World Cup Champion—1975, 1977 Olympic Bronze Medalist—1976 World Champion—1977 Amateur Wrestling News

"Man of the Year"—1980 Vice-President of FILA Coaches Commission National Wrestling Coach

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

7

DAN GABLE:

RUSS HELUCKSON:

JIM HUMPHREY:

NCAA Champion—1969, 1970 NAAU Champion—1969, 1970 Pan American Champion, 1971 World Champion—1971 Olympic Champion—1972 Amateur Wrestling News

"Man of the Year"—1970 USA/AAU World Cup Coach—1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982 USA/AAU Senior World Coach— 1977, 1978, 1979 USA/AAU Olympic Coach— 1980 Head Wrestling Coach—Univ. of Iowa

NAAU Champion—1973, 1975, 1976, 1979, 1980 Tblisi Champion—1974 Pan American Champion—1971, 1975, 1979 World Cup Champion—1978 World Silver Medalist—1979,

Bronze Medalist—1971 Olympic Silver Medalist—1976 Amateur Wrestling News "Man of the Year"—1981 USA/AAU Junior World Freestyle

Coach—1981

NAAU Champion—1977, 1978, 1979 (Most outstanding Wrestler—1977, 1980) Pan American Bronze Medalist—1975 World Silver Medalist—1977 USA/AAU Elite Freestyle Coach—1980 USA/AAU Junior World Coach—1981 National Wrestling Coach—Canada

Head Wrestling Coach—Univ. of Wise.

8

CONTRIBUTING TECHNICIANS

BEN PETERSON:

Foreign Guest Contributing Technicians ION BACIU:

ED YAROVINSKY:

Holds Master of Sport degree from Russia Russian National Champion Currently U.S. Citizen

NCAA Champion —1971, 1972 NAAU Champion —1973, 1976, 1977, Pan American Champion—1975 World Cup Champion —1980 World Bronze Medalist—1973 Olympic Champion —1972,

Silver Medalist—1976 Head Wrestling Coach—Maranatha Baptist Bible College

National Champion of Romania

  • 1978 European Medalist—1966, 1970, 1971, Olympic Silver Medalist —1968 World Champion —1967

1972

I am grateful to Ion Baciu, Don Behm, Gene Davis, Dan Gable, Russ Hellickson, Jim Humphrey, and Ben Peterson for their demonstration of the tech- niques in the Syllabus. Their excellent technical skills were invaluable. I would also like to express my gratitude to Ed Yarovinsky for contributing the section entitled Tactics.

My

greatest

debt

in

preparing

the

manuscript

goes to Ted Reese. His command of the English

language coupled with his comprehension of the wrestling holds made him an excellent candidate for editorial comment; a position he filled most com- petently.

The text of the book was typed accurately and effi- ciently by Nancy Bottolfsen and Mary Bowder. I am also grateful to Don Krone for his readily available editorial comments and to Joe Scalzo for his en- couragement and valuable suggestions.

Further, I would

like

to

thank

those men

in

the

AAU Wrestling Division who were the initiators of the National Syllabus concept, and to Sun Co. who in part made this project possible by supporting the National Wrestling Coaching Program.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Finally, thanks go to my wife Arlene and three children Jodi, Katie, and Tommy for tolerating with the Syllabus that filled countless hours of our time together. As always, my wife's unfailing encourage- ment made the completion of the book possible.

INTRODUCTION

T he calibre of the participants in the sport of wrestling is constantly improving. This improve-

ment is in part the result of better training methods

and revised wrestling techniques and tactics. In the past thirteen years ten United States wrestlers, Rick Sanders, Fred Fozzard, Dan Gable, Wayne Wells, Ben Peterson, Lloyd Keaser, John Peterson, Stan Dziedzic, Lee Kemp and Chris Campbell have won gold medals in either the Olympic or World Cham- pionships. These wrestlers and others have made noteworthy additions to the technique and tactics of wrestling in the United States. Each of these wrestlers, at one time, was both a composer and a performer of his own compositions. For this reason each had his own personal repertoire unlike the others. After all, can one compare the wrestlers Rick Sanders and Dan Gable? A separate style and arsenal of technical skills are what characterize each of them. What does this mean to other wrestlers in the ac- quisition of wrestling skills? It means that each wrestler should develop the style andtechnical skills most favorable to his individual qualities.

The purpose of The U.S. Wrestling Syllabus is to capture and disseminate the best techniques as

they exist

today. A great deal of time and effort has

gone into producing The U.S. Wrestling Syllabus. It started several years ago with the committee that determined the outline, content, and format of the syllabus. After our most successful wrestlers were photographed executing the most effective techni- ques selected for the syllabus, the text was finally organized and produced.

T he ideal wrestler would have a variety of physi- cal and mental qualities. He would be as strong

as Paul Anderson (Olympic weight lifting champion), have as much endurance as Frank Shorter (Olympic marathon champion), be as dexterous as Kurt Thomas (World gymnastic champion), have the flex- ibility of Olga Korbut (Olympic gymnast champion), have the daring and decisiveness of Sugar Ray Leonard (Olympic boxing champion), and have the tactical forethought of a Bobby Fischer (World chess champion). Naturally, all these character- istics would be embodied in specific wrestling techniques. Unfortunately, the wrestler hasn't been and probably never will be born with the combina- tion of all these qualities. There are numerous examples, however, where a wrestler with the excellent development of any one of these qualities, such as strength or endurance coupled with the proper tactics and techniques, has become World or Olympic champion. A wrestler can compensate for the lack of certain physical qualities with the practical mastering of technique. The prac- tical mastering of technique makes the wrestler ap-

PREFACE

pear faster, more agile, more enduring, stronger, more daring, and more decisive. For example, a wrestler who is technically well prepared utilizes, simultaneously or sequentially, so many muscle groups, that in competition he always appears more powerful than even his stronger opponent. Also, a technically well-prepared wrestler uses less energy because he does not bring into play any un- necessary muscle groups and does not strain himself because he has many ways to neutralize an unexpected attack. The practical mastering of technique allows a wrestler to become less tired and objectively to seem to have greater endurance and strength. When a wrestler masters a large number of technical elements he also becomes more agile and is able to coordinate his actions with quickly chang- ing situations. The proper technique gives a noticeable gain in speed because it allows for max- imum rhythm of the working muscles. This maxi- mum rhythm of the working muscles is one of the major factors guaranteeing speed of movement or, as the wrestlers say, "sharpness." Further, the

12

PREFACE

technically trained wrestler is not afraid of com- plicated situations and goes after holds with no hesitation. Even a wrestler with excellent physical develop- ment must have a wide variety of technical skills to develop a winning strategy and to overcome his op- ponent's resistance. The wrestler who has mastered techniques has a more pronounced ability to build a combination of holds necessary to become a cham- pion. Today's techniques were developed by our best wrestlers and most creative coaches. These coaches and wrestlers took the best from our earlier techniques and combined them with many elements of the more modern international style. These new techniques are surprisingly multifaceted and become richer from year to year. The syllabus has captured this multifaceted technique. No other book to date has been able to capture, in sequential photos, the best wrestlers and coaches in the world executing their best tech- niques. The U.S. Wrestling Syllabus should serve as a guide to proper technique for both coaches and wrestlers.

W hen a great champion decides to write a book on wrestling, he and his book deserve deep

respect. This is an opportunity

to express to Stan

Dziedzic, by written words, my compliments and my great admiration. This work is the result of his prac-

FOREWORD

tical experiences as both an athlete and coach and scientific knowledge, and therefore merits our com- plete consideration. There have been many contacts between Stan Dziedzic and myself. I got to know him both as wrestler and expert. His participation in various FILA working groups, in the FILA Coaching Commis- sion meetings, and particularly in the lectures he gave at the 1980 Cavtat, Yugoslavia Coaching Clinic, met with warm approval of all in attendance. The best experts in the world had the opportunity of com- ing into contact with an excellent connoisseaur of the theory and practice of wrestling. Stan Dziedzic has poured his knowledge and ex- perience into this book, not only enriching the actual professional literature, but also opening new horizons in the theory of wrestling. FILA is willing not only to recommend the book, but also to use it as a resource for the methodology of professional activities in coaching. Such a work has been expected for a long time. On the FILA's behalf I wish to express to Stan Dziedzic our gratitude for another valuable work.

Milan Ercegan,

President,

FILA

1

MASTERING WRESTLING TECHNIQUE

A

great deal of practice and study is required before a wrestler can master any particular

technique. The mechanics of a particular technique are only a small part. A wrestler should also have a clear image of each component of the technique, its sequence and rhythm, as well as the role each part of the body plays.

The execution of a maneuver may cause particular defensive reactions by one's opponent. A wrestler must recognize and combat these defenses instan- taneously. Further, he needs to know both the favorable conditions for executing a technique and the ways of creating these favorable conditions. Finally, a wrestler must know the rhythm of the set- up and the technique. In the course of mastering a technique, a wrestler must learn the following:

(1) The place the technique holds in the arsenal of wrestling skills. The popularity of the tech- nique, and the percentages of success for the hold. (Example: a single leg takedown has a greater percentage of success than the head- lock, but your opponent will be more likely to expect it.)

(2) The physical qualities that are important in the fulfillment of the technique. Strength, speed, balance, flexibility, agility and endurance are some of the traits that might be considered. (3) The proper mechanics of the technique. (4) The rhythm of the technique. (5) Other techniques that might work in conjunc- tion or sequence with this technique.

(6)

The muscles utilized in the execution of the

technique and how the wrestler can develop them. (7) The different variations of the technique forced by your opponent's reaction to the maneuver. (8) The appropriate strategic preparation and how you can create favorable conditions for the technique. (9) The possibility to combine certain parts of this hold with other techniques. (Example: the foot- work employed in the execution of a headlock is also used in doing an arm throw and hip toss.)

(10) The defenses to the technique, and how you should react to each defense.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

15

After several training sessions, a wrestler should begin to know the place of a technique in the arsenal of wrestling skills, the importance of particular physical qualities in the fulfillment of this maneuver, and the proper mechanics of the hold (points 1, 2, and 3). As training sessions continue, a wrestler should be developing the rhythm of the technique (point 4). After mastering the mechanics and rhythm of a hold a wrestler will need to challenge himself in order to progress. In subsequent lessons a wrestler should ask his opponents to create obstacles and learn the correct techniques to overcome these obstacles (point 5). One should develop the muscles involved in the move both while practicing the technique and during a specific strength training program (point 6). Mastering the different variations of a hold, learning the proper strategic preparation for a move, combining certain parts of a technique with other techniques, and counteracting the various defenses to a maneuver are particularly difficult tasks. Ex- perience, practice, feedback , and knowledge of your physical components are important in developing these skills (point 7, 8, 9, and 10). The syllabus contains the necessary information, but mastering technique will depend on the amount

of time and effort you are willing to expend. It is well known that each person must develop skills that cor- respond to his age level and wrestling background. The younger and inexperienced wrestlers should first master the basic skills and then learn- progressively—the more advanced holds. When young wrestlers are left alone in wrestling, they fre- quently build bad habits which are very difficult to correct later. The U.S. Wrestling Syllabus should serve as both a reference and technical guide. The set-up, posi- tion, and finish are illustrated by some of the best technicians in the world. The total approach, which includes the related techniques, can be an integral part of the acquisition of a wrestling skill. The se- quence which starts with the basic techniques and progresses into the more advanced is a guide for all age groups. As you can see, the task of mastering a technique is a complicated and tedious one. There are various methods available to accomplish the task. Repeated drilling, diversified drilling, and part drilling are some of the most effective methods. Each of these has a separate purpose in the acquisition of wrestling skills.

Repeated drilling

is defined

as repeatedly exe-

cuting the same technique without any change in

16

MASTERING WRESTLING TECHNIQUE

the conditions. The purpose of repeated drilling is to develop proper mechanics. In order to accomplish this goal effectively, a wrestler must have a clear im- age of every component of the hold. Without this clear image, a wrestler will develop bad habits that will be difficult to correct later. Diversified drilling is defined as performing a technique under different conditions. This type of drilling plays an important role in mastering a move by assisting him in developing the proper rhythm of the hold, in learning how to react to counters, and in developing different variations of the technique. The essential means of altering the conditions are:

choosing partners of various sizes, strength, weight, and temperament; changing the reactions of the partner to the technique; and approaching the maneuver from different positions. In part drilling the technique is broken down into three phases; the set-up, attack and finish. Each phase is drilled separately in both the repeated and diversified format. This will help the wrestler under- stand what other techniques work in conjunction or in sequence with the move, what some of the strategic preparations for the hold are, and what parts of the maneuver can be combined with other techniques. There are several other areas that affect the ac-

quisition of sports skills. The quality of the model and the test and feedback also contribute to learn- ing a wrestling technique effectively. In order to

learn the proper mechanics of a hold, it is important

to have a good model. This

is the greatest benefit a

wrestler can derive from The U.S. Wrestling Syllabus. The syllabus has captured proven techni- que, in proper sequence, demonstrated by the best models in the world. In addition to having a proper prototype, an athlete must be tested and receive feedback. The test should be rigid enough to extend a wrestler and allow him to measure his improvement. Since the quality of feedback is so important, an athlete should acquire as much feedback as possible. Both the observations of the coach, and the viewing of video tapes and films can be valuable tools in mastering holds. Further, a wrestler should review methods of improving his skills, altering awkward motions, and eliminating his mistakes. Once a wrestler has mastered a strong technical base, he is ready for the next step: strategy and tac- tics. A level of good performance depends largely on the ability of the wrestler to anticipate, in a correct and detailed manner, the tactics he is going to implement during each match.

2

STRATEGY

  • I n order to master strategy, a competitor must be well prepared physically, psychologically, and technically. The mastering of strategy can not be over-emphasized. The more a wrestler knows about strategy, the more capable he will be in creating favorable situations, and the more points he will be able to score while investing less energy and strength. In fact, it is primarily the strategy that determines the efficiency of a technique. Even the simplest hold is a very efficient weapon, if tactically set-up and efficiently performed. A competitor must first command the technical skills before he can master strategy. Limited technical skills restrict the scoring possibilities of a wrestler and make his actions predictable. An athlete who is able to execute only one or two holds will not be successful in championship competition. Once a wrestler's opponent discovers what his few techniques are, he will be unable to use them effec- tively. The element of surprise is effective only the first time. A wrestler's strategic possibilities are also af- fected by his physical abilities. Highly developed speed, strength, dexterity, and endurance enable a

wrestler to select

at a given moment

the most

ap-

propriate way to secure a hold. For example, a

wrestler with good endurance is able to execute an appropriate attack on his opponent no matter what the tempo of the match. Wrestling strategy can change as a result of a development of physical qualities. On the other hand, a more detailed knowledge of wrestling strategies contributes to a better manifestation of a wrestler's physical qualities. For example, the speed with which the wrestler performs a given hold and the strength he demonstrates during a hold greatly depends on his

ability to assess strategically

even the

slightest

change in the situation. If a wrestler is not prepared psychologically, he will be overly worried before his match. In such a case, he will lose his self-control and ability to make the appropriate strategic combinations. A wrestler afraid of dangers and obstacles is usually prey to a strong-willed opponent. During the match, it is up to the wrestler alone to solve various technical problems and fulfill various technical tasks. In order to follow the right course within a match situation, to decide the most ap-

18

STRATEGY

appropriate solution rapidly, and to react correctly and on time to all changes, the wrestler must be able to think logically and anticipate his every strategical maneuver. Strategic thinking should be based on quick estimation of the situation. It is indispensible to be able to think quickly. For this reason it is necessary to acquire, even to the point of automa-

tion, all stages in the

performance of a given hold;

this ability will enable you to make a quick assess-

ment of

a given situation

and

to

take

appropriate

steps to remedy the problem. This skill is the most important feature of strategic thinking. The suc- cessful execution of a hold depends on an athlete to anticipate and visualize future action and its main feature. The wrestler's ability to think in this fashion depends on his knowledge of wrestling. It is necessary to be able to recognize the qualities of the opponent, to read his thoughts, and to anticipate his actions. The wrestler who is able to read the thoughts of his opponent and anticipate with the highest degree of probability enhances his own possibilities in any given situation. Then the actions of his opponent are not unexpected and sudden to him; thus, they will not be as effective. On the other hand, it is not always possible to anticipate everything. During a match, unanticipated situations

and obstacles may arise and require a change in the preconceived plan. Very often the wrestler has to cope with the fact that his opponent will defeat this plan; for this reason, it is important for a wrestler to develop the flexibility of strategical thinking. The on- ly guarantee of success is the creative approach to the solution of a given problem—the ability to think through the adversities that arise in the execution of a hold and to constantly discover new means to solve these problems.

3

TACTICS by Ed Yarovinsky

A wrestler may utilize various set-ups to create favorable conditions for a particular technique.

The seven set-ups most frequently employed are:

breaking of balance, "binding" the opponent, maneuvering, threat, repeated attack, double decep- tion, and challenge. No definite sequence is im- perative, and each method may be used separately or in combination.

Breaking of Balance. By jerking, pulling, and pushing the opponent, a wrestler may succeed in breaking his adversary's balance. Once this is achieved, the opponent partially loses his ability to defend himself and must concentrate his efforts on regaining his balance. The attacking wrestler should capitalize on his opponent's vulnerability by using a sequence of several forceful and tenacious movements. By so doing, he will create favorable conditions for several other techniques.

•"Binding." By "binding" his opponent's hands, arms, neck, or a combination of these, a wrestler limits the scope of the opponent's actions and almost eliminates the possibility of attack. "Bind- ing" also forces the opponent to concentrate his attention on breaking free from this control. This is

a favorable condition and can be used successful- ly in all phases of wrestling.

Maneuvering. Maneuvering involves changing one's position on the mat and actively capitalizing on the opponent's tie-ups. The attacked opponent concentrates on the movements of the other wrestler, tries to either maintain control or give it up; and attempts to maintain a certain distance and stance while changing his position. By maneuvering properly, a wrestler may force his op- ponent either to move in a favorable direction or to remain stationary. Maneuvering can distract the opponent's attention, can give the wrestler time to learn his opponent's intentions, and can stymie his opponent. By maneuvering, a wrestler can create conditions favorable for applying certain tech- niques and for solving tactical problems en- countered during the match.

Threats. Threats are deceptive movements pre- tending to aim at grabbing a certain part of the op- ponent's body. If the opponent reacts defensively, the wrestler must quickly grab a different part of his body. For example, if a wrestler attempts a col- lar tie-up, and the defendant raises his head to pro-

20

tect it, his body and legs are left vulnerable to at- tack. A threat can open the opponent's defense,

can

make him take

a certain

stance or position,

and can produce a particular reaction. The wrestler must be aware, though, that the opponent can react by attacking. Therefore, the wrestler must be very attentive.

Repeated Attack. In a repeated attack, the wrestler uses the same technique a second time. First, the technique is carried out with less than full effort, enabling the opponent to defend against the technique easily. This will delude the opponent in- to thinking that the technique is easily foiled. The second attack must then be carried out using max- imum effort. If the opponent reacts with less than full effort because of the previous attempt, the technique will be successful.

Double Deceit. In the double deceit, a wrestler

hopes to deceive his opponent into thinking that the real technique by which he wants to succeed is a false alarm which need not require an adequate defense. If such a deception is attained, a wrestler will conduct the same technique again, but this

time

he will use full force. Double deceit differs

from repeated attack only in that in the former the wrestler employs two different techniques. After having convinced an opponent that the first tech-

TACTICS

nique was a bluff, a wrestler imitates the carrying out of the second technique in order to deceive his opponent into thinking that the second technique will actually be carried out. This creates a favorable condition for the wrestler to employ the first technique successfully.

Challenge. Challenge prepares the ground work for conducting counter-techniques; it also forces the opponent to switch to active participation. It is based on the utilization of stances which convince the opponent that conditions favor attack and active participation. Such provoked attack must be promptly answered by carefully prepared tech- niques and counter-techniques. The wrestler who uses challenge must have quick reactions, must be able to move fast, must be resolute, and must have very good counter-technique. Delays and indecisiveness will enable the opponent to attack successfully.

TACTICAL COMBINATIONS

Combined application of various techniques is based on the assumption that a wrestler's first technique will be answered by his opponent either with a defense or with a counter-attack to which the wrestler immediately responds with another tech- nique. It may often happen that the first technique

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

21

makes the opponent take a stance favorable for carrying out the second technique.

Combinations

categories:

are

usually

divided

into

three

• The first category can be expressed by the formula technique—technique. The first technique in this case produces favorable conditions for implemen- ting the second.

• The formula for the second category is fake tech- nique—defensive counter-technique—technique. In this case, the first technique is aimed at making the opponent either defend himself or counter- attack so that a favorable situation is created for applying the next premeditated technique.

• The

third

category

can

be described as tech-

nique—defense—technique or counter-technique. The first technique of this combination is con- ducted in full force, and if the opponent uses defense or counter-defense, the wrestler quickly switches to the technique which is the most ra- tional in the given situation.

Past matches have attested to the fact that com- binations in competition require high standards of physical training. As a result, all the combinations must be diligently practiced while the wrestler is in the process of training. Using the first group of com-

binations requires great strength and flexibility, very good coordination of movements, and also the development of such qualities as resoluteness and persistance. The second group demands quickness, very good reactions, self-assurance, initiative, and self-control. One must remember the opponent does not always counter the wrestler's initiative with defense. Therefore, the wrestler who starts the com- bination with a fake technique must be very atten- tive and ready for any action. To master the third group, a wrestler must attain perfect knowledge of all the possible variations of defense and counter- defense, must master a whole set of techniques, must acquire a very highly developed level of physical prowess, and must attain firm will power.

Favorable conditions are also created as a result

of the opponent's mistakes. An experienced wrestler, especially the one who knows his oppo-

nent well, can almost

always observe if the oppo-

nent

has made a mistake, or whether

he

is

simply

provoking

him

to take

a certain course of

actions.

The

most

important

thing

is

to

determine

the

mistake and to capitalize on it as quickly

as possi-

ble. Experience

reveals

most

mistakes

are

made

either

near the edge of

the mat, or when getting

up

from par-terre to a standing

position, or when the

strength

of the opponent

is either

under-or

over-

22

TACTICS

estimated. The most opportune time for creating favorable conditions is when the opponent is tired because in such a state his attention, quickness and strength diminish to the point where he often becomes apathetic or careless. Other situations conducive to improving conditions exist when the opponent is complacent, distracted, depressed, timid or frightened.

TACTICS OF CONDUCTING A MATCH

Tactics of conducting a match are aimed at achieving a predetermined goal by way of solving certain.problems which may arise. Each wrestler has a certain individualistic style of conducting a bout which is characteristic only of himself, but all wrestlers utilize the tactics of attack, counter-attack, and defense. Attack is characterized by active participation by the wrestler who attempts to strike first. Nonstop attacks involve either a series of attacks or the implementation of spurt at- tacks—single attacks. The stop series of attacks is based on the wrestler's initiative, on the imposition of his will, on his pace, on situations convenient for him, and on poses and stances favorable for im- plementing various techniques and counter- techniques. The wrestler, by using this tactic, sup-

presses the will of his opponent by refusing to let him concentrate and prepare for active participa- tion. This tactic requires endurance and will power. Spurt tactics are separate attacks that use various swift-paced actions in the hope of creating condi- tions favorable for implementing some desirable technique. The suddenness and the pace of a spurt attack, which lasts for 15-20 seconds, are aimed at stunning the opponent and disturbing his defense. This tactic can also be conducted at a different pace. It requires skillful coordination of one's movements and an instant result. The tactic of counter-attack is characterized by answering and countering all the moves of an oppo- nent. The wrestler creates a certain situation which entices his opponent to act. The wrestler then forestalls his opponent's actions with a counter- technique. This attack requires quickness of reac- tion, self-assurance, and courage. It should not be used if the opponent counter-attacks. A wrestler's defense involves constant use of defensive actions intermingled with simple counter- attacks aimed at capitalizing on the gross mistakes of the opponent. The use of this tactic requires great self-control as well as a good knowledge of defense; otherwise, the wrestler quickly makes his intentions clear to the opponent and also receives a warning

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

23

from the official. That is why attack becomes necessary. The modern level of a wrestler's professionalism requires a very detailed laying of ground work before conducting a match with any opponent. Thus, a tac- tical plan of each match should be made beforehand in which each of the following must be determined; the goal of the match, means and ways of achieving it, types of tactics and their combinations, distribu- tion of one's strength by periods of the match, and possible variants of modifying the plan. One's own qualities must be objectively compared with the qualities of the opponent. If the opponent is unknown, reconnaissance must be conducted dur- ing the match. Each plan of the wrestler must have a goal which may be achieved by general means. Determining the goal depends on the character and the type of competitions, the opponent's strength and experience, and the goal one hopes to attain. Means and ways of achieving the goal are deter- mined by technical and tactical factors, physical qualities and capabilities, and the opponent's will power. Achieving the goal involves choosing basic means of tactical preparation in the execution of certain techniques, in the kinds of tactics and in the ways of applying them. It is advisable to foresee the tempo of the match and its variants, as well as one's

choice of stance and distance. The carrying out of the tactical plan depends foremost upon the wrestler's determination and confidence. A wrestler must be creative in carrying out a plan; he should always take into account the actual situation and never follow any plan blindly.

One should

not

forget

that

tactics

require

the

quick and reasonable implementation of all the

means possible that help solve the problems which are obstructing the achievement of a certain aim. The minute breaks should always be used not only

for rest, but also for analyzing one's

plan and mak-

ing all necessary

corrections. Therefore, if in the

first period of the match the implementation of the

plan has been complicated and, for some reason, has been prevented from being changed, defense should be used. Later, during the calmer at-

mosphere of the break, the match can be better

analyzed. During such time, the wrestler's

coach

must be of great help to him. Attention and tactical

thinking play an important role in the realization of a tactical plan. In any case, whether or not the plan

has

been fulfilled, it

must

be analyzed

after

the

match so all the mistakes can be marked and avoid-

ed in the next match.

The prematch state of the wrestler also has a pro- found influence on whether he succeeds in fulfilling

24

TACTICS

his plan. It is quite possible a very good and properly constructed plan will not be carried out because of the negative emotional state of the wrestler. This must be taken into account, and everything possible should be done to eliminate these negative re- sponses.

TACTICS OF PARTICIPATING IN COMPETITIONS

These tactics are aimed at winning

by using

all

the means available while taking into account the actual circumstances. Based on his true capa- bilities, each wrestler sets a goal of reaching a cer- tain place in the competitions; simultaneously, however, he must also always aim at attaining the first place. This is the main goal, and all factors must be directed to attaining it. Hence, the wrestler must:

• Know all the rules and regulations concerning the competitions. • Know his opponents well and know their capabilities in these particular competitions. • Distribute his strength for all the days of the com- petition. • Carefully watch the competitions and analyze the results achieved by all his opponents. • Determine the best routine for keeping his weight under control and for acclimatization.

Knowledge of rules and regulations allows the wrestler to know what effect the results of his match will have on his final place finish and how a par- ticular action will be scored. Knowing one's op- ponents enables the wrestler to make a good tac- tical plan of matches and to predict possible results of his opponents. Correct distribution of one's strength during the competitions determines the wrestler's success to a great extent. The wrestler

must divide his use of

energy in each match in such

a way as to achieve the best results without de- pleting resources. The wrestler must closely watch the competitions and objectively evaluate and analyze his results as well as those of his opponents. Thus he can not only predict but also make further plans for improving his performance at competitions. This must be done even when the wrestler has been eliminated from the competition so he can acquire experience for his future competitions. Sound weight control will free the wrestler from many troubles during the competitions and will create better conditions for wrestling. Unlike in tour- nament competition, tactics of performance in in- dividual matches consist mainly of the wrestler us- ing all his abilities to attain his goal.

4

STANCE

Gene Daw's and his Mongolian opponent illustrate staggered stances.

T he stance is the starting position for initiating takedowns and is an important aspect of suc-

cessful takedown wrestling. Yet some wrestlers are unaware of the characteristics of a good stance. Takedowns require speed and proper position. A proper stance should be relaxed and comfortable. A tense stance requires a wrestler to relax before he can attack; therefore, time should be spent on learn- ing to relax and move in your stance. Relaxed doesn't mean limp. Certain muscle groups like the lower back and thigh region will be flexed because of the position. There are nine varieties of stances. A stance can be square, staggered right, or staggered left as well as high, middle, or low. The major difference be- tween the square and staggered stance is the posi- tion of the feet. In a square stance, the feet are parallel; in a staggered stance, one foot is slightly ahead of the other. Neither stance is better than the other; instead, each has certain advantages over the other. A wrestler should choose the stance that best fits the tactics and techniques he uses. In a square stance, a wrestler can penetrate with either foot, can move well and in all directions, and doesn't have

26

STANCE

either leg closer to his opponent. In a staggered stance, a wrestler has his feet in a ready position for penetration, can penetrate with the same leg on all his techniques, and only has to master one-sided defense. In either the square or staggered stances, a wrestler generally has better attacking capabilities in the higher and middle positions while a lower position has better defensive properties. In a live situation, most wrestlers change from one stance to the other, but will consistently return to the most comfortable stance. Whatever stance a wrestler chooses, he must realize that the stability of his body will not be equal in all directions since it is impossible to create a takedown stance with equal angles of support. This section will show the different stances and illustrate the important characteristics of each.

SQUARE STANCE

Front View: Feet are slightly wider than shoulder width. Palms are facing each other, and elbows are in. Head is up, and the knees are rotated inward so that the weight is always on the inside of the balls of the feet.

M

The lines of gravity start from man's center and pass through the knees to the insides of the balls of the feet. '

'Sasahara, Shozo. Fundamentals

of Scientific

Wrestling,

3rd Edition, pg. 59, 1978.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

Side View: Knees and hips are bent slightly. Head is up and looking forward. Eyes are concentrating on opponent's whole body and not on any specific part. Shoulders are slightly in front of both feet. Back is straight but shoulders are rounded. Forearms are parallel to the mat.

27

;, 2X

28

STANCE

STAGGERED STANCE

Front View: Feet are slightly wider than shoulder width. Weight is on insides of the balls of feet. Palms are facing each other and elbows are in. Head is up but not strained, and knees are rotated inward.

Side View: Knees and hips are bent slightly. Shoulders are slightly in front of both feet. Back is straight but shoulders are rounded. Fore- arms are parallel to the mat and one foot is slightly forward.

5

MOTION

A wrestler should be cautious when changing positions. When moving, a wrestler's body is

momentarily supported by one leg and therefore in a

less stable position. The following steps should be incorporated when moving in the standing position:

(1) Move with slightly bent legs. (2) Lead with the foot nearest the direction mov- ing; for instance, when moving right, a wrestler starts with his right leg.

(3) Avoid

crossing your feet or getting them too

close together. (4) Take short, quick steps. (5) Don't change the position of your torso in rela- tion to your other body parts while moving your feet. (6) In a wrestling stance, the points of the center of gravity are on the insides of the balls of the feet. When moving, always move to maintain these points of gravity.

There are three basic distances when a wrestler is in motion:

when the wrestlers each other,

are unable

to tie-up

with

when the wrestlers are at arm's length,

when

the wrestlers are in a tie-up position.

During a match the distance a wrestler maintains depends on his tactical and technical intentions. A wrestler will often find himself at a variety of distances, however, and should be able to execute techniques and defend himself from any distance.

"Sasahara, Shozo. Fundamentals

of Scientific

Wrestling,

3rd Edition, pg. 59, 1978.

6

BREAKING OPPONENT'S BALANCE

T he ability to break the balance of an opponent is a fundamental to becoming proficient in take-

down wrestling. Few wrestlers completely command the skill of breaking their opponent's balance. The time a wrestler spends to master this skill would be time well spent. Japanese Olympic Champion Shozo Sasahara uses the following diagrams to illustrate the con- cept of breaking an adversary's balance.* The triangles shown in Fig. A and B illustrate the direction to break a competitor's balance. The feet of a wrestler in the neutral position form the base of an isosceles triangle. The vertices mark the points where an opponent's balance is most vulnerable. A wrestler should constantly be aware of the orienta- tion of his competitor's triangle.

Moving an adversary in the directions marked in the circle requires a push, pull, and/or snap. A wrestler may utilize the push to force his opponent backward and the pull and/or snap to maneuver him forward. It is important to remember when a wrestler is off- balance his capacity to defend himself is significantly diminished, and his efforts will be

geared to regaining his balance. A tactical wrestler will seize this opportunity by attacking his opponent to acquire a takedown.

Figure B

 

BACK

RIGHT BACK

LEFT BACK

RIGHT FRONT '

\^_L_-- ^

" LEFT FRONT

f

FRONT

Figure C

"Sasahara, Shozo. Fundamentals

of Scientific

Wrestling,

3rd Edition, pp. 25-27, 1978.

32

Pictorial illustration of breaking opponent's balance.

BREAKING OPPONENT'S BALANCE

PES

1

1

IS

7

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE-UP

Stan Dziedzic, 1977 World champion, controlling

Wade Schalles,

1977 World University champion,

with a 2 on 1 in the 1976 Olympic trials.

T he tie-up is a fundamental of takedown wrestling often overlooked by coaches and wrestlers.

Wrestlers lose matches because they are unable to break their opponent's tie-ups effectively. Time should be spent on mastering control and breaking your opponent's control in the tie-up positions. A wrestler who has mastered the tie-up will have the necessary base to control the tempo of the match and the means to maneuver his opponents in- to positions favorable for particular techniques. He also will be able to limit his opponent's attack. A wrestler not mastering the tie-up will be unable to hide his weakness and will be easy prey for wrestlers who have mastered the control of the tie-up. As you will see in the syllabus, the tie-up is the basis for many wrestling tactics and techniques. Im- portant points on tying-up:

• Reach short and quick when tying-up. • Grip tight on tie-ups.

• Avoid making contact with your head. It restricts your movement and warns your opponent of your movement.

• The instant you acquire control of a tie-up, use it to create the conditions for a takedown.

34

THETIEUPAND BREAKING OFTHETIEUP

1

Head tie-up.

'S

4

2

Head and bicep tie-up.

3

Inside bicep-shoulder tie-up.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

4

Double bicep tie-up.

5

Double wrist tie-up.

6

High underhook tie-up.

35

36

7

Low underhook tie-up.

8

2 on 1 baseball grip tie-up.

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE UP

  • 9 •

2 on 1 undergrip tie-up.

.;•.;•••

\i

'

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

10

2 on 1 overgrip tie-up.

11

Over and under tie-up.

37

12

Head outside 2 on

1.

38

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE-UP

7.1 • Stan Dziedzic breaking the wrist control tie-up.

My opponent has control of both my wrists.

1

2 • / reach across and grasp my op- ponent's wrist. When I achieve control, I rotate my wrist toward the thumb, breaking my opponent's hold.

Now that I have treed my wrist, I move up for my 2 on 1 control.

3

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

39

7.2 • Dan Gable clearing the shoulder tie-up.

1

My opponent has a shoulder tie-up, which gives him a feeling

2

Here

my elbow

comes

across

while my opposite hand

of control and an awareness of my body position. I want to break

reaches up to catch

his

wrist. At the same

time, I shrug my

free of this position and move my opponent to create conditions for takedowns.

shoulder as / begin to twist.

40

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE-UP

3

/ turn my body in, pulling my opponent's wrist off.

( now have control of the 2 on 1 and shall look down.

4

for my take-

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

7.3

Dan Gable clearing the shoulder tie. Opposite side view.

1

2

41

42

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE-UP

7.4

Stan Dziedzic counteracting the double bicep tie-up.

1

In this position my opponent has the

2

»

To

change

the

tie-up

position,

I

3

My left arm is straight, and my thumb

inside

biceps

tie-up.

Unless

I

break

or

straighten and rotate my left arm inward

is rotated inward as tar as possible, block-

change this position, he will take advantage

while my right arm starts to circle under my

ing my opponent's right shoulder. At the

of this favorable condition. opponent's left arm. same time, my right hand is controlling and pulling his right wrist.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

43

Once / pull my opponent's wrist all the way to my chest, my left arm releases and lifts under his right arm.

4

  • 5 • / now have control. My opponent's arm is pulled tight into my

chest. I have shoulder and body position, and I am now ready to react to this favorable condition. I must make certain I'm as high as possible on his arm. I'm also holding his arm in and pushing up with my left arm.

44

7.5 • Stan Dziedzic breaking the bicep and collar tie-up.

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE-UP

1 • My opponent has control with a biceps and collar tie-up. I reach my right hand over the top of his left arm and begin to turn my body in order to put pressure on my opponent's elbow.

  • 2 • / continue to turn, and reach my right hand over the top of my

opponent's arm to his far wrist. This puts a great deal of pressure

on his elbow.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

45

/ continue my turn, drawing my opponent's wrist toward me and tight to my chest.

3

4

I now have broken his tie-up and secured the 2 on 1 control.

46

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE-UP

7.6

Don Behm breaking the

2 on 1

tie-up.

  • 1 • My opponent has control of the 2 on 1. My first reaction is to shrug my shoulders,

bend my arm, and block with my forehead.

  • 2 At this point, I am moving my hips back and yanking away.

3

/ now lunge into my opponent, using

my forearm as if giving him a forearm shiver. It is important to use the power of my legs.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

47

My opponent is now off balance. I am maintaining this drive, and continuing to crowd my opponent.

4

5

/ continue to move in, looking for my attack.

48

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE-UP

  • 7.7 • Stan Dziedzic counteracting the 2 on 1 tie-up.

    • 1 The first thing I have to do to break the 2 on 1 is keep my con- trolled arm bent and my shoulder shrugged while driving into my

opponent.

2

I'm now trying to pull my opponent's tar elbow toward me to

break the tight grip he has on my wrist.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

49

At this point I've already Jerked my arm free, and I'm reaching for my underhook.

3

4 • / now have control. It is important to emphasize I still have my opponent's far elbow, and my elbow is pinching his hand against my side.

50

THETIE-UPAND BREAKING OF THETIEUP

7.8

Stan Dziedzic countering the 2 on 1.

  • 1 • As in most breaks for the 2 on 1,1 have my shoulder shrugged and arm bent, while I drive into my opponent. I'm also controlling

his wrist.

2 I'm now pulling my opponent's wrist tightly to my chest which frees my left wrist. Also my left arm is dropping down to secure an underhook.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

51

3 • / now have an underhook and far wrist control.

A » I am looking to capitalize on my control and take my oppo- nent down.

52

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE-UP

7.9 • Stan Dziedzic breaking free from the underhook tie

-up.

1 • My opponent has a deep underhook but his hand is farther down my back and not high on my shoulder. This position allows me to put strong pressure on his elbow and shoulder.

  • 2 » At this point I'm pushing my opponent's hip away and drop-

ping my weight down which puts pressure on his elbow and shoulder. At the same time my right hand is ready to catch his arm if he pulls away.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

53

3 • / now have my opponent's arm. I want to emphasize how far back my left leg is. This drops my weight down even farther.

  • 4 •

I'm now moving in to gain 2 on 1 control.

54

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE-UP

/ have a strong 2 on 1, and I'm looking for a favorable condi- tion I can take advantage of.

5

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

55

7.10 • Stan Dziedzic clearing the high underhook tie-up.

1 • in this photo my opponent

has a high

underhook. As I drive into him, I bring my

right hand up to push off his chest.

2

Pushing my opponent back, I bring my

left arm over the top of his shoulder. It is im-

3

/ have cleared the high underhook and

will proceed to move in for my attack.

portant to rotate my wrist so I can thrust my arm free.

56

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE-UP

7.11 • Ion Baciu breaking away from the underhook.

i

  • 1 My opponent has a deep underhook. If I don't react and break this tie-up, he will capitalize on the favorable condition.

  • 2 • / step back with my right foot, dropping my weight down as I also bring down my arm. This put tension on my opponent, mak-

ing him pull back.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

57

At this moment I drive in, making my opponent feel I am go- ing for a body lock. He reacts by dropping his hips back.

3

4 • As my opponent drops his hips back, I circle my arm over top of his arm, while I move away and to my right.

58

THETIE-UPAND BREAKING OFTHETIE-UP

5 • I continue to move away till I break free of the underhook tie- up. At this point I'll be moving back in to gain my control or to attack.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

7.12 • Stan Dziedzic counteracting the over and under tie-up.

59

1 • My opponent and I are in the same tie-up position, an "over and under."

  • 2

Here I am "pummeling," trying to pry my right hand between

my opponent's arm and my chest.

60

THE TIE-UP AND BREAKING OF THE TIE-UP

3

With my hand in position, I am shrugging my shoulder and

4

My arm is inside, shoulder shrugged, and my elbow raised.

straightening my arm as I try to drive my arm inside.

With this deep control, I look for the conditions favorable for a

 

takedown.

8

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

T aking your opponent to the mat from behind is an important component of takedown wrestling. A wrestler, who wishes to become proficient at tak- ing his opponent down, will need to master these techniques. In addition, in the international style of wrestling, a takedown is not awarded until your op- ponent's knee touches the mat; therefore, learning to break your opponent down from what is common- ly referred to as the "tripod" position is imperative.

Lee Kemp, three time World champion, tries to move behind Dave Schultz, World University Silver Medalist, in the 1980 Olympic wrestle-offs.

62

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

8.1 • Ben Peterson demonstrates how to force all of the weight onto his opponent's thigh, causing it to collapse.

At this point I am driving all my weight onto my opponent's right leg.

1

2

/ continue dropping my weight, forcing my opponent to shift

his weight to his right leg.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

63

3 • / now drop to my knees using the underside of my right arm to continue to place more of the weight on top of my opponent's leg.

4

As soon as my opponent's

follow him to the mat.

legs begin

to bend,

I start

to

64

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

S » My opponent hits his side.

6 • / continue to move around for the takedown.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

65

8.2

Ben Peterson executes a near leg trip.

1

• / am beginning to put pressure on my opponent's right leg by

2

Here I begin to step in front to trip my opponent. It is impor-

pressing my right arm down, forcing him to shift his weight on top

tant that his weight

is posted on the toot I am trapping,

of his right foot.

66

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

3

/ now scoop my leg in front and begin to trip.

  • 4 / drive forward, forcing all my opponent's weight over top of the leg I am tripping.

THE UNITED

STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

67

5 • As we tall to the mat, I jerk my opponent underneath me.

6

/ coyer my opponent for the takedown.

68

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

8.3

Ben Peterson shows how to

rm a lift and sweep.

From behind, I begin to lift my oppo- nent.

1

  • 2 Once I lift my opponent off the mat, my right knee comes up to the outside.

3 • As I bring my leg into my opponent's leg, I now begin to turn him with my arms, taking him over the top of my leg.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

69

As my opponent side.

4

falls,

I

remove my leg so he lands on his

5

/ coyer my opponent for the takedown.

70

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

  • 8.4 • Ben Peterson illustrates an excellent backheel.

1

Here I lock my hands around my oppo-

2 » My left leg is deep between my oppo- 3 • With my opponent falling down, I begin

ne/it's

waist. Note that his feet are out in

nent's legs as my right toot comes

up to

to turn in order to land on my hip and not my

front, causing him to be oft balance toward

block his heel. I must emphasize that at the

butt. I also bring my left leg up between my

the rear.

 

same time I jerk his weight backwards. opponent's legs as I yank him backwards.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING

SYLLABUS

71

4 • 4s my opponent hits the mat my left leg continues to come up between his legs. This forces his weight forward even farther, preventing him from switching me.

5

/ cover my opponent for the takedown.

72

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

8.5 • Stan Dziedzic shows how to step in front and lift, a technique he used successfully against his Mongolian opponent in the 1977 World Championships.

1

I have not gained a takedown because I

have not been able to break my opponent down to the mat. He remains in a standing position, and I am behind with my hands locked.

2

I step in front of my opponent. Notice

how I am turning my knee in as I drive my toot all the way around and perpendicular to my opponent.

At this point, I thrust my hips in and up using the strength of my legs and the momentum of my hips to lift my opponent off the ground,

3

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

73

/ now have my opponent completely in the air.

4

5*1

step back and allow my opponent to

hit the mat.

6

/ maintain control,

74

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

  • 8.6 •

This opposite view of the previous technique better illustrates both the leg position and the power generated when the technique is executed properly.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

75

76

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

8.7

Stan Dziedzic demonstrates how to create the conditions to step in front and lift when your opponent is in a low stance.

1

Often when my opponent is in a squatting or lower position,

it is very difficult for me to step in front of him. Therefore, I set my

technique up by pulling my opponent back, as shown here.

2 » My opponent reacts by straightening balance so he doesn't fall to his butt.

up

to

regain

his

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

77

3

Now I begin to step in front.

/ am in front. Notice my foot is completely perpendicular to my opponent as I begin to lift.

4

78

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

5

To generate

maximum

power,

I

thrust

in

my

hips and

6

/ step back, allowing my opponent to tall to the mat.

straighten my legs.

 

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

7

/ gain control.

79

80

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

8.8 • Stan Dziedzic illustrates, in these four photos, how to set your opponent to his butt when he has his weight low.

1 • / am beginning to shift my weight backwards, pulling on my opponent's hips. I must make certain my elbows are pressed tightly against his hips.

/ am dropping my weight down now, drawing my opponent downward and backward.

2

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

81

VÌVA4.

3

As my opponent and I hit the mat, I must maintain my base.

4

Here I am following my opponent for the takedown.

82

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

8.9 • Ben Peterson shows how to complete a takedown by lifting his opponent and jerking him backwards.

1

My opponent is in a standing position attempting to break

my grip, as I begin to lift him off the mat. I must be sure to keep

/ thrust my hips into my opponent, forcing his legs upward. Simultaneously, I roll him up onto my chest.

2

 

my legs in tight.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

83

  • 3 Now that my opponent's feet are out in front of him, I begin to pull him down by cupping under his armpits and yanking back.

  • 4 As soon as my opponent's butt hits the mat, I drop my weight on top of him.

84

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

5

/ attempt to hold my opponent on his back in order to gain a

6

/ finish with a pin.

fall.

 

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

85

  • 8.10 •

Jim Humphrey executes a suplay from behind. Jim used this maneuver successfully against a Bulgarian opponent in winning his Silver Medal.

With my opponent In a standing position, I start to pull him down from behind.

1

2 * My pressure backwards forces my opponent to stand up to maintain his balance.

^p

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

  • 3 As my opponent straightens up, I begin to step In front. Here I am shifting out to the side.

•M

  • 4 / continue to move around, bringing my left leg completely in front of my opponent.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

87

5 • Holding my opponent tight to my chest, I use my legs and hips to lift him clear oft the mat.

With my opponent now well off backward and arch.

6

the mat,

I begin

to

fall

88

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

7

lamina

high arching position. My opponent is now going for

a ride towards his back.

8 • As my opponent lands on his back, I continue my momen- tum, coming around behind.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

»»»

89

90

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

  • 8.11 •

Stan Dziedzic executes the near ankle breakdown. Stan used this technique to score the tie breaking point against Ashuraliev, 2 time World Champion, in the Montreal Olympics.

1

/ am beginning to move behind my opponent.

2 • / have now dropped my hand down to my opponent's instep.

Notice I am driving forward in order to shift my opponent's weight

onto his hands.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

91

3

/ am stepping inside my opponent's far leg.

4

/ am beginning to lift my leg to force my opponent down.

92

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

93

8.12 • Stan Dziedzic demonstrates how to scoop the near

1 • My opponent is resisting a takedown by maintaining the tripod position. I am now driving forward, forcing his weight onto his hands, while my right hand is cupped over his deltoid.

2

( scoop his leg out with my left leg. Concurrently, I slide my

right hand in front of his bicep.

94

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

3

By arching my back, chopping my opponent's arm, and pull-

ing his leg up and back, I drive him to the mat.

4

/ now have the takedown.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

95

  • 8.13 • Ben Peterson shows how to perform a crotch

lift when his opponent is in the tripod position.

1

My opponent is resisting the takedown

by remaining in a tripod position with his

2

I shove my inside leg between my op-

ponent's legs. This transition must be made

3

With my hands now locked, I drive all

my weight off my inside foot. Note my arms

weight on his hands. quickly to prevent him from coming up. are wrapped tightly around my opponent's leg and my side is pressed against his lower back.

96

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

4 • / continue to drive, which puts a great deal of pressure on my opponent's lower back.

5 • / am now lifting my opponent.

  • 6 • I just continue through, jerking with my

arms and turning my head away from him. This, of course, is worth two points in the international style of wrestling.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

97

8.14 • Stan Dziedzic illustrates the "jam." This technique is utilized often in international competition.

1 • My opponent is resisting a takedown by maintaining the tripod position. In this figure I begin to step out to the side. Note I have my hands locked tightly around my opponent's chest.

  • 2 » lam using my momentum to force both all my weight and all

my opponent's onto his near arm.

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

3 • At this point I maintain my momentum, jerking my right elbow back into my opponent's hip and driving my left elbow for- ward into his shoulder to force him down to his knees.

4 • / must continue to stay square on my opponent to avoid be- ing switched as the momentum carries us to the mat. Timing and use of momentum is the key to the success in employing this technique.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

99

8.15 • Let's take a look at this same technique from a different angle. From this perspective you can imagine the force of my shoulder into the back of my opponent's shoulder.

»**>

100

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

  • 8.16 • Stan Dziedzic pulls his opponent back to acquire a takedown.

    • 1 • Since my opponent has distributed more of his weight to the

rear and maintains a wider base, instead of jamming him forward, I am going to pull him backward. It is important that a wrestler is able to feel the shifting of his opponent's weight in this position.

2

/ move behind my opponent to generate torque.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

101

3 • Using this torque, I drop to my knees, shifting my weight down and back. Note by holding my opponent's hips tightly, I pull him along with me.

When my opponent hits the mat, I maintain an even position behind him. This position helps me counter any switches or rolls.

4

102

BREAKDOWNS FROM BEHIND

5

/ continue to pivot around for the takedown.

9

Low SINGLE LEG

A wrestler who is unable to execute a low single effectively restricts his scoring possibilities. He is also more predictable than a wrestler who can per- form the technique competently; consequently, an opponent will be able to thwart his attack more easily. It is important, however, for a wrestler to be able to distinguish when he should go to his knees or stay on his feet when attempting a single. The il- lustrations in this chapter will assist a wrestler in making this differentiation.

Lloyd Keaser, 1976 Olympic Silver Medalist, at- tempts a low single on his Bulgarian opponent.

104

LOW SINGLE LEG

9.1 • Stan Dziedzic demonstrates how to post your opponent's weight on his lead foot, penetrate to a low single, and drive to your feet.

1

Leading with his

right foot, my opponent has secured a

double bicep tie-up. If I am able to post his weight on his lead

foot, I shall create ideal conditions for shooting a low single leg.

2 * In order to cause my opponent to post his weight on the lead foot, I drop my weight and pull down hard on his left arm. At the same time, I step in with my left foot.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

105

3 • Here I am in deep on a low single. I am careful not to over- reach or extend myself beyond my base as I keep my head up and back straight.

4

I step

up with my right foot and drive into my opponent. I

should emphasize I pull my right elbow tight to my side.

106

LOW SINGLE LEG

5

/

have

secured

the

single

and

am

ready

to

finish the

takedown. (Chapter 11 illustrates

numerous finishes from this

position.)

 

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

107

  • 9.2 • Dan Gable shows how to get past your opponent's arms, penetrate to a low single, and pivot to your feet

    • 1 • My opponent is posting both arms on my shoulders while maintaining inside con- trol. This creates the conditions for my single leg attack.

2

/ dip my shoulder to give me the proper

angle tor attack. Notice I have lowered my stance, but I am not bending over as I step

forward.

3

( continue into my opponent, dropping

to my back knee and inside hand.

108

LOW SINGLE LEG

5 • Still moving around behind, my left hand is pulling my opponent's shin toward me. This posts his hip which prevents him from turning Into me.

  • 4 In this photo I have shifted my drive in- to my opponent. This Is very important. I can't hesitate In this position.

6 • Here my opponent has sprawled and dropped his weight on top of me. I want to point out that I am supporting his weight on my inside hand. I also continue to spin around my opponent, and my arm Is still tightly wrapped around his leg.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

109

  • 7 • / begin to come up, still driving into my opponent, forcing his weight to the far foot.

8 • As / continue to drive into my oppo- nent, the weight is coming off his near foot allowing me to move around into position for my single leg.

  • 9 •

/ am now up on my feet and have con-

trol of the single

leg. (See Chapter 11 for

finishes from this position.)

110

LOW SINGLE LEG

9.3 • Jim Humphrey executes a low single and spin behind.

a/L

.

.12*

^s:

fi£~

1

We are both in open stances. 2 » My opponent reaches out to tie-up with me. This creates conditions that enable me to post his arm and penetrate for a single. This maneuver requires precise timing and sufficient speed.

3

/ am past

my opponent's arm and ap-

proaching his leg. I must emphasize my back is straight with my head up. Since I am covering a long distance, it will be necessary for me to drive to my knees to maintain a good base.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

111

4 • / have continued to drive to my knees and have been able to spin completely around my opponent. From this position I drive into his leg; this causes him to shift his weight to the far foot to maintain his balance.

5

This shift of my opponent's weight enables me to continue

my spin and pick up his leg with little effort.

112

LOW SINGLE LEG

6 • At this point my opponent has his weight on his hand and I am beginning to move up so I can capture his free leg.

7 • I have secured my opponent's free (far) leg and need only to move up for a takedown.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

113

  • 9.4 •

Stan Dziedzic, in these eight pictures, lifts his opponent, grasps his wrist, and throws him to his back. This technique, although available, is often overlooked by both beginners and experienced wrestlers.

  • 1 •

/ am beginning to penetrate for a low single leg. I am careful

not to extend beyond my base as I step in deep with my head up

and back straight.

2 » My opponent counters by pushing my head down,

114

LOW SINGLE LEG

I react quickly, planting my right hand and ducking between his legs.

3

4

him.

Here I push myself up with my right hand as I begin to lift

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

115

5 • As / begin to straighten up, I have my opponent lifted off the mat.

  • 6 Now upright, I grasp my opponent's wrist which is around my waist.

116

LOW SINGLE LEG

fi

7 • / force my opponent to his back by throwing myself back while yanking his wrist across my abdomen.

8 • As my opponent lands on his back I control his wrist and drive on top of him.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

117

  • 9.5 • Stan Dziedzic finishes a low single by lifting his opponent and coming out the back door.

    • 1 Once / have my opponent lifted oft the mat, there are several techniques I can employ to finish the takedown.

  • 2 » In this finish, I first straighten my body and grasp behind my

opponent's knee with my right hand. Simultaneously I step up

with my left foot.

118

LOW SINGLE LEG

  • 3 • As I pivot around on my right knee, I pull my opponent's leg in tight. I also reach over his ankle with my left hand.

  • 4 Dropping to both knees I release my opponent's leg to reach for his hip.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

119

5

Having a hold of his

hip I step up with my left toot. I should

emphasize I am pinching his ankle between my thigh and side.

120

LOW SINGLE LEG

  • 9.6 • In these photos Stan Dziedzic demonstrates another maneuver that can be used to finish a low single once you have your opponent lifted off the mat.

    • 1 •

In this finish, I first straighten my body and grasp and pull

down on my opponent's knee with my left hand. I push up on his thigh with my right hand.

2 • As I pivot around on my left knee, I continue to pull down on my opponent's right leg. I also continue to push with my right hand, thus turning my opponent.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

121

Here my opponent has landed on his back. I will try to move up and acquire a pinning combination.

3

122

LOW SINGLE LEG

9.7 • Stan Dziedzic shows how to recover after your opponent has thwarted your initial attack

  • 1 • Leading with his right foot, my oppo-

nent has secured an inside-outside tie-up. If

  • I am able to post his weight on his lead toot,

  • I shall create ideal conditions for shooting a low single leg.

2 * In order to post my opponent's weight on his lead toot, I drop my weight and pull

down hard on his left arm.

  • 3 / begin to penetrate tor the single leg. I am careful not to overreach or extend myself beyond my base as I step in deep with my head up and back straight.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

123

4 • My opponent counters by pulling his leg away and dropping his weight. This has moved me beyond my base and forced me into an awkward, unbalanced position.

  • 5 • / am now in a vulnerable situation and, unless I react quickly, I will most certainly

lose this takedown.

  • 6 At this point I release my grasp so I can push up with my right arm. At the same time

I drive into him.

124

LOW SINGLE LEG

  • 7 » In this picture my drive is more apparent as I step up with my

right foot.

8 • My drive has taken the weight off both knees. Observe that my opponent's wrist is around my waist. This along with his body position creates the conditions tor the technique that follows.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

125

  • 9 • / grasp my opponent's wrist with my opposite (inside) hand

and begin to slide my left knee under. This action will force his

weight over the top of me.

10

/ continue to my knee, lifting my head and pulling down on

my opponent's knee and wrist as it I were executing a wrist roll.

126

LOW SINGLE LEG

11

I carry through with this action and my opponent is now off

balance and falling to his side.

12 • Once my opponent hits the mat, I continue over the top of him and into his chest. I must not release his wrist, which I hold more securely by keeping my right arm tight against my body.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

9.8 • Opposite side view of the previous technique.

127

128

LOW SINGLE LEG

* iti

,1

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

129

130

LOW SINGLE LEG

9.9 • Don Behm executes a low single into a duck under, a technique he completed many times en route to winning silver medals in two World and one Olympic games.

  • 1 My opponent has my wrists, but I have inside control on the far side.

2 * At this point I attack my opponent, making him feel as if he can counter the single leg because of his control of my wrist.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

131

  • 3 • / now pull the wrist, shifting my opponent's weight over the

top of my shoulders. At the same time I am beginning to step up with my right toot.

( step up deep with my right toot while pulling the hand over the top of my head, raising my shoulders.

4

132

LOW SINGLE LEG

  • 5 / continue to my right knee, looking over my left shoulder and driving my opponent to the far side.

6

Covering my opponent, I look for the fall.

1 0

CREATING FAVORABLE CONDITIONS FOR THE SINGLE LEG

T here are three parts in executing a takedown; creating favorable conditions (set up), attack,

and finish. This chapter shows four different condi- tions and the subsequent attack. The purpose is to isolate these segments of a single leg attack. Chapter 12 illustrates numerous other single leg set- ups and attacks together with their appropriate

finish.

./AM

^

>:;•:

;

"

,

Russ Hellickson about to arm drag his Bulgarian opponent in the 1976 Olympics.

134

CREATING FAVORABLE CONDITIONS FOR THE SINGLE LEG

  • 10.1 • Stan Dziedzic executes an arm drag set-up for a single.

As a ploy I rest my hand on my oppo- nent's shoulder. He reacts and grasps my

1

2 » As soon as my opponent seizes my wrist, I pull my hand down in order to place

3

/ break his balance

arm and driving in with

here by jerking his my body. Note my

wrist.

his arm in position for an arm drag. Notice I

right hand is deep around my opponent's

rotate my palm down which turns my oppo- nent's palm and thus exposes his arm. At

leg.

 

the same time, I drag.

reach up to start the arm

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

135

  • 4 • I now have my opponent's leg secure. I should emphasize I haven't released my op-

5

I have my opponent's weight shifted to

the far foot. I let go his arm and am about to

6 • I have the single leg in the proper posi- tion and shall look for a favorable finish,

ponent's arm. Until I get his weight shifted secure a tight hold on the single leg. to the far foot, I shall not release It. I am also starting my penetration and driving in- to him.

136

CREATING FAVORABLE CONDITIONS FOR THE SINGLE LEG

10.2 • Stan Dziedzic demonstrates how to secure a single when your opponent attempts to counter the 2 on 1 tie-up.

1

/ am controlling the two-on-one.

2

My opponent reaches out to counter

the two-on-one by grabbing my elbow. This creates conditions for a single to the far leg.

3

Capitalizing

on

these

conditions,

I

reach out with my left hand for my oppo- nent's far leg. I make sure I keep my back straight and head up while I step in with my left foot and drive into my opponent.

THE

UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

137

  • 4 • ) continue to drive into my opponent. Notice the position of

  • 5 •

( now have secured the leg.

my arms and that my back is still straight and my head up. As you

can see from his position, my opponent's weight is shifting to the rear.

138

CREATING FAVORABLE CONDITIONS FOR THE SINGLE LEG

10.3 • Stan Dziedzic shows how to clear your opponent's collar tie-up and capture a single.

  • 1 •

My opponent has a collar tie-up with his

elbow inside. This makes it very difficult tor me to come inside his arm. Instead, I begin to turn, putting pressure on my opponent's shoulder. Notice my left arm is inside, be- tween my opponent's chest and my chest.

  • 2 • I have been able to force my opponent to release his tight collar tie-up by pulling

his wrist off my neck as I increased the

pressure on his arm.

Now with the 2 on 1 I

draw my opponent's arm down in order to

post the weight on his near toot.

3 • With my opponent's weight posted, I squat down, reaching my left arm around his near leg to secure the single leg. I must be sure not to let go of my opponent's wrist.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

139

4 • Only after I've driven in deep, forcing my opponent to shift his weight to his tar leg, do I release his wrist and lock my hands on the single leg.

/ now have a single leg position and shall look tor the ap- propriate finish.

5

142

CREATING FAVORABLE CONDITIONS FOR THE SINGLE LEG

  • 5 • Aided by the additional pressure of my hand driving across

his neck, I continue to force into my opponent, scooping with my

left leg back and down until it lands on the mat.

6

/ have control of the leg and shall look for my finish.

11

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

T he most complicated phase of the single leg takedown is the finish. This chapter contains 19

finishes. Chapter 12 illustrates additional finishes as part of the complete technique.

A Japanese wrestler about to finish this single on his Soviet opponent.

144

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

11.1 • Stan Dziedzic finishes this single leg by capturing the far leg.

1

/ am in tight on a single leg. Notice my head is to the inside.

My left leg is forward and turned in, my elbows are in, and I am

pulling my opponent's leg tight to my abdomen.

2 • / step with my left leg, turning my knee in while grabbing his far knee. I should emphasize that as I hook the far knee, my elbow is in, thumb completely on the outside of the far leg, and left arm is ready to post to catch my balance.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

145

  • 3 Here I am continuing to pull my opponent's leg tight to my chest. My far arm is out for a brace.

My far arm brace maintains my balance so my opponent is unable to pull me up or elevate me over.

4

146

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

11.2

Stan Dziedzic shows how to block in front of the far leg.

1

/ have my opponent's leg pinched be-

tween my thighs. My outside hand is over the top of my inside hand, and my back Is straight. Notice my elbows are In while my

neck is bulled and shoulders are shrugged.

2 If my opponent's leg Is within reaching distance, I start to reach down with my In- side hand to the Instep while my other arm

3

/ am stepping over my opponent's leg,

putting it to the outside. At the same time I shift the arm blocking my opponent's far

drops to block his far leg. leg to his near knee In order to yank it up-

ward.

THE UNITED

STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

147

4 • Now I have my opponent's leg tightly controlled. It is impor- tant that my arm is wrapped deeply around the leg and I do not grab the heel with my hand. This precludes my opponent from breaking my grip and kicking free.

5 » As my opponent straightens up to maintain his balance, I reach up with my left arm for an underhook.

148

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

' now pull back on the underhook and block my opponent's far leg so he loses his balance.

6

7 » My opponent is losing balance and falling down.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

149

  • 11.3 • Stan Dziedzic executing what is sometimes referred to as "running the pipe."

1

My opponent has an overhook, and his leg is between my

legs.

I create momentum by stepping with my right toot toward the center, as I begin to pull away counterclockwise.

2

150

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

3 • / draw my opponent's leg between my legs; at the same time I step back with my left foot.

4 • Now that my opponent is on the mat, I shall move up for the takedown. I should emphasize I have not yet gone down to my knees; instead I am squatting. This maneuver prevents him from pulling me for- ward.

/ go down to my knees to complete my takedown only after my opponent is down

5

on the mat. This foils his counters.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

151

  • 11.4 • Stan Dziedzic demonstrates how to run the pipe when your opponent has his leg to the outside.

    • 1 My opponent has an overhook, and his captured leg blocks my thigh.

2

f create momentum by stepping toward the center.

152

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

  • 3 • / am now drawing my opponent's leg tight between my legs;

at the same time I am kicking my leg deep in back to break the

control he has with his outside leg.

  • 4 Now that my opponent is on the mat, I shall move up for the takedown. Notice I have not yet gone down to my knees.

THE UNITED

STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

153

5 • / now go down to my knees to complete my takedown only after my opponent is down on the mat. This foils my opponent's counters.

154

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

11.5 • Russ Hellickson shows how to change your direction and force your opponent to his hands. Russ used this technique against several of his opponents en route to winning a silver medal in the 1976 Olympic games.

With the single leg secured, I begin to move in a circular direction away from my

1

2

»

He

counters

this motion

by turning

(opening) his hips and bringing his tree leg

3 • As I step over my opponent's leg, I jolt him forward by thrusting my shoulder into

 

opponent.

in closer to me. This creates the conditions

the back of his knee. As

I initiate this ac-

tor the following maneuver. tion, I shift my inside hand down to his

ankle.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING

SYLLABUS

155

4

/ now move over the top of my oppo-

nent's

leg

as

he

falls off balance.

At the

With my right hand on his hip, I kick my opponent's support leg out, forcing him to

5

6

» To finish, I drop down on top of my op-

ponent, pressuring him to the mat.

same time my inside hand slides down to

his knees.

his instep.

 

156

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

11.6 *

Stan Dziedzic completes the single leg by scooping his opponent's far leg. Soslan Andiev, 5 times Gold Medalist from the USSR, often utilized this finish.

/ have a single leg tackle, but my oppo- nent is countering me by keeping his leg to

1

2 • Because my opponent does

not have

an overhook, I am able to jerk up hard and

3 • / now hook my right leg above or at my opponent's knee, as I lift up. At the same

 

the outside.

quickly, straightening my body.

time I drive into my opponent.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

157

RT &mtm-

4

/ draw my opponent's leg in as / drive him toward his back.

5 » My opponent lies on his back. I move up, looking for the pin.

158

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

11.7 *

Dan Gable demonstrates a slightly different variation of the previous finish.

1

I have a single leg secured.

2

I step back with my left leg to give me

3

Now I lift my opponent's leg high and

 

space to lift my opponent's leg to the out-

to the outside. It Is Important to note I also

side.

 

have his tar wrist.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

159

A *

lam beginning to step in deep to scoop

my opponent's far leg for the turn.

/ now have the leg pulled in and drive into my opponent, trying to drop him on his

5

I have pulled my opponent's far wrist in and have lifted his leg higher, trying to

6

 

back.

rotate him to his back.

160

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

7

» My opponent falls to his back, and I move up to secure the

fall.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

161

  • 11.8 •

Dan Gable, instead of scooping, also blocks his opponent's front foot from this position. I'm certain many of his opponents remember how well Dan used this technique.

1

Here I have my opponent in a single leg

with his left foot resting on my right thigh.

2

• / yank up behind his knee, bringing his

leg Into my armpit. At the same time I bring my right leg up keeping his foot to the out- side.

3

/ am pulling his knee tight to my chest

and am twisting as I pull my opponent off balance.

162

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

In this photo I am blocking my opponent's right foot with the arch of my left foot, breaking his balance.

4

  • 5 • / have my opponent's ankle held tightly and his weight is on his hands. I need only to move up for the takedown.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

163

11.9 • Russ Hellickson shows how to maneuver your opponent's leg to the inside and finish for the takedown.

1

Here I have my opponent in a single leg

with my hips close and his knee pulled tight

to my chest.

2

( thrust my hips forward, forcing my op-

ponent's foot to the outside.

  • 3 • / wrap my arm deep around my oppo-

nent's ankle. Notice I am keeping my elbow tight to my chest and am moving as I pull my opponent off balance.

164

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

4 • Now I am beginning to raise my right

5

/ am moving upward on my opponent's

hand toward the hand pushing against my shoulder.

leg.

6 • / move back in toward my opponent, pushing his hand off my shoulder, thus forc- ing him off balance forward.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

165

  • 7 • I now step up with my left foot, blocking my opponent's left leg to prevent him from stepping and maintaining his balance.

8 • / continue for the takedown.

166

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

11.10 • Stan Dziedzic performs what

is commonly called a Heave-Ho.

1

My opponent is bending his leg up so I

2

/ start

to move away and step back

3

Having taken a deep step with my left

am unable to pinch it between my knees

with my left leg.

leg,

I begin

to bring my opponent's

leg

and control the bottom part of his leg. This counters a variety of finishes but opens my opponent for this finish, called the heave- ho.

down.

 

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

167

  • 4 ( am continuing to move away while yanking my opponent's leg upward.

5

/ am still lifting my opponent's leg as high as possible.

168

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

6

*

My

opponent

is

now

down

on

his

hands, and all his weight is going forward. I

am beginning to look for my takedown.

7

Here I am about to cover my opponent

for the takedown.

8

/ secure the takedown.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

169

  • 11.11 •

In these six photos Dan Gable clears his opponent's leg to the outside and finishes the single by grasping

his far

leg.

1

*

In

this photo,

I

have the

single leg

2 • / step back with my left leg to create

3

Notice my opponent's leg is bent. I am

secured.

 

space to pull his left

leg to

the outside. I

now stepping in, driving toward the far leg

also drop my left hand down to the inside of

my opponent's ankle.

while reaching out to catch my opponent's leg at the knee.

170

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

4 • / now have my opponent off balance and have secured his far leg.

5

( continue to drive in and try to pull the

leg out.

Observe the grip on the inside

/ now have my takedown and will look to move up for back points.

6

ankle.

 

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

171

  • 11.12 • Instead of grasping the far leg, Dan demonstrates a different finish from the same starting position

1

/ now have the leg secured.

2 • ( drop back with my left leg to create room to pull my opponent's leg to the out- side. I am also reaching down with my left hand to grasp the Inside ankle.

3 • Now controlling the ankle, I drive into my opponent, twisting his leg as I pull down on the knee. Simultaneously I shift to the outside and lift up on his ankle.

172

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

4 • / continue to turn, both to put pressure on my opponent's leg and to force him to the mat.

5

/ continue to rotate.

6

/ keep turning as I pull on the knee.

THE UNITED

STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

173

/ have pressure on my opponent's knee causing him to fall forward.

7

  • 8 Since my opponent's weight is on his hands, I will move up to acquire my takedown.

1 • / am trying to resist as my opponent counters by pushing my head down.

  • 2

My opponent has driven my head down

so forcefully I am no longer able to resist. Instead, I duck under my opponent's leg.

3 • / drop down to my right knee, duck under my opponent, planting my right hand, while trying to lift my opponent off the mat.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

175

  • 4 / now have lifted my opponent off the mat. I am reaching for his other leg because my body is slightly turned in that direction.

5

/ pivot, trying to come out behind my opponent's leg.

176

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

/ am now behind my opponent's leg, attempting to secure it tight to my chest so he can't kick away.

6

7

I am now moving up for my takedown.

THE UNITED

STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

177

/ have secured my takedown, keeping the leg up and looking for a possible turning situation.

8

178

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

11.14 • Dan Gable shows how to duck under your opponent's leg in a slightly different situation.

1

At this point

I turn my shoulder and

arm into my opponent to make him straighten his leg.

2 » My opponent is now straightening his leg. I release my grip and begin to look for the duck under.

m

  • 3 • I am now ducking under my opponent's leg, dropping down to my knees.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

179

I am now on my knee and beginning to raise up.

4

5

As / lift the leg, I start to turn toward it.

6

Continuing to lift and rotate into my

opponent, I now grab his far leg. I should

emphasize I am rising up forcefully.

180

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

jT

»

7

While still turning on his leg, I begin to move up.

"

8

Having completed my turn, the takedown is mine.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

181

  • 11.15 • Stan Dziedzic shows how to finish a single leg when your opponent is controlling the wrist.

1

My

opponent

Is

trying

to break my

secure hold on his leg by working on my in- side wrist.

/ break my opponent's control of my wrist with my opposite or free wrist.

2

3 • After I break his control, I step away and over my opponent's leg with my right leg, reaching down with my Inside hand to secure his ankle.

182

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

/ now have his ankle and am pulling it up beyond the outside of my hip.

4

  • 5 ( raise my right leg up, holding the knee tight to my hip, a maneuver which gives me

a more secure hold of my opponent's leg.

  • 6 • / now move away, drawing back on my opponent's shoulder while blocking his far

leg.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

183

7 » My opponent loses his balance and is falling. I am looking to complete the takedown.

  • 8 •

/ moire up, keeping control of the ankle, on the alert for a turn.

184

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

11.16 • Stan Dziedzic demonstrates how to finish the single leg when you have the leg to the inside.

1 • / have my opponent's leg tightly con-

2

Since

I

am

unable

to

acquire

an

3

I continue

to

drive my opponent off

trolled. Notice my right arm wrapped deeply

underhook, I drive off

my right foot and

balance,

 

around the leg and I do not grab the heel with my hand. This precludes my opponent from breaking my grip and kicking free.

push my opponent forward,

 

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

185

4

Now that my opponent's weight Is on

his hands, I move to the lar side.

I

<«fcV\s

  • 5 • As ( shift to the tar side to gain control, I maintain my grip on the Instep.

6

Keeping the same grip on the instep, I

move up high, always alert for some kind of counter.

186

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

11.17 • In this series of photos Stan Dziedzic illustrates another option when you have your opponent's leg to the inside.

1 • / have my opponent's

leg to the outside and high. Generally,

this is the easiest position to finish the single leg. My

opponent,

2

/ begin to raise my opponent's ankle and leg up by pulling up

with my right hand. At the same time, I begin to duck under my op-

however, is keeping me low on his ankle, making it more difficult ponent. for me to finish. This is a rare occurrence. I am usually able to finish this takedown in a more conventional manner.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

187

3

My head and shoulder are now under

4 • I now come into my opponent, trying to

5

/ have control of my opponent's body

my opponent's leg. Notice I am still holding

control his body. The tighter I am to my op-

and I am reaching for his far shoulders so I

his leg, my back is straight and I have dip-

ponent, the easier it will be to control him.

can take him to his back as he falls. It is im-

ped my

weight down low.

portant to lift with all my power in this posi-

tion.

188

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

  • 6 •

/ have my opponent completely off the ground. My only con-

cern is that I set my opponent down to his back, maintain control

and do not slam him.

7 • / now continue for control to get the takedown and hold my opponent tor the fall.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

189

11.18 • Gene Davis shows a variation of the previous technique.

1 • In this position I have my opponent's leg to the tar inside and up high. I prefer to

2 • / duck under my opponent's leg and begin to come up.

/ continue to come up, staying tight to my opponent while trying to control his

3

have the leg on this side of my body if at all possible. My opponent, however, is keeping me low on his leg.

hips.

190

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

\

/ now have my opponent's hips under control and begin my lift.

4

5 • / have lifted my opponent,

  • 6 ( turn my opponent so he will be on his back when I set him down.

THE UNITED STATES WRESTLING SYLLABUS

191

  • 7 / am now letting my opponent down to his back.

8

/ continue down toward the mat.

9 • He is now on his back, and I am looking to control him for the fall.

192

FINISHES TO THE SINGLE LEG TAKEDOWN

  • 11.19 • Gene Davis finishes this takedown by putting pressure on his opponent's knee

l

i

i

  • 1 / have my opponent's leg to the inside and up in the air. I can take him down from this position very easily.

2 I have my opponent's foot on top of my shoulder and am beginning to move up on the leg.

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193

3 • I am now high on the leg. My shoulder is behind my oppo- nent's calf, while my hands are above his knee on his thigh.