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Lord Ashcroft International Business School

Sustainable Management
Futures




Department: Economics, International Business and
Operations Management



Module Code: MOD000945


Academic Year: 2013/14
Semester:



Module Guide


Page 1
Contents

Sustainable Management Futures ............................................................................. 1
1. Key Information ..................................................................................................... 2
2. Introduction to the Module ..................................................................................... 2
3. Intended Learning Outcomes ................................................................................ 3
3.1 Employability skills delivered in this Module ......................................................... 4
4. Outline Delivery ..................................................................................................... 5
4.1 Attendance Requirements ................................................................................... 7
5. Assessment ........................................................................................................... 8
5.1 Submitting via TurnitinUK GradeMark [Cambridge and Chelmsford students] ... 9
5.2 Submitting your work [For LS Students] ............................................................. 12
5.3 Marking Rubric and Feedback .......................................................................... 12
5.4 Re-Assessment (resit) ....................................................................................... 13
6. How is My Work Marked? .................................................................................... 13
7. Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards ....................................................... 16
7.1 Specific Assessment Criteria and Marking Rubric.............................................. 16
7.2 University Generic Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards Level 6 ........... 17
8. Assessment Offences .......................................................................................... 20
9. Learning Resources ............................................................................................ 23
9.1. Library .............................................................................................................. 23
9.2. Other Resources .............................................................................................. 25
10. Module Evaluation ............................................................................................. 26
11. Appendix 1: Re-Assessment Information ........................................................... 27



Module Guide


Page 2
1. Key Information

Module: Sustainable Management Futures

Module Leader: Philip J arman
London School of Marketing
LS Education Group
Email: pmfjarman@gmail.com

Module Tutors: Neleisha Weerasinghe

Every module has a Module Definition Form (MDF) which is the officially validated record of the
module. You can access the MDF for this module in three ways via:

the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)
the My.Anglia Module Catalogue at www.anglia.ac.uk/modulecatalogue
Anglia Ruskins module search engine facility at www.anglia.ac.uk/modules


All modules delivered by Anglia Ruskin University at its main campuses in the UK and at
Associate Colleges throughout the UK and overseas are governed by the Academic
Regulations. You can view these at www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs. A printed extract of the
Academic Regulations, known as the Assessment Regulations, is available for every student
from your Faculty Office (all new students will have received a copy as part of their welcome
pack).

In the unlikely event of any discrepancy between the Academic Regulations and any other
publication, including this module guide, the Academic Regulations, as the definitive document,
take precedence over all other publications and will be applied in all cases.

2. Introduction to the Module
Sustainable management is an overarching term that generally refers to the ethical,
responsible, innovative, 'daring to care' form of management. The module traces the
development of our current ideas on sustainable management including three main connected
dimensions: the discussion of ethical issues and theoretical frameworks relevant for both
individuals and organisations; an overview of the ideas concerning corporate social
responsibility; and the exploration of the concept of sustainability, including respect for people,
for the environment and concern for economic prosperity. Throughout the module, a critical
approach to the different elements will be included. We expect that the discussion on ethical
concepts and values will equip students to critically evaluate the conduct of individuals,
stakeholder groups and organizations themselves, as well as the policy prescriptions of
governmental authorities and corporate governance.





Module Guide


Page 3
3. Intended Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module you will be able to:

1. Develop an understanding of the complexity of the dynamics concerning sustainable
management through the lens of ethics and responsibility.

2. Critically evaluate individual and organisational ethical action and behaviour against a
framework for ethical/responsible/management practices.

3. Examine the various types of corporate 'failures' and evaluate the policy responses
available together with the case for ethical management.

4. Apply ethical/sustainability theories and principles to case study examples of business
behaviour reflecting on our role as citizens, social actors, managers, leaders and human beings
responding to the challenges of sustainability.

Module Guide


Page 4

3.1 Employability skills delivered in this Module

It is important that we help you develop employability skills throughout your course which will
assist you in securing employment and supporting you in your future career. During your course
you will acquire a wide range of key skills. In this module, you will develop those identified
below:



SKILL Skills acquired in
this module

Communication (oral) X
Communication (written) X
Commercial Awareness X
Cultural sensitivity X
Customer focus
Data Handling
Decision making
Enterprising
Flexibility
Initiative X
Interpersonal Skills X
Leadership/Management of others
Networking
Organisational adaptability
Project Management
Problem Solving and analytical skills X
Responsibility X
Team working
Time Management X
Other
Module Guide


Page 5

4. Outline Delivery
Please make sure that you have read through both the weeks readings and the associated
case studies for that week before attending the lecture and seminar for that week. The case
studies and additional materials will be scanned and put in the VLE.

Week Lecture Student activity Reading references
1

Business ethics matters:
what is it and why does it
matter?
In order to fully benefit
from the lessons, students
are expected to read the
recommended Lecture
notes, Practical
applications and Case
studies, available in the
IMSS.

It is a MUST

to read other
additional material
available in the VLE and
the IMSS
Business Ethics and Issues
(Values), by Fisher, Lovell,
and Valero-Silva, 4
th
ed.
Pearson Chapter 1

Check case studies of Key
text
- 2.4. Aids
- 2.5. Child labour
- 2.6.M15 and whistle
blowing
- 2.8. Fat Cats
Ed. 2009: p.54; 57; 58; 62
Ed. 2012: p. 56; 58; 59; 63

Senge, et al. (2010) The
Necessary Revolution-
Chapter 1

Stern Review (2006)
Executive Summary.


TO BE COMPLETED BY
WEEK 1
2

Individuals responses to
ethical issues - part 1
In order to fully benefit
from the lessons, students
are expected to read the
recommended Lecture
notes, Practical
applications and Case
studies, available in the
IMSS.

It is a MUST

to read other
additional material
available in the VLE and
the IMSS
Business Ethics and Issues
(Values), by Fisher, Lovell,
and Valero-Silva, 4
th
ed.
Pearson Chapter 2, 3

TO BE COMPLETED BY
WEEK 2
3

Individuals responses to
ethical issues - part 2
In order to fully benefit
from the lessons, students
are expected to read the
recommended Lecture
notes, Practical
applications and Case
studies, available in the
Business Ethics and Issues
(Values), by Fisher, Lovell,
and Valero-Silva, 4
th
ed.
Pearson - Chapter 4
TO BE COMPLETED BY
Module Guide


Page 6
IMSS.



It is a MUST
WEEK 3
to read other
additional material
available in the VLE and
the IMSS
4

Organisational responses
to ethical issues part 1
In order to fully benefit
from the lessons, students
are expected to read the
recommended Lecture
notes, Practical
applications and Case
studies, available in the
IMSS.

It is a MUST

to read case
studies mentioned in the
LN.
Case Study
- 7.1 Women in executive
boards Ed. 2012: p.270

- 9.5: Uwa Stakeholders
Ed. 2012: p. 257

It is a MUST
Business Ethics and Issues
(Values), by Fisher, Lovell,
and Valero-Silva, 4
th
ed.
Pearson Chapter 5 & 6
to read other
additional material
available in the VLE and
the IMSS
http://www.cipd.co.uk/hr-
resources/factsheets/whist
leblowing.aspx

Porter and Kramer (2006)
Strategy and Society,
Harvard Business Review

Fleming and J ones (2013)
The End of Corporate Social
Responsibility. Chapter 1:
Introduction

TO BE COMPLETED BY
WEEK 4
5

Organisational responses
to ethical issues part 2
In order to fully benefit
from the lessons, students
are expected to read the
recommended Lecture
notes, Practical
applications and Case
studies, available in the
IMSS.

It is a MUST to read other
additional material
available in the VLE and
the IMSS

Case Study 12.16 South
Africa and Apartheid
- Ed. 2012: p.476
- Ed. 2009: p. 490
Business Ethics and Issues
(Values), by Fisher, Lovell,
and Valero-Silva, 4
th
ed.
Pearson Chapter 9
Blackburn, W. 2009. The
Sustainability Handbook.
Chapter 2. (In VLE )
Morin, E. 1999. Six
proposals for education in
the 21
st
century. (In VLE )
Porter and Kramer (2011)
Creating Shared Value.
Harvard Business Review

TO BE COMPLETED BY
WEEK 5
6

The international context In order to fully benefit
from the lessons, students
are expected to read the
Business Ethics and Issues
(Values), by Fisher, Lovell,
Module Guide


Page 7
recommended Lecture
notes, Practical
applications and Case
studies, available in the
IMSS.

It is a MUST to read other
additional material
available in the VLE and
the IMSS

and Valero-Silva, 4
th
ed.
Pearson - Chapters 10, 11 &
12


TO BE COMPLETED BY
WEEK 6

Students should read the chapters detailed in the above online delivery time table and
access all additional material available in the VLE.

* It is very important that students visit the VLE periodicall y as new content related to
additional reading will be uploaded there by the ARU module leader.
*It is very important to refer section 9: Learning Recourse section of this document for
information on additional reading.


4.1 Attendance Requirements

Attending all your classes is very important and one of the best ways to help you succeed in this module.
In accordance with the Student Charter, you are expected to arrive on time and take an active part in all
your timetabled classes. If you are unable to attend a class for a valid reason (eg: illness), please
contact Mrs. Olga Kutsenko - o.kutsenko@lseducationgroup.com

London School of Marketing will closely monitor the attendance of all students and will contact you by e-
mail if you have been absent without notice for two weeks. Continued absence can result in various
consequences including the termination of your registration as you will be considered to have withdrawn
from your studies.

International students who are non-EEA nationals and in possession of entry clearance/leave to remain
as a student (student visa) are required to be in regular attendance at London School of Marketing.
Failure to do so is considered to be a breach of national immigration regulations. London School of
Marketing is statutorily obliged to inform the UK Border Agency of the Home Office of significant
unauthorised absences by any student visa holders.
Module Guide


Page 8
5. Assessment
The assessment for this module consists of one part. Submission dates vary.

Part Type of
assessment

Word or
time limit
Submission method Submission
dates
1 Draft a summary
of the essays based
on the two scenarios
selected, needs to
be provided for
feedback


2 page IMSS TBA

2 This module is
assessed by one
assignment.

3000
words
LSM Submission Website

http://www.lsmsubmissions.com
TBA



Part 010 Assignment
This must be completed and submitted by the stipulated deadline (make sure to check your
time table)

In Week 10 four scenarios will be released; you are required to choose 2 from 4 provided to
you, and write a 1500-word essay style response to each question relating to the issues
contained in each of them [3000 words in total]. Each scenario is worth 50% of the overall
mark.

The assessment is designed to evaluate your knowledge and skills in the subjects covered in
the module. In the assessment, you need to spot key words that will guide you as to what is
expected in the question. As such the questions will invite the following types of response:

Definitions: These will ask you to show that you have learned some concepts, by setting out
their precise meanings. Such questions need to be complemented by some further analysis.
Keywords for these types of questions are: describe, identify, define, name, examine,
distinguish between, compare, provide examples, summarise.

Evaluate: This is designed to test your reasoning of cause and effect. You need to offer
structured and coherent explanations. Keywords are: Interpret, explain, discuss, what conditions
influence, what are the consequences, what are the implications of.

Judgement: This requires that you make a judgement, perhaps of a policy or of a course of
action. Keywords: evaluate, critically examine, assess, do you agree that.

Advice: Some questions might ask your advice in particular situations. Your advice needs to
be based on policy, good practice, principles and evidence of actions that can be effective.
Keywords: Design, create, recommend, advice.
Module Guide


Page 9

Critique: Many questions will include the word critically, this means that you expect to look at
least two points of view, offering a critique of each view and your judgement. Key words:
critically analyse, critically consider.



The following marking indicates how each scenario will be assessed:

Mark
Learning
Outcome
Introduction - A clear outline of the issue, and what is going to be
covered in the assignment.
15 LO 1-4
Theory and Application - Clear explanation of the theoretical or
conceptual ideas that are going to use to address the question set.
Outlining the academic debates associated with the theoretical or
conceptual framework and providing a clear rationale for adopting the
chosen ideas.
Students should demonstrate an awareness of the key points from
the relevant theory and their significance in establishing the
importance of the issue they have chosen.

60 LO 1-4
Conclusion - The conclusion should be concise and accurately
reflect the content of the assignment. A good conclusion will reflect
on the strength of the essays central argument.
15 LO 1-4
Presentation Evidence of good range and appropriate references
used.
10 LO 1-4
TOTAL MARKS 100%


All coursework assignments and other forms of assessment must be submitted by the published
deadline, which is detailed above. It is your responsibility to know when work is due to be
submitted ignorance of the deadline date will not be accepted as a reason for late or non-
submission.

Any late work will NOT be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment task
in question.

You are requested to keep a copy of your work.
5.1 Submitting via TurnitinUK GradeMark
[NOT relevant to LS students]

You are required to submit your written assignment(s) online via Turnitin/Grademark. Unless
stated on the assignment brief, all your assignments should be submitted online. Hard copy
assignments handed into the iCentre will NOT be marked. You must put YOUR Student ID
number (SID) as the submission title (details below).

Module Guide


Page 10
You will be enrolled automatically to two types of Turnitin class: 1) Grademark Classes entitled
by module name, to which you will submit a ONE TIME ONLY final submission; 2) The
Originality Report Class to which you can submit multiple drafts for originality checking.

The Grademark class page shows the start date (when you can begin submitting work), the due
date for your assignment and the post date. All assignments must be submitted by 5pm on the
due date. Any late work will NOT be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the
assessment task in question. The post date is the date when both feedback and provisional
results will be posted online. You should follow the detailed instructions provided on the VLE.

When you submit your paper, remember to:


ONLINE SUBMISSION AND FEEDBACK THROUGH GRADEMARK

At the post date you will get your feedback through Turnitin/Grademark. We have implemented
this online feedback system to give you the following benefits:

More timely receipt of your feedback;
Better quality feedback;
The ability to hand in your work online;
Reduction in time spent queuing to hand in and pick up your assignments;
The ability to receive marker feedback when it is posted, regardless of your location;
Reduction of both yours and the universitys carbon footprint by no longer printing work.

HOW TO VIEW YOUR FEEDBACK

Module Guide


Page 11
Click on the class that you wish to view and then you will see the assignments for the module
listed. Click the blue view button to open up the document viewer. A new window will open and
you will see your feedback on the right-hand side of the screen. Or click on the grey arrow to
download a copy of your assignment and feedback.



POINTS TO NOTE

1. The due date as seen in eVision is the official submission deadline. Any late work will
NOT be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment task in
question. Do not leave it until the last minute to submit your work the system becomes
extremely busy and can be slower during the period of the deadline.

2. Grademark final submission classes will become available 10 working days before the
final submission date. Be aware that work can only be submitted ONCE to these classes
and cannot be removed or changed.

3. All work submitted MUST be entitled by your Student ID number.

4. Any work handed in via the iCentre will NOT be marked.

5. The Originality Report is automatically generated by Turnitin on submitting work. A paper
copy of the originality report is not required.

6. The Originality Report will not be used to make assessment decisions unless concerns
arise as to poor academic practice, plagiarism, or collusion. The report may then be
considered as part of the normal investigatory procedures undertaken by the academic
team and the Director of Studies (again, please see Section 10 of the Assessment
Regulations).

7. Re-sits and extensions are also to be submitted via Turnitin. New Turnitin classes will be
created for re-sits.

8. Full details as on submitting to Turnitin, the Originality Report, and a FAQs list, can be
located on the module VLE. If you have experience submission difficulties, please email:
LAIBS_Grademark_Support@anglia.ac.uk Furthermore, there is a support VLE site
(http://vle.anglia.ac.uk/sites/grademark/laibs/Content/Start.aspx) with videos to show you
how to submit your work and to view your feedback.

All coursework assignments and other forms of assessment must be submitted by the published
deadline which is detailed above. It is your responsibility to know when work is due to be
submitted ignorance of the deadline date will not be accepted as a reason for late or non-
submission.
Module Guide


Page 12



5.2 Submitting your work [For LS Students]

All student work which contributes to the eventual outcome of the module (i.e. if it determines
whether you will pass or fail the module and counts towards the mark you achieve for the
module) is submitted according to your institutions guidelines. Academic staff CANNOT accept
work directly from you.

Any late work will NOT be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment task
in question.

You are requested to keep a copy of your work.



5.3 Marking Rubric and Feedback

The rubric, shown in Section 7.1 Specific Marking Criteria, will be used to mark your work.

Feedback
You are entitled to written feedback on your performance for all your assessed work. For all
assessment tasks which are not examinations, this is provided by a member of academic staff
through Grademark at Cambridge and Chelmsford. At other locations and Associate Colleges,
this is provided through the completion of the assignment coversheet on which your mark and
feedback will relate to the achievement of the modules intended learning outcomes and the
assessment criteria you were given for the task when it was first issued.

Examination scripts are retained by Anglia Ruskin and are not returned to students. However,
you are entitled to feedback on your performance in an examination and may request a meeting
with the Module Leader or Tutor to see your examination script and to discuss your
performance.

Anglia Ruskin is committed to providing you with feedback on all assessed work within 20
working days of the submission deadline or the date of an examination. This is extended to 30
days for feedback for a Major Project module (please note that working days excludes those
days when Anglia Ruskin University is officially closed; e.g. between Christmas and New Year).
Personal tutors will offer to read feedback from several modules and help you to address any
common themes that may be emerging.

On occasion, you will receive feedback and marks for work that you completed in the earlier
stages of the module. We provide you with this feedback as part of the learning experience and
to help you prepare for other assessment tasks that you have still to complete. It is important to
note that, in these cases, the marks for these pieces of work are unconfirmed. This means
that, potentiall y, marks can change, in either direction!

Module Guide


Page 13
Marks for modules and individual pieces of work become confirmed on the Dates for the Official
Publication of Results which can be checked at www.anglia.ac.uk/results.

5.4 Re-Assessment (resit)
If you are unsuccessful with the 1st attempt of your assessment, you must complete a re-
assessment. As indicated in Section 6.2.7. of the Senate Code of Practice, this is a NEW
assessment, you CANNOT re-work the assessment explained in this section. The re-
assessment information is given in Appendix 1.

6. How is My Work Marked?
After you have submitted your work or you have completed an examination, Anglia Ruskin
undertakes a series of activities to assure that our marking processes are comparable with
those employed at other universities in the UK and that your work has been marked fairly,
honestly and consistently. These include:

Anonymous marking your name is not attached to your work so, at the point of marking,
the lecturer does not know whose work he/she is considering. When you undertake an
assessment task where your identity is known (e.g. a presentation or Major Project), it is
marked by more than one lecturer (known as double marking)

Internal moderation a sample of all work for each assessment task in each module is
moderated by other Anglia Ruskin staff to check the standards and consistency of the
marking

External moderation a sample of student work for all modules is moderated by external
examiners experienced academic staff from other universities (and sometimes
practitioners who represent relevant professions) - who scrutinise your work and provide
Anglia Ruskin academic staff with feedback, advice and assurance that the marking of your
work is comparable to that in other UK universities. Many of Anglia Ruskins staff act as
external examiners at other universities.

Departmental Assessment Panel (DAP) performance by all students on all modules is
discussed and approved at the appropriate DAPs, which are attended, by all relevant
Module Leaders and external examiners. Anglia Ruskin has over 25 DAPs to cover all the
different subjects we teach.

This module falls within the remit of the Economics, International Business and Operations
Management DAP.

The following external examiners are appointed to this DAP and will oversee the
assessment of this and other modules within the DAPs remit:








Module Guide


Page 14




MARKETING, ENTERPRISE AND STRATEGY

External Examiners
Name
Academic Institution Position or Employer
Dr Chris Miller

University of Glamorgan Principal Lecturer


The above list is correct at the time of publication. However, external examiners are appointed
at various points throughout the year. An up-to-date list of external examiners is available to
students and staff at www.anglia.ac.uk/eeinfo.

Anglia Ruskins marking process is represented in the flowchart overleaf:


Module Guide


Page 15
Anglia Ruskins marking process is represented in the flowchart below:
Student submits
work / sits
examination
Work collated and passed to
Module Leader
Work is marked by Module
Leader and Module Tutor(s)
1
. All
marks collated by Module Leader
for ALL locations
2

Internal moderation samples
selected. Moderation undertaken
by a second academic
3

Unconfirmed marks and feedback
to students within 20 working
days (30 working days for Major
Projects)
External moderation samples
selected and moderated by
External Examiners
4

Marks submitted to DAP
5
for
consideration and approval
Marks Approved by DAP
5
and
forwarded to Awards Board
Any issues?
Any issues?
Students receive
initial (unconfirmed)
feedback
Confirmed marks
issued to students
via e-Vision
M
a
r
k
i
n
g

S
t
a
g
e

I
n
t
e
r
n
a
l

M
o
d
e
r
a
t
i
o
n

S
t
a
g
e

E
x
t
e
r
n
a
l

M
o
d
e
r
a
t
i
o
n

S
t
a
g
e

D
A
P
4

S
t
a
g
e

YES
YES
NO
NO
Flowchart of Anglia Ruskins Marking Processes
1
All work is marked anonymously or double marked where identity of the student is known (e.g.in a presentation)
2
The internal (and external) moderation process compares work from all locations where the module is delivered
(e.g.Cambridge, Chelmsford, Peterborough, Malaysia, India, Trinidad etc.)
3
The sample for the internal moderation process comprises a minimum of eight pieces of work or 10% (whichever
is the greater) for each marker and covers the full range of marks
4
Only modules at levels 5, 6 and 7 are subject to external moderation (unless required for separate reasons). The
sample for the external moderation process comprises a minimum of eight pieces of work or 10% (whichever is
the greater) for the entire module and covers the full range of marks
5
DAP: Departmental Assessment Panel Anglia Ruskin has over 25 different DAPs to reflect our subject coverage
Module Guide


Page 16
7. Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards
7.1 Specific Assessment Criteria and Marking Rubric
A++ = 90-100 A+ = 80-89% A = 70-79% B = 60-69% C = 50-59% D = 40-49% F = 30-39% F- = 20-29% F = 10 -19% F---- = 0-9%


A
s
s
e
s
s
m
e
n
t


Exceptional
information base
exploring and
analysing the
discipline, its
theory and ethical
issues with
extraordinary
originality and
autonomy. Work
may be
considered for
publication within
Anglia Ruskin
University.

Exceptional
management of
learning
resources, with a
higher degree of
autonomy/explora
tion that clearly
exceeds the
assessment brief.
Exceptional
structure/accurate
expression.
Demonstrates
intellectual
originality and
imagination.
Exceptional
team/practical/pro
fessional skills.
Work may be
considered for
publication within
Anglia Ruskin
University
Outstanding
information base
exploring and
analysing the
discipline, its
theory and ethical
issues with clear
originality and
autonomy

Outstanding
management of
learning
resources, with a
degree of
autonomy/explora
tion that clearly
exceeds the
assessment brief.
An exemplar of
structured/accurat
e expression.
Demonstrates
intellectual
originality and
imagination.
Outstanding
team/practical/pro
fessional skills


Excellent
knowledge base
that supports
analysis,
evaluation and
problem-solving
in
theory/practice/et
hics of discipline
with considerable
originality


Excellent
management of
learning
resources, with
degree of
autonomy/researc
h that may
exceed the
assessment brief.
Structured and
creative
expression. Very
good academic/
intellectual skills
and
practical/team/pro
fessional/problem
-solving skills
Good knowledge
base that
supports analysis,
evaluation and
problem-solving
in theory/
practice/ethics of
discipline with
some originality


Good
management of
learning
resources, with
consistent self-
directed research.
Structured and
accurate
expression. Good
academic/intellect
ual skills and
team/practical/
professional/probl
em solving skills
Satisfactory
knowledge base
that supports
some analysis,
evaluation and
problem-solving
in
theory/practice/et
hics of discipline

Satisfactory
management of
learning
resources. Some
autonomy in
research but
inconsistent.
Structured and
mainly accurate
expression.
Acceptable level
of academic/
intellectual skills
going beyond
description at
times.
Satisfactory
team/practical/pro
fessional/problem
-solving skills
Basic knowledge
base with some
omissions at the
level of
theoretical/ethical
issues. Restricted
ability to discuss
theory and/or or
solve problems in
discipline

Basic use of
learning
resources with
little autonomy.
Some difficulties
with
academic/intellect
ual skills. Some
difficulty with
structure/accurac
y in expression,
but evidence of
developing
team/practical/pro
fessional/problem
-solving skills
Limited
knowledge base.
Limited
understanding of
discipline/ethical
issues. Difficulty
with theory and
problem solving
in discipline

Limited use of
learning
resources.
Unable to work
autonomously.
Little input to
teams. Weak
academic/
intellectual skills.
Still mainly
descriptive.
General difficulty
with
structure/accurac
y in expression.
Practical/professi
onal/ problem-
solving skills that
are not yet secure
Little evidence of
knowledge base.
Little evidence of
understanding of
discipline/ethical
issues.
Significant
difficulty with
theory and
problem solving
in discipline

Little evidence of
use of learning
resources.
Unable to work
autonomously.
Little input to
teams. Very weak
academic/
intellectual skills.
Work significantly
descriptive.
Significant
difficulty with
structure/accurac
y in expression.
Little evidence of
practical/professi
onal/problem-
solving skills
No evidence of
knowledge base;
no evidence of
understanding of
discipline/ethical
issues. Total
inability with
theory and
problem solving
in discipline.

No evidence of
use of learning
resources.
Completely
unable to work
autonomously.
No evidence of
input to teams.
No evidence of
academic/intellect
ual skills. Work
wholly
descriptive.
Incoherent
structure/accurac
y and expression.
No evidence of
practical/professi
onal/ problem-
solving skills
NO EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY
The executive
summary should
have overviewed
the main
recommendation
of the report. The
idea is that top
management do
not have to read
the whole report
to know what it is
about.
Module Guide


Page 17
7.2 University Generic Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards Level 6

Level 6 is characterised by an expectation of students increasing autonomy in relation to their study
and developing skill sets. Students are expected to demonstrate problem solving skills, both
theoretical and practical. This is supported by an understanding of appropriate theory; creativity of
expression and thought based in individual judgement; and the ability to seek out, invoke, analyse and
evaluate competing theories or methods of working in a critically constructive and open manner.
Output is articulate, coherent and skilled in the appropriate medium, with some students producing
original or innovative work in their specialism.
Mark Bands Outcome
Generic Learning Outcomes (GLOs) (Academic Regulations,
Section 2)
Knowledge & Understanding
Intellectual (thinking), Practical,
Affecti ve and Transferable Skills
C
h
a
r
a
c
t
e
r
i
s
t
i
c
s

o
f

S
t
u
d
e
n
t

A
c
h
i
e
v
e
m
e
n
t

b
y

M
a
r
k
i
n
g

B
a
n
d

90-
100%
Achieves
module
outcome(s)
related to
GLO at this
level
Exceptional information base
exploring and analysing the
discipline, its theory and ethical
issues with extraordinary
originality and autonomy. Work
may be considered for
publication within Anglia Ruskin
University
Exceptional management of
learning resources, with a higher
degree of autonomy/exploration
that clearly exceeds the
assessment brief. Exceptional
structure/accurate expression.
Demonstrates intellectual
originality and imagination.
Exceptional
team/practical/professional skills.
Work may be considered for
publication within Anglia Ruskin
University
80-89%
Outstanding information base
exploring and analysing the
discipline, its theory and ethical
issues with clear originality and
autonomy
Outstanding management of
learning resources, with a degree
of autonomy/exploration that
clearly exceeds the assessment
brief. An exemplar of
structured/accurate expression.
Demonstrates intellectual
originality and imagination.
Outstanding
team/practical/professional skills
70-79%
Excellent knowledge base that
supports analysis, evaluation and
problem-solving in
theory/practice/ethics of
discipline with considerable
originality
Excellent management of learning
resources, with degree of
autonomy/research that may
exceed the assessment brief.
Structured and creative
expression. Very good academic/
intellectual skills and
practical/team/professional/proble
m-solving skills
60-69%
Good knowledge base that
supports analysis, evaluation and
problem-solving in theory/
practice/ethics of discipline with
some originality
Good management of learning
resources, with consistent self-
directed research. Structured and
accurate expression. Good
academic/intellectual skills and
Module Guide


Page 18
team/practical/
professional/problem solving skills
50-59%
Satisfactory knowledge base that
supports some analysis,
evaluation and problem-solving
in theory/practice/ethics of
discipline
Satisfactory management of
learning resources. Some
autonomy in research but
inconsistent. Structured and mainly
accurate expression. Acceptable
level of academic/ intellectual skills
going beyond description at times.
Satisfactory
team/practical/professional/proble
m-solving skills
40-49%
A marginal
pass in
module
outcome(s)
related to
GLO at this
level
Basic knowledge base with some
omissions at the level of
theoretical/ethical issues.
Restricted ability to discuss
theory and/or or solve problems
in discipline
Basic use of learning resources
with little autonomy. Some
difficulties with
academic/intellectual skills. Some
difficulty with structure/accuracy in
expression, but evidence of
developing
team/practical/professional/proble
m-solving skills
30-39%
A marginal
fail in
module
outcome(s)
related to
GLO at this
level.
Possible
compensatio
n. Sat-isfies
qualifying
mark
Limited knowledge base. Limited
understanding of
discipline/ethical issues. Difficulty
with theory and problem solving
in discipline
Limited use of learning resources.
Unable to work autonomously.
Little input to teams. Weak
academic/ intellectual skills. Still
mainly descriptive. General
difficulty with structure/accuracy in
expression. Practical/professional/
problem-solving skills that are not
yet secure
20-29%
Fails to
achieve
module
outcome(s)
related to
this GLO.
Qualifying
mark not
satisfied. No
compensatio
n available
Little evidence of knowledge
base. Little evidence of
understanding of
discipline/ethical issues.
Significant difficulty with theory
and problem solving in discipline
Little evidence of use of learning
resources. Unable to work
autonomously. Little input to
teams. Very weak academic/
intellectual skills. Work significantly
descriptive. Significant difficulty
with structure/accuracy in
expression. Little evidence of
practical/professional/problem-
solving skills
10-19%
Inadequate knowledge base.
Inadequate understanding of
discipline/ethical issues. Major
difficulty with theory and problem
solving in discipline
Inadequate use of learning
resources. Unable to work
autonomously. Inadequate input to
teams. Extremely weak
academic/intellectual skills. Work
significantly descriptive. Major
difficulty with structure/accuracy in
expression. Inadequate
Module Guide


Page 19
practical/professional/ problem-
solving skills
1-9%
No evidence of knowledge base;
no evidence of understanding of
discipline/ethical issues. Total
inability with theory and problem
solving in discipline
No evidence of use of learning
resources. Completely unable to
work autonomously. No evidence
of input to teams. No evidence of
academic/intellectual skills. Work
wholly descriptive. Incoherent
structure/accuracy and expression.
No evidence of
practical/professional/ problem-
solving skills
0%
Awarded for: (i) non-submission; (ii) dangerous practice and; (iii) in
situations where the student fails to address the assignment brief (eg:
answers the wrong question) and/or related learning outcomes
Module Guide


Page 20
8. Assessment Offences

As an academic community, we recognise that the principles of truth, honesty and mutual
respect are central to the pursuit of knowledge. Behaviour that undermines those principles
weakens the community, both individually and collectively, and diminishes our values. We are
committed to ensuring that every student and member of staff is made aware of the
responsibilities s/he bears in maintaining the highest standards of academic integrity and how
those standards are protected.

You are reminded that any work that you submit must be your own. When you are preparing
your work for submission, it is important that you understand the various academic conventions
that you are expected to follow in order to make sure that you do not leave yourself open to
accusations of plagiarism (e.g. the correct use of referencing, citations, footnotes etc.) and that
your work maintains its academic integrity.


Definitions of Assessment Offences

Plagiarism
Plagiarism is theft and occurs when you present someone elses work, words, images, ideas,
opinions or discoveries, whether published or not, as your own. It is also when you take the
artwork, images or computer-generated work of others, without properly acknowledging where
this is from or you do this without their permission. You can commit plagiarism in examinations,
but it is most likely to happen in coursework, assignments, portfolios, essays, dissertations and
so on. Examples of plagiarism include:

directly copying from written work, physical work, performances, recorded work or images,
without saying where this is from;
using information from the internet or electronic media (such as DVDs and CDs) which
belongs to someone else, and presenting it as your own;
rewording someone elses work, without referencing them; and
handing in something for assessment which has been produced by another student or
person.

It is important that you do not plagiarise intentionally or unintentionally because the work of
others and their ideas are their own. There are benefits to producing original ideas in terms of
awards, prizes, qualifications, reputation and so on. To use someone elses work, words,
images, ideas or discoveries is a form of theft.

Collusion
Collusion is similar to plagiarism as it is an attempt to present anothers work as your own. In
plagiarism the original owner of the work is not aware you are using it, in collusion two or more
people may be involved in trying to produce one piece of work to benefit one individual, or
plagiarising another persons work. Examples of collusion include:

agreeing with others to cheat;
getting someone else to produce part or all of your work;
copying the work of another person (with their permission);
submitting work from essay banks;
paying someone to produce work for you; and
allowing another student to copy your own work.
Module Guide


Page 21

Many parts of university life need students to work together. Working as a team, as directed by
your tutor, and producing group work is not collusion. Collusion only happens if you produce
joint work to benefit of one or more person and try to deceive another (for example the
assessor).



Cheating

Cheating is when someone aims to get unfair advantage over others.

Examples of cheating include:

taking unauthorised material into the examination room;
inventing results (including experiments, research, interviews and observations);
handing your own previously graded work back in;
getting an examination paper before it is released;
behaving in a way that means other students perform poorly;
pretending to be another student; and
trying to bribe members of staff or examiners.


Help to Avoid Assessment Offences

Most of our students are honest and want to avoid committing assessment offences. We have
a variety of resources, advice and guidance available to help make sure you can develop good
academic skills. We will make sure that we make available consistent statements about what
we expect. You will be able to do tutorials on being honest in your work from the library and
other support services and faculties, and you will be able to test your written work for plagiarism
using TurnitinUK (a software package that detects plagiarism).

You can get advice on how to use honestly the work of others in your own work from the library
website (www.libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/referencing.htm) and your lecturer and personal
tutor.

You will be able to use TurnitinUK, a special software package which is used to detect
plagiarism. TurnitinUK will produce a report which clearly shows if passages in your work
have been taken from somewhere else. You may talk about this with your personal tutor to see
where you may need to improve your academic practice. We will not see these formative
TurnitinUK reports as assessment offences. All students in Cambridge and Chelmsford are
also expected to submit their final work through TurnitinUK as outlined above.

If you are not sure whether the way you are working meets our requirements, you should talk to
your personal tutor, module tutor or other member of academic staff. They will be able to help
you and tell you about other resources which will help you develop your academic skills.


Procedures for assessment offences

An assessment offence is the general term used to define cases where a student has tried to
get unfair academic advantage in an assessment for himself or herself or another student.
Module Guide


Page 22

We will fully investigate all cases of suspected assessment offences. If we prove that you have
committed an assessment offence, an appropriate penalty will be imposed which, for the most
serious offences, includes expulsion from Anglia Ruskin. For full details of our assessment
offences policy and procedures, see Section 10 of the Academic Regulations at:
www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs.
Module Guide


Page 23
9. Learning Resources
9.1. Library

Library Contacts

Lord Ashcroft International Business School
libteam.aibs@anglia.ac.uk

Business and Management http://anglia.libguides.com/businessmanagement

Tourism and Hospitality Management http://anglia.libguides.com/tourism (databases found in
the journals tab)



Reading List Template Anglia Ruskin University Library
Resources
Key Text

Fisher, Lovell and Valero-Silva (2012) Business Ethics and Values. 4
th
Edition.
Pearson
Please note that this is a new edition of the text book. Most of the chapters are similar
to previous editions, except Chapter 9: Corporate Social Responsibility and Chapter
10: Sustainability. A version of the e-book will be available at the Library.

Additional references will be digitised and available in the VLE, all the books are
available in the library.

Senge, Peter. 2008. The necessary revolution: how individuals are working together to
create a sustainable world. London: Nicholas Brealey. Available as e-book. Chapter
1, 24-29

Stern Review (2006) The Economics of Climate Change. London: HM Treasury.
Available at http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/+/http://www.hm-
treasury.gov.uk/stern_review_report.htm

Blackburn, W. (2007) The Sustainability Handbook: The complete management guide
to achieving social, economic and environmental responsibility, London: Earthscan.
Chapter 2. Determining Scope (pp. 17-32).

Fleming, Peter and J ones, Marc. 2013. The end of corporate social responsibility: crisis
and critique. London: Sage. Introduction (pp. 1-17) and Chapter 1 (18-33)

Porter and Kramer (2006) Strategy and Society, Harvard Business Review



Additional References


Module Guide


Page 24
Blackburn, W. (2007) The Sustainability Handbook: The complete management
guide to achieving social, economic and environmental responsibility, London:
Earthscan.
Barrow, C.J . (2006) Environmental management for sustainable development,
London: Routledge
Esty, D. and Winston, A. (2009) Green to Gold: how smart companies use
environmental strategy to innovate, create value and build competitive
advantage, Hoboken, NJ . J ohn Wiley and Sons.
Friedman, T.L. (2006) The World is Flat: The Globalised World in the Twenty-First
Century, Penguin Books, London
Friedman, T.L. (2008) Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why the World needs a Green
Revolution and how we can renew our global future, Penguin Group, London
Gardiner, H. (2008) 5 Minds for the Future, Harvard Business School Publishing,
Boston, USA
Giddens, A. (2009) The Politics of Climate Change, Polity Press, Cambridge
Harvard Business Review (2003) Harvard Business Review On Corporate
Responsibility, Harvard Business Press, Boston, USA
Helm, D. and Hepburn, C. (editors) (2009) The Economics and Politics of Climate
Change, Oxford University Press, Oxford
Hulme, M. (2009) Why We Disagree About Climate Change, Cambridge University
Press, Cambridge
Savitz, A. and Weber, K. (2006) The Triple Bottom Line, J ossey-Bass, San
Francisco, USA
Seldon, A. (2009) Trust: How We Lost It and How To Get It Back, Biteback
Publishing Limited, London
Sen, A. (2009) The Idea of Justice, Penguin Books, London
Smick, D.M. 2009) The World Is Curved: Hidden Dangers to the Global Economy,
Marshall Cavendish Business, London
Stiglitz, J . (2003) Globalisation and its Discontents, Penguin Books, London
Stiglitz, J . (2006) Making Globalisation Work, Penguin Books, London
Wales, A., Gorman, M. and Hope, D. (2010) Big Business Big Responsibility: From
Villains to Visionaries: How Companies are Tackling the Worlds Greatest
Challenges, Palgrave MacMillan, Basingstoke
Willard, B. (2002) The Sustainable Advantage: Seven Business Case Benefits of a
Triple Bottom Line, New Society Publishers, Canada
Willard, B. (2005) The Next Sustainability Wave: Building Boardroom Buy-In, New
Society Publishers, Canada
Willard, B. (2009) Sustainability Champions Guidebook: How to Transform Your
Company, New Society Publishers, Canada

Journals
Harvard Business Review
J ournal of Business Ethics
J ournal of Cleaner Production
Business Ethics Quarterly
Business and Sustainable Development
Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management
J ournal of Environmental Management
J ournal of Corporate Citizenship
International J ournal of Business Strategy
Academy of Management
Environment and Planning A
Module Guide


Page 25
Environment, Development & Sustainability
Environment and Planning A
Environmental Politics
Geoforum
Global Environmental Change
Global Environmental Politics
Global Competitiveness Report, World Economic Forum
Human Relations
Human Development Report, United Nations Development Programme
National Geographic
New Scientist
Organization and Nature
The Economist
World Development Report, World Bank
World Investment Report, United Nations


Websites
http://www.cipd.co.uk/hr-resources/factsheets/whistleblowing.aspx
http://ec.europa.eu/environment/emas/toolkit/toolkit_5_4_1.htm
http://carboncalculator.direct.gov.uk/carboncalc/html/
International Institute for Sustainable Development http://www.iisd.org
http://www.anglia.ac.uk/ruskin/en/home/microsites/global_sustainability_institute.html
http://www.guardian.co.uk/sustainable-business
https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com
https://www.globalreporting.org
http://www.economist.com/
http://nbs.net/
http://www.forumforthefuture.org/our-work/hub/sustainable-business



9.2. Other Resources

Students are encouraged to participate in the seminars and events of the Global Sustainability
Institute Anglia Ruskin University.

http://www.anglia.ac.uk/ruskin/en/home/microsites/global_sustainability_institute.html

A number of groups are available at the university such as:

Student Union Anglia Ruskin University http://angliastudent.com/

Global Responsibility Leadership Initiative Anglia Ruskin University
http://groupspaces.com/GRLI/

GoGreen Movement
www.gogreenmovement.org
Module Guide


Page 26

Anglia Ruskin University Environmental Team
http://www.anglia.ac.uk/ruskin/en/home/microsites/environmental_management.html


10. Module Evaluation

During the second half of the delivery of this module, you will be asked to complete a module
evaluation questionnaire to help us obtain your views on all aspects of the module.

This is an extremely important process which helps us to continue to improve the delivery of the
module in the future and to respond to issues that you bring to our attention. The module report
in section 11 of this module guide includes a section which comments on the feedback we
received from other students who have studied this module previously.

Your questionnaire response is anonymous.

Please help us to help you and other students at Anglia Ruskin by completing the Module
Evaluation survey. We very much value our students views and it is very important to us that
you provide feedback to help us make improvements.

In addition to the Module Evaluation process, you can send any comment on anything related to
your experience at Anglia Ruskin to tellus@anglia.ac.uk at any time.

Module Guide


Page 27
11. Appendix 1: Re-Assessment Information

THIS INFORMATION ONLY APPLIES TO STUDENTS WHO ARE UNSUCCESSFUL IN
THEIR FIRST SUBMISSION
DRAFT VERSION AWAITING EXTERNAL EXAMINER APPROVAL
Assessment will be confirmed before the re-assessment period
The re-assessment for this module consists of one part:

Part Type of assessment Word or
time
limit
Submission dates
010 This module is assessed by one assignment 3000
words
TBA
011

Part 010 Assignment
This must be completed and submitted by 5.00 pm on the stipulated date.

One month prior to the submission date the scenarios will be released. You will be provided
with 2 scenarios and write a 1500-word essay style response to each of the questions raised.
Each scenario is worth 50% of the overall mark.

The assessment is designed to evaluate your knowledge and skills in the subjects covered in
the module. In the assessment, you need to spot key words that will guide you as to what is
expected in the question. As such the questions will invite the following types of response:

Definitions: These will ask you to show that you have learned some concepts, by setting out
their precise meanings. Such questions need to be complemented by some further analysis.
Keywords for these types of questions are: describe, identify, define, name, examine,
distinguish between, compare, provide examples, summarise.

Evaluate: This is designed to test your reasoning of cause and effect. You need to offer
structured and coherent explanations. Keywords are: Interpret, explain, discuss, what conditions
influence, what are the consequences, what are the implications of.

Judgement: This requires that you make a judgement, perhaps of a policy or of a course of
action. Keywords: evaluate, critically examine, assess, do you agree that.

Advice: Some questions might ask your advice in particular situations. Your advice needs to
be based on policy, good practice, principles and evidence of actions that can be effective.
Keywords: Design, create, recommend, advice.

Critique: Many questions will include the word critically, this means that you expect to look at
least two points of view, offering a critique of each view and your judgement. Key words:
critically analyse, critically consider.



Module Guide


Page 28




The following marking indicates how each scenario will be assessed:

Mark
Learning
Outcome
Introduction - A clear outline of the issue, and what is going to be
covered in the assignment.
15 LO 1-4
Theory and Application - Clear explanation of the theoretical or
conceptual ideas that are going to use to address the question set.
Outlining the academic debates associated with the theoretical or
conceptual framework and providing a clear rationale for adopting the
chosen ideas. Students should demonstrate an awareness of the key
points from the relevant theory and their significance in establishing
the importance of the issue they have chosen.

60 LO 1-4
Conclusion - The conclusion should be concise and accurately
reflect the content of the assignment. A good conclusion will reflect
on the strength of the essays central argument.
15 LO 1-4
Presentation Well structured, theory applied to the situation, good
range of references, well written.
10 LO 1-4
TOTAL MARKS 100%


Module Definition Form (MDF)
Module Code: MOD000945 Version 4 Date amended 30/9/13
1. Module Title
Sustainable Management Futures
2a. Module Leader 2b. Department 2c. Faculty
Louise Chalkley Dept of Economics,
International Business and
Operations Management
Lord Ashcroft International
Business School
3a. Level 3b. Module Type
6 Standard Module
4a. Credits 4b. Study Hours
15 150
5. Restrictions
Type Module Code Module Name Condition
Pre-
requisites:
None
Co-
requisites:
None
Exclusions: None
Courses to which this
module is restricted
None
LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT INFORMATION
6a. Module Description
This module is a core module on all of LAIBS Courses. It is a capstone module that takes a
futures perspective on management, organisations and the changing nature of business and
enterprise models. It is both a forward looking and integrative module that aims to bring together
our students understanding of the evolving context of sustainable management. The module
takes a dimensions based view of the notion of sustainable management futures by introducing
the 'people, planet and profit lenses' for understanding sustainable management. Our aim is to
introduce students to the idea and value of developing a 'futures mindset' from a number of
perspectives including ethical and entrepreneurial; tolerant and innovative; and responsible and
responsive. For the purpose of this module sustainable management as a notion is defined in
terms of taking an integrative and 'futures' oriented approach to management. Sustainable
management is ethical, responsible, innovative, 'daring to care', management. The context of
the recession provides the necessity for a futures mindset that is not only ethical but also
creative in the solutions and leadership it requires. Sustainable management futures thus takes
a dynamic: context, theorising, action learning and reflective practice approach in this
penultimate core module across most courses on LAIBS. An important feature of this module
will be to introduce students to new thinking and different practices in businesses and
organisations through a series of live case studies. The blending of academic and practice

MDF generated on Wednesday 15 January 2014, 00:12:24.85 Page 1 of 4
6a. Module Description (Continued)
based inputs is a core element of the model. The module will help students develop an
understanding of the various tools and techniques and analytical frameworks available to
tomorrow's business leaders to create and manage a sustainable management future from a
people, planet and profit dimension. Familiarity with ethical concepts and values will equip
students to critically evaluate the conduct of individuals, stakeholder groups and organisations
themselves, as well as the policy prescriptions of governmental authorities. The theoretical and
practical implications of the people, plant and profit dimension will be studied from both an
individual and an organisational perspective using the live case studies. The module moves on
to review the key contemporary debates involving corporate social responsibility and its
implications for the various stakeholders, including governmental authorities. Various types of
corporate - governance 'failures' will be identified and policy remedies reviewed, drawing on UK,
EU and global experience. Formative assessment will be based on the production of a portfolio
of seminar work that each student will update after each seminar session. These will be
periodically examined by the module team and feedback supplied.
6b. Outline Content
Making sense of Context (WHAT-WHERE)
What are the problems, concepts, i.e. worldviews on the topic of sustainability and its different
variations: e.g. deep ecology, bare-foot economy, human development, sustainable
development, eco feminism, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, business
ethics.
Theories and Analytical Frameworks (WHY)
What are the main theories, conceptual frameworks, methodological tools, research techniques
involved in understanding sustainable management practices. For example: systems thinking,
computer based games; etc.
Action Learning and Experience (HOW)
Case studies and presentation of companies, organizations and businesses concerned and/or
implementing different initiatives on sustainable management. The recent banking and financial
crisis provides one such live and important context to situate this learning within. Linking up with
our practitioner advisors in this area dynamic and live personal and organisational cases will
lend themselves to a dynamic learning context for students.
Reflexive Practice (BUT)
Overview of main problems on sustainability, such as green-washing; environmental neo-
colonialism; behavioural patterns; or in general a critical approach on the dynamics of
knowledge and power in environmental issues.
Being a research led module as well, both internal and external staff will be used to 'liven' up the
student experience drawing upon contemporary issues, research and perspectives in the area of
sustainable management. Led by the Director of Research and a research active team the
module draws upon the themes of research that AIBS is clustering its research efforts on
including Leadership and emerging futures, Entrepreneurship, Economic impact analysis and
public service and change management.
6c. Key Texts/Literature
Fisher, C., Lovell, A. and N. Valero-Silva (2013). Business Ethics and Values - Fourth Edition.
Pearson Education Limited: Harlow.
Other texts and academic articles/chapters in books will be suggested throughout the module
and you will be expected to read around the lectures. Where the weekly reading differs from the
core text a copy will be made available on the VLE at the beginning of the semester.
Last Updated: 29/Sep/2013

MDF generated on Wednesday 15 January 2014, 00:12:24.85 Page 2 of 4
6d. Specialist Learning Resources
Module guide, associated website materials and specified articles.
7. Learning Outcomes (threshold standards)
No. Type On successful completion of this module the student will be
expected to be able to:
1 Knowledge and
understanding
Develop an understanding of the complexity of the dynamics
concerning sustainable management in its three dimensions:
planet, people and profit.
2 Knowledge and
understanding
Critically evaluate individual and organisational actions and
behaviour against a framework for sustainable management
practices
3 Knowledge and
understanding
Examine the various types of corporate 'failures' and evaluate the
policy responses available together with the case for sustainable
management
4 Intellectual, practical,
affective and
transferable skills
Apply sustainability theories and principles to case study examples
of business behaviour reflecting on our role as citizens, social
actors, managers, leaders and human beings responding to the
challenges of sustainability
8a. Module Occurrence to which this MDF Refers
Year Occurrence Period Location Mode of Delivery
2013/4 ZZD Template For
Distance Learning
Delivery
Distance Learning
8b. Learning Activities for the above Module Occurrence
Learning
Activities
Hours Learning
Outcomes
Details of Duration, frequency and other comments
Lectures 0 N/A N/A
Other teacher
managed
learning
12 1-4
Students are required to read the weekly lecture
notes, case studies and all other learning materials
associated with every lesson and then attempt to
answer the given questions at the end of each week.
Students are also expected to participate in
webinars and video conferences for the purposes of
assignment briefings and formative and summative
assessments.
Students are required to submit their work to the
online tutor on a weekly basis and demonstrate that
they have engaged with the module and have
achieved the required levels of the wider reading
and understanding.
Student
managed
learning
138 1-4
Students are required to read the weekly lecture
notes, case studies and all other learning materials
associated with every lesson and then attempt to
answer the given questions at the end of each week.
Students are also expected to participate in
webinars and video conferences for the purposes of

MDF generated on Wednesday 15 January 2014, 00:12:24.85 Page 3 of 4
8b. Learning Activities for the above Module Occurrence (Continued)
Learning
Activities
Hours Learning
Outcomes
Details of Duration, frequency and other comments
assignment briefings and formative and summative
assessments.
Students are required to submit their work to the
online tutor on a weekly basis and demonstrate that
they have engaged with the module and have
achieved the required levels of the wider reading
and understanding.
TOTAL 150
9. Assessment for the above Module Occurrence
Assessment
No.
Assessment
Method
Learning
Outcomes
Weighting (%) Fine Grade or
Pass/Fail
Qualifying Mark
(%)
010 Coursework 100 Fine Grade 30
Details:
3000 word essay
In order to pass this module, students are required to achieve an overall mark of 40%.
In addition, students are required to:
(a) achieve the qualifying mark for each element of fine grade assessment as specified
above
(b) pass any pass/fail elements.

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