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Accountancy course

New Era University


Private University, Quezon City
Tuition fees
Bachelor's P 12,000-18,000 per semester
Master's P 11,500 per semester
National College of Business and Arts
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till Jun 20, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 21,000-23,000
per semester
Master's
P 12,000
per semester
Our Lady of Fatima University in Quezon City
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 25,000
per semester
Master's
P 12,500
per semester
Business Administration Course
Informatics International College Diliman
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till May 16, 2014
Tuition fees
Diploma
P 25,000-30,000
per semester
Metro Manila College
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till Jun 6, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 19,000-20,000
per semester
Master's
P 9,700
per semester
New Era University
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 12,000-18,000
per semester
Master's
P 11,500
per semester
BSBA in Marketing Management
BSBA in Human Resource Development Management
BSBA in Financial Management
Master in Business Administration
major in:
- Human Resource Management
- Organizational Development
St. Paul University Quezon City
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till May 30, 2014
Tuition fees
Master's
P 15,500
per semester
BS in Business Administration
major in:
- Human Resource Development Management
- Management Accounting
- Marketing Management Master in Business Administration
major in:
- Operations Research and Logistics
- Tourism and Hospitality Managementview courses information
Bestlink College of the Philippines
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till Jun 13, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 5,000
per semester
BSBA in Marketing Management
BSBA in Human Resource Management
view courses information
Philippine Women's University in Quezon City
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 26,000-27,000
per trimester
Master's
P 13,000
per trimester
BS in Business Administration
major in:
- Marketing Management Master in Business Administration
specializing in:
- Industrial Security Managementview courses information
Siena College
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 20,000-25,000
per semester
Master's
P 15,000
per semester
BS in Business Administration
major in:
- Financial Management
- Human Resource Development Management
- Marketing Management
- Operations Managementview courses information
Southeast Asian College
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 19,500-21,000
per semester
BS in Business Administration
major in:
- Management
- Marketingview courses information
Saint Pedro Poveda College
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till May 12, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 30,000-35,000
per semester
BS in Business Administration
major in:
- Managementview courses information
Our Lady of Fatima University in Quezon City
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 25,000
per semester
Master's
P 12,500
per semester
BS in Business Administration
major in:
- Banking and Finance
- Business Management
- Marketing Management
- Operations & Supply Chain Management Master in Business Administration
Doctor of Business Administration
view all courses
Trinity University of Asia
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 30,000-36,000
per semester
Master's
P 1,900
per unit
BS in Business Administration
major in:
- Financial Management
- Human Resource Development Management
- Marketing Managementview all courses
New Era University
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 12,000-18,000
per semester
Bachelor of Elementary Education
major in:
- General Education
- Pre-School Education
- Special Education Bachelor of Secondary Education
major in:
- English
- Filipino
- Mathematics
- Music, Arts, Physical Education and Health
- Social Studies
- Technology and Livelihood Educationview all courses
Bestlink College of the Philippines
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till Jun 13, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 5,000
per semester
Bachelor of Elementary Education
Bachelor of Secondary Education
major in:
- English
- Filipino
- Mathematics
- Social Studies
- Technology and Livelihood Education
- Values Educationview all courses
St. Paul University Quezon City
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till May 30, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 42,000-48,000
per semester
AB in Religious Education
view courses information
AMA Computer University
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till May 31, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 27,000-31,000
per trimester
Bachelor of Elementary Education
Bachelor of Secondary Education
view courses information
Philippine Women's University in Quezon City
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 26,000-27,000
per trimester
Bachelor of Elementary Education
major in:
- Pre-School Education
- Special Educationview courses information
Siena College
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Bachelor of Secondary Education
major in:
- Biology
- English
- Mathematics
- Physical Science
- Religious Education
- Special Educationview all courses
Southeast Asian College
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 19,500-21,000
per semester
BS in Elementary Education
major in:
- Early Childhood Education
- English
- Mathematics BS in Secondary Education
major in:
- English
- Mathematics
- Technology and Home Economicsview all courses
Our Lady of Fatima University in Quezon City
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 25,000
per semester
Bachelor of Elementary Education
major in:
- Pre-School Education Bachelor of Secondary Education
major in:
- Englishview courses information
Angelicum College
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till May 31, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 24,000-28,000
per semester
BSEd in Mathematics
BSEd in Biological Science
view courses information
Trinity University of Asia
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 30,000-36,000
per semester
Bachelor of Elementary Education
major in:
- General Curriculum
- Pre-School Education
- Special Education Bachelor of Secondary Education
major in:
- English
- Filipino
- Mathematics
- Physical Education, Health and Musicview all courses
Saint Pedro Poveda College
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till May 12, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 30,000-35,000
per semester
Bachelor of Elementary Education
major in:
- Early Childhood Education
- English
- Mathematics Bachelor of Secondary Education
major in:
- English
- Mathematics
- Special Educationview all courses
Grace Christian College
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till Jun 6, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 70,000-75,000
per semester
Bachelor of Elementary Education
major in:
- Early Childhood Education
- Pre-Elementary Education
- Special Education Bachelor of Secondary Education
major in:
- Chinese Language
- English
- Mathematics

Metro Manila College
Private College, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till Jun 6, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 19,000-20,000
per semester
Master's
P 9,700
per semester
Bachelor of Elementary Education
Bachelor of Secondary Education
MA in Education
major in:
- Supervision and Administration
Bestlink College of the Philippines
Private University, Quezon City
Application for AY 2014/15Open till Jun 13, 2014
Tuition fees
Bachelor's
P 5,000
per semester
Bachelor of Secondary Education
major in:
- English
- Filipino
- Mathematics
- Social Studies
- Technology and Livelihood Education
- Values Educationview all courses














A GUIDE FOR STUDENTS STUDYING ACCOUNTING

The following study guide is a series of rules and suggestions
which, if followed, will help you achieve the maximum results for
your study efforts. Although there is no substitute for HARD
WORK and a DESIRE TO LEARN, most of you can use your study time
and classroom time more efficiently.

READING THE TEXTBOOK
-------------------
1. Studying accounting is not like reading a novel or even like
-----------------------------------------------------------
studying history, sociology, or economics.
-----------------------------------------
a. Each assignment in accounting BUILDS on previous
assignments. If you do half-hearted work in Chapter 1 and 2, you
may be confused by Chapter 3 and lost by Chapter 4.

b. Accounting books are condensed. Almost every sentence is
important. Scan reading just does not work!

2. Read to understand "WHY."
------------------------
a. This is a technical subject, it is logical, and it
requires reasoning.

b. Strive to be able to say, "I understand why they do
that." If you can understand "WHY" in accounting, there is very
little to memorize.

c. Try to explain every new topic in your own words.
Putting the new ideas into your own words is better that reciting
the words of the text a hundred times.

3. Work problems to understand "HOW."
---------------------------------
a. Even though you understand "why they do that" in
accounting, you must be able to do it yourself. This is a
do-it-yourself course.

b. To be sure that you understand "how" as well as "why,"
work the problems that are shown with the reading material.
Don't copy the book. Try your own skill and then check your
answers.

4. Remember "why"and "how.
----------------------
a. Go back to previous chapters and notes to refresh your
memory. Rework problems that were difficult for you. Try to
work extra problems that are similar to the assigned homework.

b. Never wait until examination time to review your
accounting.

The REVIEW-AS-YOU-GO plan produces better results, doesn't
take as long, and saves all that last minute worry and sacrifice
of other courses. The forgetting curve is the mirror image of
the learning curve. You forget as fast as you learn

It is a scientific fact that information that has been
forgotten requires that it be relearned, requiring the same time
it took to learn it the first time.

5. If there is something you do not understand, prepare
specific questions to ask your instructor. Some students keep a
notebook of points with which they have questions. PIN-POINT THE
ITEMS THAT YOU DO NOT UNDERSTAND. Don't make vague comments to
your instructor such as "I don't understand any of this
material." Such statements are a strong indication to the
instructor that you have made no attempt to try to understand,
and will receive very little sympathy or help.

WORKING HOMEWORK PROBLEMS
-------------------------
1. READ THE PROBLEM! Read the instructions and scan the
problem to see what is ahead.

2. Work the problems without "PAGE FLIPPING" back to the
chapter.

a. When in doubt, look back at the chapter -- but NOT until
you have tried to do the problem on your won. This indicates
that you do not remember the chapter material. You are not
prepared for an examination.

b. The "PAGE-PLIPPING" method is guaranteed to waste a
maximum of your time and to produce a minimum of results.

3. Keep up with the class! IT IS EASIER TO KEEP UP THAN TO
CATCH UP!!

A. Check your problem against the solution presented in
class.

b. Be sure that you understand the correct solution.

4. Note the part of the problem with which you have difficulty
and ask questions during the classroom session.

MAKE BEST USE OF CLASS TIME
---------------------------
1. Classes are never interesting unless you TAKE PART.

2. ALWAYS BE PREPARED before you go to class.

3. DO NOT BE AFRAID TO ASK QUESTIONS. If you have a question,
at least ten other students probably have the same question but
are afraid to ask because it might sound like a dumb question.

4. Students who make FAILING GRADES also fail to attend
classes, fail to pay attention during class, fail to have their
homework,and fail to ask the instructor for help until it is too
late. And when they do ask, it isn't for help. They go to the
instructor to offer poor excuses for poor performance which the
instructor has heard from other students over the years.
Remember, when you start your career after graduation, excuses
won't be a substitute for poor performance; nor will it earn you
a grade in this course.

PREPARING FOR EXAMS
-------------------
1. Be specific in your study; concentrate on the things which
seem to be most important.

a. Note items that the instructor emphasizes in class.

b. Note homework problems that are assigned.

2. Do not stop with just "getting the idea." Be sure that you
can work problems without the aid of the book. Practice by
teaching the material to someone else. Study groups of two or
three students work well for this purpose.

3. Every exam has an element of speed. Have your "hows" and
"whys" at your finger tips. If you are slow, you probably need
to study more.

4. The questions on exams approach the material from a slightly
different angle to test your ability to REASON AND UNDERSTAND
rather than your ability to memorize.

5. When taking exams, many points are lost and questions missed
because the student does not READ THE PROBLEM. This is
especially true with multiple choice questions. Read what the
question is really asking, not what you think or want it to
ask..AVOID CARELESS ERRORS. On each exam, assume that you have
made several careless errors and allow enough time at the end of
the exam to look for them.

6. An excellent strategy to use when taking an exam is to
quickly look through the entire exam and answer all of the
questions that are easy for you. Those are "sure" points and
help to relieve the pressure when you go back to work on the more
difficult and time-consuming problems.

7. The greatest weakness in a student's ability to take an exam
is to keep up a good STEADY PACE without the clock causing the
student to panic. Remember, when you panic by constantly
thinking about the time factor, the mind closes up on you and
that ends any chance you have to do well. It is better to
concentrate on answering only 80% of the questions and getting
them all correct than to answer all of the question and missing
half of them. Of course it is best to answer all of the questions
and get them all correct, which is only possible if you
concentrate, keep your composure, and maintain a steady pace.


END

Fifteen Tips for Studying Accounting
By Fr. Thomas Conway, O.F.M., C.P.A., Ph.D.
1. The sequence is intentional. Keep in mind that the accounting course that you are taking is one in a sequence of
courses. It has been placed where it is because that course's material is derived from material from one or more
earlier courses. Make sure that you have access to textbooks of your earlier courses. (If you're a little bit inclined
to take courses out of order, forget it!)
2. The material within a given course is often sequential. This is especially true of Accounting I (ACCT-200).
That is, the material covered early in the course is necessary to do problems covered later in the course. If you
don't understand the first few chapters of the textbook, you need to go back and study those chapters before
going on to later ones.
3. Determine the scope of the course. It's not unusual for particular chapters or particular sections of chapters to
be deleted from the scope of a course.
4. Practice, practice, practice. There is tremendous value in going over as many problems as you can.
5. You're trying to learn as many points as you can. If you get stuck on a particular point, don't spend a long
time trying to look it up or figure it out. Make a note of it and ask a friend or the professor about it later.
6. Novels are meant to be read from beginning to end. Accounting textbooks are not. Skim the text, use the
index, jump around, read the questions at the end of the chapter, look at tables and charts, cross-reference things,
and notice the section headings. You're dealing with technical language: it's not unusual to have to read a given
paragraph several times before you understand it.
7. We're not in Kansas anymore. In a history class, if you know 90% of the information about each presidency,
war, historical movement, etc., then you'll probably be fine. In accounting, you often have to know how
to finishthe problem. This is especially true for multiple-choice exams. For this reason, it's often better to
completely understand some problems (and not know how to do other problems) than to have a somewhat vague
notion of how to approach every type of problem. Also, having a strong understanding of one type of problem
will sometimes give you a clue as to how to approach a seemingly unrelated problem that you never studied.
8. Sorry to disappoint you, but accounting isn't exactly like math. In math, the rules tend to be absolute. In
accounting, many of the rules have exceptions and often the "final answer" (for example, a recommendation to a
company) depends a great deal on the context of the problem.
9. But wait, currency doesn't come in negative denominations. Get in the habit of asking yourself if your final
answer makes sense in the context of the problem.
10. Find a partner. Spend part of your study time by yourself and part of your study time with someone else. A
portion of the study time by yourself can be used to identify what things you understand and what things you
don't. You and your study partner can trade notes on this and teach each other. Studies have shown that by
teaching others you ensure that you will recall the information later. The most important rule about working with
someone else: keep to the task! Work hard to keep to the subject at hand. Interrupt your partner when he/she
starts talking about unrelated topics.
11. Learn the vocabulary. There is no quicker tip-off to the professor that you don't know what you're doing than
using terminology inappropriately. (For example, the clueless student will typically sprinkle the term "money"
liberally throughout an essay while accounting textbooks seldom use the term.) Most accounting textbooks have
at least one glossary. Also, most textbooks put the key terms in boldface type. Do enough reading of the
textbooks to understand how the author uses each important term.
12. Don't be fatalistic. Yes, accounting is difficult. Yes, accounting is hard work. Yes, it takes time. No, it's not
impossible. Most good students report having some breakthrough moments: times when suddenly a range of
topics suddenly make sense. You might be closer than you think to having one of those breakthroughs.
13. Develop a sense of curiosity. There are many rules in accounting which seem at first to be either contradictory
or counterintuitive or both. Try to figure out why the rule exists and talk to other people about it. The really good
students treat accounting as one big puzzle-game which they expect to win!
14. Take some satisfaction in the fact that you're doing something difficult. Even though accounting is a very
marketable skill, that's not the best reason to study it. The best reason to study accounting is that it helps develop
your ability to do analytic thinking.
15. Bad things happen. If nothing else motivates you to study, remind yourself that it's very possible to get a "D" or
an "F" in an accounting course. This worst-case scenario plays itself out for some students every semester. Use
this fact as motivation when you are debating whether to study accounting or to go out for pizza.







How to Study Accounting
Ken Harper, Instructor
Sharon Miller, Assistant

1. Cumulative Study -- Accounting is certainly not a mystery, and is easy to learn.
The major secret to learning accounting is remembering that it is a cumulative
study subject based on the first five chapters. Each learning objective builds on
the previously learned concepts and procedures. The accounting course is
organized so that you learn the most fundamental concepts and procedures
first, then you will be required to build on these concepts and procedures. To
learn accounting, you must master the first five chapters. These fiver chapters are
the basis for the next sixteen chapters. When students run into difficulty, it is
generally because they have either forgotten the earlier material or have not
learned it well enough to move forward.
2. Maintain a good attendance record -- You need to hear from me what topics
are important, why they are important, and how to use them. Copying notes
from other classmates may not always show you the what, why and how.
3. Participate actively in class -- Arrive at your classroom a few minutes early.
Choose a seat where you can hear and be heard. Don't be afraid to ask or
respond to questions. Try to overcome your shyness. Commit yourself to ask or
answer questions in class. Remember someone else in the class is probably
wondering about the same thing.
4. Do not use memorization as a substitute for understanding -- You need to
understand both the reasons and the mechanic of accounting. Memorizing
information will hurt you later on in the course.
5. Take notes -- A recent study indicated that you will remember 10% to 15% of
what was said in class. However, if you write it down, your retention rate
increases to 85%. Note taking is essential to learning accounting. You must learn
to take notes efficiently, accurately, and quickly so you will not jeopardize your
ability to listen effectively.
6. Make friends by studying in a group -- Exchange telephone numbers with at
least two classmates. Make arrangements to study with these friends on a regular
basis. Working in groups has benefits. These benefits include increasing your
knowledge of accounting and improving your critical thinking and
communication skills. If you are able to explain and demonstrate (verbalize) the
learning objective to other group members, then you really understand the
concepts. Don't be afraid to change study groups if you are unhappy with your
original group. Finally, don't allow you study group turn into a gossip group, stick
to your accounting.
7. Be prepared -- Before going to class review the textbook, study guide, homework
assignment, and class notes. Make a list of questions you have to ask me. Writing
out your questions makes it easier for you to ask me in class.
8. Keep up with the work -- Waiting until the last minute does not give you the
opportunity to completely understand the learning objectives. If you have
completed your homework and are able to verbalize the learning objectives to
other members in your study group, then you will do well on the test. If however,
you are trying to complete the reading and homework assignments the night
before the examination, you will be unprepared. There is a saying, "He who does
the homework ahead of time gets the A or B. He who doesn't do the homework
ahead of time gets the C or D."
9. Tape record the class lectures -- This procedure has two benefits. First, you will not
be overly concerned about taking notes. Secondly, recording gives you another
opportunity to hear the lesson. It especially lets you review words that you are
not familiar.
10. Find out what resources are available to you -- Resources available to you are:
1. Study guide
2. Tutorial - Sharon Miller
3. Your fellow classmates
4. Your instructor:
5. F41
6. Phone 408.864.8589
7. Electronic Mail School harperken@fhda.edu
8. Electronic Mail Home: drkenharper@yahoo.com
"Printer Friendly How"
Accounting Study and Test Taking Tips
Or, ways to avoid looking like this before or during an exam!


Learning the Key Concepts
1. Keep up daily. Each assignment in accounting builds on previous
assignments. If you do not understand Chapter 1, you will have difficulty in
Chapter 2 and may be lost in Chapter 3. As you are reading, jot down points
of confusion. Ask these questions in class if they are not clarified.
2. Focus on understanding "why".
a. This is a technical subject with its own set of rules; however, once you
learn the basic rules, accounting is internally logical.
b. Strive to understand why items are handled in a certain way. If you can
understand why, there is very little to memorize.
c. Be critical. Ask me to explain the reasons for accounting methods that
you do not understand.
3. Work problems to understand "how"
a. You may be able to understand "why", but you must also be able to work
problems to demonstrate your understanding.
b. Before beginning a problem, take a moment and determine how you will
set-up the problem. Be neat and orderly and show all of your work.
Developing an orderly methodology for solving problems will help you to
organize your thoughts and make exam taking less stressful. Additionally,
when partial credit is given, you are more likely to receive credit if your work
is orderly and easy to follow.
c. I will often provide a list of "extra" problems. If you find that you are
having trouble with a particular concept, work the related extra problems for
additional practice.
d. Most accounting texts include demonstration problems, self tests and
key terms at the end of each chapter. Insure that you are familiar with the key
terms presented and use the other review material to help improve your
understanding of the chapter contents.

Making the Best Use of Class Time
1. Be prepared before you come to class read the assigned reading material
and complete or at least attempt the homework.
2. Don't be afraid to ask questions. If you are uncomfortable asking questions
in class, ask them after class or come by my office to discuss them.
3. Attend class and take notes. Taking notes helps you to remember the
material and gives you a feel for the areas that I think are important.
Additionally, I often cover material in class that is not in the text.

Preparing for and Taking Exams
1. Be sure that you can work problems representing all concepts covered
without the aid of the book or solutions manual.
2. Know the material. You will not have unlimited time for the exam. If you
have to spend significant time trying to remember the "hows" and "whys"
related to each exam question or problem, you will have difficulty completing
the exam.
3. Do not expect exam problems and questions to be a carbon copy of
homework problems. The material may be covered from a different angle to
test your ability to reason and understand, rather than memorize. When
studying consider how concepts covered in homework could be presented
differently. While working homework problems ask yourself "what if"
questions to challenge your understanding of the material. For example, if the
homework problem reflects a loss situation, ask yourself, "how would I treat
this if it were a gain situation?"
4. At the beginning of the exam, quickly scan the exam to determine what is
on it. Easy problems - do those first. Problems that you think you may be able
to do if you think about it - do those next. Problems that you swear came
from another course - leave them for last. One of the worst things you can do
is try to solve a problem that you do not understand first. This may cause you
to get bogged down and confused and may keep you from completing
problems that you do understand. For most students it is wise to work the
problems first and then return to the multiple choice questions. This allows
you to get warmed up on the problems, preparing your brain for the often
more challenging multiple choice questions.
5. Budget your time appropriately. If a problem is worth only a few points, do
not spend half an hour on it (regardless of how brilliant your answer, it will still
only be worth those few points).
6. Read the problem carefully. Often points are lost because the question
asked was not fully answered.
7. Show all of your work. I cannot give partial credit without it.
8. Tips for navigating multiple choice questions (the following tips are
excerpted/adapted from "Gleim CPA Review, A System for Success", 2007
Edition).
a. Attempt to ignore the answer choices - do not allow the answer choices
to influence your reading of the question. If four answers are presented,
three of them are incorrect. These incorrect answers are called distractors
and they are called this for a good reason. For computational items, the
distractors are often the result of common mistakes so do not assume your
answer is correct just because it is listed.
b. Read the question carefully and in its entirety to determine the precise
requirement. DO NOT assume you know what is being asked based on prior
experience in class or with the homework. You may find it helpful to
underline or circle important information as you read such as dates, time
periods, etc. This will also help you to ignore extraneous information. Be
especially careful when the requirement is an exception: e.g. "which of the
following is not...."
c. If possible, determine the correct answer before looking at the answer
choices (see a. above)
d. Read the answers choices carefully. Even if the first answer appears to
be correct, do not skip the remaining choices. As you determine which part of
an answer is incorrect, mark the answer in some way (I cross out the
words/word that make an answer wrong). This process of elimination is
particularly helpful if you are not certain of the correct answer.