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Appendix B

Cross Word Puzzle for Pressure Ulcers



(2)
PERCEPTION (1)
U
MALNUTRITION (3)
P
(5) L
MUSCLE (4)
O
INTACT (6)
SUBCUTANEOUS (7)
TROCHANTER (8)
(10) U (9)
I R H
ASS ESSMENT (11)
C E
H L
(12) FRICT I ON
U
(13) MOBILITY


Questions for Cross Word Puzzle:

1) Across: Persons with impaired sensory _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ for pain and pressure are more
at risk for impaired skin integrity than clients with normal sensation.

2) Down: A characteristic of dark skin at risk for skin breakdown can be that the skin
appears darker than surrounding skin and may have a _ _ _ _ _ _ or even a bluish hue.

3) Across: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ is a risk factor that impairs wound healing
.
4) Across: A Stage IV pressure ulcer has full thickness skin loss with extensive destruction,
tissue necrosis, or damage to _ _ _ _ _ _ , bone, or supporting structures.

5) Down: The presence and duration of _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ on the skin increases the risk of ulcer
formation.


6) Across: A Stage I pressure ulcer has _ _ _ _ _ _ skin whose indicators include changes in
skin temperature, tissue consistency, and appears as a defined area of persistent redness
in lightly pigmented skin, whereas darker skin tones may appear with persistent red, blue
or purplish hues.

7) Across: A Stage III ulcer is described as having full-thickness skin loss involving
damage or necrosis of _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tissue that may extend down to, but not
through, underlying fascia.

8) Across: A common pressure ulcer site is the _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.

9) Down: Another common pressure ulcer site is the _ _ _ _.

10) Down: Due to immobility and sitting for prolonged periods of time can cause pressure
ulcers to develop at this site, the _ _ _ _ _ _ _.

11) Across: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ of clients for risk of pressure ulcer should not be delegated to
assistive personnel.

12) Across: The mechanical force exerted when skin is dragged across a coarse surface such
as bed linens is called _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.

13) Across: Impaired _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ is a risk factor for pressure ulcer development.

(Potter, & Perry, 2005, pp. 1483-1564)