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COMMUNITY NEWS, CULTURE, COMMENTARY, COMMERCE FRIDAY, JULY 4, 2014 VOLUME III, ISSUE 39 FREE

AUTO BODY
VALLEY
& STORAGE
The AREAs LEADER in Technology, Equipment, Experience & Training
701- 845- 4844
755 15th Ave SW Valley City, ND
Count on us: Over 90 years of combined Auto Body Experience. Auto Body Repair, Bufng, Windshield Chip Repair & Glass Replacement, etc.
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Local Rental Nationwide Drop-of
AUTO BODY
VALLEY
& STORAGE
The AREAs LEADER in Technology, Equipment, Experience & Training
701- 845- 4844
755 15th Ave SW Valley City, ND
Count on us: Over 90 years of combined Auto Body Experience. Auto Body Repair, Bufng, Windshield Chip Repair & Glass Replacement, etc.
Now Available!
Local Rental Nationwide Drop-of
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HAPPY
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thru
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DAILY DRINK SPECIALS
Morgan Mondays -- $3
Tea Tuesday -- $3
Whiskey Wednesday -- $2.50
Thirsty Thursday -- $2
can beer - all day!
Buckets of can beer everyday!
6 for $15
Dart boards,
pool table &
pull tabs!
THURSDAY
Burger & Chips
$3 - 4-7 PM
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CAFE
Corner of Hwys 46 & 1
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CONVENIENCE
Corner of Hwys 46 & 1
701-762-4211
GAS &
DIESEL
GROCERIES
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Patriotic display
Pullout fag allows readers to show USA love
PAGE 10
WE ARE BUILDING COMMUNITIES
WWW.INDY-BC.COM
INDEPENDENCE DAY: A ag ies proudly and the Independent believes everyone should have a chance to proud-
ly display our nations ag. To help, weve provided our readers a pullout section with a US ag waving brilliantly
in the sky. (Roger Bluhm/photo)
AMERICA IS A TUNE. IT MUST BE SUNG TOGETHER. GERALD STANLEY LEE
PAGE 02 the independent - 07.04.14
AREA BUSINESS with ROGER BLUHM
Getting a glimpse of Heartland Flax
Flax, the tall vase in its natural state, along with seeds, milled and oil prodcued from
fax is displayed at Hearland Flaxl. (Roger Bluhm/photo)
H
eartland Flax
in Valley City is
under the radar in
the area.
Te company takes fax
and transforms it into fax
oil, four and meal, which
is then used in many food
products.
Flax is the plant ver-
sion of fsh oil, said Tara
Anderson, export man-
ager. Its a component of
Omega 3, 6 and 9.
Any product that says
on the wrapper it is a good
source of Omega 3 has fax
in it.
Te company has more
than 70 employees and
believes its location is
perfect.
Were in the heart of
fax country, said Bob
Larson, who is in charge
of sales. Flax is all over
the world and were in the
perfect spot for shipping
both to the east and west
coasts.
Flax products are used
in baked goods, beverages,
bread, cereals, granola,
cookies, chips, crackers,
pasta, pizza crust, wafes,
wraps, supplements, even
chocolate.
One of our growing
uses is in natural pet foods
and animal feed, Larson
said. Many people want
their pets to be fed healthy
and fax is used there.
Heartland Flax processes
fax
into
many
products and ships it to
other locations for use.
Name a food company
and we probably have fax
in some product, Larson
said. Flax is a great source
of fber and nutrients and
we are growing and grow-
ing.
Alyssa Miller, human re-
sources manager, said the
company, which recently
held a job fair in Valley
City, is always hiring and
growing.
We always need help
and we are looking for
good people, Miller said.
FLAX: 19
LOCK IN YOUR GRAIN TRAILER RENTAL OR LEASE NOW!
CALL TODAY: 701-845-2021
RALPH, RANDY or JAN
WE HAVE GRAIN TRAILERS ALUMINUM AND STEEL
22 TO 42 FOOT AG HOPPERS
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Others also avail-
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PREVENTATIVE RESTORATIVE COSMETIC
Comprehensive dentistry in a comfortable, caring environment
DR. CARON BERG DR. TESSA LAGEIN
CALL 701-845-4221
202 Central Ave. #1 Valley City
bridgecitydentistry.com
BRIDGE CITY DENTISTRY NEW PATIENTS WELCOME
1114#155_01
FRIDAY, July 4
CITYWIDE SALE: Nome will
host a citywide sale July
4, 5 and 6, beginning at 9
a.m. each day.
FIREWORKS: Nome will
host a free freworks dis-
play downtown just after
dusk.
SANBORN FOURTH: The
Sanborn Fire Department
presents its 48th Annual
4th of July Celebration: A
parade will be at 10 a.m.,
a Pickup Pull at 11 a.m., a
Demolition Derby at around
2 p.m., Rafe Ticket draw-
ing and freworks at dusk.
Everyone is invited.
FIREWORKS: Buffalo will
host a freworks display
at about 10:20 p.m. at
the Buffalo Ballfeld on the
northeast part of town.
Everyone is invited.
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333.
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
at Fellowship Corner, 320
2nd Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. Monday and Saturday
meetings are at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday meetings
are at noon and 7:30 p.m.
The Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
and last Saturday of the
month at 8 p.m. are open
speakers meetings for all to
attend, not just alcoholics.
A Friday 5:30 p.m. meeting
is held at Sheyenne Care
Center conference room.
More info: 701-845-2864.
MUSEUM: The Litchville
Community Library is open
by appointment for the
season. More info: 701-
762-3964, 701-762-4475
or 701-840-3768.
SATURDAY, July 5
CITYWIDE SALE: Nome will
host a citywide sale July
4, 5 and 6, beginning at 9
a.m. each day.
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333.
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
at Fellowship Corner, 320
2nd Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. Monday and Saturday
meetings are at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday meetings
are at noon and 7:30 p.m.
The Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
and last Saturday of the
month at 8 p.m. are open
speakers meetings for all to
07.04.14 the independent PAGE 03
IF YOU TAKE ADVANTAGE OF EVERYTHING AMERICA HAST TO OFFER, THERES NOTHING YOU CANT ACCOMPLISH. GERALDINE FERRARO
C O M M U N I T Y
C
ALENDAR
Whats Going On around the Area
ARTS n COMMUNITY n GROUPS n GOVERNMENT n SCHOOL n MUSIC
List your
event
We welcome all submis-
sions for area events and
activities that are free or
low-cost and open to the
public. Calendar listings
in The Independent are
provided at no cost as a
public service to our read-
ers.
To have your listing
published, use our easy
online submissions form
at www.indy-bc.com or
email a complete descrip-
tion well in advance to
The Independents Cal-
endar Editor at: submis-
sions@indy-bc.com
Include the events
date, time, place, and
other relevent informa-
tion. Please also include a
contact name and phone
number and/or email ad-
dress.
DEADLINE:
Calendar listings are due
by noon Tuesdays for that
Fridays publication.
07.04.14
the independent
A publication of
Smart Media LLC
P.O. Box 175
Valley City, ND 58072
Volume 3, Issue 39
All Rights Reserved
vitals
MISSION STATEMENT
To highlight and publicize
local contribution to educa-
tion, the arts, and quality of
life;
To provide quality news
content relating to the activi-
ties and concerns of the
local population;
To be a marketplace of
ideas; and a forum for free
debate;
To feature local talent and
achievers;
To provide a venue for
showcasing local products
and services through attrac-
tive and stimulating advertis-
ing.
CONTACT US
NIKKI LAINE ZINKE
Publisher/Founder
editor@indy-bc.com
701-840-1045
ROGER BLUHM
Editor/General Manager
editor@indy-bc.com
701-645-8890
ADVERTISING
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701-645-8890
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DISTRIBUTION
THE INDEPENDENT is published weekly from
its Smart Media LLC home in Fingal, N.D., and
is available at designated distribution outlets in
the Barnes County and surrounding area. No
one is permitted more than one current issue of
THE INDEPENDENT without permission. Addi-
tional copies and back issues are available for $5
prepaid. Theft of THE INDEPENDENT will
be prosecuted.
T
oday is the day Americans take
to lighting freworks and having a
grand time.
Ofen, however, people dont realize
why they are doing these things.
In plain English,
its because our
forefathers stood
up against oppres-
sion, against high
taxes and against a
king.
Why we ofen
take for granted the
freedoms we have,
it wasnt always the
case. Te original
13 colonies fought
for our freedom
and won.
July 4 is Inde-
pendence Day in
the United States
of America. Its our birthday as a nation,
circa 1776, and beftting a nation as great
as ours, we celebrate with freworks.
Tose freworks have meaning for us.
If you remember the words of the Star
Spangled Banner, Francis Scott Key
mentioned bombs bursting in air, while
saying our fag still few strong.
Tats strong symbolism and we cel-
ebrate each year beftting his song.
Take a moment between watermelon
bites and remem-
ber ben Franklin,
George Washing-
ton and the others
who fought against
Englands king to
make us free.
Tink of the
Declaration of In-
dependence and of
the Constitution.
Sing heartily to
our patriotic songs
and salute the fag
proudly.
Tank a veteran.
Tank a soldier.
Tank God.
Be safe this holiday. Dont drink and
drive. Take precautions when lighting
freworks.
But stand proud. For on this day,
Americans stand together.
-- RB
Let freedome ring
attend, not just alcoholics.
A Friday 5:30 p.m. meeting
is held at Sheyenne Care
Center conference room.
More info: 701-845-2864.
SUNDAY, July 6
CITYWIDE SALE: Nome will
host a citywide sale July
4, 5 and 6, beginning at 9
a.m. each day.
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333.
MONDAY, July 7
SENIORS: Buffalo Se-
nior Citizens meets every
Monday at the Community
Center, Buffalo, from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
TEEN LIBRARY: Teen Li-
brary Crime Lab with Ward
Williams at the Valley City
Barnes County Library, 4
p.m. More info: 701-845-
3821.
LITCHVILLE: The Litch-
ville Community Center
hosts regularly scheduled
events, including: morning
coffee from 8 to 10 a.m.
Monday-Saturday; On
the Move exercise group
Tuesdays and Thursdays
at 8 a.m.; and cards (Hand
& Foot) with refreshments
Wednesday evenings at 7
p.m. No fee, but donations
accepted. More info: 701-
762-4856.
LIARS DICE: Play progres-
sive liars dice at the Vault
in Valley City on Mondays
from 6 p.m. to midnight.
More info: Paul Stenshoal,
701-840-9313.
ENGLISH CORNER: English
Corner will meet Mondays
(except holidays) from 5:30
to 6:30 p.m. at the Valley
City-Barnes County Library.
More info: 701-845-4005.
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333.
FARMERS MARKET: The
Valley City Farmers Market
takes place from 4 to 6
p.m. at the Rosebud Visitor
Center parking lot. More
info: Norma Voldal, market
manager: 701-845-4303.
CITY COUNCIL: Wimbledon
City Council meets the frst
Monday of the month at
7 p.m. in Wimbledon City
Hall.
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
at Fellowship Corner, 320
2nd Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. Monday and Saturday
meetings are at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday meetings
are at noon and 7:30 p.m.
The Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
and last Saturday of the
month at 8 p.m. are open
speakers meetings for all to
attend, not just alcoholics.
A Friday 5:30 p.m. meeting
is held at Sheyenne Care
Center conference room.
More info: 701-845-2864.
TUESDAY, July 8
KIWANIS: The Lisbon Ki-
wanis Club meets at noon
at Parkside Lutheran Home
in the dining room.
ROTARY: Valley City
Rotary Club meets every
Tuesday at noon at the Val-
ley City VFW.
BONE BUILDERS: Improve
balance, increase energy,
bone density, mobilty and
lower blood pressure with
this free program. Tuesd-
says and Thursdays at
10:30 a.m. at Enderlin
Senior Center. More info:
701-437-2669.
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333.;
OPEN MIC: Open Mic is
now being held at The
Vault in Valley City. Open
7:30 p.m. to close. The
Vault is located in the 200
block of Central Avenue
North.
LIBRARY BOARD: The
Valley City-Barnes County
Public Library Board holds
its regular meeting at 5:15
p.m. at the library in Valley
City. More info: Mary, 701-
845-3821.
HEALTH MINISTRY: The
Buffalo Community Health
Ministry board meets the
PAGE 04 the independent 07.04.14
WHERE LIBERTY DWELLS, THERE IS MY COUNTRY. BENAJMIN FRANKLIN
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Word Find Week of July 4, 2014
CATEGORY: US CAPITALS
ALBANY
ANNAPOLIS
ATLANTA
AUGUSTA
AUSTIN
BATON ROUGE
BISMARK (sic)
BOISE
BOSTON
CARSON CITY
CHARLESTON
CHEYENNE
COLUMBIA
COLUMBUS
CONCORD
DENVER
DES MOINES
DOVER
FRANKFORT
HARRISBURG
HARTFORD
HELENA
HONOLULU
INDIANAPOLIS
JACKSON
JEFFERSON CITY
JUNEAU
LANSING
LINCOLN
LITTLE ROCK
MADISON
MONTGOMERY
NASHVILLE
OLYMPIA
PHOENIX
PIERRE
PROVIDENCE
RALEIGH
RICHMOND
SACRAMENTO
SALEM
SANTA FE
SPRINGFIELD
ST PAUL
TOPEKA
Walk Thru/Drive Thru 517 Main St. Lisbon 701-683-2276
I Scream, u Scream
Always Ice Cream - But Also Great Food!
GRILLED CHICKEN SANDWICHES w/ALL YOUR FAVORITE FIX'ENS!
1031#139
VFW Post 2764 - Valley City
Burgers, Cheeseburgers
Pork or Beef Sandwiches
Saturdays from 11 AM - 1:30 PM
VFW Post 2764 - Valley City
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Bettins Greenhouse
147 5th Ave SW Valley City
BEDDING PLANTS! 701-845-3881
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CLOSING SOON...
HURRY IN FOR CLEARANCE BARGAINS!
second Tuesday of each
month. More info: Parish
Nurse Gwen Fraase, 701-
633-5533.
WEDNESDAY, July 9
SENIORS: Tower City
Senior Citizens group
meets every Wednesday
at the Community Center
in Tower City from 10 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m. A meal is
served. More info: Betty
Gibbons, president, 701-
840-0184.
STORY TIME: At Valley
City Barnes County Public
Library, 10:30 a.m. More
info: 701-845-3821.
KIWANIS: The Valley City
Kiwanis Club meets every
Wednesday at 12:04 PM
at various locations in
VCSU Student Union. Use
the West door for entry.
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open
daily 1-4 p.m. through
Labor Day in Wimble-
don. Open other times by
appointment. More info:
701-435-2875 or 701-
435-2333.
SOIL CONSERVATION:
The Barnes County Soil
Conservation Board meets
every second Wednesday
of the month at 4 p.m. at
the Barnes County SCD
offce, 575 10th St. S.W.,
Valley City. More info: 701-
845-3114, Ext. 3.
POKER TOURNEY: Texas
Holdem Tournament is ev-
ery Wednesday at 7 p.m.
at the Eagles Aerie, Valley
City. Open to all player
levels. More info: Richard
Hass: 840-2612. Free, for
people 21+.
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Mon-
day, Wednesday and
Saturday at Fellowship
Corner, 320 2nd Ave. S.E.
in Valley City. Monday and
Saturday meetings are at
8 p.m. and Wednesdat
meetings are at noon and
7:30 p.m. The Wednesday
7:30 p.m. and last Satur-
day of the month at 8 p.m.
are open speakers meet-
ings for all to attend, not
just alcoholics. A Friday
5:30 p.m. meeting is held
at Sheyenne Care Center
conference room. More
info: 701-845-2864.
THURSDAY, July 10
TOPS: Tops Club of
Enderlin meets every
Thursday at the Senior
Center in Enderlin. Weigh
in from 8:30 to 9 a.m.;
meeting at 9.
HEART PROGRAM: Ender-
lin Senior Center with
free bingo at 1 p.m. and
birthday celebrations at
2:15 p.m. More info: 701-
437-2669.
QUILTERS: St. Catherine
Quilters makes quilts
for those in need every
Thursday from 1 to 4:30
p.m. and 6:30 to 9 p.m. in
the St. Catherine School
gym basement, Valley
City. Anyone is welcome;
no experience necessary.
More info: Lela Grim, 701-
845-4067.
MUSEUM HOURS: The
Enderlin Museum is open
through September from 1
to 4 p.m. on Thursday and
Friday and from 9 a.m. to
noon on Saturday. Also
open by special appoint-
ment. More info: 701-799-
0725 or 701-793-9743.
BONE BUILDERS: Improve
balance, increase energy,
bone density, mobilty
and lower blood pressure
with this free program.
Tuesdsays and Thursdays
at 10:30 a.m. at Enderlin
Senior Center. More info:
701-437-2669.
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open
daily 1-4 p.m. through
Labor Day in Wimble-
don. Open other times by
appointment. More info:
701-435-2875 or 701-
435-2333.
CELEBRATE RECOVERY: A
12-step, Christian-based
recovery program for
those 18 and over for all
habits, hurts and hangups,
begiing at 6:15 p.m. with
a small meal. Group and
worship starts at 7 p.m.
Located at 658 4th Street
SW.
07.04.14 the independent PAGE 05
OURS IS THE ONLY COUNTRY DELIBERATELY FOUNDED ON A GOOD IDEA. JOHN GUNTHER
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
www.indy-bc.com
- Since 1976 -
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SLAUGHTERING
TUESDAYS &
THURSDAYS
V
a
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y
Meat S
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p
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845-4705
800-752-5142
A Full Service
Old-Fashioned Meat Market

Order Our
North Dakota Beef
LocallyFed
& Grown
Over 20
Gourmet
Cheeses!
Delicious
Selection of
Brats!
HOMEMADE BEANS
POTATO SALAD
CRAB SALAD

AWARD
WINNING
BEEF
STICKS
JERKY
SAUSAGE
OPEN
M-F: 8AM-6PM
SAT: 8AM-5PM
ROD HAUGTVEDT
Owner
GREAT GRILLING
HAND-CUT STEAKS RIBS
BURGERS CHICKEN
CLOSED
JULY 4 & 5
407 MAIN STREET
BUFFALO, ND 58011
PHONE: 701-633-5317 1
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5
week nights
HOUR
Happy
Windsor
Wednesdays
only $2.50
5:30-6:30 PM
75 cents off
TAPS, WELLS
& DOMESTICS
Serving July 11
our famous
prime rib
new new new
$2 daily
drink specials
SHUFFLE OFF TO BUFFALO
Saturday July 19
Music, Fun & Food
for People of All Ages!
MISSION
Our mission is
to nurture the
healing ministry
of the Church by
bringing it new
life, energy and
viability in the 21st
century. Fidelity to
the Gospel urges
us to emphasize
human dignity and
social justice as we
move toward the
creation of healthier
communities.
MERCY HOSPITAL 570 Chautauqua Blvd.
valley City (701) 845-6400 or 1-800-371-9177
14_0616#119
PAGE 06 the independent 07.04.14
THE CEMENT OF THIS UNION IS THE HEART-BLOOD OF EVERY AMERICAN. THOMAS JEFFERSON
O
ne of the things I
enjoy about being
a musician are the
diferent types of gigs I have
gotten to play. I started out
playing in folk clubs, put
a very successful wedding
band together playing par-
ties and dance music.
I played as a one man
band in many a bar, strolled
in restaurants and of course
have been on the road play-
ing concerts all across Amer-
ica and the world the last
20 years with my trio Chris
Burke with Joe and John
DeMasi. We have recorded
videos and CDs, appeared
on numerous TV talk shows
and lived the dream!
Tat project has started
to wind down though and
we only do a few gigs a year
now so I have gotten into
playing more local gigs.
My wife seems happy to
have me around more and I
know that I am very happy
to be around and to spend
more nights sleeping in my
own bed rather than a ho-
tel room! I play at a lot of
the nursing homes and as-
sisted living facilities in the
area from Oakes to Lisbon
to Fargo to Valley City. You
may have even walked by
when I once a month rock
out with the Sheyenne Care
Center Rhythm Band! Tey
are usually one hour shows
and the res-
idents still
have a will-
ing spirit to
boogie and
sing along
though the
body may
not be as co
operative.
I was
quite excited when Nam
Sabir of Sabirs Restaurant
here in Valley City asked
me if I might like to come
and play at his place. He
has a tradition of live mu-
sic on the weekends and has
had a number of diferent
musicians playing there. It
is a three-hour gig from 6
p.m. till 9ish every Friday
and Saturday nights. Te
place has a wonderful at-
mosphere, the food is excel-
lent and the music defnitely
helps to take the dining ex-
perience up a notch. Best of
all, I get to brush of some of
those tunes I havent played
in years. Te crowd is varied
in age so I try to play ap-
propriate music and I will
do a few things from the Big
Band era. but I mainly fo-
cus on music from the 60s,
70s and 80s as well as some
country classics by people
like Johnny Cash. Kenny
Rodgers and Willie Nelson.
You can just sit back and lis-
ten, sing a long or we even
have a few people dancing
in the aisles. I bring my one
man band se
t up as well as my acous-
tic guitar so I can rock out
or give you a table side sere-
nade. I will be there for most
of the summer with the ex-
ception of a few weekends
when I am away. I hope you
will come down and let me
sing your favorite song for
you.
Nam has also installed a
barbeque pit out in the back
and will be starting outdoor
dining and cooking soon.
Great music and great food
under the stars are a combi-
nation that cant be beat. It is
also a nice way to celebrate
a special occasion or to just
reconnect with the one you
love!
I enjoy playing at restau-
rants now way more than
bars because the clientele
are way better behaved.
Tey do serve alcohol at Sa-
birs though and Nam claims
that his prime rib is the best
in town. Tere is only one
way to fnd out of course
and that is to come on down
and taste it for yourself.
Live music is becoming
less and less common so I
really think it adds to our
community to be able to of-
fer services like mine to the
public in a restaurant set-
ting. I really look forward
to seeing you this summer.
I know you wont be disap-
pointed but will agree with
the couple from Oregon
that was passing through
the other night and was so
pleasantly surprised as they
said to have such a wonder-
ful evening of high quality
food and high quality en-
tertainment in of all places,
little old Valley City, North
Dakota!
So until next time, Ill see
you from the stage!
The joys of playing for friends, family and fans here in Valley City
By Joseph
DeMASI
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VIEW FROM THE STAGE
Host or attend a Block Party
V
alley City and Barnes County are
joining the nation in encouraging
everyone in the county to host or
attend a block party.
Having a block part is a way for neigh-
bors to get to know each other, which will
help promote awareness, safety, and neigh-
borhood unity.
Block parties can also be spiritual as states
Sister Dorothy Bunce, director of Mission
at Mercy Hospital, one of the organizations
in Valley City encouraging everyone to
participate in block parties. Bunce states,
when we learn to know each other, we get
to better know the needs of others, and this
will create fellowship and a sense of com-
munity. She continues by saying that this
is what it means to be a caring community.
Valley City in the past has had many
PARTY: 16
07.04.14 the independent PAGE 07
FROM EVERY MOUNTAIN SIDE LET FREEDOME RING. SAMUEL F. SMITH, AMERICA
Tis column looks back at early
area history as found in the
archives of the Enderlin
Historical Society and Museum.
Museum website:
www.enderlinmuseum.org
T
his week we
have a couple
of baseball
articles found in the
July 6, 1922 issue of
Te Enderlin Independent.
n nn
Team from Fargo to Play Sunday
MANCHESTER BISCUIT CO.
WILL SEND ITS TEAM TO MEET
ENDERLIN
Enderlin will again meet an unfamil-
iar visiting team when the Manchester
Biscuit Co. nine of Fargo will play base
ball here Sunday afernoon. Te match
is scheduled for 3:00 p.m. sharp.
According to reports, the Manchester
team is a strong one and will provide
keen competition for the local men.
Arrangements are being made for
Wyndmere to play here in the near
future.
n nn
Horses Race When Ball Team Fails
Dynamite Nip, Mule Owned by Jim
Walsh Bucks Such A Race.
Filled with an altruistic desire to
compensate the citizens of Enderlin for
their disappointment over the failure of
Alice to appear for its scheduled game
Tuesday, the holiday committee of the
American Legion, headed by William
J. Shaughnessy, framed an impromptu
horse race.
Upon soliciting entries from the
highways and the byways, word was
sent along the thoroughfares announc-
ing the approaching contest, and Mr.
Shaughnessy, assisted by L. Haines and
Lake Garwin, stationed himself at the
ball park to serve as reception commit-
tee to the three hundred anticipating
holiday merry makers, who rushed
forth to witness the spectacle.
On the starting line were three
horses, while one lone mule, Dynamite
KNOW: 16
By Susan
SCHLECHT
DID YOU KNOW?
Remembering baseball back in the day
P
resident Barack
Obama has come
and gone.
While on the Stand-
ing Rock Indian Res-
ervation south of
Bismarck, he gave a
message of encourage-
ment to all of the resi-
dents in Indian Coun-
try.
He promised a better future for Indi-
an children by breaking down the old
cycles that have handicapped progress
on Indian Reservations. Te common
theme of his proposals was the idea of
giving Native-Americans greater con-
trol of their environment.
Every Native-American deserves the
chance to work hard and get ahead, he
said. So he talked economic develop-
ment.
Tat means creating more jobs and
supporting small businesses in places
like Standing Rock, he said.
From there, he went on to propose
returning control of Indian educa-
tion to tribal leaders, with additional
resources and support so tribes could
reform their schools.
While the President was holding
out new hope for a distressed people,
Senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND)
and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) were ap-
propriately touting the need for more
research of Indian problems.
Not to be lef out of the parade,
North Dakota State University was
promoting an American Indian Pubic
Health Resource Center, consisting
largely of academic programs some
distance from ground zero.
Having chaired the North Dakota
Indian Afairs Commission for Gover-
nor George Sinner for four years, my
experience tells me that there is good
reason to be skeptical. I have become
inoculated against the oversupply of
rhetoric and undersupply of every-
thing needed to transform rhetoric
into action.
As for the Presidents proposals for
economic development on reserva-
tions, that is a pipedream. Te folks
in the reservation power structure like
to hear such talk but it is unrealistic.
Economic opportunities for Native-
Americans cannot fourish within the
perimeters of reservations.
To share in the modern economy,
Native-Americans must think and par-
ticipate beyond reservations. It does
no good to talk about new economic
opportunities as long as thinking is
confned to the geographic bounds of
the reservation.
Te casinos were supposed to be the
answer to unemployment. Tey pro-
vided some jobs but unemployment
on reservations continues to be high
and will remain high as long as the
only acceptable employment must be
on reservations.
Ten there is the Presidents pro-
posal to delegate more authority over
schools.
If there is authority to be delegated,
it will not change education on the res-
ervations. Te heart of the education
problem, which is the root of reserva-
tion unemployment, is the same as it is
in non-Indian territory - motivating
young people to get an education and
become employable.
Russ McDonald, chairman of the
Spirit Lake Sioux Tribe, got the mes-
sage.
No matter what kind of race you
are, no matter where you come from,
if youre living in poverty and you be-
come educated, you have the chance to
pull yourself out.
Te solution is not deciding who
turns the lights on but getting students
in the classroom. We keep coming up
with temporary answers for perma-
nent problems because they require
little courage and cost less money.
OMDAHL: 16
OPINION: LLOYD OMDAHL
Reservation parochialism isnt the answer
By Lloyd
Omdahl
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the independent 07.04.14
WE SLEEP PEACEFULLY AT NIGHT, CRADLED BY THE BIG STRONG HANDS OF AMERICA. VAL SAINTSBURY
PAGE 08
O
rganic gardening is gardening with-
out the use of synthetic fertilizers,
chemicals, growth hormones and
regulators. It requires more management
and has potential of great returns in the
harvest.
Organic gardening can be done in any
soil. Sandy soils: it is suggested to fork in
lots of compost, top of the compost with
a good mulch and give it a drink of water.
Loam: just add compost and mulch. Clay
soils should be aerated with a garden fork,
spread gypsum, and give a good soaking.
Cover soil with thick wet newspaper, which
is then covered with compost or mulch and
then another good soaking.
Once the soil is properly prepared you can
fertilize with a number of organic or natural
substances.
Natural substances, such as animal ma-
nure, is high in nitrogen, and bird manure
is high in potassium. Plants can be grown
in your organic garden to provide fertilizer,
break up compost heaps and work as a com-
post activator. One such plant is a Comfrey,
which is a herb plant. Chop up the leaves of
the Comfrey, mix into a liquid, and spray.
It will fertilize while working as a insect
deterrent. Comfrey has nitrogen, calcium,
potash, and phosphorus, greater than any
animal manure.
To make most water mixtures, use the tea
bag procedure.
Decompose, chop, or process necessary
materials. Mix with water, sometimes it is
necessary for the water mixture to brew for
a specifc amount of time. Once properly
brewed, strain the water through a tea bag
or cofee flter process.
Collect the water and spray over the gar-
den crop.
Rotation is especially important in organ-
ic gardening. It is a good idea to remember
that above ground crops like leaf and fruit
crops like liquid fertilizer.
BETWEEN: 20
BETWEEN THE ROWS
Organic gardening can work well
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W
hen President
Barack Obama
paid his much-
ballyhooed visit to the
Standing Rock Indian
Reservation in North Da-
kota a rare presidential
visit to Indian country
tribal sovereignty was a big
part of the narrative. Te
President touted policies
like the Violence Against
Women Act, which gave
tribes the authority to pros-
ecute crimes committed on
Indian lands by non-tribal
members.
I know that throughout
history, the United States
ofen didnt give the nation-
to-nation relationship the
respect that it deserved,
the President said during
his brief address in Cannon
Ball, North Dakota. \
So I promised when I
ran to be a President whod
change that a President
who hon-
ors our sa-
cred trust,
and who re-
spects your
sovereignty,
and upholds
treaty obli-
gations, and
who works
with you in a
spirit of true partnership, in
mutual respect, to give our
children the future that they
deserve.
Lofy rhetoric, to be sure,
but just a week afer the
President spoke those words
a member of his administra-
tion was before the House
Natural Resources Com-
mittee to argue against a bill
that would give tribes great-
er sovereignty in regulating
oil and gas development on
Indian land.
Something youd think
President Obama would
support, given his promise
to respect the sovereignty of
the tribes.
Te bill is sponsored by
Rep. Kevin Cramer of North
Dakota, and according to a
press release on his website
would allow tribes to opt-
in to a categorical exclusion
from the National Environ-
mental Policy Act in order
to speed the development of
gas-gathering pipelines.
Put simply, it would give
tribes more choices. Tey
can maintain the status quo,
or they can opt for a degree
of autonomy.
Capturing natural gas
has been a big problem in
North Dakota. Because its
been difcult for the oil and
gas industry to expand gas
capture alongside exploding
gas production a lot of gas
is getting burned of rather
than used.
And nowhere in North
Dakota is faring worse than
on the Fort Berthold Indian
Reservation where a lengthy
and sluggish federal permit-
ting process has slowed the
build out of capture infra-
structure.
Heres how bad its got-
ten: On the Fort Berthold
reservation, which produces
roughly 30 percent of North
Dakotas oil output, faring is
46 percent.
In the rest of state its 29
percent.
Cramer hopes to cut
through some of the federal
red tape, giving the tribe
more authority to approve
the built out of pipelines to
capture gas instead of burn-
ing it of.
But the Obama admin-
istration, again afer the
President just visited Indian
Country in North Dakota
to tout his commitment to
tribal sovereignty, is fghting
the legislation.
I was just with the Presi-
dent of the United States on
a North Dakota reservation
a week ago where he talked
about honoring sovereignty
and here the administration
seems to be going against
that very concept of sover-
eignty for the tribe, Cramer
told Michael Nedd, the As-
sistant Director for Minerals
and Realty Management for
the Bureau of Land Manage-
ment, during questioning
before the House Natural
Resources Committee last
week.
In response, Nedd told
Cramer that merely giv-
ing the tribes input into the
BLMs decision-making pro-
cess is enough sovereignty
for them.
Congressman what I
can say again that the Sec-
retarys authority under the
Indian Minerals Leasing Act
certainly allows the BLM
to work with the tribes in
managing those trust lands,
Nedd said. In working
through the tribes with con-
sultation, the BLM certainly
incorporates their input into
that.
And so the administra-
tion feels again they have
enough authority to proceed
to conduct the work on the
authority Congress has giv-
en them.
Tis bill would just inject
confusion and the admin-
istration position is that we
they have enough authority
to do that.
I guess the Obama ad-
ministration is for tribal
sovereignty, except when
the tribes might govern in
ways not in keeping with
the Obama administrations
preferred policy.
Which, of course, really
isnt sovereignty at all.
OPINION: ROB PORT
President doesnt really support Native American sovereignty at all
By Rob
PORT
the independent
youre local. so are we.
because it matters.
07.04.14 the independent PAGE 09
Tower City , ND 603 Elm St 3 bds, 2 ba with detached garage and storage
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PATRIOTISM IS NOT SHORT, FRENZIED OUTBURSTS OF EMOTION, BUT THE TRANQUIL AND STEADY DEDICATION OF A LIFETIME. ADLAI STEVENSON
PAGES 10-11 the independent - 07.04.14
THERE ARE THOSE, I KNOW, WHO WILL SAY THAT THE LIBERATION OF HUMANITY, THE FREEDOM OF MAN AND MIND, IS NOTHING BUT A DREAM. THEY ARE RIGHT. IT IS THE AMERICAN DREAM. ARCHIBALD MACLEISH
Independence Day
2014
the independent
youre local. so are we.
because it matters.
S
how your patriotic pride by displaying this special pullout in your home or
business. Independence Day celebrates our nations rise above tyranny and
oppression at the hands of the British. We fought for Independence and have
proudly defended democracy throughout our nations 238 years. Show your pride,
display the fag of the United States of America.
NATIONAL HONOR IS NATIONAL PROPERTY OF THE HIGHEST VALUE. JAMES MONROE
PAGE 12 the independent - 07.04.14
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IF OUR COUNTRY IS WORTH DYING FOR IN TIME OF WAR LET US RESOLVE THAT IT IS TRULY WORTH LIVING FOR IN TIME OF PEACE. HAMILTON FISH
07.04.14 the independent PAGE 13
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These lovable animals, available through Sheyenne Valley Friends of Animals,
are hoping youll give them a happy new home!
To inquire about an adoptable pet seen here, contact SVFA (Sheyenne Valley Friends of Animals)
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PO Box 78
ENDERLIN
First Lutheran Church
326 Blu St
(701) 437-3317
Sundays at 9:30 a.m.
Pastor Thea Monson
First Methodist Church
228 5th Ave
(701) 437-3407
Trinity Lutheran Church
319 Fourth Ave.
(701) 437-2433
Hope Lutheran Church (AFLC)
(meets at Enderlin Methodist)
Sunday School@10 a.m.
Worship Service@11 a.m.
701-437-3777
Pastor Dennis Norby
thenorbys@msn.com
FINGAL
Holy Trinity Catholic Church
419 1st Ave.
(701) 924-8290
FORT RANSOM
Standing Rock Lutheran Church,
136 Mill Rd.
(701) 973-2671
KATHRYN
St Pauls Lutheran Church
(701) 796-8261
11546 52nd St SE
LEONARD
Bethel Moravian Church
15407 49th St SE
(701) 645-2287
Leonard Lutheran Church
PO Box 279
(701) 645-2435
St Peters Lutheran Church
(ELCA)
4713 150th Ave SE
(701) 347-4147
LISBON
Assembly Of God
1010 Forest St.
(701) 683-5756
First Baptist Church (ABC)
401 Forest St.
(701) 683-4404
First Presbyterian Church
10 6th Ave. West
Pastor Juwle S. Nagbe
(701) 318-4273
Sunday Worship 11:15 a.m.
Trinity Lutheran Church
418 5th Ave W.
(701) 683-5841
United Methodist
(602 Forest St.
701) 683-4479
St Aloysius Catholic Church
102 7th Ave W.
(701) 683-4584
Redeemer Lutheran Church
803 Forest St.
(701) 683-5347
LITCHVILLE
First Lutheran Church
(701) 762-4297
506 5th St
Trinity Lutheran ELCA
5809 Co. Rd. 60 SE
(701) 669-2282
MARION
North Marion
Reformed Church
(701) 669-2557
4430 99th Ave SE
NOME
St Petri Lutheran Church
12505 52nd St SE
(701) 924-8215
ORISKA
St Bernard Catholic Church
(701) 845-3713
606 5th St
SANBORN
Our Saviors Lutheran Church
Sunday service 9 a.m.
Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Pastor Mark Haines
Sacred Heart Catholic Church
(701) 646-6306
711 4th St
TOWER CITY
St. Pauls Lutheran Church
(701) 749-2309
401 Broadway St
www. splbl.org.
VALLEY CITY
All Saints Episcopal Church
516 Central Ave. N
701-845-0819
Calvary Baptist Church
(Independent)
2030 West Main St.
701-845-8774
Congregational United Church
of Christ
217 Fourth St. NW
701-845-1977
Epworth United
Methodist Church
680 Eighth Ave. SW
701-845-0340
Evangelical Free Church
1141 Ninth St. SW
701-845-1649
Faith Lutheran Church
575 10th St SW #3
701-845-4390
First Baptist Church
3511 S. Kathryn Rd.
701-845-4500
First Church of the Nazarene
913 Riverview Drive
701-845-4193
Grace Free Lutheran Church
(AFLC)
2351 West Main St.
701-845-2753
Mercy Hospital Chapel
570 Chautauqua Blvd.
701-845-6400
New Life Assembly of God
520 Winter Show Rd.
701-845-2259
Our Saviors Lutheran
138 Third St. NW
701-845-1328
Rivers Edge Ministry
(Interdenominational)
348 E. Main St.
St. Catherines Catholic Church
540 Third Ave. NE
701-845-0354
St. Pauls Evangelical Lutheran
Church (WELS)
202 3rd St NW
701-845-0702
Sheyenne Care Center Chapel
979 Central Ave. N.
701-845-8222
Southwest Bible Chapel
826 Fifth St. SW
701-845-2792
Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA)
499 Fourth Ave. NW
701-845-3837
Valley Apostolic
Sunday School 10AM
Sunday Worship 11AM
Pastor Tony Puckett
215 Fourth Ave. NW
(701) 845-9590
pastor@valleyapostolic.com
Valley Baptist Church
204 5th St. NW
701-845-6950
PAGE 10 the independent 04.18.14
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RLH Enterprises
Fingal, ND Dealer
CALL: 701-412-3143
OR EMAIL:
rlh.enterprises@yahoo.com
CONTACT
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CHURCH DIRECTORY
To include your
churchs weekly
worship sched-
ule in this direc-
tory and/or up-
date the listed
i n f o r ma t i o n ,
please send an
email with com-
plete information
to submissions@
indy-bc.com
BUFFALO
Bualo Lutheran Church
(701) 633-5302
505 3rd St N
www. splbl.org.
First Presbyterian Church
P.O. Box 146
701-633-5410
Service 10:00 a.m. Sun-
days
St. Thomas Church
(701) 633-5150
1160 W. Main
Valley City, ND
701-845-3786
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342 CENTRAL AVE. N.
VALLEY CITY, N.D.
701-845-5013
0320#421
Janice, Nancy & Seth
will help you with all your
Home Furnishings!
TWIN SIZE
Starting at $99* each piece
FULL SIZE - $269
QUEEN SIZE - $292
KING SIZE - $599
(*when sold in set)
Armstrong
Funeral Home
Your Concern
Is Our Concern
Enderlin Lisbon Gwinner
701-437-3354
701-683-4400
Charlie & Debbie
Armstrong
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OPEN
MONDAY-SATURDAY
301 CENTRAL AVE. N
VALLEY CITY
701-845-1022
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CONSIGNMENT
& EMPORIUM
HOW OFTEN WE FAIL TO REALIZE OUR GOOD FORTUNE IN LIVING IN A COUNTRY WHERE HAPPINESS IS MORE THAN A LACK OF TRAGEDY. PAUL SWEENEY
PAGE 14 the independent - 07.04.14
BUFFALO
Buffalo Lutheran Church
(701) 633-5302
505 3rd St N
www. splbl.org
First Presbyterian Church
P.O. Box 146
701-633-5410
Service 10 a.m. Sundays
St. Thomas Church
(701) 633-5150
PO Box 78
ENDERLIN
First Lutheran Church
326 Bluff St
(701) 437-3317
Sundays at 9:30 a.m.
Pastor Thea Monson
First Methodist Church
228 5th Ave
(701) 437-3407
Trinity Lutheran Church
319 Fourth Ave.
(701) 437-2433
Hope Lutheran Church
(AFLC) (meets at Enderlin
Methodist)
Worship Service: 10 a.m.
701-437-3777
Pastor Dennis Norby
thenorbys@msn.
com
FINGAL
Holy Trinity
Catholic Church
419 1st Ave.
(701) 924-8290
FORT RAN-
SOM
Standing Rock
Lutheran Church,
136 Mill Rd.
(701) 973-2671
KATHRYN
St Pauls Lutheran Church
11546 52nd St SE
(701) 796-8261
LEONARD
Bethel Moravian Church
15407 49th St SE
(701) 645-2287
Leonard Lutheran Church
PO Box 279
(701) 645-2435
St Peters Lutheran Church
(ELCA) 4713 150th Ave SE
(701) 347-4147
LISBON
Assembly Of God
1010 Forest St.
(701) 683-5756
First Baptist Church (ABC)
401 Forest St.
(701) 683-4404
First Presbyterian Church
10 6th Ave. W.
Pastor Juwle S. Nagbe
(701) 318-4273
Sunday Worship 11:15 a.m.
Trinity Lutheran Church
418 5th Ave W.
(701) 683-5841
United Methodist
(602 Forest St.
701) 683-4479
St Aloysius Catholic Church
102 7th Ave W.
(701) 683-4584
Redeemer Lutheran Church
803 Forest St.
(701) 683-5347
LITCHVILLE
First Lutheran Church
506 5th St
(701) 762-4297
First Reformed Church
210 8th Ave
Worship: 9:30 a.m.
701-762-4440
Trinity Lutheran ELCA
5809 Co. Rd. 60 SE
(701) 669-2282
MARION
North Marion Reformed
Church
4430 99th Ave SE (701) 669-
2557
NOME
St Petri Lutheran Church
12505 52nd St SE
(701) 924-8215
ORISKA
St Bernard Catholic Church
606 5th St
(701) 845-3713
PILLSBURY
Baldwin Presbterian Church
Service 9:30 a.m. Sundays
SANBORN
Our Saviors Lutheran
Church
Sunday service: 9 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:30 a.m.
Pastor Mark Haines
Sacred Heart Catholic
Church
711 4th St
(701) 646-6306
TOWER CITY
St. Pauls Lutheran Church
401 Broadway St
www. splbl.org
(701) 749-2309
VALLEY CITY
All Saints Episcopal Church
516 Central Ave. N
701-845-0819
Calvary Baptist Church
(Independent)
2030 West Main St.
701-845-8774
Congregational United
Church of Christ
217 Fourth St. NW
701-845-1977
Epworth United
Methodist Church
680 Eighth Ave. SW
701-845-0340
Evangelical Free Church
1141 Ninth St. SW
701-845-1649
Faith Lutheran Church
575 10th St SW #3
701-845-4390
First Baptist Church
3511 S. Kathryn Rd.
701-845-4500
First Church of the Nazarene
913 Riverview Drive
701-845-4193
Grace Free Lutheran Church
(AFLC)
2351 West Main St.
701-845-2753
Mercy Hospital Chapel
570 Chautauqua Blvd.
701-845-6400
CHURCH DIRECTORY
OPEN
MONDAY-SATURDAY
301 CENTRAL AVE. N
VALLEY CITY
701-845-1022
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CONSIGNMENT
& EMPORIUM
Armstrong
Funeral Home
Your Concern
Is Our Concern
Enderlin Lisbon Gwinner
701-437-3354
701-683-4400
Charlie & Debbie
Armstrong
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342 CENTRAL AVE. N.
VALLEY CITY, N.D.
701-845-5013
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Janice, Nancy & Seth
will help you with all your
Home Furnishings!
TWIN SIZE
Starting at $99* each piece
FULL SIZE - $269
QUEEN SIZE - $292
KING SIZE - $599
(*when sold in set)
THRIFT-E-SHOP
ARC Thrift-e-Shop
141 2nd St NE
Valley City, ND
845-4189
Mon,Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat
9:30 am to 5:30 pm
Thur 9:30 am to 8 pm
Senior discount: 20%
off EVERY TUESDAY
GRANNYS CLOSET
12:30 pm to 5:20 pm M-F
Costume Rentals
shopping with a
purpose. every day.
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Heat your entire home,
domestic water and more
with the Classic OUTDOOR
WOOD FURNACE from
Central Boiler. Dual fuel ready
models available. Call Today!
RLH Enterprises
Fingal, ND Dealer
CALL: 701-412-3143
OR EMAIL:
rlh.enterprises@yahoo.com
CONTACT
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I
n Luke 15 we have three parables describing things
that are lost. Sometimes the chapter is called the
Lost and Found chapter in the Bible.
Te frst verses of the chapter describe a lost sheep
and the shepherd who seeks it out.
Te next section speaks of a lost coin and a woman
who diligently seeks afer it.
Te fnal parable is the one that is traditionally called
the Parable of the Prodigal Son and is certainly one of
the most familiar parables in the Bible.
Te word prodigal is not one that we use very ofen. It describes the
wasteful spending of the son afer his father gave him his portion of the
inheritance. Te son took what he had and lef the home and family he
had and went to a far away country.
Te Bible says in Luke 15:13, Not many days later, the younger son
gathered all he had and took a journey into a far country, and there
he squandered his property in reckless living. Reckless spending and
squandering what we have is bad enough in good days but the parable
makes clear that a famine had come to the land he was in and his op-
tion as a penniless man were severely limited. His situation is dire and
he recognizes it in verse 17 when he says, I perish here with hunger!
Tere is no excuse for this sons activity, it is sin. It is horrible what he
has done to his father.
Now here is where we ofen get focused on the son who has lef his
home. We begin to point out the various details that Jesus included in
the parable.
Each one is important; I dont deny that, but what we should be con-
sidering most carefully is the character of the Father. Just as the prodigal
son does.
As he comes to know the depth of his need he remembers the char-
acter and compassion of his father. He thinks of how his father treats
even his hired workers.
Te son having seen his desperate need goes to the father who will
help him. It seems that the son wants to try and make a deal with the
father.
He wants to work so that he might be provided for in that way. Te
father doesnt allow that to come up. But when the son is seen even at a
far away distance, the father runs to him and embraces him. A celebra-
tion erupts.
Te parable continues and shows an older brother upset about all of
this. Verse 28 says, he was angry and refused to go in to the place of
celebration.
Many books have been written looking at this parable. A few words
here will not sufciently reveal to us everything God desires to show us
in these words.
However, we do have the great joy of knowing that the father de-
scribed in this parable is the Heavenly Father and he will receive with
joy and gladness all who come to Him.
As Jesus said in John 6:37, All that the Father give me will come to
me, and whoever comes to me I will never cast out. So as the father in
the parable says to his older son, your brother was dead, and is alive;
he was lost, and is found. Tis then is true for all those who believe in
Jesus Christ today.
Tey are alive. Tey are found.
What a gracious God we have!
The Rev. Dennis Norby pastors for HOPE AFLC in Enderlin.
Reach him by email: thenorbys@msn.com
MAY THE SUN IN HIS COURSE VISIT NO LAND MORE FREE, MORE HAPPY, MORE LOVELY, THAN THIS OUR OWN COUNTRY! DANIEL WEBSTER
07.04.14 the independent PAGE 15
By the Rev.
Dennis NORBY

New Life Assembly of God
520 Winter Show Rd.
701-845-2259
Our Saviors Lutheran
138 Third St. NW
Worship 8:30 and 10 a.m.
701-845-1328
Rivers Edge Ministry
(Interdenominational)
348 E. Main St.
St. Catherines Catholic Church
540 Third Ave. NE
701-845-0354
St. Pauls Evangelical Lutheran
Church (WELS)
202 3rd St NW
701-845-0702
Sheyenne Care Center Chapel
979 Central Ave. N.
701-845-8222
Southwest Bible Chapel
826 Fifth St. SW
701-845-2792
Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA)
499 Fourth Ave. NW
701-845-3837
Valley Apostolic
Sunday School 10AM
Sunday Worship 11AM
Pastor Tony Puckett
215 Fourth Ave. NW
(701) 845-9590
pastor@valleyapostolic.com
Valley Baptist Church
204 5th St. NW
701-845-6950
Lost and found
FAITHFULLY
Church not listed?
Have the leader of your
church submit the
information to
editor@indy-bc.com
and well add it to our
listings.
www.indy-bc.com
NORTHWESTERN
INDUSTRIES
SUPPLIER TO THE
SHOOTING SPORTS
416 WEST MAIN STREET - VALLEY CITY, ND 58072
(701) 845-1031 OR (800) 286-1031 leon_nwi@hotmail.com
OWNER: LEON PYTLIK
WE BUY OR
PAWN GUNS
14_0220#269
14_0422#46
Vintage Variety
A little bit of everything
LOTS OF BARGAINS
701-840-2361
219 Central Ave Valley City
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Jeffrey A. Nathan
Dawn J. Mathias
(Licensed Directors)
251 Central Ave. S.
Valley City, ND 58072-3330
oliver-nathanchapel@csicable.net
www.oliver-nathanchapel.com 701-845-2414
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MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN YOUR LIFE!
1015 5th Ave. NE Jamestown 701-952-9520
Find us online: www.healthtogoh2o.com
Vitamins & Minerals
Herbal Supplements
Organic Products
Gluten-Free Foods
Odorox Air Purication System
Phone Plans - NO CONTRACT
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SATURDAY: 10AM - 4PM
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GLUTEN-FREE MEAL OPTIONS & NEW GRIDDLE PIZZA
I LOVE MY FREEDOM. I LOVE MY AMERICA. JESSI LANE ADAMS
PAGE 16 the independent - 07.04.14
PARTY: From 6
neighborhoods that have hosted
block parties, but recently fewer
have participated. We hope to
renew the spirit, and expand the
idea out into the county, notes
Teresa Will, City County Health
District director. We have many
new people moving into the area,
and block parties will help us all
meet and get to know each other,
continues Will.
When people know each other
there is defnitely an increase in
safety in a neighborhood. Tats
one reason the national slogan
is: Give neighborhood crime and
drugs a going away party! Reduce
crime, drugs & violence.
Chief Fred Tompson and Fire
Chief Gary Retterath invite neigh-
borhoods having block parties to
contact them at city hall and if pos-
sible they would bring a police car
and fre engine. Also, city commis-
sioners are available to attend and
happy to talk about city happen-
ings. Just give them a call at city
hall (845-1700).
Anyone hosting a block party
is encouraged to register your
party, whether you want the street
blocked of or not. Valley City
people are asked to phone city hall
at 845-1700, and anyone in the ru-
ral area is asked to phone Mercy
Hospital at 845-6456. For more
information use the same phone
numbers.
KNOW: From 7
Nip, a mighty and ferce mule,
proud property of Jim Walsh,
entered the gallop. Te beast, upon
eyeing his competitors, noted that
they belonged to a diferent species,
so suddenly withdrew from the race
with break neck speed, snorting,
and dashed of into the prairies.
Te judges of the event, Reynold
Petrich and Bob Harper, awarded
the frst prize of three dollars to
the brown horse, the sorrel drew
the two dollar second prize and
the third award, one dollar, was
handed to the black animal.
Whereupon the three contestants
trotted of happy and contented,
while the bystanders remarked that
the sport was much faster than the
Alice game ever could have been.
n nn
Sues Comments: First, I need to
apologize to all our Alice friends!
As I have found ofen in my
newspaper research, it evidently
was quite common for neighbor-
ing towns to write good-natured
articles demeaning each other.
Sunday afernoons and holidays
were ofen reserved for ball games
as entertainment for the entire
community. Whether this article
is based on any facts at all is lef
to each of you to decide. I would
say that much of it was written
with tongue in cheek. Remem-
ber this was 1922, and everyone
wasnt carrying a cell phone so you
didnt just call up someone from
the visiting team and ask if they
were actually coming to play the
game. When a team didnt show
up, other arrangements were ofen
made locally, at the last minute.
OMDAHL: From 7
Reservations have never been
good places for Native-Americans.
Tey are even worse today because
the American economy and society
have become nationalized. Isolat-
ed pockets of geography may have
been feasible 200 years ago but not
today.
While Native-Americans de-
serve a greater share of the public
resources, performance and ac-
countability must be integral parts
in the delegation of more authority.
Simply strengthening the parochi-
alism of reservations is not an an-
swer.
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CHOOSE CATEGORY
oFor Sale
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THIS NATION WILL REMAIN THE LAND OF THE FREE ONLY SO LONG AS IT IS THE HOME OF THE BRAVE. ELMER DAVIS
THEME: NATURAL
DISASTERS
ACROSS
1. *Hurricane-prone U.S. city
6. Olympic chant
9. British singer-songwriter
13. Gibson garnish
14. Hair goo
15. Subject of the musical,
Evita
16. Declare invalid
17. Flower necklace
18. Latin American plain
19. *One killed over 200,000
people in 2004
21. Crying like a sheep
23. How many if by sea?
24. Chinese dynasty (1368-
1644)
25. In the capacity of
28. Chesterfeld, e.g.
30. Designated limit
35. Do ___ others...
37. Schindler kept one
39. Art class support
40. Pains
41. Torchers misdeed
43. Japanese soup
44. Bear down under
46. Dublin land
47. 100 centavos
48. To imbue with soul
50. ____ Las Vegas starring
Elvis
52. Bloodshot
53. Horticultural implement
55. Get it wrong
57. *Warm current
60. *Dry spell
64. Bye to Banderas
65. Pastrami holder
67. Umble Heep
68. That is, Latin
69. Reef fsh
70. Artillery burst
71. Unit of force
72. Hole puncher
73. Senior
DOWN
1. Castle feature
2. Travelers stops
3. Hokkaido native
4. *_____ St. Helens, erupt-
ed in 1980
5. They come with marriage
6. Wrinkly fruit
7. ___ no evil...
8. Way out
9. Kosher eatery
10. *1972 deadly blizzard
killed thousands here
11. Goes with ding
12. Lennons lady
15. *Black Death
20. Dough
22. Mandelas org.
24. Like a hippopotamus
25. *Measured by seismo-
graph
26. Soviet entity
27. Rand McNally book
29. *It can get wild
31. Pack down
32. Basket material
33. Band on coat of arms
34. *It can happen in a fash
36. 1952 Winter Olympics
host
38. Reality TV star Spelling
42. _____ Say Never
45. ENT, e.g.
49. Local network
51. Kindle
54. Land of Gangnam
Style
56. Like country life
57. Whirlpool
58. Property right
59. Facial protrusion
60. The Farmer in the ____
61. Embellish
62. Possess or hold
63. *God of thunder
64. *This usually quickly fol-
lows disasters
66. Coniferous tree
CROSSWORD SUDOKU
CROSSWORD
SOLUTION
SUDOKU
SOLUTION
Directions: Fill in the blank squares in
the grid, making sure that every row,
column and 3-by-3 box includes all
digits 1 through 9.
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Dairy Queen Brazier
909 Central Ave N 701-845-2622
NEW FLAVOR:
STRAWBERRY
LEMONADE
EVERY DAY. 11-4. TRY OUR
BACON
CHEESE
BURGER
07.04.14 the independent PAGE 17
www.bakkegardandschell.com
Serving You
Since 1978
701.845.3665 OR 800.560.3665
BAKKEGARD & SCHELL
159 12th Avenue SE Valley City, ND
What We Do
Installation & Service
Commercial Residential
New Construction Remodels
Heating Refrigeration A/C
24 Hour Service
Free Consultations
Our mission is simple:
Provide a quality product and personal, professional
service to our customers.
We are committed to quality service and customer satisfaction!
We support our employees and are committed to our community!
Established in 1978
Our mission is simple: Provide a quality product & personal professional service .
We are committed to quality service & customer satisfaction!
We support our employees & are committed to our community!
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www.bakkegardandschell.com
Serving You
Since 1978
701.845.3665 OR 800.560.3665
BAKKEGARD & SCHELL
159 12th Avenue SE Valley City, ND
What We Do
Installation & Service
Commercial Residential
New Construction Remodels
Heating Refrigeration A/C
24 Hour Service
Free Consultations
Our mission is simple:
Provide a quality product and personal, professional
service to our customers.
We are committed to quality service and customer satisfaction!
We support our employees and are committed to our community!
Established in 1978
HE LOVES HIS COUNTRY BEST WHO STRIVES TO MAKE IT BEST. ROBERT G. INGERSOLL
PAGE 18 the independent - 07.04.14
MUSEUM WITHOUT WALLS
By Dennis
STILLINGS
I
n 1940, afer
g r a d u a t i n g
from the Nor-
mal School in Val-
ley City, my moth-
er began teaching
in a country school
located somewhere
between Leal and
Rogers.
When my wife and I moved
back here from Hawaii in 2006, it
occurred to me to try to fnd the
old school house. I started out by
asking a few old-timers from the
area about it.
Tey knew of the school build-
ing, but were quite certain that it
was long gone.
One old-timer suggested that
the building might have been
moved down to one of the settle-
ments located on the west shores
of Lake Ashtabula.
I made a tour of these places,
but the problem turned out to be
that there were several buildings
that looked like they might have
served as rural school houses, but
there was no way to tell where any
of them came from.
Tis experience, along with what
I learned later about houses in Val-
ley City, convinced me that North
Dakotans have long had a habit of
recycling old buildings.
I drove around town to check
out what had happened to Stillings
and Axelson family homes, as well
as commercial and institutional
buildings I remembered from my
younger days in Valley City.
Our family home was gone
which I had known for a long time
as were my grade school (Lin-
coln) and junior high (Ritchie).
So many other familiar buildings
were gone that it would be tedious,
not to say sad, for me to list them
here.
Tere were some bright spots:
the houses of my grandparents
and great-grandparents have sur-
vived and still look much like I
remember them, only in far better
condition.
But in that twilight zone between
old houses still being used
as residences and those
that are completely gone,
are the repurposed
buildings that were once
places of business.
Tree of them are illus-
trated here.
Gas stations tended
to be located where the
main trafc was, but there
were a few located well
into residential areas.
For a long time, there
were at least eight neigh-
borhood grocery stores
scattered around Valley
City.
Beginning in the late
1950s the neighborhood
grocery began to disap-
pear, and by the early
1970s only two still re-
mained.
One of those was our
old neighborhood store,
now called Handys.
Repurposed and Remembered
This building at 627 Second Street SW was, in the late 1940s, Mels
Grocery (Mel Olson), and later, Sandos. The store was about a block
from our house, and it was our go-to place for groceries. My mother
sent me to Mels many times to pick up something, and if there was a
nickel or more in change, it had better come home with meand not
in the form of a popsicle or candy bar.
Note the hours, and that there was deliv-
ery.
This residence at 456 Second Street NW was once Larson Oil & Walts
Sinclair gas station along with Kennedys Caf. My fathers mail route
was in our area, so occasionally I would toddle along while he picked
up mail from the drop box on Second St. and Fifth Ave., deliver along
the block we live on now, cross the tracks and stop at this 1940s ver-
sion of Cenex and belly up to the coffee bar for a cup of joe, payment
for which involved rolling the dice out of a dark brown leather cup,
double or nothing.
This house at 625 3rd Ave. NW was known as Marvin Grocery. The
structure of the building looks much like what I remember. My indul-
gent paternal grandmothermy mother would perhaps have said
overindulgentwould give me a nickel or two so I could go to Marvins
and purchase a Dreamsicle, and maybe also fetch her a package of
Fig Newtons.
WE CANT ALL BE WASHINGTONS, BUT WE CAN ALL BE PATRIOTS. CHARLES F. BROWNE
07.04.14 the independent PAGE 19
Many a small thing has been made
large by the right kind of advertising.
Let Roger show you how INDY ads
can work for you: Call 701-645-8890
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HELP WANTED
Medicine for the soul. In-
scription over the door of the
Library at Thebes. Ye Olde
Books & Curious Goods. 226 E.
Main St., Valley City. 701-845-
8721; yeoldebooks@yahoo.com
14_0314
Chads Window Washing
Service: Are you tired of dirty
windows? Let us help you get a
cleaner view this spring! Won-
dering where to ft time in to get
your windows clean before an
event? Pane relief is just a call
away! 701-710-1726. 14_0508#75
SERVICES
indy ads
work
701.645.8890
Advertising Account
Executive Wanted: Come
Grow With Us! If you love
The Independent, want to help
our local businesses grow
and thrive, and want to earn
the best commission in the
region, email a cover letter
and resume to: Roger Bluhm
rogerads@indy-bc.com
No phone calls please.
THREE WINDOWS, $300.
Picture window (doesnt open) 42 x 48
2 double-hung windows 42 x 18
Energy Star insulaon, white vinyl frames.
Jeld-Wen brand in original packaging.
Call Dennis at 490-2800.
Publishers Notice: All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or an intention, to make any such
preference, limitation or discrimination.Familial
status includes children under the age of 18 liv-
ing with parents or legal custodians, pregnant
women and people securing custody of children
under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings advertised in this news-
paper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination, call North Dakota
Fair Housing Council Toll-free 1-888-265- 0907.
HUD Toll free 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free tele-
phone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
927-9275.
Page Housing Development has
an affordable 2 bedroom apart-
ment 680 square feet, accepts
rental assistance, ample parking.
Located in Page, N.D. Now un-
der new management, for more
information, contact Leah at
701-526-3708. 14_0429#58
HOUSING
REAL ESTATE
NEW DEVELOPMENT IN DEVILS
LAKE: Ackerman Valley, 20,000-
25,000 sq ft lots available to ac-
commodate campers, park models,
manufactured or stick-built homes.
Prices range from $17,500-$20,000.
Resort access optional. Call for de-
tails, 701-739-6325. 14_0530#7
WANTED: Rent-to-Own home
in small community (Fingal, Nome,
Tower City, Kathryn, Sanborn, Wim-
bledon, etc.) outside of Valley City. At
least two bedrooms. Contact Roger
at 970-580-4036. 14_0605#12
When you rent a house or apart-
ment, you want affordability, choic-
es, great locations, and friendly ser-
vice. Cornerstone Rentals LLC offers
all this and more, including some pet
friendly options. Call 701-845-APTS
(2787) or email trishia@propertiesby-
cornerstone.com today. 14_0616#15
FOR SALE: Captains bed w/
bookcase headboard, $175; Large
recliner, Lazy Boy, brown, $150;
6-drawer dresser and mirror, $100;
42 round kitchen table, formica
top, 17 leaf, $125; Queen bed,
$125; New twin mattress, Serta,
$125; Older bar bell weight set,
make offer; Older drafting board w/
parallel rule, make offer. 701-845-
4434, 701-490-0698. 14_0627#24
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
Full-time and part-time shifts for cashiers, cooks,
and servers. Servers $7.25 hr. plus tips - Cashiers
and cooks premium wage DOE. PTO and Wellness
benefts for full-time. Very fexible scheduling.
Call Travis at 701-749-6000 or stop by for application.
Tower Travel Center
Exit 307 - Tower City, ND
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CALL THE INDY TO PLACE ADS: 701.645.8890
FOR SALE: Corner lot in City of
Wimbledon, ND. Water included.
Call 701-435-2372 or 701-320-
2505. 14_0623#23
FLAX: from 2
We are a growing company and were
proud to be in Valley City.
Te plant is located on 14th Street in
Valley City, east of Bjornson Golf Course.
n Te Tasty Treat Drive In in Litchville
has opened for the summer with some new
features.
Te business was renovated to allow
customers to sit in the eatery to enjoy their
treats.
Te business is open Monday through
Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
n Te Lisbon Airport received $405,950
in federal grant money for a hangar.
Lisbon Airport was one of nine in the
state to receive federal grant money. Te
others were located in Walhalla, Harvey,
Casselton, Rolla, Cando, Edgeley, Hec-
tor Internatonal in Fargo and the Barnes
County Airport.
Barnes County Municipal Airport
received $233,136 for a 900-foot runway,
overlay of 9,300-square yards of apron and
rehabilitate 165 feet of existing parallel
taxiway.
Te hangar being built in Lisbon will be
6,780 square feet.
In total, $4.1 million in grant money
was awarded by the U.S. Department of
Transportation.
n Brent Tielges was recently named
president of Choice Financial Bank in
LaMoure.
Tielges replaces Raymond Tielges,
who is retiring.
n Te Enderlin swimming pool is open
and swim lessons will be ofered July 7, 14
and 21 at a cost of $30.
Lessons will be held for diferent levels
of swimmers at 9, 10 and 11 a.m. Private
lessons are also available.
Te daily fee for swimming is $2 for 11
and under and $3 for 12 and over. Season
passes are $55 for a single pass and $110
for family.
the independent 07.04.14 PAGE 20
The Barnes County 4-Hers successfully competed in the annual 4-H Horse Show on
June 28 at the North Dakota Winter Show Arena. Ten 4-hers from Barnes County par-
ticipated in the event, competing in up to 12 classes including Showmanship, Western
Pleasure, Trail, Pole Bending, Barrel racing and Equitation over Fences. Achievement
days is the next event for Barnes County 4-hers which will be held on July 11 at the
NDWS building. During this event the 4-Hers showcase the projects they have been
working on all year as well as show their animals. Pictured at the Horse Show are left to
right, Breanna McDonald, Brooke McDonald, Cassidy Cruff, Samantha Bergrud, Hailey
Schaefer and Jessica Undem. Not pictured are Kaynen Malec, Harlie Storhoff, Cassie
Baasch and Jerry Walker. (Courtesy photo)
SUMMER
SAVINGS!
DOWNTOWN VALLEY CITY 845-1523
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Helping Families
Honor, Connect & Remember
For Over 70 Years
In Your Time of Need...
We can help
Serving You
Michael Lerud & Allen Schuldt
Owners & Funeral Directors
515 Central Ave N - Valley City, ND - 701-845-3232 - www.lerudschuldt.com
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EAGLES AERIE 2192
345 12TH AVE. N.E.
VALLEY CITY, ND
CALL US
845-2192
YES, WE ARE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!
DINING ROOM OPEN TUESDAY - SATURDAY.
BASKETS AVAILABLE IN LOUNGE.
FULL SALAD BAR THURSDAY - SATURDAY.

E
V
E
R
Y
S
ATURDAY NIGHT 5
-9
P
M
!
summer 2014
JOIN THE
FUN
!
Get to know
your neighbors!
For ideas or
assistance in
planning your
own block
party, call
701-845-1700
or check out
www.valleycity.us
14_0606#108
THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH AMERICA THAT CANNOT BE CURED BY WHAT IS RIGHT WITH AMERICA. WILLIAM J. CLINTON
BETWEEN: From 8
But root crops dislike liq-
uid fertilizer, compost and
manure.
It is a good management
to plant a root crop afer a
leaf or fruit crop.
It is also possible to buy
organic foliage sprays over
the counter.
All types of garden plants
can be grown organically
with ample amounts of re-
turn in the harvest.
Vegetable crops vary in
the nutrients they require,
but some plants supply
nutrients in the case of le-
gumes, but rotation is the
key. Vegetables are divided
into three feeding catego-
ries.
Heavy feeders are toma-
toes, corn, and Cucurbits.
Light feeders are beans and
peas; and root crops include
carrots, onions and pota-
toes. General rotation rule
to remember is plant heavy
feeder afer a light feeder,
plant a heavy feeder then a
light feeder or a root crop.
Crop rotation prevents dis-
ease and aids in pest con-
trol.
Source: NDSU, Steven T.
Bohl
Te Valley City Community Gardens
(VCCG) Steering Committee invites
you to send your gardening questions
to VCCG Gardening Column, ATTN:
Stephanie Mayfeld, 230 4th St., N.W.,
Rm. 204, Valley City, ND 58072-2947 or
vcgardens@gmail.com.
Valley City Community Gardens is
located directly west of Riverside Gardens
on 10th St. SW.
submitted by Diane Hueser