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Plumbing terms

Roughing-in
The installation of all parts of the plumbing system which can be completed prior to the installation of fixtures.
Floor mounted fixtures
Refers to s plumbing fixture that rests on the floor.
Flush meter
A device which discharges a predetermined quantity of water to fixtures for flushing purposes.
Full bath
A bathroom containing a water closet, a lavatory and a bathtub.
Hose bibb
A faucet to which a hose may be attached.
Area drain
A receptacle for wastes which are ultimately discharged into the sanitary drainage system.
Riser
A water supply pipe that extends one full storey or more to convey water to fixture branches or to a group of
fixtures.
Soil stack
a vertical line of piping that extends one or more floors and receives the discharge of water closets, urinals and
similar fixtures.
Vent pipe
the pipe installed to ventilate a building drainage system and to prevent trap siphonage.
Stack vent
a vent which also serves as a drain
the extension of a soil or waste stack above the highest horizontal drain connection to the stack.
Building supply pipe
the pipe from the water main or other source of water supply to the water distributing system of the building.
Vent stack
a vertical pipe installed in order to provide circulation of air to and from the drainage system.
Drain pipe
a pipe that only conveys liquid waste, free from fecal matter.
Siphonage/Syphonage
a suction created by the flow of liquid in the pipes.
Stack
general term for any vertical line of soil, waste and vent pipe extending through one or more storeys.
Backflow
The flow of water in pipes in a reverse direction from which is normally intended.
Battery of fixtures
Any group of two or more similar adjacent fixtures which discharge into a common horizontal waste or soil
branch.
Branch
Any part of the piping system other than the main riser or stack.
Clean-out
A fitting with a removable plate or plug that is placed in plumbing drainage pipe lines in to afford access to the
pipes for the purpose of cleaning their interior.

Developed length
The length of pipe measured along the center line of the pipe and fittings.
Crown weir
The highest part of the inside portion of the bottom surface at the crown of a trap.
Fixture drain
The drain from the trap of a fixture to the junction of that drain with any other drain pipe.
Indirect waste pipe
A waste pipe that does not connect directly with the drainage system but conveys liquid waste by discharging
into a plumbing fixture or receptacle.
Sewer
An artificial conduit, usually underground, for carrying off waste water and refuse.
Alkalinity
Cased by bicarbonates, carbonates or hydroxide components.
E.Coli
Bacteria in water
Foamability
Caused by detergent
Flocculation
Coagulation, alum is added
Ferrous bicarbonate
Iron in water
Hardness
Caused by calcium and magnesium
Zeolite
Water softening
Black water
Water plus human waste from toilets and urinals
Grey water
Waste water from laundry area, lavatory, sink, shower and bathtub
Color/Discoloration
Caused by iron and manganese
50-75 gpd
water supply requirement for single family
4
WSFU value for bathtub, public use
3/8
Minimum fixture supply size for lavatory

Synonymous Terms
Toilet water closet
Individual vent back vent
Building sewer
Building drain
Clean-out
p-trap
floor set floor mounted
gate valve full way valve
hub bell
lavatory wash basin
vent stack main vent
common vent unit vent
soil or waste vent
slop sink service sink
flocculation coagulation


I. ESSENTIAL PARTS OF PLUBMING SYSTEM
(SANITARY DRAINAGE)
1. HOUSE SEWER OR
BUILDING SEWER - That horizontal run of pipe, starting from 5 outside the building
which receives the sewage from the house drain or building and
conveys the same to the sewer main or approved point of disposal..
2. HOUSE DRAIN OR
BUILDING DRAIN -The lowest horizontal run of pipe inside the building which receives
the discharge from fixtures and other branches and conveys the same
to the house or building sewer.
3. PRIMARY BRANCH -The Primary Brach of a building drain is the single sloping drain from
the base of a stack up to its junction with the main building drain or
with other branches. The primary branch is also called a Lateral.
4. SECONDARY
BRANCH -That horizontal run of pipe emanating from a fixture or group of
fixtures up to its junction with the primary branch.
5.HORIZONTAL
BRANCH -That t horizontal run of pipe, which receives the distance from fixture
and convey the same to the stack.
6. BRANCH INTERVAL -That length of pipe of a stack no less than eight feet which receives
the discharge from the horizontal branch.
7. SOILSTACK -The vertical run of pipe, which receives discharge from fixture without
fecal matter.
8. WASTE STACK -That vertical matter run of pipe, which receives discharge from
fixtures without fecal matter.
9. LATERAL - In lateral plumbing - a secondary pipe line. In sewerage a common
sewer to which no other common sewer is tributary. It receives
sewage only from building sewer.
10. FIXTURE DRAIN -The drain from the trap of the fixture to the junction of the fixture to
the drain of the pipe. ( See definition of terms).
11. SPECIAL WASTE
OR INDIRECTT
WASTE PIPE - Waste water pipe from fixtures or appliances which is allowed to
discharge into a properly vented fixture and with no direct connection
with the drainage system.


BIBB - SYNONYMOUS WITH FAUCET, COCK, TAP. PLUG, ET. (FAUCET)
FAUCET - A VALVE ON A WATER PIPE BY MEANS OF W/C WATER CAN BE DRAWN
FROM OF HELD WITH IN THE PIPE.
CAP - A FITTING INTO WHICH THE END OF A PIPE IS SREWED FOR THE
PURPOSE OF CLOSING THE END OF THE PIPE.
PLUG - A PIPE FITTING WITH OUTSIDE THREAD & PROTECTING HEADS THAT IS
USED FOR CLOSING THE OPENING IN ANOTHER FITTING
(CLEAN OUT, P. TRAP).
NIPPLE - PIPE FITTING WITH OUTSIDE THREAD FOR CONNECTING TWO PIPES.
SLEEVE - A PIPE COUPLING.
COUPLING - A PIPE FITTING WITH INSIDE THREAD FOR CONNECTING TWO PIPES;
METHOD OF PIPE CONNECTION; A SHORT INTERNALLY THREADED
SECTION OF A PIPE USED TO JOIN TWO PIPES OR CONDUIT.
UNION - A PIPE FITTING USED TO CONNECT THE ENDS OF TWO PIPES,
NEITHER OF WHICH CAN BE TURNED.
SERVICE ELL,
STREET ELL - A MALLEABLE-IRON FITTING FOR THREADEDPIPE, HAVING 45 DEGREE
OR 90 DEGREE BEND, WITH INSIDE THREAD ON ONE END & OUTSIDE
THREAD ON THE OTHER.

REDUCER - ARE FITTING USED TO CONNECT PIPES OF DIFF. SIZES IN THE SAME
LINE ; A PIPE COUPLING, WITH INSIDE THREADS, HAVING ONE END
WITH SMALLER DIAMETER THAN THE OTHER.
INCREASER - A COUPLING WITH ONE END IS LARGER THAN THE OTHER.
ELBOW - A FITTING JOINING TWO PIPES AT AN ANGLE.
TEE - T SHAPED FITTING WITH TWO OUTLET S, ONE AT 90 DEGREE TO
THE CONECTION TO THE MAIN LINE; FITTING SHOULD NEVER BE
USED WITH PIPES CARRYING SEWAGE BUT MAY BE USED W/ VENT
PIPES ; CHANGE IN DRAINAGE NOR DIRECTION.
RISER - A WATER SUPPLY PIPE THAT EXTENDS VERTICALLY ONE FULL
STOREY OR MORE TO CONVEY WATER TO BRANCHES OF FIXTURES .
(VERTICAL PIPE IN H2O SUPPLY LINE.)
SERVICE PIPE - THE PIPE FROM THE WATER MAIN OR SOURCE OF WATER SUPPLY TO
THE BUILDING SERVED.
HYDRANT - A CYLINDRICAL RESERVOIR USSUALLY OF METAL; AN APPRATUS FOR
DRAWING WATER DIRECTLY FROM A MAIN.
HOSE REEL - A CYLINDRICAL DEVICE WHICH TURN ON AN AXIS AROUND WHICH A
FIRE HOSE IS WOUND & CONNECTED.

TYPES OF VALVES & CONTROLS
a. GATE VALVE - A VALVE IN WHICH THE FLOW OF WATER IS CUT OFF BY
MEANS OF A CIRCULAR DISK. THIS VALVE IS USED WHEN
A NORMAL FULLY OPEN OR CLOSED POSITIONS IS
DESIRED. EITHER END MAY BE USED AS AN INLET.
GLOBE VALVE - USED WHEN IT IS DESIRED TO THROTTLE THE WATER
SUPPLY. SAME END MUST ALWAYS BE USED AS AN INLET.
CHECK VALVE - A VALVE THAT AUTOMATICALLY CLOSES TO PREVENT
THE FLOW OF WATER IN A REVERSE DIRECTION.
ANGLE VALVE - CHANGES THE DIRECTION OF THE FLOW OF WATER AS
WELL AS CONTROL IT. ACT SOMEWHAT LIKE GLOVE VALVE
BUT ARE USUALLY USED FOR A RIGHT ANGLE TIRN.
FLUSH VALVE - FORM A VALVE USED IN A FLUSH TUNK FOR THE PURPOSE
OF CONTROLLING THE FLUSHING OF FIXTURES.
TYPES OF CHECK VALVE:
SWING CHECK VALVE - HAS PIVOTED FLAP WHICH IS READILY PUSHED OPEN
BY PRESSURE NOR OR LIFT CHECK VALVE CONSIST
OF A LOOSE DISK WHICH CLOSES BY GRAVITY WHEN
THE PRESSURE ON BOTH SIDES ARE EQUAL.
BALL CLOCK - A FAUCET OPENED OR CLOSED BY THE FALL OR RISE
OF A BALL FLOATING ON THE SURFACE OF WATER W/
A SPHERICAL FLOAT.
CORPORATION COCK - A STOP VALVE PLACED IN A SERVICE PIPE CLOSE TO
ITS CONNECTION W/ A WATER MAIN; A DEVICE INS-
TALLED WHEN TAPPING A CITY WATER MAIN WITH
PRESSURE.

KINDS OF FAUCET:
KEY COCK, COMPRESSION COCK, HOSE BIBB, SELF CLOSING FAUCET

TWO TYPES OF SPRINKLER:
UPRIGHT - USED ABOVE PIPING WHEN PIPING IS EXPOSED.
PENDENT - THIS TYPE PROJECTS THRU A FINISHED CEILING
WHEN PIPING IS CONCEALED.

THRREE WAYS OF WATER DISTRIBUTION:
UPFEED SYSTEM FROM NORMAL WATER PRESSURE FROM PUBLIC WATER MAIN LOW RISE BLDGS.
PNEUMATIC TANK FROM AIR PRESSURE FROM SUNCTION TANK FOR TALL BLDGS.
W/C CANNOT BE REACHED BY NORMALWATER PRESSURE.
DOWNFEED SYSTEM BY GRAVITY FROM OVERHEAD TANKS ARE SUPPORTED BY
STRUCTURAL FRAMES.

COLOR CODE FOR PIPES: BENDS EQUIVALENT IN DEGREES
POTABLE WATER - BLUE x 360 = 90
ELECTRICAL - ORANGE OR LT GRAY 1/8 x 360=45
INDUSTRIAL - GRAY 1/5 x 360=72
SEWAGE - ORANGE BROWN 1/16 x 360= 22.5
COMMUNICATION CABLE - YELLOW
STAND PIPE - RED G.I. PIPES = 6.00m LENGTH MAX.
HOT WATER - WHITE PVC PIPES = 3.00m LENGTH MAX.


BACK PRESSURE AIR PRESSURE IN DRAINAGE PIPESN GREATER THAN ATMOSPHERIC
PRESSURE.
BACK FLOW TERM ONLY FOR WATER. REVERSAL OF FLOW OF WATER (DRAWBACK)
THE FLOW OF WATER INTO A WATERSUPPLY SYSTEM FROM ANY SOURCE
OTHER THAN ITS REGULAR SOURCE.
BACK SIPHONAGE A SUCTION CREATED BY THE FLOW OF LIQUIDS IN PIPES.
VACUUM AN AIR PRESSURE LESS THAN ATMOSPHERIC.
VENT A PIPE OR OPENING USED FOR ENSURING THE CIRCULATION OF AIR IN A
PLUMBING SYSTEM & FOR REDUCING THE PRESSURE EXETED ON TRAP SEALS.
- IS A DEVICE INSTALLED IN A HOUSE DRAIN INTENDED TO PREVENT THE
THE BACKFLOW OF SEWAGE; DEVICE THAT PREVENT THE LOSS OF SEAL BY SIPHONAGE, BACK PRESSURE,
ETC.
VENT STACK (DRY) A VERTICAL VENT PIPE INSTALLED PRIMARILIY FOR THE
PURPOSE OF PROVIDING CIRCULATION OF AIR (MAIN VENT,)
STACK VENT (WET) - IS THE EXTENSION OF A SOIL OR WASTE STACK ABOVE
THE HIGHEST HORIZONTAL DRAIN CONNECTED TO THE
STACK .
WET VENT (TERM FOR
SECONDARY BRANCH) - WET VENT IS THAT PORTION OF A VENT PIPE THRU WHICH
LIQUID WASTE FLOW.
DRY VENT - A VENT THAT DOES NOT CARRY WATER OR WATER-BORNE
WASTES.
BACK VENT PIPE (INDI-
VIDUAL VENT PIPE) - THE PART OF A VENT LINE WHICH CONNECTS DIRECTLY
WITH AN INDIVIDUAL TRAP UNDERNEATH OR BEHIND THE
FIXTURE & EXTENDS TO THE BRANCH OR MAIN, SOIL, OR
WASTE PIPE AT ANY POINT HIGHER THAN THE FIXTURE
TRAP IT SERVES.
UNIT VENT - AN ARRANGEMENT OF VENTING SO INSTALLED THAT ONE
VENT PIPE WILL SERVE TWO (2) TRAPS.
DUAL VENT - A.K.A.UNIT VENT OR COMMON VENT.
BRANCH VENT - A VENT PIPE CONNESTING FROM ABRANCH OF THE
DRAINAGE SYSTEM TO A VENT STACK.
GROUP VENT - A BRANCH VENT THAT PERFORMS ITS FUNCTION FOR
TWO (2) OR MORE TRAPS. (SEE DUAL & UNIT VENT.)
CIRCUIT VENT - A GROUP VENT EXTENDING FROM IN FRONT OF THE LAST
FIXTURE CONNECTION ON A HORIZONTAL BRACNH TO
THE VENT STACK. (SEE ALSO LOOP VENT, BRANCH VENT.);
PIPE CONNECTED TO A HORIZONTAL DRAINAGE PIPE RE-
CEIVING THE DISCHARGE. ( MIN OF 5 FIXTURES OR
POSSIBLE OF 20 FIXTURES).
RELIEF VENT - A VENT THE PRIMARY FUNCTION OF WHICH IS TO PRO-
VIDE CIRCULATION OF AIR BETWEEN DRAINAGE & VENT
SYSTEM, ( IS USED IF THERE ARE MORE THAN 10
FIXTURES)
CONTINOUS VENT - I S A VERTICAL VENT THAT IS CONTINUATION OF THE
DRAIN, TO WHICH THE VENT CONNECTS (OR USTR).
STACK - A GENERAL TERM USED FOR ANY VERTICAL LINE OF
SOILWASTE OR VENT PIPING.
SOIL STACK - A VERTICAL SOIL PIPE CONVEYING FECAL MATTER &
LIQUID WASTE; A VERTICAL PIPE WHICH RECEIVES THE
DISCHARGE FROM WATER CLOSET.
WASTE STACK - VERTICAL PIPE WHICH RECEIVES THE DISCHARGE OF
FIXTURES OTHER THAN WATER CLOSET.
COMM0N VENT - USED FOR BACK TO BACK FIXTURES (SEE UNIT/
DUAL VENT).
FIXTURE - A RECEPTACLE ATTACHED TO A PLUMBING SYSTEM
OTHER THAN A TRAP IN WHICH WATER OR WASTES MAY
BE COLLECTED OR RETAILED FOR ULTIMATE DISCHARGE
INTO THE PLUMBING SYSTEM.
FIXTURE UNIT - 71/2 GAL/MIN (WATER CONSUMPTION).
FIXTURE DRAIN - THE DRAIN FROM THE TRAP OF FIXTURE TO THE
JUCNTION OF THE DRAIN WITH ANY OTHER DRAIN PIPE.
FIXTURE BRANCH - THE SUPPLY PIPE BETWEEN THE FIXTURE & THE WATER
DISTRUBUTING PIPE .
GRADE (PITCH) - THE SLOPE OR FALL OF A LINE OF PIPE IN REFERENCE
TO A HORIZONTAL PLANE USUALLY EXPRESSED IN
PERCENT (2% SLOPE & PROVIDE A STRAP @ EVERY
1.0 MTS.)

LATRINE - A WATER CLOSET CONSISTING OF A CONTINOUS
TROUGH CONTAINING WATER . THE TROUGH EXTENDS
UNDER TWO (2) OR MORE ADJACENT SEATS. (PROHIBITED
BY HEALTH AUTHORITIES FOR PERMANENT
INSTALLATIONS).
SEPTIC VAULT - 1 CHAMBER
SEPTIC TANK - IS A WATERTIGHT RECEPTACLE WHICH RECEIVES THE
DISCHARGE OF A PLUMBING SYSTEM OR PART THEREOF.
(2 CHAMBER)





Minimum Plumbing Facilities
Types of building
or occupancy
Water closets
(fixtures/person)
Urinals
(fixtures/person)
Lavatories
(fixtures/person)
Bathtubs or
showers
(fixtures/person)
Drinking
fountains
Assembly places
(theaters,
auditoriums,
convention halls,
etc. for
permanent
employee use)
Male
1: 1-15
2: 16-35
3: 36-55

Female
1: 1-15
2: 16-35
4: 36-55

Over 55, add 1
fixture for each
additional 40
persons
0: 1-9
1: 10-50

Add 1 fixture for
each additional
50 males
Male
1 per 40

Female
1 per 40

Assembly places
(theaters,
auditoriums,
convention halls,
etc. for public
use)
Male
1: 1-100
2: 101-200
3: 201-400

Female
3: 1-50
4: 51-100
8: 101-200
11: 201-400

Over 400, add 1
fixture for each
additional 500
males and 2 for
each 300 females
1: 1-100
2: 101-200
3: 201-400
4: 401-600

Over 600, add 1
fixture for each
additional 500
males
Male
1: 1-100
2: 201-400
3: 401-750

Female
1: 1-200
2: 201-400
3: 401-750

Over 750, add 1
fixture for each
additional 500
persons
1 per 75
Dormitories
school or labor
Male
1 per 10

Female
1 per 8

Add 1 fixture for
each addl 25
males (over 10)
and 1 for each 20
females (over 8)
1 per 25

Over 150, add 1
fixture for each
50 addl males
Male/Female
1 per 12

Over 150, add 1
fixture for each
addl 20 males
and 1 for each
addl 15 females
1 per 8
Dormitories for
staff use
Male
1: 1-15
2: 16-35
3: 36-55

Female
1: 1-15
3: 16-35
1 per 50 Male/Female

1 per 40
1 per 8
4: 36-55

Over 55, add 1
fixture for each
addl 40 persons
Dwellings
-single dwelling
-multiple



SEPTIC TANK: TREATMENT TANK DETAILS
1. This plan illustrates the recommendations of BS6297 1983 and Approved Document H and is for guidance
only. The Council will not be answerable for the efficient operation of a construction to this design. It is the
Owner/Agent's responsibility to ensure that the disposal system will function satisfactorily.
2. Capacity of septic tank suitable for a maximum of 20 persons.
May be constructed in engineering brickwork, 7N/mm2 concrete blockwork or reinforced concrete. Provision to be
made for adequate ventilation to septic tank. Manhole cover and frame type to be suitable for expected loading
(at or above ground level). 100 precast concrete slabs or 100 concrete slab reinforced with BRC structural mesh
B196. (Where loading is likely on slab, manhole covers and slab thickness to be designed accordingly).




The preliminary layout of a storm sewer system is divisible into two major operations as follows:
1. Locate and space inlets.
2. Prepare a plan layout of the storm sewer system showing the following data:
a. Location of all underground utilities in the plan and profile. Also plot these utilities on cross sections.
b. Location of the main storm sewer line.
c. Direction of flow.
d. Location of inlets.
e. Location of manholes.
f. Location of outfall(s).
g. Shape and type of conduit.

The preliminary plan can be constructed through the application of the design criteria that follow.
Inlet Locations
Maximum Spacing: Water should normally not travel more than 300 to 600 feet (92183 m) before interception,
with the closer spacing employed for flat terrain and for high-speed highways. Moreover, spacing of inlets should be
designed to prevent water from spreading over more than one-half of the traveled lane and from overtopping the
curb. Since a parking lane or shoulder is not considered a traveled lane, the flow of water can utilize the full parking
lane or shoulder width. However, the future expansion of the roadway should be considered before the full parking
lane is used for conveyance of water.
At Low Points: In a curb section, at least one inlet must be located at the low point of each sag vertical. However, if
there is a possibility of clogging because of high quantities of debris, two inlets should be installed--one at the low
point and one where the grade elevation is about 0.20 foot (60 mm) higher than at the low point. Hydraulic
Engineering Circular No. 12 Drainage of Highway Pavements has a discussion about the use of flanking inlets.
At Bridge Ends: Generally, inlets should be placed to intercept the gutter flow before it reaches the bridge.
At Intersections: Inlets at intersections are to be placed in order to intercept the gutter flow before it reaches a
pedestrian crosswalk.

Prevention of Cross Pavement Flow: The flowing of water across pavements should be prevented in order to
preclude icing in the winter and hydroplaning during the warmer months. In particular, where pavements are
superelevated, inlets shall be placed to intercept the gutter flow before the pavement becomes too flat for effective
pickup.
Driveway Openings: Where driveways have a descending grade from the gutter, the installation of inlets might be
necessary to preclude the design storm from overflowing at the driveway openings. However, to minimize the number
of inlets, the driveway cross section should be designed with a gutter sufficiently deep to accommodate the design
flow.
Side Drainage: Drainage from outlying areas should be intercepted before it reaches the roadway pavement,
especially where mud and debris will be carried onto the pavement.
Conduit Location
The location or lateral placement of a conduit system is dictated by economics, hydraulic requirements, ease
of construction and maintenance, and local community preference.
Proposed storm sewer shall be laid at least 8 feet (2.5 m) horizontally from any existing or proposed water mains.
The distance shall be measured from center to center. In cases where it is not practical to maintain an 8 foot (2.5 m)
separation, Chapter NR 811 of the Wisconsin Administrative Code shall be consulted for additional guidelines.
Curvilinear and angular alignments in conduits produce hydraulic losses. Therefore, if possible, any change in
alignment between structures is to be avoided, especially on trunk or main line segments of a storm sewer system. For
pipes with diameters of 30 inches (750 mm) or more, a long radius curve of 100 feet (30 m) or more is permissible. The
radius of curvature specified shall be one of the available standard manufactured curves in the specified type of
material.
On lateral lines, an angular change in alignment for conduit of 30 inches (750 mm) or less in diameter is
permitted.
Standards For Storm Drain Pipe
Pipe Diameter: The minimum pipe diameter shall be as follows:


* for short runs, smaller sizes may be specified.
Under special conditions, such as a problem with fine debris or flat grades, the minimum pipe size for
laterals should be 18 inches (450 mm).
Pipe Strength: Strength requirements for pipe shall conform to the ASTM designations for the type and class of pipe
as given in the approved practice drawing.
Pipe Slope: See procedure 13-25-35, for minimum pipe slopes.
Manholes
Purpose: The principal purpose of a manhole is to provide maintenance access to a continuous underground conduit.

Types: See Chapter 16 of this Manual for standard detail drawings of approved manholes. Special manholes
shall be designed when conditions make the use of the above-listed manholes not feasible. When a manhole is
used as an inlet, the design criteria for inlets apply.
Location: In general, manholes are to be located as follows:
1. At the end of existing and future lines
2. Where the conduit changes size
3. At sharp curves or angles in the line (10 or over)
4. At points where there is an abrupt change in grade
5. At all intersections
6. At junctions of sewers If possible, avoid locating manholes in traffic lanes. When manholes must be placed in

traffic lanes, care shall be taken to avoid the normal wheel tracks. Spacing: To facilitate maintenance operations,
manhole spacing should be as follows:


In cases where a municipality has its own policy on spacing of manholes, requiring a lesser maximum spacing,
consideration may be given to that policy.
Outfalls
To preclude an expensive design, care should be taken to avoid placing an outfall underwater or where water might back
up into the system. In general, sewer outfalls shall be placed at existing drainage ditches and natural low points.
















1. What determines the size of a leaching field? PERCOLATION TEST
2. What is an important concern in private water supply? HARDNESS.
3. What part of water supply design is affected by building height? STATIC HEAD
4. Statements:
a. Correct
*Dry pipe sprinkler systems are more efficient than wet pipe systems.
*The hazard classification does not necessarily affect sprinkler layout.
b. Incorrect
*Siamese connections serve both sprinklers and standpipes
*Standpipes must be located within stairways or vestibules of smoke-proofed enclosures.
*Standpipes are required in buildings four or more stories high or those exceeding 150 feet.
5. The pressure in a city water main is (0.39273 MPa). If the pressure loss through piping, fittings, and the water
meter has been calculated as 231 psi (o.15847 MPa) and the highest fixture requires 12 psi (0.08268 MPa) to
operate, what is the maximum height the fixture can be above the water main? 50 FEET (15M)
6. You have been retained by a client to design a house in a suburban location. The nearest water main is one
block away (about 1000M) and the city has no plans to extend the line in the near future. City and county
regulations do permit the drilling of wells. What should you recommend you client regarding water supply?
ESTIMATE THE COST OF EXTENDING THE MUNICIPAL LINE, SINCE THE WATER QUALITY IS KNOWN AND IT
WOULD ENSURE A LONG-TERM SUPPLY. CONSULT WITH NEARBY PROPERTY OWNERS WHO PLAN TO BUILD IN
THE AREA TO SEE IF THEY WOULD BE WILLING TO SHARE THE COST OF EXTENDING THE LINE.
7. Which statements about drainage are correct?
a. Correct
*Vents help prevent the drainage of water from traps
*The house drain cannot also be called the building sewer
*Cleanouts are always a necessary part of a drainage system
b. Incorrect
*Drains should always slope at a minimum of 1/8 inch per foot (.0099 per meter) or 9.9mm/meter. [0.99%]
8. Water hammer most often occurs when:
WATER SUDDENLY STOPS WHEN FLOW IS TURNED OFF.
9. One component of a plumbing system that every building has is a : STACK VENT
10. Select the incorrect statements:
a. Correct
*Several types of plastic can be used for cold water piping, but only PVDC is used for hot water supply where
allowed by local codes.
*Steel pipe is more labor intensive and requires more space than copper pipes in plumbing chases.
*ABS is suitable for water supply.
b. Incorrect
*Type M pipe is normally specified for most interior plumbing