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LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

Technical and Cross Reference Data




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Table of Contents

OPERATION OF VACUUM MOTORS IN AIR SERIES..................................................................................3
AIR WATTS....................................................................................................................................................4
CARBON BRUSH CONSUMPTION..............................................................................................................5
CHANGING CARBON BRUSHES................................................................................................................6
CENTRAL VACUUM MOTOR SELECTION..................................................................................................7
DESCRIPTION OF LAMB DATE CODES......................................................................................................8
CONNECTING VACUUM MOTORS IN ELECTRICAL SERIES.....................................................................9
FILTRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR VACUUM MOTORS...........................................................................10
NOISE AND VIBRATION IN CENTRAL VACUUM INSTALLATIONS.........................................................11
VACUUM CLEANER RATING METHODS..................................................................................................13
BYPASS MOTOR VENTILATION................................................................................................................15
G2K Cross Reference..............................................................................................................................16
Model Number Suffix Meanings............................................................................................................18
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TECHNICAL DATA
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

OPERATION OF VACUUM MOTORS IN AIR SERIES

One may connect two vacuum motors in air series by connecting the discharge of the first
motor to the inlet of the second motor to increase the overall vacuum level in a cleaning
machine. We have a number of customers that utilize motors in this manner in various types
of equipment.

There are potential problems associated with the air series application of motors as it
produces a severe thermal condition on the second motor. The discharge air from the first
motor is quite warm and when it is ducted to the second motor, the heated air increases
further in temperature due to the compression of the air in the vacuum system.

The high temperatures can have an adverse effect on the bearing system of the second
motor. In addition, the high temperatures coupled with the increased pressures in the
second motor can cause the grease to be forced out of the ball bearing at the bottom (fan
end) of the second motor.

Depending on the effective operating orifice of the vacuum system, enough heat can be
generated to cause deformation of the fan system that can lead to a fan strike or locked
rotor condition.

Another problem is the electrical current required to operate the air series vacuum system.
Special wiring assemblies and circuits may be necessary to carry the high current level when
operating two motors in air series.

When two like motors are connected in air series, the sealed vacuum level will increase by
approximately 60% from that of a single motor. Airflow at a wide open condition does not
appreciably increase by operating two vacuum motors in air series.

Another problem frequently seen in air series applications is that adequate cooling air is not
provided for the first or lower motor. Both motors must receive cooling air directly from
outside the motor enclosure and there must not be any recirculation of motor cooling air. If
the motors are not properly cooled, severe thermal problems can develop in the motors.

Applications using vacuum motors connected in air series should be thoroughly tested to
ensure the integrity of your design. There are potential problems with this type of application
as noted above and these must be fully understood. Air series installations might have an
adverse effect on the life of the motors and the reliability of your equipment.
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TECHNICAL DATA
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

AIR WATTS

An air watt (or air power) is a measure of power in classical terms of physical units of force,
distance and time. More simply put, it is a measure of the work done in a given period of
time. Mechanical power is also measured in watts, with 746 watts equal to one horsepower.

Air watts measure the power available to perform the cleaning function of a vacuum
cleaning system. It correlates closely to the dirt pick-up and transport capabilities of the
cleaner. Air watts has also become a recommended method of determining the power of
a vacuum cleaning system by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), the
standards agency for the vacuum industry.

To calculate air watts, the vacuum (in inches of water lift) and the air flow (in cubic feet of air
per minute) must be known. Ametek measures the vacuum on an ASTM test box by
recording the vacuum at a number of orifice points and calculates airflow based on the
vacuum recorded. The formula used for air flow calculation is:

Air Flow (CFM) = (13.35 x D
2
)
Vacuum

Note: D =Orifice Diameter

The formula used for calculating air watts is:

Air Watts = Vacuum (inches of water) x Air Flow (cubic feet/minute)
8.5

The above method of calculating air watts is a simplified method of a more complex method
used by ASTM. However, the ASTM method is very detailed and requires a computer to
make the calculations. For general purposes, the simplified method is generally sufficient.

The maximum number of air watts generally occurs at an orifice point between 7/8" and 5/8".
Most vacuum cleaners have been designed to operate at an effective orifice in this range to
take advantage of the maximum efficiencies available from the vacuum motor. The
effective orifice of a vacuum cleaning system is the total of the impedance to air flow that
the system places on the motor. These would include the filtration system; hose length,
construction and diameter; cleaner housing design and sealing; floor tools; etc. The final test
of a cleaner would be to determine air watts at the end of the hose as this will measure the
amount of effective work being done by the system.

Air watts is a logical method of rating vacuum cleaners, as it measures the work being done
by the machine and can readily be compared to other units. This is why ASTM is using air
watts as one of the rating criteria for vacuum cleaning systems.
5
TECHNICAL DATA
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

CARBON BRUSH CONSUMPTION

In the process of commutation, the carbon of the brushes is consumed. Some of this material
is consumed in the maintenance of the film of carbon on the commutator. Most of the
carbon is abraded away and escapes in the air stream. When a motor is running well, the
dusting is minimal because consumption per hour is low, and the concentration of the dust in
the air stream at any time is minimal.

When a motor is commutating poorly, carbon is being consumed at a faster rate. This could
be as the film on the commutator is built up and then torn down as the resins and binders are
cooked out of the brush by excessive heating. It also could be as the result of friction as
could be the case if the comm had a poor finish or there was movement of a bar. In these
cases, more carbon is being used per hour and it is discharged into the ventilation air stream.

In a typical central vacuum system, there is generally a lot of static electricity built up in the
PVC pipe by the movement of air and debris through the system. The pipes attract the
carbon dust that has been discharged into the air stream and thus the coating on the pipes.
Carbon dust is a natural by product of running a vacuum motor. It will always be there by
nature of the machine.

There is a growing trend in the European market to place filters on the discharge air to trap
carbon dust and other dust in the air going through the vent system. This could prevent a
large portion of the carbon dust from escaping from the power unit.

If the area where the unit is installed is very dry, i.e. high altitude, low humidity, etc., this could
contribute to the dusting on the pipes. We have seen a number of installations in
Scandinavia where there was a lot of carbon dust on the pipes, especially during the winter.

Another idea that could assist would be to wrap the pipes in the area of the power unit with
bare copper wire and connecting it to ground. This would discharge the static charge in the
pipes and reduce the attraction point for the airborne carbon dust. However, in this case, if
the static charge is removed from the pipe, the carbon dust will be free to go anywhere the
discharge air goes and will not be collected on the pipe.

It is important to check is the operating condition of the vacuum motor if excessive dusting is
observed as this condition could be the cause of some other mechanical or electrical
problem.

Dusting of the carbon brush material is normal for a vacuum motor. If there are very high
static charge levels in the pipe, the carbon dust can collect more quickly on the pipes as
well as on the power unit. The same dusting is present with canister and other vacuum
motors. However, since there is not the build-up of static charges as in a central vacuum
cleaner with plastic duct pipes, the carbon dust is discharged back into the air in the area
being vacuumed.
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TECHNICAL DATA
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

CHANGING CARBON BRUSHES

The following steps should be followed when changing the carbon brushes on Lamb vacuum
motors. For best results, always use original Lamb replacement parts.

1. Disconnect motor from the power source and remove vent fan cover if the unit is a
bypass design.
2. Insert a standard blade screw driver between the top of the brush mechanism and the
brush lead wire clip and gently tap the screw driver handle until the clip touches the
commutator. Some models have blade terminals on the brush holder. For these units,
remove the connector from the blade terminal.
3. Remove the brush clamp screws with a Phillips screw driver.
4. Once the brush mechanism is free, generally the brush clip can be removed the rest of
the way by hand.
5. To install new brush mechanism, first insert the brush clip into the end of the brush
mechanism between the nylon insulator and the brass and push in straight by hand. Then
use needle nose or standard flat blade pliers to gently seat the clip. For the units with the
blade terminal, push the connector on to the terminal.
6. Insert the locator tab on the bottom of the brush mechanism into the corresponding hole
on the top of the commutator end bracket and secure the mechanism with the brush
clamp and the screws that were earlier removed.
7. To properly seat the carbon brush on the commutator, operate the motor at half voltage
for about 30 minutes and then operate the motor at full voltage for an additional 30
minutes.

7
TECHNICAL DATA
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

CENTRAL VACUUM MOTOR SELECTION

Most central vacuum systems use a tangential discharge motor design as it simplifies the
ducting of the discharge air to the outside. Most manufacturers in North America use the
sealed vacuum levels of the motor as a rating point of the cleaner. This is probably not the
best rating as the motor cannot pick up any dirt while it is in a sealed condition. However,
this is how the market generally advertises here.

Most manufacturers typically have three steps in their product lines. The low end of the line
uses a 2-stage 145mm diameter motor with sealed vacuum of about 2500mm waterlift. The
mid step either uses a 3-stage, high performance 145 mm diameters or a 2-stage mid-
performance range 183mm diameter motor with vacuum in the range of 2800 mm waterlift.
The top end of the market typically uses a 3-stage, high-performance 183mm motor with
vacuum in the range of 3300mm waterlift. The three steps would typically relate to watt
ratings of cleaners of 1000-1100 watts, 1200 watts and 1400 watts respectively.

There is a lot of interest in North America today about designing quiet central vacuum
systems. One approach to the noise issue is the use of Lamb's ACUSTEK series of 145mm
diameter motors. These units are available in 2 of 3 stage designs. Literature is included in
the catalog on these motors. These motors are only available with peripheral discharge for
the vacuum air.

The vacuum motors in most central vacuum cleaners operate at an effective orifice of
16mm. This is the sum of the impedance to airflow in the system contributed by the floor
tools, ducting, hose, filters, leaks, etc.

Special attention must be paid to filters. The motors should only handle clean, dry, filtered air
in central vacuum systems. Lamb Electric does not recommend any particular type of filter
over another. The only requirement is that debris should not pass through the fans of the
motor. In cases where cyclonic separation filtration systems are used, it may require the
installation of a secondary filter to ensure that only clean air enters the motor.
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TECHNICAL DATA
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

DESCRIPTION OF LAMB DATE CODES

Lamb Electric does not mark the symbols of Underwriters Laboratories Inc. on its motors. All
Lamb vacuum motors are component recognized by UL for construction details. This
component recognition is indicated as part of the date code that is stamped on the motor
after inspection. Please note that the component recognition signifies that the product
meets applicable standards for construction and that it does not signify the suitability of our
motor as a component of your end product. That must be determined through your local
testing agency.

The date code on Lamb motors is a 6-digit number, followed by an alpha character that
signifies that the motor is component recognized.

A typical date code would be: 050390F

The first two digits (05) identify the inspector who approved the motor after final assembly.

The next 4 digits (0390) represent the month and year of manufacture. Lamb normally post
dates the motor by 3 months so the motor was actually built in December, 1989. The post
dating is done to provide ample time for the product to reach the customer and be built into
products before starting the normal warranty of 12 months.

The last character (F) is the designator indicating that the product is component recognized.

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TECHNICAL DATA

CONNECTING VACUUM MOTORS IN ELECTRICAL SERIES

The following discussion covers the connection of two vacuum motors in electrical series for
use in having only one motor model to serve both 120 and 240 volt systems.

Lamb does not build any vacuum motors with dual voltage ratings that will operate on both
120 and 220 volts.

Two motors rated at 120 volts may be connected in electrical series to operate satisfactorily
on 240 volt power. However, there are some concerns that must be considered in your
design program. First, the motors on 240 volts will be operating in a de-rated condition as
each will see about 120 volts instead of the typical 120 volts seen in North American
applications. The electrical system will probably be unbalanced due to manufacturing
variations in the motors. In other words, it is possible to have different voltages applied to
each motor.

Also, if a short occurs in one motor, the second motor becomes the sole voltage drop which
will result in higher temperatures and possible failure. If there were a locked rotor condition in
one motor, it is possible that the motor could stay in the circuit with a current level that would
not trip a circuit breaker for an extended time and create severe temperature problems. In
addition, the voltage could rise in the second motor and make it run at excessive speed.

There are also agency considerations to keep in mind. Circuitry must be provided that will
give adequate protection to the motors and ensure that if the voltage to the two motors
becomes imbalanced that the entire unit will shut down.

The concept is possible but there are many complexities in the design that you will have to
keep in mind in order to meet agency requirements.

10
TECHNICAL DATA
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

FILTRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR VACUUM MOTORS

Lamb Electric has frequently been asked to recommend filtration methods to be used in
conjunction with its vacuum motors. This bulletin outlines the Lamb Electric position on proper
filtration to be used in central vacuum cleaners.

Lamb Electric does not produce vacuum cleaners and, therefore, is not in a position to
recommend one method of filtration over another. Lamb's position is that the vacuumed air
going through the fan section of the vacuum motor must be adequately filtered to keep dirt
and other foreign material from passing through the fans. The Lamb Limited Warranty Policy
is printed on the reverse side of this bulletin for your information.

The Limited Warranty specifies that a motor which fails as the result of inadequate filtration is
to be considered out of warranty and the responsibility of the customer. Lamb is not in a
position to determine what type of filtration system is appropriate for a particular cleaning
machine. Lamb can only observe the results of filtration systems when evaluating motors.

The manufacturer of the vacuum cleaner must determine the type of filtration system he
intends to use, keeping in mind that it must prevent dirt and other foreign material from
entering the fan system of the motor.

The central vacuum industry uses several filtration methods to protect the motor. Cleaners
employing paper filter bags, cloth bags and cyclonic filter systems appear to be satisfactory
in protecting the fan system and the motor. The final responsibility for the design of a filtration
method and its incorporation into a cleaner, of course, rests with the vacuum cleaner
manufacturer.

Lamb Electric has not altered its position on filtration as it relates to warranty and does not
favor one method over another. The only requirement is that the method be effective and
keep dirt and foreign material out of the fan system. If such material is found in the fan
system upon inspection at Lamb, warranty claims on the motor are rejected.

In cases where Lamb regularly receives motors for repair that appear to have inadequate
filtration, the customer will be advised of these findings. The manufacturer will be
encouraged to evaluate their filtration system and take steps to ensure that no foreign
materials pass through the fan system.

The intent of this statement is to clarify questions within the vacuum cleaner industry related
to the Lamb Electric position on filtration and warranty. The results of a properly designed
filtration system will be clearly evident through examination of motors returned for repair. The
final responsibility for cleaner design rests with the manufacturer.

11
TECHNICAL DATA
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

NOISE AND VIBRATION IN CENTRAL VACUUM INSTALLATIONS

Vibration-generated noise components should not be a major concern as related to the
overall noise levels of central vacuum systems installed in apartment-type dwellings. Lamb
Electric vacuum motors are built to rigid balance and vibrations specifications. Armatures
and fans, the rotating components of the vacuum motor, are dynamically balanced. In
addition, many high-performance motors receive a final trim balance operation after final
assembly to ensure that the vibration level of the unit is acceptable. With the balancing
operations, vibration of the motor as a noise component should not be a concern in the
application of Lamb motors.

While vibration can generate a noise component, the normal vibration levels of Lamb
vacuum motors seldom add any significant noise to the cleaner assembly. The use of resilient
mounting arrangements for the motor in the cleaner can absorb any vibration and minimize
the noise generation from mechanical vibration.

Conventional applications of central vacuum cleaner power units in North America are
typically installed in either the basement of garage of single family homes. The power unit is
located well away from the living area of the dwelling. In addition, the vacuum discharge
air is normally ducted to the outside of the dwelling and is not near the living area.

In apartment-type installations, the power unit is typically mounted on an interior wall,
immediately within the living area. This places the cleaner much closer to the residents of the
home and dictates that steps must be taken by the cleaner manufacturer to reduce the
overall noise level of the end product.

As a first step, consider using Lamb Electric's ACUSTEK product line. These low noise bypass
vacuum motors generate significantly lower noise levels than conventional designs while
operating at normal cleaner orifice points. The motors are available only in peripheral
discharge designs. However, because of the construction of apartment-type dwellings and
the proximity of dwelling units, it is often impossible to discharge the vacuumed air outside
the home. In such cases, peripheral discharge bypass vacuum motors can be successfully
employed.

There are two major areas where the Lamb ACUSTEK motors contribute to lower noise levels.
The first is in the ventilation (cooling) fan system. This fan is a major noise contributor in bypass
vacuum motors. Lamb has redesigned the fan and the fan cover. This has changed the
pitch of the noise from the vent fan to a lower, less objectionable level.

The second area of redesign is in the discharge of the working air. The new labyrinth system
provides better direction to the discharge air as it comes off the blade tips of the last fan
stage. This improvement significantly reduces turbulence of the air and thus generates less
noise than conventional designs. The combination of the redesign to the vent fan system
and the enhancements to the discharge system for vacuumed air has enabled the ACUSTEK
product line to register significantly lower overall noise levels than other designs.

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In addition, designing for noise reduction can include the use of mufflers on the inlet to the
vent fan on all vacuum motors. Mufflers can be installed on the discharge air duct for units
that discharge the air out of doors or other units using tangential discharge bypass vacuum
motors. The use of these mufflers can dramatically lower the overall noise levels of the power
unit.

Within the power unit of the central vacuum cleaner, consider the use of baffles that have
been lined with sound deadening foam materials. Some of these materials have a thin sheet
of lead sandwiched between two layers of foam which provides excellent sound absorption.
The motor should have a resilient mounting to isolate it from the power unit and thus reduce
the possibility of vibration-generated noise components from the motor adding to the noise
level of the cleaner.

Also, attempt to change flow direction as often as possible within the cleaning unit. This will
enable the sound deadening materials to absorb as much of the sound power that has been
generated by the motor as possible. Providing at least the minimum cross sectional flow
area at the inlet and discharge is essential to the proper operation of the motor.
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TECHNICAL DATA
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION


VACUUM CLEANER RATING METHODS

There are many methods of rating vacuum cleaners that have been used in the industry.
These methods have been quite confusing to the consumer. The following discussion is
intended to define the ratings without drawing any conclusions.

Peak Horsepower (PHP) has been used to rate canister vacuum cleaners for many years. To
test for peak horsepower (PHP), fans are removed from the motor and the motor is energized.
The peak inrush current for vacuum motors is typically in the range of 40-50 amps and lasts for
only an instant. The PHP normally occurs during the inrush, at about 6,500 RPM, as the motor
moves toward normal operating speeds in the range of 15,000-25,000 RPM. Today, vacuum
motors are built with ratings above 5.0 PHP. The PHP ratings have moved up steadily over the
past few years. Actual air performance of today's high PHP motors may be lower than older
units with lower PHP ratings

Watts is a popular rating method in Europe and countries outside North America for rating
canister and other commercial cleaners. Cleaner watt ratings are determined by testing the
unit at maximum normal load and measuring the watts at that point. Most agencies allow
cleaners to be rated at a given percentage above the watts observed during the test. The
premise of watt rating of cleaners is that higher ratings have more cleaning power. Primarily,
motors with higher watt ratings consume more electrical power than those with lower ratings.
This rating is similar to peak horsepower.

Amps have been used to rate upright cleaners for many years. As with watts, it is simply a
measure of the amount of electrical power that is consumed by the appliance. Cleaners of
higher amp ratings do not necessarily have a greater work capacity than lower rated
machines. Again, this is similar to both watts and PHP as rating methods.

Sealed Vacuum is used extensively in rating and advertising central vacuum cleaners. This
can be a misleading method of rating a cleaner as no work is being done by the unit while
the inlet is sealed. Picking up dirt through a vacuum system requires both vacuum and
airflow. When the vacuum is operating with the inlet sealed, there is no airflow and, hence,
no dirt pick-up. Some high sealed vacuum motors have less vacuum pressure at the normal
operating points in cleaners than motors with lower sealed vacuum performance. This is a
popular rating because it is easy to measure and demonstrate.
14

Air Watts (Air Power) is a measure of power in classical terms of physical units of force,
distance and time. More simply put, it is a measure of the work done in a given period of
time. Mechanical power is also measured in watts, with 746 watts equal to one horsepower.

Air watts measure the power available to perform the cleaning function of a vacuum
cleaning system. It correlates closely to the dirt pick-up and transportation capabilities of the
cleaner. Air watts has also become a recommended method of determining the power of
a vacuum cleaning system by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), the
standards agency for the vacuum industry.

However, this term is not well understood and many manufacturers do not use it. Lamb has
prepared an additional discussion sheet regarding air watts and its application to vacuum
cleaning systems

15
TECHNICAL DATA
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

BYPASS MOTOR VENTILATION

Proper ventilation of bypass vacuum motors in cleaners and other appliances is critical to
their attaining their design life. This is a critical design consideration in the application of a
Lamb bypass vacuum motors. This discussion is not intended to be critical of any particular
appliance. Rather, it puts forth considerations to be taken into account in the application of
Lamb bypass vacuum motors in appliances.

The most common problem encountered is recirculation of the cooling air where there is not
a positive separation between the cooling air inlet and discharge areas. By using heated air
to cool the motor, it can run at elevated temperatures and thus can shorten the life
expectancy of the unit. While the appliance may pass temperature tests at agencies with
this condition, the elevated temperature caused by the recirculation can put the motor at
risk of premature failure.

Care must be taken to prevent recirculation of cooling air. Many effective methods have
been employed to prevent recirculation of ventilation air. These include using foam rings
and other sealants between the vent fan housing and the appliance body, having the
motor extend outside the unit hosing, etc. It is important to ensure that only cool, ambient air
is used for motor cooling. The discharge air should be directed away from the cooling air
inlet to ensure that outside ambient air only is used for cooling.

Another common problem is the result of restricted inlet or discharge area for the ventilation
air. Lamb recommends that a minimum of 3 square inches of area be allowed for both the
inlet and discharge of the cooling air. If this area is not provided, the motor temperature can
be affected to the point that it will run hotter than normal and can result in premature failure.

The appliance should be installed or used in an area where the ambient temperature in not
elevated to high levels. For a central vacuum cleaner, such areas as small closets, attics,
garages can have very high ambient temperatures that will create problems for the motors
in operation.

Continued operation of the vacuum motor at very high temperatures can lead to premature
failure. One of the most common problems seen is bar movement of the commutator.
Commutator construction varies but most of the units that Lamb uses have the bars held in
place with a molding compound. These commutators are very durable and have been
highly reliable when the operating temperatures of the motors are within agency limitations.

However, high ambient temperature can cause a bar on the commutator to move slightly.
When this happens, the carbon brush can jump slightly on each revolution of the armature.
Excessive arcing at the brushes will occur and will lead to increased temperature. Once this
starts, the motor generally fails prematurely. Other potential problems of high temperature
motor operation are increased dusting of the brushes (also a factor of raised commutator
bars) and the possibility of armature shorts.

16
G2K Cross Reference Sheets
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

G2K Cross Reference

The new Lamb G-2000 series of vacuum motors includes both thru flow and bypass designs.
They employ thermoset fan and commutator brackets, dual ball bearings, leadless
automated field construction and un-insulated brush holders

In the G-2K series of Lamb vacuum motors, the connection to earth or ground is made
through the top bearing of the motor to the armature. This method is the same as is used on
the Lamb Series 84 (Redesigned) 7.2 (183mm) motors. The method has been approved by
regulatory agencies world wide.

Brush connections in the new G2K series of motors are made by means of a brass tab that
contacts the un-insulated brush holder and attaches to a tab terminal on the field terminal
board. This method provides a more positive connection than that used on the
conventional Lamb motor designs.

Conventional fields are wound on manual or automatic equipment. Finishing is manual and
includes lead attachment, forming and taping. Varnish is done by dipping and baking. The
new G-2K fields are made on automatic equipment and eliminate the need for the hand
finishing operations. Varnish is accomplished by use of special coated wire that is heated to
fuse the wires.

120 and 240 Volt Motors
Classic Version Style G2K Model
116309-00 1-stg, TF, 120v 119400-00
116310-00 1-stg, TF, 240v 119401-00
116311-00 2-stg, TF, 120v 119402-00
116312-00 2-stg, TF, 240v 119403-00
116125-01 2-stg, BP-P, 240v 119405-00
116471-00 2-stg, BP-P, 120 v 119406-00
116471-13 2-stg, BP-P, 120 v, AS/E 119406-13
116472-00 2-stg, BP-T, 120 v 119407-00
116472-13 2-stg, BP-T, 120 v, AS/E 119407-13
116669-50 2-stg, TF, 120v, 2AM 119408-00
116670-50 2-stg, TF, 240v, 2AM 119409-00
117073-00 2-stg, BP-T, 120v 119410-00
117073-37 2-stg, BP-T, 120v, AS/E 119410-37
116455-50 1-stg, TF, 120v, 2AM 119411-00
116392-00 2-stg, BP-T, 120v, AS/E 119412-13
116392-01 2-stg, BP-T, 120v 119412-00
116757-00 2-stg, BP-Q, 120v 119413-00
17
116757-13 2-stg, BP-Q, 120v, AS/E 119413-13
116336-01 2-stg, BP-P, 120 v 119414-00
Low Voltage Motors
Classic Version Style G2K Model
116512-13 36V, 3-stg, BP-P, AS/E 119431-13
116513-13 36V, 3-stg, BP-T, AS/E 119432-13
116515-13 24V, 3-stg, BP-T, AS/E 119433-13
116158-13 36V, 2-stg, BP-T, AS/E 119434-13
116599-13 24V, 2-stg, BP-Q, AS/E 119435-13
116599-29 24V, 2stg, BPQ, AS/E, IT 119435-29
116157-00 24V, 2-stg, BP-T, AS/E 119436-13
116596-13 36V, 3-stg, BP-Q, AS/E 119437-13
116598-13 24V, 3-stg, BP-Q, AS/E 119438-13
116597-13 36V, 2-stg, BP-Q, AS/E 119439-13

18
Model Number Suffix
Meanings
LAMB ELECTRIC DIVISION

Model Number Suffix Meanings

This list is a best approximation of the suffix meanings because exceptions will exist due to the
time frame in which the models were released. Newer models are more likely to follow the
first column (B/B) and will have fewer exceptions. B/B stands for ball bearings on the top and
bottom of the blower assembly. B/S stands for ball and sleeve bearings.


Bearing Type
B/B B/S Description
-00 -50 BASE MODELS
-01*
*THESE SUFFIXES HAVE VARIOUS MEANING, PLEASE
CONSULT PRINTS OR ENGINEERING SERVICES
-02*
-03*
-04*
-05 -55 TOTAL MOTOR BALANCE
-06 -56 OPEN
-07 -57 LEAD TERMINATION
-08 -58 LEAD LENGTH/COLOR OR BOTH
-09 -59 OPEN
-10 -60 400 HZ BRUSH MECHS
-11 -61 INTERRUPTER BRUSHES (ONE STANDARD, ONE INTERUPTER
-12 -62 EXPOXY FAN CASE / MIELE SPECIAL
-13 -63 *AIR SEAL AND EPOXY FAN CASE / MIELE
-14 -64 *AIR SEAL, EPOXY FAN CASE, AND EPOXY FAN BRACKET
-15 -65 *1 1/2" INLET TUBE AND EPOXY FAN CASE (5.7")
-16 -66 16 BAR VERSION OR 22 BAR DESIGN 0F -00
-17 -67 *2.0 INLET TUBE AND EPOXY FAN CASE (7.2:)
-18 -68 OPEN
-19 -69 GROUND LEAD
-20 -70 ALT. FAN MATERIAL
-21 -71 OPEN
19
-22 -72 TAPPED BRACKET (COMM AND /OR FAN) / MIELE SPECIAL
-23 -73 MIELE SPECIAL
-24 -74 OPEN
-25 -75 HI-FLOW LOUVER
-26 -76 NON-CLOGGING LOUVER
-27 -77 NON-CLOGGING LOUVER,AIR SEAL & EPOXY FAN CASE
-28 -78 EPOXY FAN CASE, EPOXY ROTATING FANS & AIR SEAL
-29 -79 *1 1.2" INLET TUBE, EPOXY FAN CASE, *AIR SEAL
-30 -80 OPEN
-31 -81
* AIR SEAR, EPOXY, ONE INTERRUPTER AND ONE STANDARD
BRUSH PER MOTOR
-32 -82 * 1 7/8" DIA. INLET TUBE, EPOXY FAN CASE, AND AIR SEAL
-33 -83 OPEN
-34 -84 LABEL DIFFERENCE
-35 -85 OPEN
-36 -86 OPEN
-37 -87 SAME AS -13 PLUS ANODIZED AND ROTATING FANS
-38 -88 H-34 FAN BACK AND BIG WASHER (ANTI-GYRO)
-39 -89 OPEN
-40 -90 OPEN
-41 -91 OPEN
-42 -92 *AIR SEAL ONLY
-43 -93 MIELE SPECIAL
-44 -94 OPEN
-45 -95 OPEN
-46 -96 OPEN - RESERVED FOR FUTURE RBC DESIGN (SEE NOTE #1)
-47 -97 OPEN - RESERVED FOR FUTURE RBC DESIGN (SEE NOTE #1)
-48 -98 RBC & NO LEAD TERMINALS (SEE NOTE #1)
-49 -99 RUBBER BEARING CUP IN FAN END BRACKET (SEE NOTE #1)