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CREATIVE SUGAR

THE FALL ISSUE


J UNE 2013 - AN EMERGI NG ARTI ST MAGAZI NE
ART OF
SUMMER
2 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
COVER STORY ON PAGE 16
Photography by: Jodi Jones
Styl e Edi tor: Sherah Jones
MUA: J essi ca Ross
Hai r: Lazar us Douvos
Model s:
Mi ka Fur uya (L) Agency Model Management
Fr anci nne Tacca (R) at Muse Model s
Mi ka
Dress: I ssa London
Headband: St yl i st s own
Ri ng: Ver ameat
Fr anci nne
Vest: Vi nt age
Top: 4 Love & Li ber t y
Pant: Ter Et Banti ne
J ewel r y: Ver ameat
Sandal s: Hache
Turban and Gl asses: St yl i st s own
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 3
Creative Sugar
Issue NO. 5
Editor-in-Chief
Sabrina Scot
Copy Editor
Marilyn Recht
Photographers
Joseph Gallo
Jodi Jones
Writers
Jen Pit
Joseph Gallo
Kenneth Lundquist, Jr.
Style Editor
Sherah Jones
Hair
Lazarus Douvos
Makeup
Jessica Ross
Social Media
Marketng Manager
Kyle Hockaday
Graphic Design
Sabrina Scot
2013 Creatve Sugar Magazine
All rights to art, words, photos, design and
copyrights are the property of the Artst.
All work in this publicaton may not be used
without the Artsts consent.
New York, New York
Contact:
info@creatvesugarmagazine.net
phone: 1-888-669-5513
web: creatvesugarmagazine.net
facebook.com/creatvesugarmagazine
COVER STORY ON PAGE 16
Photography by: Jodi Jones
Styl e Edi tor: Sherah Jones
MUA: J essi ca Ross
Hai r: Lazar us Douvos
Model s:
Mi ka Fur uya (L) Agency Model Management
Fr anci nne Tacca (R) at Muse Model s
FROM THE EDI TOR
EDI TOR- I N- CHI EF
Wel come to the Art of Summer i ssue.
As you enj oy fun, rel axi ng days spent at a l ocal street or
musi c festi val , the beach, or an art studi o event, thi nk
of us. Thi s i ssue was i nspi red by our favori te moods and
events for summer.
4 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR








A
R
T
&




C
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QUANTUM RADIANCE: ARTIST ANDREW SALGADO 6
BY KENNETH LUNDQUIST, JR.
LOOKING AT THE SKY IN PARIS 12
BY JASON STONEKING
SUMMER FEST - FASHION EDITORIAL 16
PHOTOGRAPHER: JODI JONES
STYLE EDITOR: SHERAH JONES
HAIR: LAZARUS DOUVOS
MAKEUP: JESSICA ROSS
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 5




C
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MUSIC WAGON 22
BY JEN PITT
ARTIST HYUN: ROCKING ON EMPTY SERIES 26
BY SABRINA SCOTT
CUTLOG ART FAIR NY 2013 28
BY JEN PITT
TAKE ON FILM 34
BY JOSEPH GALLO
6 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
q
by Kenneth Lundquist, Jr.
uantum radiance:
Artist andrew salgado
London. Its a dark, moist evening with an above average amount of bustle in the city. Andrew
Salgado peers down from his studio window onto the streets below. His eyes focus not on the
honeybee actvity, but on the rain smearing down the window and how the faces of those
hurrying by are altered.
Andrews astounding percepton is directly expressed in his paintngs. He captures an essence of
his subjects, a vulnerability that is today rarely seen in abstract expressionism. His quintessental
accent streams across the choppy Atlantc as he explains why art is simply his Universe.
Art fnds the avenue to artculate the things I cant adequately express in any other way. I have
realized recently that I defne myself frst and foremost as an artst: this is the formatve aspect
of my person; all other things are tangental to that aspect as my core. Its how I know where I
am in the world, how I understand stmulus and how I relate to others.
I ask Andrew what atracted him to his current style and how his work stands out among other
artsts.
I think this was a long process of understanding how to respond to the imagery I was drawn
to, historically and contemporarily. I think style is an open-ended queston, and not something
(conti nued on page 10)
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 7
by Kenneth Lundquist, Jr.
(conti nued on page 10)
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that ever needs to be understood fully...I like to
think of it as a porous entty, and I would assume
that how I work in 1, 2, 5 or 10 years should
change quite radically. For instance, Ive taken
some large departures recently with the works
for my most recent solo show but these might be
minute occurrences, or subtle changes that only
Im really aware (or not so aware) of. I think thats
what keeps studio-work excitng - the noton
that nothing is set in stone. Its all about a large
process of exploraton.
My work was once critcized as being
schizophrenic, which I thereafer adopted as one
of my strengths because I think that even within
the confnes of what I do, and how I paint, I tend
to be something of a chameleon. Im always
looking to change, challenge, and work outside
of my comfort zone, so involving newness and
experimentaton in the studio is key to me. I really
have no specifc process; everything changes from
paintng to paintng. I recently moved into a new
studio which allows me to work on a body of work
concurrently, as opposed to consecutvely, and
this is doing interestng things to the formaton
of the paintngs and how I am beginning to
create cohesive bodies of works, as opposed to
just individual paintngs. The rest is up to happy
accidents and an atempt to contnually push
myself into new territory. I will say that my work
comes from a very personal, passionate, and
highly motvated source. Im extremely involved
in what I do and have genuine belief that what Im
doing might invoke some sort of positve change.
Truly interested, I ask Andrew what his favorite
color is. He snickers and elaborates.
Ah, the most simple questons are stll the most
excitng. I love Prussian Blue. Burnt Umber. Naples
Yellow Light. Those are my top 3. However, for
my last show I made an arbitrary rule: no blue. I
played with purple, which I hate, just to see what
came of it.
Wondering what or who would inspire Andrew,
he explains that rather than people or parts, its a
principle that sustains him.
Bjork once said that it was her ultmate desire
as an artst to create the perfect piece of music;
that she was aware that this is an impossible
feat, but that shed keep on trying, over and
over Its the obsession that pushes one into
the studio to do the same thing over and over
with the hope that some beautful fourishes
might occur along the way.
Being so eloquent, Im sure Andrew has some
advice for the emerging artsts of today.
I see a lot of younger artsts who are too hard
on themselves. I know; Ive been there. But
when youre 24 and you expect everything to
happen to you in an instant, youll burn out. Its
a marathon, not a sprint, and artsts need to
focus on their own individual careers and the
trajectory that will allow them to accomplish
their own career at their own pace. You are not
in a race against your peers. Your colleagues
are not your enemies. I had a miserable tme
in my MFA because it felt like everyone was
hoarding resentment toward everyone else.
Fred Tomaselli has a brilliant quote about his
career being something of slow drips and long
burns while others around him have fashed up
and fzzled out. Now that Im a litle older, and
experienced some modest successes, Ive goten
a bit of clarity on the subject. I dont want too
much too soon. I want to control my career and
the pace that I reach certain goals because I
want to mature gracefully into the career Ive
chosen. Young artsts worry too much. Chill out
and work hard - harder than everyone else - and
things will happen.
The painters painter- Andrew Salgado.
Visit his website for more: andrewsalgado.com
Like him on Facebook: facebook.com/andrew.
salgado.artst
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 11
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REGARDE L E CI EL I S EVERYWHERE
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 13
LOOKI NG AT THE SKY I N PARI S


BY J ASON STONEKI NG
Its summertme in Paris, which means, among
other things, that the street artsts are out
on the town. Of late, Paris has become quite
a respectable city for street art. We get the
occasional visit from the likes of Banksy and
Shepard Fairey, and we have our own bona
fde internatonal star, Invader, whose cousin
Mr. Brainwash was made famous in Banksys
documentary Exit Through the Gif Shop.
Paris also has its prolifc locally known street
heroes (shout out to Miss-Tic), as well as a sea of
new taggers, wheatpasters and fat-out vandals
competng to decorate the City of Lights as we
sleep.
Recently, theres been a new player, whose
signature piece has sprouted up everywhere in
the city over the last year or two. And theres
been a certain amount of disagreement about
how this work should be viewed. The piece
consists simply of the words regarde le ciel
(French for look at the sky), writen in lower-
case cursive, always with the ellipsis on the end.
The debate is about whether this is street art,
graft writng, or just the tag of an amateur
prankster, unversed in the ways of the outsider
(outdoor) art world. Some say that it lacks the
graphic elements on which street art depends,
and others say it lacks the individual style and
reference that a seasoned graft writer would
bring. But I, your humble reporter, disagree on
both counts.
Firstly, I think the consistency of the lower-case
cursive, childish and dreamlike, reminiscent of
fourth
-
grade chalkboard writng, is graphic in
its own right. Its visual style is not only highly
intentonal, but evocatve of innocence. It poses
questons to the compromises of adult society
before one even begins to consider the words.
Then theres the ellipsis at the end, which
indicates that the thought is unfnished, that
the words lead to something. And what they
lead to is the mother of all graphic elements
The sky itself is the visual companion piece to
the text. When I stop to follow the directons,
and look up at the sky, I understand why
people do it so rarely. Its bloody terrifying
(also, astoundingly beautful and tear-jerkingly
immense). It makes everything so small: your
life, your death, tme itself. The universe is the
actual creator, and this wall-writer is simply the
messenger. Its like found art on a cosmic scale.
Ive met street artsts who reject such pieces
because they (the artsts) are invested in
elevatng street art beyond mere words, to
earn technical respect from the mainstream
(indoor) art community. Ive also known graft
writers who are skeptcal of conceptual street
artsts as neophytes who dont respect the
tme-honored rules of the street. I even know
guys in hard-core defacement crews who view
any discernible meaning in a piece as a sell-
out concession that violates their core value of
revolutonary vandalism. And there really isnt
that much wall space on which these ideological
disagreements are playing out.
Most taggers, artsts, and crews, however they
label their work, have rules about where they
will and wont tag. The nuances that separate
these sets of rules become evident when
diferent groups compete on a common tagging
site. But regarde le ciel is everywhere. Not
playing by anyones rules. Appearing boldly
14 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
at common graft sites and also a growing
assortment of other venues. It is seemingly
the spontaneous product of one person,
wandering the city with a spray can, pissing
on whatever territory theyre in when they
happen to notce the sky.
Can it really be called a tag? Theres no
signature, no ego, no discernible reacton to
other local taggers. regarde le ciel doesnt
seem to be a clique, a crew, or a band there
doesnt seem to be a product. There is a
Facebook page* for the piece, which doubles
as the page for priveste cerul (Romanian for
watch the sky); perhaps the artst has some
te to Romania, but theres no clear indicaton
of other related works, allied taggers, or any
kind of beef or vendeta. The author could be
a child or an army. The piece doesnt conform
to typical Parisian street art: its not a stencil
or a wheatpaste poster, a decal or a skewed
corporate/municipal logo.
Yet despite the difculty in classifying it, I dont
think this work can fairly be called vandalism
either. Ive heard people say that these words
deface the buildings, including some buildings
that most taggers would consider of-limits.
(In Paris, some buildings have walls that
stand pretly on their own). But when I do as
the piece suggests, and look at the sky for a
moment, it suddenly seems clear to me that,
if anything, the buildings are the defacers
large manmade ego constructons, spoiling the
pristne skyscape, lashing out in fear of their
own impermanence.
Whatever your attude about the boundaries
and defnitons of street art and graft,
regarde le ciel contnues to pop up all over
the city, challenging more and more of us to
think about its meaning. As Oscar Wilde once
wrote, Diversity of opinion about a work
of art shows that the work is new, complex,
and vital. When critcs disagree the artst is
in accord with himself. And whether you
love it (as I have come to) or hate it, theres
certainly no shortage of opinion on regarde
le ciel so perhaps the artst has put his or
her fnger on something big. When I told my
neighbor that I was writng about it for Creatve
Sugar, he ofered up his own pet theory: the
artst is actually a killer, and the truck that runs
me over when Im standing in the street, looking
at the sky, will be part of the piece as well!
* htps://www.facebook.com/#!/
pages/Regarde-le-ciel-priveste-
cerul/141651332569318?fref=ts
AL L PHOTOS BY L ESL I E MCAL L I STER
THE BUI L DI NGS DO THE DEFACI NG
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 15

photo by meli ssa robi n photography
COMPETI TI ON FOR WAL L SPACE
LOOKI NG AT THE SKY I N THE STREET
16 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
16
SUMMER
FEST
PHOTOGRAPHER: JODI JONES
STYLE EDI TOR: SHERAH JONES
HAI R: LAZARUS DOUVOS
MAKEUP: JESSI CA ROSS
MODELS: MI KA FURUYA AT AGENCY MODEL MANAGEMENT,
MARI AH MORRI SON AND FRANCI NNE TACCA AT MUSE
MODELS
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 17
SUMMER
FEST
Cape and bodysui t: Nadi a Tarr
Scarf: I ssa London
Gl asses: Styl i st s own
18 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR 18
Top: Styl i st s own
Pant: Li ndsay Degen
Vest and Hat: Vi ntage
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 19
Mari ah (L)
Dress: I ssa London
Bag: Johnny Was
Ri ngs: Verameat
Gl asses: Styl i st s own
Franci nne (R)
Top: Charl otte Ronson
Ski rt: Ter Et Banti ne
Bracel et: Verameat
Gl asses: Styl i st s own
20 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
Good Game. Two-hour looped
performance of a post baseball game
hand slap, 2010.
Photo provided by Artsts.
20
Top: JW Los Angel es
Bl oomers: Li ndsay Degen
Earri ngs: Verameat
Bracel et: Gi ul i ana Mi chel otti
and Verameat
Boots: H by Hudson
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 21
sands of ti me by meli ssa robi n photography
Franci nne (R):
Jacket: Vi ntage
Top: Saunders
Bl oomers: Li ndsay Degen
Mari ah (L):
Dress: I ssa London
Hat: Li ndsay Degen
Neckl ace: Verameat
22 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
MUSI C
WAGON
BY J EN PI TT
MADE IN NEW YORK
Brent Wellington Barker III and Ariel De Lion
met years ago when they worked together at
LES.FMa Lower East Side Radio staton. Brent
sprouted from theater and Ariel has been focusing
on music for over twenty-fve years. One day a
few years back, they were going to interview an
artst but wanted to conduct the interview in his
space instead of bringing him to the studiothey
wished they could record it with their phones, but
as it turns out phones only have a line out and
no line in and thats when it occurred to them
that a dream device and technology should be
made to facilitate high quality phone capturing
and broadcastng. Ariel few to Israel to meet with
some developers and pitch his idea. Soon the
MUSIC WAGON appa relatve of the Flix Wagon
app made by the same developers--was created,
with no compettors and no boundaries. They
make it clear that anyone can and should use
it. When asked if they think this inventon could
further lead to the demise of their beloved radio
staton, their response is hopeful: The way I
see it We are standing next to a tombstone
that reads LIVE MUSIC, and we pick up our
shovels and begin to exhume the grave, Brent
excitedly describes.
Their headquarters moved from the Lower
East Side to Bushwick, where they formed a
larger than life collectve of twelve people, stll
under the name MUSIC WAGON. All twelve
live in this shared Bushwick space replete
with psychedelically painted walls, lofed
beds and a tp jar in the bathroom reading,
you shit in our toilet, chip in for T.P. Brent
found the space a litle less than a year ago,
right when the app was being developed.
What was initally supposed to be eight of his
friends moving in turned into twelve, most of
whom he knows through his past experience
as associate manager at the Living Theatera
Lower East Side gem of revolutonary theater
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 23
MUSI C
WAGON
BY J EN PI TT
24 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
performances. The house consists of dancers,
models, painters, bands and event promoters
including Jay Rogovian from Mr. Bugsley
Presentsa major events company and force
behind the local and broader music scenes.
The two house bands, Plutonian Ode and De Lion
are a driving force behind the whole operaton.
Together they promote the Music Wagon app
by using it to broadcast live and in turn the app,
enables them to gain further reach, creatng a
symbiotc relatonship between artst and label.
Pat Demayo is a drummer for both bands and
stresses the importance of collaboraton in their
work. He fnds that their space is a perfect hub for
other musicians to come and rehearse or record.
Not only is the space an astounding rabbit hole of
color and talent but an integral character to Music
Wagons developing story is the BUS. The bus is an
old school bus Brent found in Philadelphia where
he spent the summer of 2012 gutng and paintng
ittransforming it into a throwback sixtes van
with a vinyl lined ceiling. Admitedly the bus is
just straight up cool and practcal but it adds
an essental layer to what Music Wagon wants
to achievea democratzaton and universal
spreading of high quality artstc content. As Pat
says, If a band is at a festval but isnt on the line
up, they can play a show on top of the bus and
we can stream it live with the appits a type of
guerilla theater approach to live music. Indeed
that is exactly what they plan to do this summer
as they tour all of the Unites States in July,
including MazFest, Mountain Jam, Camp Bisco
and many more music festvals.
Afer that Brent wishes to use the bus in order
to pick up artsts at the airport and interview
them live en route to the venues. This way fans
can feel more connected to their favorite artsts
and artsts can have greater ownership over their
broadcasted content.
Ariel brought up an appalling statstcthat there
are only 900 start ups in the entre state of New
York although Bloomberg is encouraging small
business to thrive in New York. If there are any
graves to be exhumed along with live music,
consider it an invitaton to start a project that
can reach your neighborhood or beyond.
Whether you are an artst, a music lover, a
journalist or techie, Music Wagon can get you
what you need and fastbut the guys do have
one caveat: No kitens and no babies.
( TOP) ARI EL DE L I ON - MW FOUNDER AND
CEO, VOCAL I ST I N DE L I ON
( ABOVE RI GHT) BRENT WELLINGTON BARKER
I I I - MUSI C WAGON S NYC OPERATI ONS
DI RECTOR, ACTOR
( BOTTOM RI GHT) THE BUS AT FRI EZE ART
FAI R
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 25
26 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
photo by ri chard kern
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 27
ARTI ST HYUN: ROCKI NG ON
EMPTY SERI ES
BY SABRI NA SCOTT
Artst Hyun describes her work as Hunky Funky
Junky. Her most current collecton, enttled
Rocking on Empty, is a collecton of images and
sculptural assemblages inscribed with her text.
I take guitar pics, broken records, chains, and
rock n roll memorabilia and combine them with
automotve objects (tres, panels, assorted parts)
to make pieces that are a litle outside of tme,
she says.
Her heroes are the Ramones and Mad Max, and
graft has been an infuence. Shes interested in
the living city streets where she fnds discarded
elements for her artwork. She enjoys trucks,
skateboarders, signs and logos, which translate
into the light mood that imbues her sculpture.
Hyun has a natural spirit about her, and she
enjoys nostalgia for things that she didnt experi-
encesuch as cultural aspects of the 70s and
80s. We talked lightly about then and now, as
well as her art, during a studio visit.
Hyun is from South Korea, and atended college
in Sydney, Australia. Now living in New York,
she is enthusiastc and inquisitve about NYC
culture. She says that the Korean culture is very
compettve and therefore an art school degree
is important. However, afer getng her Masters
at Parsons, she questoned that ethic. Although
school was a relevant experience for Hyun, she
was made to feel that her artwork had to be
socially or politcally based. Not wantng to be
categorized that way, she emphasizes that her
work is purely for entertainment and meant to
be enjoyed that way.
One thing that tes her work together is the use
of text; its something shes always been atract-
ed to. However, she describes having worked
in a lot of diferent mediums. An early favorite
work of mine was a drawing of a hamburger and
a nude man. I basically played of a Duchamp
idea I saw in a magazine. Early on, during my
training as a fguratve painter (which I hated
so much!), I started using images from more fa-
mous masterpieces so that people would know I
was appropriatng. One of my worst works was a
projecton of one of my animatons over huge ice
blocks. I wasnt happy with such a huge serious
monumental impressive work, she said.
Today, she feels shes evolved as an artst. I am
beter now at tying the concept and visuals of
my work together. I know what I want now. I
know what I love. Im beter now at putng that
into my work, she said. These days Hyun is into
denim: the actual texture of the fabric and the
idea of it. Everyone has an idea of what this
fabric represents. I want to bring this into my
work, she said.
Theres a bright future ahead for Hyun as she
prepares for new studio space and creatng more
work.
You can check her out at: hunkyjunkyfunky.com
AL L I MAGES FOR ARTWORK ARE
UNTI TL ED AND PROVI DED BY ARTI ST
28 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
BETWEEN THE LINES
CUTLOG ART FAIR
NEW YORK 2013
BY J EN PI TT
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 29
BETWEEN THE LINES
CUTLOG ART FAIR
NEW YORK 2013
C
utlog, a Parisian import to New York that
acts as an ofshoot of Frieze, was part of New
York Art week from May 8th

to May 13th. It
started in Paris in 2009 and, due to sustained
success, decided to showcase its best on New
York at the Clemente Soto Velez Center in the
Lower East Side.
There is always a short moment dedicated to a
deep breath before entering one of these fairs.
Many tend to display easily consumable, eye
catching visual and conceptual artsort of like
visual jinglesannoying and fat. I expected
this of Cutlog, afer all, three foors flled with
meaningful, well executed art seemed too good
to be true these days(all those adjectves
could have quotatons marks around them, as
this piece will not delve into a discussion on
the defniton of art or its validity). Fortunately
though this fair challenged that assumpton,
that feeling of weariness and predictability. On
a general scale the works were large, powerful,
demonstratons of skill paired with thought and
emoton. A majority of the work featured an ex-
treme atenton to detail to an almost obsessive
level. Many works focused on infnitesimally
detailed paterns or drawings so fne and intri-
cate one got bafed by all the tny lines meetng
side by side to create a larger world of shadow
an light that bursts to life. Drawings and photo-
graphs revealed objects or landscapes and all
their small nuanced lines and crannies. Cutlog
serves as a microscope or lens being literally
put upon objectsreal or make-believe in order
to explore and understand them deeply, almost
scientfcally.
A striking example of this was gallery House
of the Noblemans exhibit, Paper Vernacular,
which is themed on contemporary interpreta-
tons of paper and drawing mediums which are
strikingly new, while invoking the traditon of
fne crafsmanship in art, as Julia Sinelnikova,
one of the assistant curators, describes. The
walls were lined with grand expanses of paper
on which worlds of intricately perfect lines were
drawn to
(conti nued on page 33)
I MAGES ON THESE PAGES ARE
COURTESY OF CUTLOG ART FAI R 2013
30 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
UNTI TL ED. ACRYL I C PLYWOOD, HOLTON ROWER, THE HOL E
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 31
J AEEUN LEE, COURTESY OF REBECCA HEI DENBERG
MARNI KOTAK, CALORI E COUNTDOWN CUTLOG PERFORMERS
32 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
BE OBL I VI ON I N DI SCONNECT, 2011. NEON, CARDBOARD BOXES,
PAL L ETS, VARI ABL E. NATASHA WHEAT, THE APARTMENT.
COURTESY OF CUTLOG
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 33

(contnued from page 29)
create dizzying paterns like Ivan Yazykovs Book
of Letersa series of black and white drawings
of an ethereal other world that engulfs the eye
in its web of detail.
Given all this, it was extremely startling to fnd
Tillamook Tillie Cheddar the fourteen year old
Jack Russell Terrier from Brooklyn, widely re-
garded as the worlds preeminent canine artst
as the program describes, with 20 solo exhibi-
tons world wide. How to approach this; there
are just an infnite amount of angles in which to
discuss this. Is it animal abuse? Is it artstc extor-
tonwho is receiving the dogs earned money?
What genre does it consttute, or beter, is it f-
nally a ground breaking new genre, and if so, will
it be quickly destroyed if others start to emulate
it? We cant ignore that it is a commentary on
art itself and whether or not one needs human
atributes to produce it, it also fuels the noton
of art as a sentent experience over a ratonal
one. Artsts are bound to feel dismayed at the
pomp and atenton this paintng dog receives,
and buying one of the works might have the
thrill of novelty if nothing else, but although I do
not wish a future in which humans are using ani-
mals to create lucratve works of art, the event
is monumentally interestng in terms of the
discussions it triggers about what is necessary to
create, which includes the realms of disability,
sensibility, and cognizance. Tillie has her own
trailer which remained in the parking lot turned
courtyard of the Clemente Soto Velez center.
Beautful, ft, naked women are ofen found
in exhibits either as subjects of pictures or as
performance art. The act of undressing will
forever retain a level of untapped mystque,
fear and wonder, but its numerous displays
run the risk of turning it into a tred trope.
Marni Kotak subverts this trope with her piece
Calorie Countdown, where she spends all
of the festvals four days morning to night on
the elliptcal, listening to her ipod (I had the
delight of watching her sing along to Bohemian
Rhapsody) while the calorie counter app on her
phone was projected onto the wall
behind, next to a before picture of her. Marni
wears a bikini on her slightly overweight and
fabby bodyher before picture shows of an
even fuller fgure, and she is sweatly rocking
out on her elliptcal surrounded by gawkers
and cameras. Maybe Marni was pontfcatng
on this citys obsession with exercise or how
the unft body looks like exercising. By the tme
I saw Marni at around 7 pm, she had already
burned over 4,000 calories and was probably
no thinner than the day beforethis breeds a
sense of desperatonto be ft must one literally
or metaphorically become chained to exercise
and diet? An ideal body is certainly sacrifce, and
Marnis performance showed this sacrifce in a
refreshingly non indulgent tone.
Of course there are thousands more pieces to be
mulled over but these are some gems that stood
out. As a fair, it was widely successful bringing
a wide array of viewers to the Lower East Side
and connectng artsts from all over the globe.
Hopefully Cutlog has found itself a home here
in New York and will be returning next year. It is
defnitely worth checking out.
AN ART DI SCUSSI ON, COURTESY OF CUTLOG
34 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
TAKE ON FI LM
BY J OSEPH GALLO
Having Fun With Film
Many of you may not know or remember that the latest flm
cameras came with features that digital cameras have, such as
vibraton reducton, auto focus, power advancing the flm, and
modes for the camera to automatcally calculate the best setngs
for the shot. One diference was having a strip of photographic
flm instead of an electronic sensor in the camera. One other dif-
ference with digital is instant gratfcaton in seeing the results of
your photo on the back of the camera.
I use earlier manual cameras, which requires me to turn the
focus ring by hand untl the image is clear. The viewfnder uses
a mirror to see out the front lens of the camera, and the mirror
fips out of the way when the shuter is trippedthis is the same
with my digital SLR. I fnd a much lower risk of failure using my
digital SLR, but sometmes the predictability can be boring. I then
appreciate that every shot counts when using flm.
With a digital camera, one can shoot untl the batery dies or the
memory card is full, which in comparison seems limitless. With
my flm camera, I need to think carefully about framing the shot,
calculatng the lightng, and whether the subject and my camera
are in focus. Color flm can be even more challenging than black
and white flm because when framing an image for a shot there
is more going on. But of course some subjects like freworks call
for color.
Removing the color from a digital image is not the same as tak-
ing a black and white flm photo. It does not have the same look
and feel. Color flm has subtle diferences in the shades of color
compared to images captured on a digital sensor. There is a slight
distorton with flm. The grain of flm is diferent than the grain of
digital images. Instead of square pixels, a flm image has a grain
of tny random-shaped crystals due to the chemical salts that
record the image.
The payof of flm is more antcipated. Waitng to get the flm
developed: how will the photos look? Seeing the fruit of all your
labor fnally placed before you. Some images may come out as
expected, some may not. Sometmes you may be pleasantly
surprised.
CONTRAST
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 35 CONTRAST
36 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
Technology contnues to advance and with it the tools of photography. For now Im enjoying
rediscovering flm and what my flm cameras can do.
A great website for more about flm photography is: htp://japancamerahunter.com
Joseph Gallo studied flm B&W flm photography and darkroom under Michael Silverwise and color flm photography
under Christne Callahan at the Internatonal Center of Photography.
STI L ETTO SI L HOUETTES
WONDER WHEEL AT NI GHT
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 37
GREEN L AGOON WI TH HOLGA
CROCUS
38 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
CREATIVE SUGAR Summer 2013 39
ART +
FASHI ON +
L I FE
CREATI VE SUGAR MAGAZI NE
SEEKI NG WRI TERS + PHOTOGRAPHERS
I NFO@CREATI VESUGARMAGAZI NE. NET
40 Summer 2013 CREATIVE SUGAR
HAPPY SUMMER