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Fennel Seed

(Foeniculum vulgare)
Traditional and Contemporary Use: as a warming aromatic digestive, powerful
carminative, local anti-inflammatory, diuretic, and lactation stimulant. Fennel is
therefore indicated for digestive debility, anorexia, belching, hiccupping or
reflux, persistent epigastric pain relieved by warmth or pressure, with slippery
coating on the tongue and slow pulse rate, intestinal cramps, colic, and
flatulence (especially in children or infants). Its diuretic quality helps to dilute
urinary salts and dissolve stones. Its choleric and expectorant properties open
obstructions of the liver, spleen and gall. The seed especially, contains large
quantities of volatile oils which provide a bronchodilator action that eases
shortness of breath and wheezing plus a stimulation to the thyroid, facilitating
the burning of fats and weight loss, and an effect on the nervous system
resulting in psychoactive and aphrodisiac effects.
As per German Commission E Monograph*: Fennel Oil, Foeniculum vulgare,
"Approved Herb"; (see Fennel Seed below)
Use: Peptic discomforts, such as mild, spastic disorders of the gastrointestinal
tract, feeling of fullness, flatulence.
Catarrhs of the upper respiratory tract.
Fennel honey: Catarrhs of the upper respiratory tract in children..
Contraindications: Fennel honey: None known.
Other preparations: Pregnancy. Not to be used for infants and toddlers..
Side Effects: In rare cases, allergic reactions affecting skin and respiratory
system..
Duration of Administration: Unless otherwise advised by a physician or
pharmacist, one should not consume fennel oil for an extended period (several
weeks).
Note: Fennel syrup, fennel honey: Diabetics must consider sugar content of
bread exchange units according to manufacturer's information.
Actions: Stimulation of gastrointestinal motility.
In higher concentrations, antispasmodic.
Experimentally, anethole and fenchone have shown a secretolytic action on the
respiratory tract.
In vitro, antimicrobial..
As per German Commission E Monograph*: Fennel Seed, Foeniculum vulgare,
"Approved Herb";
Use: Dyspepsias such as mild, spastic gastrointestinal afflictions, fullness,
flatulence.
Catarrh of the upper respiratory tract.
Fennel syrup, fennel honey: catarrh of the upper respiratory tract in children.
Contraindications: Herb for infusions and preparations containing an
equivalent amount of the essential oil: None known.
Other preparations: Pregnancy.
Side Effects: In individual cases allergic reactions of skin and respiratory tract.
Duration of Administration: Fennel preparations should not be used on a
prolonged basis (several weeks) without consulting a physician or pharmacist.
Note: Fennel syrup, fennel honey: Diabetics must consider sugar content of
bread exchange units according to manufacturer's information.
Actions: Promotes gastrointestinal motility, in higher concentrations acts as an
antispasmodic. Experimentally, anethole and fenchone have been shown to
have a secretolytic action in the respiratory tract; in the frog, aqueous fennel
extracts raise the mucociliary activity of the ciliary epithelium.
Need to look up a word: See the Glossary
See the following for more detailed information.
Fennel Clinical Review
Fennel Research Abstracts
*German Commission E Monographs: published by Integrative Medicine Communications
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Fennel Seed, Sweet
(Foeniculum vulgare var.
dulce)
Pure Sweet Fennel Seed Essential Oil
Order 1/3rd oz. size
Order 1 oz. size
These true essential oils are complete whole botanical distillates or expressions. They
have not been solvent extracted, nor are they fragrance oils, which refers to synthetics.
And, unless noted otherwise, they are not commercial oils, meaning, for instance, that
they have not been enhanced with additives to meet a particular standard. In essence,
they are the concentrated molecular constituents that gives a botanical its fragrance.
Essential oils are considered part of the "life force" of a plant, and can be considered the
plant analogue of hormones.
Ingredients Pure Essential Oil of Fennel Seed (Foeniculum vulgare var. dulce, also
F. officinale, Anethum foeniculum)
Parts Used Seed.
Origin Hungary
Concentration Pure, not modified or augmented.
Preparation Steam Distillation
Grade Aromatherapy
Safety Data Tested at low dose; relatively non-toxic - (moderate use due to high
phenolic content); non-irritant; non-sensitizing (rare sensitization
possibly with bitter); cross sensitization reported with anise and
coriander ingestion; sweet fennel is preferred (no fenchone). Avoid in
pregnancy, epilepsy. *1.
Aromatherapy use Note: Top to Middle, floral, licorice like.
Mental: Considered a tonic, eases tension and stress, reportedly brings
strength and courage.
Physical: Is a warming aromatic digestive, powerful carminative, local
anti-inflammatory, diuretic, and lactation stimulant. Fennel is therefore
indicated for digestive debility, anorexia, belching, hiccupping or
reflux, persistent epigastric pain relieved by warmth or pressure,
intestinal cramps, colic, and flatulence (especially in children or
infants). Fennel reportedly stimulates the thyroid to burn fats. If true,
this coupled with its diuretic and expectorant properties, would
explain fennel's reputation for cleansing the body, including the liver
and spleen, of toxins and poisons, and its use for weight loss and
reduction of cellulite. Also said to stimulate estrogen, explaining its use
for pre-menstrual tension, scanty periods, and menopausal problems
plus low sexual response (a reported aphrodisiac). It is also well
known for increasing milk in nursing mothers. Fennel is expectorant
and antispasmodic, finding use with coughs and bronchitis.
Additionally, it provides a bronchodilator action that eases shortness
of breath and wheezing.
Skin: Cleansing the body has to improve the appearance and health of
your skin. Fennel is known to have a cleansing action and reputation
for reducing wrinkles; makes sense.
Structure / Function Traditional and Esoteric Use: (many of these are attributed to the
internal use of whole seed, or extracts; little documented medical use
of Essential Oil; some internal) aperitif, anti-inflammatory, analgesic,
antimicrobial, antiseptic, anti-infectious, antiphlogistic, antispasmodic
(neuromuscular-reflex modification in central nervous system and
spinal cord, muscle relaxer, psychoactive, stupefier, balsamic,
cholagogue, choleretic, cicatrizant, digestive (carminative, splenic,
stomachic, depurative, diuretic, aperitif (aids digestive secretions),
estrogen like - (emmenagogue, facilitates delivery, galactogogue),
expectorant, hypotensive, laxative, restorative, stimulant tonic-low
dose (cardiotonic, respiratory, kidney - diuretic?), vermifuge. *1. See
the Glossary
See the Library Section on Fennel
*1. The Aromatherapy Practitioner Reference Manual, by Sylla
Sheppard-Hanger. see Atlantic Institute of Aromatherapy in the
Reference Links.