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CCNA Discovery

Working at a Small-to-Medium Business or ISP
9.4.2.3 : Configuring RIPv2 (Challenge)

Topology Diagram



Objectives

Create an efficient IP address design based on the requirements.

Assign appropriate addresses to interfaces and document the addresses.

Configure and verify RIPv2 on routers.

Test and verify full connectivity.

Document the network implementation.

Background / Preparation

In this activity, you will be given a network address that must be subnetted to complete the addressing of the
network. Create equal size subnets for each of the individual LANs. A combination of RIPv2 and static routing
is required so that hosts on networks that are not directly connected can communicate with each other.

Step 1: Subnet the address space.

a. Examine the following addressing requirements:

The ISP LAN uses the 209.165.200.224/27 network.

The link between ISP and HQ uses the 209.165.202.128/27 network.

The 192.168.40.0/24 network is subnetted for all other addresses in the network.

The HQ LAN 1 requires 20 host IP addresses.

The HQ LAN 2 requires 28 host IP addresses.
All contents are Copyright 19922008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information. Page 92 of 115

CCNA Discovery

Working at a Small-to-Medium Business or ISP

The BRANCH LAN 1 requires 15 host IP addresses.

The BRANCH LAN 2 requires 18 host IP addresses.

The link between HQ and BRANCH requires an IP address at each end.

b. Consider the following questions when creating your network design:

How many subnets need to be created from the 192.168.40.0/24 network?

What is the subnet mask that can provide the necessary number of sub-networks, each subnet
large enough to support the requirements?

How many total IP addresses are required from the 192.168.40.0/24 network?

What is the maximum number of host addresses that can be supported on each subnet?

How many addresses are left on each subnet to support future growth?

c. Assign subnetwork addresses to the topology.

Assign subnet 0 of the 192.168.40.0 network to the HQ LAN1 subnet.

Assign subnet 1 of the 192.168.40.0 network to the HQ LAN2 subnet.

Assign subnet 2 of the 192.168.40.0 network to the BRANCH LAN1 subnet.

Assign subnet 3 of the 192.168.40.0 network to the BRANCH LAN2 subnet.

Assign subnet 4 of the 192.168.40.0 network to the link between the HQ and BRANCH routers.

Step 2: Determine interface addresses.

a. Assign the first valid host address in the 209.165.200.224/27 network to the LAN interface on the ISP
router.
b. Assign the last valid host address in 209.165.200.224/27 network to PC5.
c. Assign the first valid host address in the 209.165.202.128/27 network to the WAN interface of ISP.

d. Assign the last valid host address in the 209.165.202.128/27 network to the serial 0/0/1 interface of
HQ.
e. Assign the first valid host address in the HQ LAN1 network to the LAN1 interface of HQ.
f. Assign the last valid host address in the HQ LAN1 network to PC3.
g. Assign the first valid host address in the HQ LAN2 network to the LAN2 interface of HQ.
h. Assign the last valid host address in the HQ LAN2 network to PC4.
i. Assign the first valid host address in the BRANCH LAN1 network to the LAN1 interface of BRANCH.
j. Assign the last valid host address in the BRANCH LAN1 network to PC1.
k. Assign the first valid host address in the BRANCH LAN2 network to the LAN2 interface of BRANCH.
l. Assign the last valid host address in the BRANCH LAN2 network to PC2.
m. Asssign the first valid host address in the HQ/BRANCH WAN link to the serial 0/0/0 interface of HQ.

n. Assign the last valid host address in the HQ/BRANCH WAN link to the serial 0/0/0 interface of
BRANCH.