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Chemical Risk Assessment (CRA) Guide


Department of Chemical Engineering

Introduction Page 1
How to obtain an SDS Page 2
The CRA Form
o Section 1: Identify the chemical Page 3
o Sections 2 and 3: Chemical usage and exposure Page 4
o Section 4: How dangerous is the chemical? Page 5
o Section 6: How can I keep myself and others safe? Page 6
o Section 7: Details of Safety Precautions Page 7
o Section 5: How Dangerous will my work be? Page 8
Contact details for submission of CRA forms Page 9

Introduction:
A Chemical Risk Assessment (CRA) form must be completed for each chemical that a researcher requires before they are permitted to handle it. A
completed CRA form is proof that a researcher has read the Chemicals Safety Data Sheet (SDS) and understands the hazards associated with the chemical
they are requesting. For this reason the technical staff cannot release a chemical to any researcher until we have approved the completed CRA form.
The following is a guide that has been designed to help you complete the Chemical Risk Assessment (CRA) form correctly. It is important that every area of
the form is completed before you hand the form in (with the exception of some chemicals, see notes on Section 2 for details).
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How to obtain an SDS:
When filling out a CRA you will need to refer to the chemicals SDS (Safety Data Sheet, also known as a MSDS), these can be accessed from our Chemical
database on ChemAlert.
To access ChemAlert please follow this link: https://chemalert.rmt.com.au/curtin/ from any computer on the Curtin Computer Network (please make sure
that pop-ups are enabled on your web browser). Use the product name/synonym search field to search for the chemical you require. Once you have
found the correct chemical you can double-click on the chemicals name to bring up the products details, click on the Reports tab, and then the
Manufacturer SDS link. This will open the MSDS as a PDF file (again, ensure pop-up blockers are disabled).
If you cannot find the SDS on ChemAlert, and you are completing a CRA for a chemical that you have recently ordered, please find an electronic copy of the
SDS on the manufacturers website and email it, with your completed CRA to the relevant technical officer.

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Write the name of the
chemical.
Write the name of the
chemicals manufacturer.
Tick Yes if the SDS
(Safety Data Sheet) is
available on ChemAlert.
If the SDS is not on
ChemAlert then you must
obtain a copy and send it
with your CRA via email to
the lab staff.
Write todays date here.
Write your full name here.
Write here the building and room number that the chemical will be stored in.
Building 205 Lab users please write 205:147 (unless working in lab 307);
Becher Building Lab users please write Becher building, Building 500 users
please also include your room number 2244, 2227, or 2237.
Write here the Building
and room in which you
will be using the chemical.
Tick Yes or No to
indicate if the chemical is
Hazardous or not. Refer to
section 2 of the SDS for
details.
Tick Yes or No to
indicate if the chemical is
Dangerous or not. Refer to
section 2 of the SDS for
details.
Specify the DG class of your chemical here, if the
chemical has a Subsidiary Risk (or secondary class)
then write it under Sub Class. Refer to Section 14
of the SDS to find the DG (or UNDG Transport Class)
number for the chemical. If the chemical has no DG
class then write N/A (not applicable).
Write the full name of
your supervisor here.
The CRA Form, Section 1: Identify the Chemical


















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Attention: If you are filling out this CRA for a chemical that is non-dangerous, and non-hazardous
then you only need to fill in Sections 1 and 2 of the CRA. Refer to Section 2 of the SDS to see if your
chemical is Hazardous or Dangerous.
Who could be exposed to the chemical that you are using? List all the relevant descriptions here.
Examples are provided on the form.
The CRA Form, Sections 2 and 3: Chemical Usage and Exposure


















Write here the highest
concentration of the
chemical that you will use.
For example: If you are
making a 10% v/v solution
of Acetic acid from a bottle
of 100% Acetic acid, then
you will need to state
100% here.
In this section you must provide details regarding:
- What task the chemical will be used for.
Describe briefly what you will use the chemical for.
For example: Used as a reagent in chemical synthesis of a catalyst.
- How the chemical must be stored.
Refer to section 7 of the SDS for details about storage. Also refer to section 10 for details about what
chemicals/materials are incompatible with your chemical and cannot be stored with them.
For example: many acids are incompatible with Oxidisers and cannot be stored in the same cupboard.
- How chemical waste will be disposed of.
No chemicals can go down the sink, only water and detergent. The
procedure for ChemEng labs is stated below:
All chemical waste must be stored in a container separate from other
types of chemical waste. The container must be clearly labelled with
the names of the chemicals inside the container, the name of the
person who made the waste, and the words Hazardous Waste.
Hazardous waste must be provided to lab staff for safe disposal.

Consider how you or other
personnel can be exposed
to the chemical and tick
the boxes that are
appropriate.
Examples are provided on
the form.
To provide details of
Chemical quantities and
usage please write under
the relevant sections:
Frequency: How often will
you use the chemical?
(e.g. daily, weekly, 2-3
times a week, monthly).
Duration: How long you
will use the chemical for?
(e.g. 1 semester, 1 year, 3
years).
Quantity: How much will
you require at the
frequency you have
specified? (e.g., 100mls,
1kg, 4L).
For example one
researcher might use a
Quantity of 100mls, at a
Frequency of once a
month, for a Duration of 3
years.
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Tick the relevant health hazards that apply to your chemical, remember to include immediate and
long-term health effects. Read section 11 of the chemicals SDS for details regarding health hazards.

If the SDS mentions acute or chronic health hazards that are not covered by a tick-box, please tick
Other and write the details of that hazard in the field provided. Some examples are: Blood
disease, heart disease, blindness, degradation of tooth enamel, etc.

The CRA Form, Section 4: How Dangerous is the Chemical?





Please Note:
An Asphyxiant is a
substance that will displace
oxygen in the air (such as
compressed nitrogen gas),
or that will remove oxygen
from your blood causing
you to suffocate even
when oxygen is available
(such as Carbon
monoxide, or cyanide).
Please Note:
A Carcinogen is a
substance that can cause
cancer. If your Chemical is
a definite, probable or
possible carcinogen please
tick this box.
Please Note:
Tick Reproductive System
Disease if your chemical is
classed as a: Teratogen
(will damage an embryo),
or if the SDS mentions any
other reproductive effects.
Please Note:
Tick Respiratory Tract
Irritant if your chemical is
an irritant when inhaled or
if it produces corrosive
fumes.
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Tick the relevant control categories that you can use to make your work safe. Please note
that if you select a category you must also select the remaining categories under it. For
example: selecting 3. Isolation will also require you to select options 4, 5 and 6. Specific
notes are provided for each section below.

The CRA Form, Section 6: How Can I Keep Myself and Others Safe?




Can you completely
Eliminate chemicals from
the task or process that
you intend to undertake?
Can you Substitute this
chemical for a safer one?
Can you Isolate yourself
and other lab users from
this chemical? Consider the
examples listed on the
form.

Can you Engineer a
process or use equipment
to make this task or
process safer? Consider
the examples listed on the
form.

Can you perform
Administrative tasks to
better prepare for your
task/process? Consider the
examples listed on the
form.
Can you use PPE (Personal
Protective Equipment) to
keep yourself save when
using this chemical?
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Please provide details for the control groups that you ticked in the above section. What will
you do to make your work with this chemical safe? Please do not write any comments for
the controls that you did not tick in the above section. Consider the examples provided
below for each control group.

List all PPE that you will require. Minimum PPE when working with any chemical in the lab
includes: Safety glasses, latex/nitrile gloves, lab coat/long sleeves, long pants, and enclosed
shoes. Other PPE may be required depending on your task, some examples include:
butyl/PVA chemical gloves, goggles, chemical apron, face shield, and dust mask.

The CRA Form, Section 7: Details of Safety Precautions
Can you Isolate yourself
and other lab users from
this chemical? Some
examples are provided on
the form. Please note that
using your chemical in a
fume cupboard is not
isolation unless your
task/process is the only
work being carried out in
the fume cupboard. This
action is usually only
required for chemicals that
present substantial a
hazard.
See section 6 of the CRA
form for other examples.

Can you Engineer a
process or use equipment
to make this task or
process safer? Some
examples include: Using
the chemical in a fume
cupboard to extract fumes
and dusts, using another
ventilation source to dilute
fumes. See section 6 of the
CRA form for other
examples.
What Administrative work
can you do to better
prepare for your
task/process? Include good
lab practices here, such as:
removing clutter from your
work area, cleaning
surfaces before and after
working with chemicals,
washing hands after work
(even when wearing
gloves).
See section 6 of the CRA
form for other examples.

If you have selected
Elimination or Substitution
then no further work is
required. Selecting either
of these options means
that you will not be using
the chemical as you have
selected an alternative
process or chemical,
therefore no CRA is
required for your original
chemical.

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Attention:
Please first complete Sections 6 and 7 of the CRA, this section should be completed last.

What would be the Consequences if you were to be exposed to the chemical during your
work? Choose a consequence level from the left side of the table and write your answer in the
box below. When you choose the correct key-word consider the controls that you have
mentioned above (PPE, Administration, Engineering etc.) as these measures should make your
work safer.
What is the Likelihood of being exposed to this chemical during your work? Choose a
consequence level from the top of the table and write your answer in the box below. When
you choose the correct key-word consider the controls that you have mentioned above (PPE,
Administration, Engineering etc.) as these measures should make your work safer.
What is the Risk Rating that results from your planned work with the chemical? Using the table
to the right, find the intersection of your Consequence and Likelihood levels, this key-word is
your Risk Rating. For example, if I choose Minor and Unlikely, then my Risk Rating is Low.
Write the Risk Rating in the box below.
Please note: You will not be permitted to begin work if you risk rating is higher
than Medium as several safety meetings would need to be arranged. This is
described in the table to the left which is found on the same page as Section 6
on the CRA form.
The CRA Form, Section 5: How Dangerous Will My Work Be?

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Contact Details for Submission of CRA Forms:
When you have completed the CRA form please email it to the technical officer that is responsible for the area you are working in (see below). The
technical staff will reply and provide feedback if your form requires revision or will otherwise inform you that the form has been accepted.
Building 205 Laboratories:
Ann Carroll
Technical Officer
a.carroll@curtin.edu.au

Tomoko Radomirovic
Technical Officer
t.radomirovic@curtin.edu.au

Becher Building and Building 500 Laboratories:
Jason Wright
Technical Officer
jason.wright@curtin.edu.au