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1600 Harden St., Columbia, S.C.

29204
University of South Carolina
Fine Arts Department

Course Syllabus

ARTH 320 - History of Italian Renaissance Art
Credits: 3

The origins and development of Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy
during the 15th and 16th centuries.
Course ID ARTH 320 sec. 01, Fall 2013, 3sch

Instructor: Dr. Jasmin W. Cyril

Course Catalogue Description: The origins and development of Renaissance painting,
sculpture, and architecture in Italy during the 15th and 16th centuries.

Student Learning Outcomes:
Through course study, individual research and practical experiences, each student will be
able to:-
1. Develop critical thinking skills and cultivate the ability to make intelligent and
informed judgments regarding excellence in the arts of Renaissance Italy.
Understand and evaluate contemporary thinking about art and design in Early
Modern Italy.
2. Develop aesthetic perception by increasing their awareness of the aesthetic
qualities in man-made and natural environments.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of how art is an expression of social values,
cultural precepts and accomplishments of a civilization.
4. Critique, analyze and evaluate artistic and personal responses to artwork in oral
and written forms.

Course Requirements:
1. Required Text: Hartt, Frederick and David Wilkins, History of Italian
Renaissance Art: Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture. 7
th
Ed. Pearson. 2010.
ISBN: 978-0205705818

Method of Instruction: General methodology used in teaching this course: Lecture,
written response to artwork within the context of specific aesthetic theory, student
presentations concerned with current issues and concerns in aesthetic theory and its
relationships to art objects and events.
The material for this course will be covered in class through class lecture, group
discussion, student presentations, audio/video media, and reading assignments. Students
should read the assigned materials .PRIOR to coming to class so that they may
ACTIVELY participate in the discussions. Audio and video media and supplementary
materials will be used to enhance and augment class discussions
Course Evaluation: Students will be evaluated using the following tools and grading
scales:

pg. 2

Knowledge Assessment:
Three Essay Examinations in Class 300
Gallery Review 100
Students should expect to attend one gallery or museum exhibition and write a one to two
page critical analysis double-spaced and word processed using font 10-14
.
Research assignment 100
Research paper or research book project

Total ` 500

Knowledge Assessment Grading Scale:
500 -450 = A 449- 400 = B 399 299 = C 198 150= D 149-0 = F


Additive Grading Rubric and
Knowledge Assessment
Knowledge Grade
Student Learning
Outcomes
Assessments
Superior
Mastery
100
Critique, analyze and evaluate artistic
and personal responses to artworks in
oral and written forms
Completely reviews the required
works for artistic analysis based
on the principles of design, uses
appropriate vocabulary,
completely evaluates the artworks
based on the evaluation criteria
introduced in class discussion and
assigned reading from the text in
correct written English essay
format. Refers to additional
works beyond the requirement.
Adds students unique critical
perspective in addition to
lecture/video/textual presentation.
With proper citation of relevant
specific bibliographic resources.
A Level Mastery 90
Critique, analyze and evaluate artistic
and personal responses to artworks in
oral and written forms
Reviews the required works for
artistic analysis based on the
principles of design, but may not
use all vocabulary appropriate.
Uses only assigned works, none
additional. Critical evaluation is
based on class lecture and text
reading, with less additional
personal perspective. Citation of
basic resources.
B Level Mastery 80
Critique, analyze and evaluate artistic
and personal responses to artworks in
oral and written forms
Reviews some of the required
works for artistic analysis, but
uses less appropriate vocabulary.
Does not include all of assigned
works for review. Essay is
competently written in English
essay format. Evaluation is based
pg. 3

on personal response and does not
include all the criteria required in
total. Cites some general
resources.
C Level Mastery 70
Critique, analyze and evaluate artistic
and personal responses to artworks in
oral and written forms
Incompletely reviews the works
required in the assignment. Does
not use vocabulary correctly or
completely. Does not use proper
English grammar or spelling or
essay format. Evaluation is based
on preferences rather than
evaluation criteria required.
D Level Mastery 60
Critique, analyze and evaluate artistic
and personal responses to artworks in
oral and written forms
Reviews only one of the required
works in the assignment. Misuses
vocabulary specific to the work or
does not use any appropriate
vocabulary. Essay is
grammatically incorrect in large
part. There is no critical
evaluation or the evaluation is
based entirely on subjective
preferences.
Skills Necessary to be Successful in the Course
Essential Skills
50
Finding information on websites and
library resources on specific artists, works,
or artistic periods/movements.
Uses databases and search
engines and to access specific
information on artists and their
works generated by museums and
institutions of higher learning.
Includes books beyond the text in
addition to specific journals from
online databases.
40
Uses databases and search
engines and to access specific
information on artists and their
works generated by museums and
institutions of higher learning.
Includes books beyond the text.
30
.
Uses search engines to access
specific information on artists and
their works generated by
museums and institutions of
higher learning
20
Uses search engines to access
specific information on artists and
their works relying on Wikipedia.
10
Uses search box to find general
information, usually restricted to
commercial websites





pg. 4



Important Dates:
Labor Day: 2 September 2013
Fall Break: 17-18 October. 2013
Thanksgiving Holiday: 27-29 November 2013
Last day to DROP a class: 28 August 2013
Last day of Classes: 6 December 2013


COLLEGE/CLASS POLICIES:

STUDENT CODE OF ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITY:

Assignments and examination work are expected to be the sole effort of the student
submitting the work. Students are expected to follow the University of South Carolina
Honor Code and should expect that every instance of a suspected violation will be
reported. Students found responsible for violations of the Code will be subject to
academic penalties under the Code in addition to whatever disciplinary sanctions are
applied. Cheating on a test or copying someone elses work, will result in a 0 for the
work, possibly a grade of F in the course, and, in accordance with University policy, be
referred to the University Committee for Academic Responsibility and may result in
expulsion from the University.

USE OF ELECTRONIC DEVICES:
It is the instructors responsibility to keep the learning environment at an optimum level.
Therefore, cellular phones, etc. must be in silent mode and cannot be used during class.
This includes talking, texting, etc.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:

Reasonable accommodations are available for students with a documented disability. If you have
a disability and may need accommodations to fully participate in this class, contact the Office of
Student Disability Services: 777-6142, TDD 777-6744, email sasds@mailbox.sc.edu, or stop by
LeConte College Room 112A. All accommodations must be approved through the Office of
Student Disability Services. Accommodations are made available in accordance with the
Disability Act of 1995 as related to post secondary educational institutions. Peer
tutoring, study groups and laboratories are available to promote student learning and
enhance student development.

CLASS ATTENDANCE (EXCUSED ABSENCES):

Students may secure an official excuse for class absences caused by school sponsored
extracurricular activities, personal illness, death in family, severe family illness, and
court summons (not incarceration). Excuses may be obtained in the Office of Student
Affairs in the Administration Building, Room 100. Satisfactory documentation is
required. Satisfactory documentation must be in the form of an official document of the
issuing agency. That is, an official seal, letterhead and signature must appear on the
document. Absolutely no copies will be accepted as satisfactory documentation. Any
evidence of alteration of an official document will not be accepted, and the student may
be subject to the appropriate disciplinary actions if alteration of the official document is
proved. (Notes from relatives, friends, etc., are not accepted as "official"
documentation for absences.) The Student Health Center is delegated to issue excuses to
students who receive services from the Student Health Center staff based on the students
health assessment. Students may miss three classes without excuses. Over three absences
without excuses will affect the final grade. Make up examinations must be covered by
pg. 5

college excuses and must be completed and turned in a week after the exam is taken in
class.
Makeup exams will be allowed only with pre-approval of the instructor or with an
acceptable, documented reason. Acceptable reasons for makeup exams include severe
illness, family emergencies or other unavoidable events including dangerous weather
conditions and car accidents. Exam format for makeup exams may be different than the
original exam and will likely utilize a short answer format. An oral examination may also
be utilized if deemed appropriate by the instructor.



1. Assignment Rubric
foCritical Analysis
Assignment


Identification
5 % Artist,
Title, Date,
Medium,
Subject Matter
Poor 50-65
Fails to
correctly
identify any
components of
the artwork.
Fair 65-75
Only identifies
one of the
components of
the artwork.
Good 75-85
Identifies two
of the
components of
the artwork.
Excellent
86-100
Correctly
identifies all
components of
the artwork.
Describe
25 %
Historical
connections,
Literal objects,
Elements,
Mood/Feeling
Poor
Gives a basic
description of
the artwork,
but no other
information.
Fair
Acceptably
describes the
artwork and
identifies the
major
elements of
art, but does
not explain the
mood.
Good
Describes the
artwork in full
detail and
Identifies the
major
elements of art
used and how
they create the
mood. Does
not draw
historical
connections.
Excellent
Draws
historical
connections.
Clearly
describes the
artwork in full
detail.
Identifies the
major
elements of art
used and how
they create a
specific
feeling/emotio
n.
Analyze
10 % Color
Theory,
Principles of
design,
Lighting
Poor
Fails to
correctly
identify any of
the principles
of design.
Fair
Mentions one
significant
principle of
design used
here.
Good
Discusses the
principles of
design used,
but not how
they enhance
the mood of
the artwork.
Excellent
Defines the
most
significant art
principles an
how they were
used to
organize the
piece.
Interpret
25 %
Meaning, How
does it relate
to you
personally,
Symbolism,
Purpose
Poor
Does not give
meaning or
purpose to the
art work.
Fair
Does not
identify a
purpose for the
work. Draws
meaning from
personal
observation
rather than an
educated
assessment.
Good
Explains the
purpose of the
work/content.
Forms an
educated
meaning, but
does not
attempt to
relate the work
personally.
Excellent
Explains the
purpose of the
work/content.
Forms an
educated
meaning for
the artwork,
and attempts
to relate to the
piece on a
pg. 6

personal level.
Judge
10 % Does
this piece have
intrinsic
value?, Does it
successfully
convey it's
desired
meaning?
Poor
Fails to
effectively
evaluate the
work of art.
Fair
Student simply
states that
he/she likes or
dislikes the
work. No real
'evaluation'.
Good
A personal
evaluation is
drawn but does
not seem to
comply with
the
observation,
analysis and
interpretation.
Excellent
A critical
personal
evaluation is
drawn based
on careful
observation,
analysis and
interpretation.
GUMS
25 %
Grammar,
Usage,
Mechanics,
Syntax
Poor
A large amount
of grammar,
usage,
mechanical
issues.
*Incomplete or
run-on
sentences
*A large
amount of
spelling errors.
*Errors
interfere with
readability.
Fair
Many
grammar,
usage,
mechanical
issues.
*Lacking
developed
sentences.
*Many spelling
errors.
*Errors affect
readability
somewhat.
Good
Some
grammar,
usage,
mechanical
issues
*Well
developed
sentences.
*Some spelling
errors.
*Errors do not
affect
readability.
Excellent
Few grammar
errors
*Well
developed
ideas and
complex
sentence
structures
*Few to no
spelling errors.
Bibliography and Other Resources
Baxandall, Michael. Painting and Experience in Fifteenth Century Italy, New York:
Oxford Univ. Press, 1988.
Brown, Patricia Fortini, Art and Life in Renaissance Venice. New York: Abrams, 1997.
Cole. Alison.Virtue and Magnificence: Art of the Italian Renaissance Courts. New York:
Abrams, 1998.
Cole, Bruce. Masaccio and the Art of Early Renaissance Florence. Bloomington: Indiana
Univ. Press, 1980.
Edgerton, Samuel. The Heritage of Giottos Geomety: Art and Science on the Eve of the
Scientific Revolution, Ithaca: Cornell Univ. Press, 1991.
Franklin, David. Painting in Renaissance Florence, 1500-1550, New Haven: Yale Univ.
Press, 2001.
Freedberg, Sidney J. Painting in Italy 1500-1600, 3
rd
. ed. New Haven: Yale Univ. Press,
1993.
Gilbert, Creighton ed. Italian Art 1400-1500: Sources and Documents. Evanston:
Northwestern Univ. Press, 1992.
Hall, James. Dictionary of Subjects and Symbols in Art.8
th
ed. Westview Press, 2007.
Hall, Marcia. Color and meaning: Practice and Theory in Renaissance Painting.
Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992.
Heydenreich, Ludwig. Archtecture in Italy, 1400-1500. 2
nd
ed. New Haven: Yale univ.
Press, 1996
Humfry, Peter. Painting in Renaissance Venice. New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1995.
Lotz, Wolfgang. Architecture in Italy, 1500-1600. 1500-1600. 2
nd
ed. New Haven: Yale
Univ. Press, 1995.
Murray, Peter. Renaissance Architecture. New York: Electa/Rizzoli, 1985.
Olson, Roberta, Italian Renaissance Sculpture. London: Thames and Hudson, 1992.
Seymour, Charles. Sculpture in Renaissance Italy, 1400-1500. New Haven: Yale Univ.
Press, 1992.
pg. 7

Shearman, John. Mannerism. Baltimore: Penguin, 1978.
White, John. The Birth and Rebirth of Pictorial Space. 3
rd
. ed. Boston, Faber and Faber,
1987.


ART HISTORY RESOURCES ON THE WEB

http://witcombe.sbc.edu/ARTHLinks.html

http://artcyclopedia.com