Anda di halaman 1dari 8

A low-noise block downconverter (LNB) is a key element in a satellite receiver system and is responsible for converting the relatively high frequency of the received signal into the more convenient L-Band. But how do they work and what do they look like on the inside? Let’s have a look! From a theoretical standpoint, a low-noise block downconverter (LNB) is a fairly simple circuit. The key components are a pre-amplifier, a local oscillator, a mixer and another amplifier for the L-Band output – that’s it. Now, let’s tear some C-Band LNBs apart and have a look at the practical implementation.

The first LNB I found is a Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB. According to the manufacturer the LNB works between 3.4 4.2 GHz with 60 dB gain and has a frequency uncertainty of ± 500 kHz. Essentially ± 500 kHz means that the LO frequency drifts over a range of 1 MHz. That might sound like a lot but is small enough for analogue TV signals.

<a href=C-Band DRO LNB Teardown Posted on September 12, 2012 by KF5OBS 4 Comments A low-noise block downconverter (LNB) is a key element in a satellite receiver system and is responsible for converting the relatively high frequency of the received signal into the more convenient L-Band. But how do they work and what do they look like on the inside? Let’s have a look! From a theoretical standpoint, a low-noise block downconverter (LNB) is a fairly simple circuit. The key components are a pre-amplifier, a local oscillator, a mixer and another amplifier for the L-Band output – that’s it. Now, let’s tear some C -Band LNBs apart and have a look at the practical implementation. The first LNB I found is a Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB. According to the manufacturer the LNB works between 3.4 – 4.2 GHz with 60 dB gain and has a frequency uncertainty of ± 500 kHz. Essentially ± 500 kHz means that the LO frequency drifts over a range of 1 MHz. That might sound like a lot but is small enough for analogue TV signals. Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB The PCB looks very clean. The design is very straightforward and obviously kept as inexpensive as possible. PCB of the Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB " id="pdf-obj-0-20" src="pdf-obj-0-20.jpg">

Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB

The PCB looks very clean. The design is very straightforward and obviously kept as inexpensive as possible.

<a href=C-Band DRO LNB Teardown Posted on September 12, 2012 by KF5OBS 4 Comments A low-noise block downconverter (LNB) is a key element in a satellite receiver system and is responsible for converting the relatively high frequency of the received signal into the more convenient L-Band. But how do they work and what do they look like on the inside? Let’s have a look! From a theoretical standpoint, a low-noise block downconverter (LNB) is a fairly simple circuit. The key components are a pre-amplifier, a local oscillator, a mixer and another amplifier for the L-Band output – that’s it. Now, let’s tear some C -Band LNBs apart and have a look at the practical implementation. The first LNB I found is a Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB. According to the manufacturer the LNB works between 3.4 – 4.2 GHz with 60 dB gain and has a frequency uncertainty of ± 500 kHz. Essentially ± 500 kHz means that the LO frequency drifts over a range of 1 MHz. That might sound like a lot but is small enough for analogue TV signals. Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB The PCB looks very clean. The design is very straightforward and obviously kept as inexpensive as possible. PCB of the Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB " id="pdf-obj-0-26" src="pdf-obj-0-26.jpg">

PCB of the Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB

On the bottom right is the input pre-amplifer stage. The three white round things with 4 golden legs each are transistors. Right above the transistors (where the green silk screen is) are the bias regulators for the pre-amplifier.

Next there are two 3-pole hair-pin filters. The two band-pass filters are supposed to make sure that only signals in the intended frequency range (3.4 4.2 Ghz) make it into the next stage, the mixer.

The mixer circuit is a simple Schottky diode mixer. The rectangular thing in the center of the bottom PCB is a 180 degree stripline hybrid coupler. The stripline on the bottom is the input for the Local Oscillator (LO) signal. On the top right is the input for the RF input (from the 3-pole hairpin filter). The two signals are combined by the hybrid coupler and then handed off to the red Schottky mixing diode. The Shottky diode and the 180 degree hybrid coupler together form a single-balanced mixer. The IF signal (L-Band signal) is then handed off to the top board.

The top board is rather boring: On the top left side is a L-Band amplifier. On the right side is the voltage stabilization for all the circuitry in the LNB.

But wait, we skipped the Local Oscillator (LO) on the bottom board. Let’s have a closer look because this part of the circuit is rather interesting.

On the bottom right is the input pre-amplifer stage. The three white round things with 4[ 1 ] . A " id="pdf-obj-1-16" src="pdf-obj-1-16.jpg">

Closer look at the Dielectric Resonator Oscillator (DRO) and schottky diode mixer of the Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB

The purple thingy on the far left side (with the transparent plastic screw) is a Dielectric Resonator. A Dielectric Resonator (DR) is an electronic component that exhibits resonance at a particular frequency by means of change in permittivity. In summary, permittivity is a measure of how an electric field is affected by a dielectric medium, in this case the Dielectric Resonator.

Just a little bit to the right of the Dielectric Resonator is the oscillator transistor (white circle with four golden legs). The stripline, which is connected to the left leg of the transistor (transistor’s base), is used to couple the dielectric resonator into the circuit through an electric field.

Dielectric Resonator Oscillators (DRO) can be tuned about ± 20 % around their center frequency by introducing a metallic or dielectric disturbance into the magnetic field [1]. A

DRO can be tuned by a voltage if a voltage dependent disturbance is introduced into the electric field. The practical implementation can be as simple as using a varicap tuned stripline. I have another Norsat LNB available for teardown. It’s a Norsat 8215. The main difference is the tighter frequency tolerance of ± 250 kHz. Let’s have a look inside, shall we?

DRO can be tuned by a voltage if a voltage dependent disturbance is introduced into the

Norsat 8215 C-Band LNB

The first difference is that this LNB only has one PCB as opposed to two. The second thing I immediately noticed is the fact that in this design Norsat decided to use three MMICs instead of discrete transistors in the input stage. Also quite apparent is the big heavy metal shielding around the Local Oscillator in the bottom left corner. I would assume that this little shielding case makes the main difference between the ± 500 kHz and ± 250 kHz frequency uncertainty.

Other than that the circuitry hasn’t changed all too much. They’re now using a different type of

filter and instead of using just one Schottky diode as in the previous model, Norsat now uses

two antiparallel Schottky diodes. In case you’re wondering where the diodes are, they are in the

tiny black SOT-23 package above the hybrid coupler.

DRO can be tuned by a voltage if a voltage dependent disturbance is introduced into the

PCB of the Norsat 8215 C-Band LNB

After removing the metal shield around the DRO, I noticed that Norsat changed the oscillator design a little bit. Now there are two striplines enclosing the dielectric resonator (top and bottom). One stripline is connected to the collector of the oscillator transistor and the other one to the base of the transistor. I personally have very good experience with this kind of DRO and have been using it for many years in homebrew designs.

Closer look at the Dielectric Resonator Oscillator (DRO) and the schottky diode mixer of the Norsat

Closer look at the Dielectric Resonator Oscillator (DRO) and the schottky diode mixer of the Norsat 8215 C-Band LNB

DROs are fairly simple to design. Asides from a few challenges in designing the actual PCB,

they have a lot in common with regular Pierce crystal oscillators. Let’s compare a standard

Pierce oscillator and an oscillator for dielectric resonators.

Closer look at the Dielectric Resonator Oscillator (DRO) and the schottky diode mixer of the Norsat

Standard Pierce crystal oscillator (left) and Dielectric Resonator Oscillator (right)

The Pierce crystal oscillator is on the left and the DRO on the right side. At first one may notice

the ‘missing’ feedback capacitor. But it’s actually there; The parasitic capacitance of the collector-emitter junction. In the GHz range the collector-emitter junction’s capacitance is big enough so that an additional feedback capacitor is no longer needed.

The second difference is that a crystal is actually electrically connected to the circuit. A dielectric resonator is loosely coupled through an electric field between two striplines.

Modern, more stable C-Band LNBs use a 10.05859375 MHz reference Temperature Compensated Crystal Oscillator (TCXO) and a Phase Locked Loop (PLL) based multiplier to generate the 5.15 GHz LO signal. By multiplying 10.05859375 MHz by 512 one gets 5.15 GHz.

TRADUCCION

A downconverter bloque de bajo ruido (LNB) es un elemento clave en un sistema receptor de satélite y es responsable de convertir la relativamente alta frecuencia de la señal recibida en la más conveniente L-Band. Pero, ¿cómo funcionan y qué aspecto tienen por dentro? Vamos a echar un vistazo!

Desde un punto de vista teórico, un convertidor reductor de bloque de bajo ruido (LNB) es un circuito bastante simple. Los componentes clave son un pre-amplificador, un oscilador local, un mezclador y otro amplificador para la salida L-Band - eso es todo. Ahora, vamos a romper algunos LNB banda C aparte y echar un vistazo a la aplicación práctica. El primer LNB que he encontrado es un LNB Norsat 8520 C-Band. De acuerdo con el fabricante de la LNB funciona entre 3.4 hasta 4.2 GHz con 60 dB de ganancia y tiene una incertidumbre de frecuencia de ± 500 kHz. Esencialmente ± 500 kHz significa que la frecuencia del oscilador local se desplaza en un rango de 1 MHz. Esto puede sonar como mucho, pero es lo suficientemente pequeño como para señales de TV analógica.

TRADUCCION Publicado el <a href=12 de septiembre 2012 p or KF5OBS 4 Comentarios A downconverter bloque de bajo ruido (LNB) es un elemento clave en un sistema receptor de satélite y es responsable de convertir la relativamente alta frecuencia de la señal recibida en la más conveniente L-Band. Pero, ¿cómo funcionan y qué aspecto tienen por dentro? Vamos a echar un vistazo! Desde un punto de vista teórico, un convertidor reductor de bloque de bajo ruido (LNB) es un circuito bastante simple. Los componentes clave son un pre-amplificador, un oscilador local, un mezclador y otro amplificador para la salida L-Band - eso es todo. Ahora, vamos a romper algunos LNB banda C aparte y echar un vistazo a la aplicación práctica. El primer LNB que he encontrado es un LNB Norsat 8520 C-Band. De acuerdo con el fabricante de la LNB funciona entre 3.4 hasta 4.2 GHz con 60 dB de ganancia y tiene una incertidumbre de frecuencia de ± 500 kHz. Esencialmente ± 500 kHz significa que la frecuencia del oscilador local se desplaza en un rango de 1 MHz. Esto puede sonar como mucho, pero es lo suficientemente pequeño como para señales de TV analógica. Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB El PCB se ve muy limpio. El diseño es muy sencillo y obviamente mantenido tan barato como sea posible. PCB de la Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB " id="pdf-obj-4-15" src="pdf-obj-4-15.jpg">

Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB

El PCB se ve muy limpio. El diseño es muy sencillo y obviamente mantenido tan barato como sea posible.

TRADUCCION Publicado el <a href=12 de septiembre 2012 p or KF5OBS 4 Comentarios A downconverter bloque de bajo ruido (LNB) es un elemento clave en un sistema receptor de satélite y es responsable de convertir la relativamente alta frecuencia de la señal recibida en la más conveniente L-Band. Pero, ¿cómo funcionan y qué aspecto tienen por dentro? Vamos a echar un vistazo! Desde un punto de vista teórico, un convertidor reductor de bloque de bajo ruido (LNB) es un circuito bastante simple. Los componentes clave son un pre-amplificador, un oscilador local, un mezclador y otro amplificador para la salida L-Band - eso es todo. Ahora, vamos a romper algunos LNB banda C aparte y echar un vistazo a la aplicación práctica. El primer LNB que he encontrado es un LNB Norsat 8520 C-Band. De acuerdo con el fabricante de la LNB funciona entre 3.4 hasta 4.2 GHz con 60 dB de ganancia y tiene una incertidumbre de frecuencia de ± 500 kHz. Esencialmente ± 500 kHz significa que la frecuencia del oscilador local se desplaza en un rango de 1 MHz. Esto puede sonar como mucho, pero es lo suficientemente pequeño como para señales de TV analógica. Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB El PCB se ve muy limpio. El diseño es muy sencillo y obviamente mantenido tan barato como sea posible. PCB de la Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB " id="pdf-obj-4-21" src="pdf-obj-4-21.jpg">

PCB de la Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB

En la parte inferior derecha se encuentra la etapa de pre-amplificador de entrada. Las tres cosas redondas blancas con 4 patas de oro cada uno son transistores. Justo encima de los transistores (donde la pantalla de seda verde es) son los reguladores de polarización para el pre- amplificador. A continuación son dos filtros de 3 polos Horquilla. Los dos filtros de paso de banda se supone que deben asegurarse de que sólo las señales en el rango de frecuencias deseado (3.4 a 4.2 Ghz) lo hacen en la etapa siguiente, la mesa de mezclas. El circuito mezclador es un simple mezclador de diodo Schottky. Lo rectangular en el centro de la parte inferior de la PCB es un acoplador híbrido de línea de cinta de 180 grados. La línea de cinta en la parte inferior es la entrada para la señal del oscilador local (LO). En la parte superior derecha está la entrada para la entrada de RF (desde el filtro de horquilla 3 polos).Las dos señales se combinan por el acoplador híbrido y luego entregan al diodo Schottky mezcla rojo. El diodo Shottky y el acoplador híbrido de 180 grados juntos forman un mezclador balanceado simple. La señal de IF (señal de banda L) es luego pasa a las manos del tablero superior. El tablero superior es más bien aburrido: En la parte superior izquierda es un amplificador de L-Band. En el lado derecho es la estabilización de tensión para todos los circuitos de la LNB. Pero espera, nos saltamos el oscilador local (LO) en el tablero inferior. Vamos a echar un vistazo más de cerca, porque esta parte del circuito es bastante interesante.

En la parte inferior derecha se encuentra la etapa de pre-amplificador de entrada. Las tres cosas1 ]. Un DRO se puede ajustar mediante una tensión de si " id="pdf-obj-5-4" src="pdf-obj-5-4.jpg">

Una mirada más cercana en el dieléctrico resonador oscilador (DRO) y un mezclador de diodos Schottky del Norsat 8520 C-Band LNB

La cosita púrpura en el extremo izquierdo (con el tornillo de plástico transparente) es un resonador dieléctrico. Un resonador dieléctrico (DR) es un componente electrónico que exhibe resonancia a una frecuencia particular por medio de cambio en la permitividad. En resumen, permitividad es una medida de cómo un campo eléctrico se ve afectada por un medio dieléctrico, en este caso el dieléctrico resonador. Sólo un poco a la derecha del dieléctrico resonador es el transistor oscilador (círculo blanco con cuatro patas de oro). La línea de cinta, que está conectado a la pierna izquierda del transistor (base de transistor), se utiliza para acoplar el resonador dieléctrico en el circuito a través de un campo eléctrico. Dieléctricas Resonador Osciladores (DRO) se puede sintonizar alrededor de ± 20% en torno a su frecuencia central mediante la introducción de una estructura metálica o dieléctrica perturbación en el campo magnético [ 1 ]. Un DRO se puede ajustar mediante una tensión de si

una perturbación dependiente de la tensión se introduce en el campo eléctrico. La aplicación práctica puede ser tan simple como usar un varicap sintonizado línea de cinta. Tengo otra Norsat LNB disponible para el desmontaje. Es un Norsat 8215. La principal diferencia es la tolerancia de frecuencia más estricto de ± 250 kHz. Vamos a echar un vistazo dentro, ¿de acuerdo?

una perturbación dependiente de la tensión se introduce en el campo eléctrico. La aplicación práctica puede

Norsat 8215 C-Band LNB

La primera diferencia es que este LNB tiene un solo PCB en lugar de dos. La segunda cosa de inmediato me di cuenta es el hecho de que en este diseño Norsat decidió usar tres MMICs en lugar de transistores discretos en la etapa de entrada.También es bastante evidente la gran protección metálica pesada alrededor del oscilador local en la esquina inferior izquierda. Supongo que este pequeño caso de blindaje hace que la principal diferencia entre el kHz ± 500 y ± 250 incertidumbre de frecuencia kHz. Aparte de que el circuito no ha cambiado demasiado. Ahora están usando un tipo diferente de filtro y en lugar de utilizar sólo un diodo Schottky como en el modelo anterior, Norsat ahora utiliza dos diodos Schottky antiparalelas. En caso de que usted se está preguntando donde los diodos son, están en el pequeño negro SOT-23 paquete por encima del acoplador híbrido.

una perturbación dependiente de la tensión se introduce en el campo eléctrico. La aplicación práctica puede

PCB de la Norsat 8215 C-Band LNB

Después de retirar el escudo de metal alrededor de la DRO, me di cuenta de que Norsat cambió el oscilador diseñar un poco. Ahora hay dos líneas de bandas que encierran el resonador dieléctrico (superior e inferior). Una línea de cinta está conectado al colector del transistor oscilador y el otro a la base del transistor. Yo personalmente tengo muy buena experiencia con este tipo de DRO y he estado usando durante muchos años en los diseños de homebrew.

Una mirada más cercana en el dieléctrico resonador oscilador (DRO) y el mezclador de diodos Schottky

Una mirada más cercana en el dieléctrico resonador oscilador (DRO) y el mezclador de diodos Schottky del Norsat 8215 C-Band LNB

DROs son bastante simples de diseñar. Los apartes de algunos de los retos en el diseño de la PCB real, tienen mucho en común con los osciladores de cristal regulares Pierce. Vamos a comparar un oscilador estándar Pierce y un oscilador de resonadores dieléctricos.

Una mirada más cercana en el dieléctrico resonador oscilador (DRO) y el mezclador de diodos Schottky

Estándar Pierce oscilador de cristal (izquierda) y dieléctrico resonador oscilador (derecha)

El oscilador de cristal Pierce está a la izquierda y el visualizador en el lado derecho. En un principio se puede notar la 'falta' condensador de realimentación. Pero en realidad no; La capacitancia parásita de la unión colector-emisor. En el rango de GHz capacitancia de la unión colector-emisor es lo suficientemente grande como para que ya no se necesita un condensador de realimentación adicional. La segunda diferencia es que un cristal está realmente conectado eléctricamente al circuito. Un resonador dieléctrico está acoplado libremente a través de un campo eléctrico entre dos líneas de bandas. Modernos LNB banda C, más estables utilizan una referencia de temperatura 10.05859375 MHz compensada oscilador de cristal (TCXO) y Phase Locked Loop (PLL) multiplicador basado para generar la señal LO 5.15 GHz. Multiplicando 10.05859375 MHz por 512 se obtiene 5,15 GHz.