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Enterprise Buildings Integrator

Overview
ii
Notice
This document contains Honeywell proprietary information. Information contained herein
is to be used solely for the purpose submitted, and no part of this document or its contents
shall be reproduced, published, or disclosed to a third party without the express permission
of Honeywell Limited Australia.
While this information is presented in good faith and believed to be accurate, Honeywell
disclaims the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a purpose and makes no
express warranties except as may be stated in its written agreement with and for its
customer.
In no event is Honeywell liable to anyone for any direct, special, or consequential damages.
The information and specifications in this document are subject to change without notice.
Copyright 2003 Honeywell Limited Australia
Honeywell Trademarks
Honeywell Enterprise Buildings Integrator

and SafeBrowse

are U.S. registered


trademarks of Honeywell, Inc.
Other Trademarks
Microsoft, and SQL Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.
Trademarks that appear in this document are used only to the benefit of the trademark
owner, with no intention of trademark infringement.
Support and Other Contacts
For technical assistance, call your nearest Honeywell office.
Training Classes
Honeywell holds technical training classes on Enterprise Buildings Integrator. These
classes are taught by experts in the field of building control systems. For more information
about these classes, contact your Honeywell representative.
Document Release Issue Date
ZD34-001-300 R300 0 April 2003
iii
Readme File
Before installing and configuring Enterprise Buildings Integrator, you should refer to the
readme.txt file located in the root directory on the installation CD. This file contains
information about features that may have been added or changed since the production of
the Enterprise Buildings Integrator publication set or online help.

iv
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview v
Contents
1 About This Guide
The EBI Documentation Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Document Availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2 Introduction to EBI
The Versatility of EBI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
EBI and Security Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
EBI and Building Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
EBI and Fire Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
EBI and Pharmaceutical Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Architectural Flexibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Server Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Distributed System Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Point Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Controller Interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Controller-to-Server Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Mobile Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Electronic Signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Operator Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Station Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Point Control Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Exchanging Data with Other Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
ODBC Data Exchange. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
ODBC Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
OPC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Network API. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Advanced Customization Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Custom Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Server Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Companion Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Honeywell Digital Video Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Honeywell Web Point Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Integrated Maintenance Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Honeywell Energy Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Phone Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
About Standard Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Mapping Controller Memory Locations to Standard Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Contents
vi R300
Scanning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Point Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3 Using EBI
Responding to Alarms and Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Managing Operator Response to Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Analyzing System Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Storing Point History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Archiving Point History and Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
4 Using EBI for Security Management
Cardholder Management Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Cardholder Information in the Server Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Integrated PhotoID. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Visitor Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Controlling Building Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Understanding Supervisory Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Server Control of Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Downloading Access Information to the Field Device. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Managing Alarms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Access Control Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Card Readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Access Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Floor Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Time Periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Access levels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Perimeter Global Anti-Passback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Occupancy Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Cardholder Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
5 Using EBI for Building Management
Accessing HVAC Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Alarm Paging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Phone Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Life Safety Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Glossary
Index
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 1
1 About This Guide
This guide provides an overview of Enterprise Buildings Integrator (EBI). It describes the
concepts behind EBI, and describes the ways in which EBI can be configured to meet your
specific requirements.
1 About This Guide
2 R300
The EBI Documentation Set
The EBI documentation set includes the following documents in addition to this guide.
(Document Availability on page 3 describes the ways in which each document is
supplied.)
Installation Guide
The Installation Guide describes how to set up server and client computers and install the
EBI components.
Access Control and Security Guide
The Access Control and Security Guide is primarily designed for engineers and system
administrators responsible for configuring and supporting an EBI security system. It also
includes operational information relating to Cardholder Management for photo
identification.
Building Management Guide
The Building Management Guide is primarily designed for engineers and system administrators
responsible for configuring and supporting an EBI building management system.
Configuration and Administration Guide
The Configuration and Administration Guide describes basic configuration tasks and
administration procedures. It is designed to be read in conjunction with the Access Control
and Security, and Building Management guides.
HMIWeb Display Building Guide
The HMIWeb Display Building Guide describes how to use HMIWeb Display Builder, the tool
used to create custom HMIWeb displays. (HMIWeb displays are based on Web standards.)
Display Building Guide
The Display Building Guide describes how to use Display Builder, the tool used to create
custom DSP displays. (DSP displays use a proprietary format.)
Quick Builder Reference/Help
The Quick Builder Reference/Help describes how to use Quick Builder, the tool used to
configure controllers, Stations and other system items.
Operators Guide
The Operators Guide describes how to use Station to monitor and control your EBI system.
The EBI Documentation Set
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 3
Application Development Guide
The Application Development Guide describes how to write custom applications for EBI.
Server Scripting Reference
The Server Scripting Reference describes how to extend the functionality of your EBI system
by writing scripts for the server, points and other items. (A script is a mini-program that
performs a specific task.)
Hardware and Point Build Reference
The Hardware and Point Build Reference is a troubleshooting reference for engineers who want
to understand the syntax and structure of the hardware and point definition files created by
Quick Builder.
Interface and Controller References
There is a separate reference for each type of interface and controller supported
by EBI. Each reference describes how to set up and integrate the controller with EBI.
Document Availability
The documents are supplied in one or more of the following formats:
Documentation Seta help file that contains all EBI documents.
You can access the Documentation Set from Station, or from the Start menu
by selecting Programs ! Enterprise Buildings Integrator !
EBI Documentation.
Printincluded in the EBI delivery package.
PDFsupplied on the EBI CD. (If necessary, you can load them on any computer.)
Context-sensitive helpsupplied with client applications such as Quick
Builder and Display Builder.
The following table shows the formats in which each document is supplied.
Title Documentation
Set
Print PDF Context-sensitive
help
Overview
Installation Guide
Configuration and
Administration Guide

Access Control and
Security Guide

1 About This Guide
4 R300
Building Management
Guide

HMIWeb Display Building
Guide

Display Building Guide
Quick Builder Reference
Operators Guide
Server Scripting Reference
Application Development
Guide

Hardware and Point Build
Reference

Controller and Interface
References
(If configured in
Quick Builder.)
Title Documentation
Set
Print PDF Context-sensitive
help
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 5
2 Introduction to EBI
This chapter provides a brief introduction to EBI.
2 Introduction to EBI
6 R300
The Versatility of EBI
An EBI system takes care of a buildings security management, building management, and
fire monitoring. It is a one-window, web-enabled system that allows you to control
everything from HVAC, lighting, and energy, to life-safety and security subsystems, to
financial and personnel records, environmental controls, and supply chain databases.
EBI is used in a wide range of applications including:
Large commercial buildings
Telecommunications
Industrial sites
Casinos
Education
Healthcare
Government
Prisons
Airports
Of course, EBI can also be tailored to suit other specialized applications, and it is
compatible with controllers from all the major providers. The philosophy behind EBI is to
provide an open standard for integration and to embrace open technology.
It is fully integrated with Microsoft Windows 2000, with industry networking
standards and works seamlessly with BACnet and Echelon LONmark devices.
Standard TCP/IP network topologies include LAN, WAN, serial, and dial-up
access.
EBI is based around a client-server architecture. A high-performance real-time database is
maintained by the server (which can be redundant). This provides real-time information to
local or network-based (LAN or WAN) clients such as Stations, or other applications such
as spreadsheets or relational databases. And because it is modular in design, EBI is an
extremely cost-effective and scalable solution. Configurations can range from small
single-node systems to multi-server integrated systems, as shown in the following figures.
The Versatility of EBI
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 7
EBI and Security Management
The Security Manager option provides an affordable way of ensuring the security
of people, assets, and intellectual property. Its comprehensive approach to access
control and security accommodates all of your security requirements including:
Efficient management of cardholder details
Access card design and creation, including PhotoID
Comprehensive control and monitoring of all cardholders at your site,
including shift management, guard tour, and visitor management
Prompt, intelligent alarms, including operator response instructions and
deadman timer
Figure 2.1 Redundant-Server System with Security, Building and Fire Management
Dial In
Remote Access
Server
HVACControllers
Internet Access
Enterprise Systems &Databases
F-Box BNA
Stations (Clients)
Security &Access Controllers
XLS System
Other Integration
2 Introduction to EBI
8 R300
EBI and Building Management
The Building Manager option provides tools and data to better manage the environment,
resulting in energy efficiency and significant cost savings. Maintenance staff have, at their
fingertips, the functionality and information they need to minimize maintenance costs,
including:
Scheduling
Detailed HVAC information
Alarm Pager
Phone Control
HVAC reports
EBI and Fire Management
The Life Safety option allows a Station (EBIs operator interface) to monitor and test the
buildings fire panels. The operator is provided with continuous information about the
buildings fire protection systems and can actuate a fire alarm or building evacuation from
Station.
EBI and Pharmaceutical Compliance
EBIs Pharmaceutical Compliance option addresses the specific needs of the
pharmaceutical, biotechnology or medical device industries. In particular, it addresses
21CFR Part 11 guidelines most critical for FDA-regulated industries, namely electronic
records and electronic signatures.
Architectural Flexibility
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 9
Architectural Flexibility
The philosophy behind EBI is to provide an open standard for integration and to embrace
open technology. EBI supports TCP/IP networking standards, and industry-specific
standards such as BACnet and Echelon LONmark. EBI also supports standard LAN and
WAN network topologies, as well as serial and dial-up connections.
EBI is based around a server-client architecture. The server maintains a high-performance,
real-time database. Clients include Stations (EBIs operator interface) and other
applications such as spreadsheets or relational databases.
The modular design of EBI makes it an extremely cost-effective and scalable solution. The
following examples show typical configurations that range from small single-node systems
to multi-server integrated systems.
Server Redundancy
You can improve system availability with server redundancy. In a redundant
server system, EBI is installed on two identically configured servers.
EBI uses software arbitration to determine which server acts as primary. (With software
arbitration, each server polls the other over the network to determine whether the other
server has failed.)
2 Introduction to EBI
10 R300
Distributed System Architecture
Distributed System Architecture (DSA) allows you to integrate up to 10 servers
into a single system. DSA is appropriate for:
Logically separate EBI systems located in different parts of a facility
Geographically-dispersed systems, as shown in the following figure, in
which the servers are connected through a WAN
Figure 2.2 Typical Redundant Server System
Controllers
Stations
Primary Server Backup Server
Ethernet

Architectural Flexibility
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 11
Point Servers
A point server is a high-level interface that allows EBI to exchange data with other
applications or sub-systems, such as LON and BACnet, without the need for individually
configuring points in EBI.
Point servers read data directly from the field when requested by EBI. The structure of
each data set (called a flexible point) is determined by the application or sub-system, rather
than by EBI.
The LonWorks point server option, for example, gives EBI access to Honeywell
EXCEL 10 devices without the need for complex point-building configuration tasks. It also
includes pre-built point detail displays for EXCEL 10 devices so that operators can
monitor their HVAC system.
The following figure shows a typical system that uses three LonWorks point
servers to integrate three LonWorks networks.
Figure 2.3 Typical Geographically-dispersed System
Master Control Center
WAN
Site A
Site B
Site C
2 Introduction to EBI
12 R300
Controller Interfaces
Controller interfaces enable EBI exchange data with controllers by individually mapping
memory locations in the controllers to standard points in EBI. (EBI provides interfaces for
most types of controllers used in security and building management.)
To learn about standard points, see About Standard Points on page 27.
Controller-to-Server Connections
The way in which you connect a controller to the server depends on several
factors, such as the physical layout of your site and the controllers
communication ports.
Network Connections
If a controller has a network port, you can connect it directly to the network, as
shown in the following figure.
Figure 2.4 An EBI System with LonWorks Point Servers
Honeywell or
Third-party
LON Devices
LON Bus LON Bus LON Bus
Ethernet
Honeywell Server
LonWorks
Point Servers
Architectural Flexibility
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 13
Indirect Serial (Terminal Server) Connections
You can connect controllers to the network through a terminal server. (A terminal
server allows you to connect several controllers to the network even though they
only have serial or parallel ports.) Most terminal servers also provide a range of
serial connection options, such as RS-232, RS-422 and RS-485.
Terminal servers are particularly useful if you have a:
Site-wide network, and you want to connect controllers to the LANas
shown in the following figure
Geographically-dispersed controllers on a WAN
Figure 2.5 Controllers Connected Directly to the Network
Controllers
Ethernet
Honeywell Server
2 Introduction to EBI
14 R300
Direct Serial Connections
If you have a small system, you can connect controllers to the servers serial
ports.
Note that you can add more serial ports to the server with a serial adapter. An
advantage of serial adapters is that they provide a choice of interfaces, such as
RS-422 and RS-485, which are suitable for medium-distance links.
Terminal Servers and Server Redundancy
If you have redundant servers, you must use terminal servers to connect
controllers that only have serial ports. (Unlike the controllers, terminal servers can
automatically switch communications to whichever server is running as primary.)
Figure 2.6 Typical System with Terminal Servers

Controllers

Network
Server
Terminal Server
Terminal Server
Building A Building B

Architectural Flexibility
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 15
Modems
You can use modems to connect controllers located at remote sites.
If you only require infrequent scanning, you could use a dial-up modem. If you
require more frequent scanning, you could use a modem in conjunction with a
leased line.
Note that you can also use modems to connect remote Stationsfor example to
give engineers after-hours access from home.
Figure 2.7 A Terminal Server in a Redundant Server System
Controllers
Primary Server Backup Server

LAN
Terminal Server
2 Introduction to EBI
16 R300
Stations
Station is EBIs user interface that presents information in a graphical, user-friendly manner.
In general, Station runs on standard computers that are connected to the server
through the network. However, Station supports most Windows-compliant
peripherals such as touch-screens and membrane keyboards with dedicated
function keys. (If you have an entry-level system, you can even use Station on the
server computer.)
Displays
Station uses displays to present information. Each display is, in effect, a control
panel that shows information about a particular part of the system, and contains
appropriate controls such as buttons and scrollbars.
System Displays
EBI is supplied with a comprehensive set of system displays that present information in a
standardized manner.
Figure 2.8 A Typical System Display
Stations
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 17
Custom Displays
You can make it much easier for operators to supervise your facility if you create suitable
custom displays, such as the one shown in the following figure.
You use Display Builder, a specialized drawing tool supplied with EBI, to create custom
displays. There are two versions of Display Builder:
The HMIWeb
TM
version creates HMIWeb displays, which are based on Web
standards.
The DSP version creates displays with a proprietary format. This format
was used exclusively in earlier versions of EBI, and is still used for many system
displays.
Each version is supplied with clip art libraries that cover both security and
building management. You can also insert your own graphics, such as
photographs and floor layouts.
Figure 2.9 A Typical Custom Display
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Mobile Stations
If you have a wireless network you can use handheld devices (mobile Stations) to access your
EBI system.
Mobile Stations provide users with full Station capabilitiesthey provide the same level of
control as Station on a desktop computer.
Mobile Stations connect to a Mobile Station Server which, in turn, connects to the EBI server.
(A Mobile Station Server is loaded with both Station and Microsoft Terminal Services.)
Up to five mobile Stations can connect to a Mobile Station Server.
Electronic Signatures
EBIs Electronic Signature option enables you to implement electronic signatures for specified
operator actions, such as controlling particular points and acknowledging certain messages.
(Electronic signatures are the legally binding equivalent of an operators handwritten
signature.)
For critical actions, you can configure them to require two signatures.
Details about each action, including the operator name(s), date and time are
stored in the events database.
Operator Security
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 19
Operator Security
You can configure operator security using:
Areas
Station Security
Point Control Restrictions
Areas
You can restrict access to your site by dividing it into areas, and then assigning
operators (and, if appropriate) Stations to specific areas.
Areas are particularly useful in buildings that have several tenants, and in large
facilities where different operators have responsibility for different parts of a
facility.
Areas allow you to restrict operator/Station access to:
Alarms
Points
Custom and cardholder detail displays
Access levels
Zones
Station Security
You can restrict access to Station using either operator-based or Station-based
security.
Operator-based Security
With operator-based security each operator has an operator ID and a security
level, and logs on to Station using the operator ID and password.
Operator-based security provides six security levels, each with different
privileges: Lvl1, Lvl2, Oper, Supv, Engr, and Mngr (shown in order of
increasing security level).
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You can use operator-based security to restrict:
Control of points
Access to specific areas
Access based on day and time
Access to specific Stations
You can also specify an inactivity time, which, if exceeded, automatically logs
off the operator.
Station-based Security
Station-based security does not require an operator ID or password to log on to
Station with Oper security level. However, passwords are required to change to
higher security levels in order to perform configuration and administration tasks.
Security is managed on a Station-by-Station basis, enabling a particular Station to
access designated parts of the database.
Duress Login
As an added security precaution, an operator, under hostile circumstances, can
log on using a duress login and set off a silent alarm in order to alert other
operators.
Point Control Restrictions
By defining each operators point control rights you can prevent certain operators
from intervening or overriding automatic point control, or even prevent them
from viewing the detail displays for points.
You can use the following techniques to restrict an operators point control rights:
Control Level. Only operators with a control level equal to or higher than
the points control level are able to control the point. (The point is assigned
a particular control level when it is configured.)
Areas. Only operators who are assigned to the same area as the point are
able to view the point. (The point is assigned to a particular area when it is
configured.)
Command segregation. Each operator is permitted to perform specified
commands in each area on status points in that area. For example, an
operator may be allowed to LOCK all doors in a particular area, but not to
UNLOCK them.
Exchanging Data with Other Applications
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 21
Exchanging Data with Other Applications
EBI includes a number of options for exchanging data with other applications.
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange allows you to capture real-time point parameter
and history data, and display it in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. The captured
data can be static or dynamically updating.
You can capture the data using either the Microsoft Excel Data Exchange Wizard,
or through cell formulas. After capturing the data, you can create charts to display
and analyze data with Microsoft Excels toolset. You can also link the values into
other OLE-enabled applications.
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange provides:
Read/write access to point parameter values
Read access to history data
Read/write access to server database files (user files)
ODBC Data Exchange
ODBC Data Exchange enables two-way exchange of data between the EBI database and an
ODBC-compliant database (either local or remote). It is typically used to periodically
transfer data for billing customers. ODBC-compliant databases include Microsoft SQL
Server, Oracle 7, Microsoft Access and Sybase 10.
ODBC Driver
The ODBC Driver is primarily intended for reporting, and enables an
ODBC-compliant application to access data in the EBI database, such as history, event,
access, and point parameter values. ODBC-compliant applications include Microsoft
Access and Microsoft Excel.
OPC
EBI provides two OPC interfaces, each of which has been optimized for a particular
purpose.
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EBI OPC Client Interface
The EBI OPC Client Interface is primarily designed for integrating low-complexity
subsystems, such as controllers. Configuration involves individually mapping OPC items to
standard points. If you require alarming for an item, you must configure the associated
points alarm properties.
EBI OPC Data Access Server
The EBI OPC Data Access Server gives an OPC client read/write access to EBI point
parameters. It is compliant with the OPC 2.0 Data Access specification, and can accept
connections from either OPC 1.0 or 2.0 clients.
Network API
The Network API allows you to create applicationsin Visual C/C++ or Visual
Basicthat exchange data with the server database. These applications can run
on another computer or the EBI server.
Applications that use Network API can have:
Read/write access to point parameter values
Read access to history data
Read/write access to server database files (user files)
Advanced Customization Capabilities
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 23
Advanced Customization Capabilities
This section describes EBIs advanced customization capabilities.
Custom Applications
The EBI API allows you to create two types of custom application that run on the server:
tasks and utilities.
Tasks are usually dormant, waiting for a request. For example, tasks can be
activated:
On a regular basis
When a status point changes state
When an operator presses a function key
When an operator selects a Station menu item
When an operator clicks a button on a display
Utilities run interactively from the command line, and typically perform
administrative functions. A utility can prompt the user for more information and
can display information directly to the user through a Command Prompt window.
Custom applications can be written in Visual C/C++ or Fortran. The API Library
incudes libraries of functions, header files, and sample source programs to help
programmers create applications.
Server Scripts
You can add extra functionality to your system with server scripts. For example,
you could create a script that emailed a report to relevant staff each time it was
generated.
A server script runs when the associated event occursfor example, when:
A point changes state
An operator acknowledges an alarm
The server starts
A report is generated
Server scripts can also include:
Periodic scripts, which run at specified intervals while the server is running
Library scripts, which perform specialized functions when called by other
server scripts
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Server scripts dont block point processing, and dont impact other server
functions because they run at a low priority.
Note that server scripting has been optimized for relatively short scripts (less than
30 lines), and is not designed for implementing control strategies (which should
be done in the controller). If a task is computationally intensive, or requires
extensive file handling, you should write a custom applicationsee Custom Applications
on page 23.
Companion Products
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 25
Companion Products
The following Honeywell products are tightly-integrated with EBI and provide specialized
functionality:
Honeywell Digital Video Manager
Honeywell Web Point Control
Integrated Maintenance Manager
Honeywell Energy Manager
Phone Control
If you would like further information about any of these products, contact your Honeywell
representative.
Honeywell Digital Video Manager
Honeywell Digital Video Manager (Honeywell DVM) is a Closed Circuit Television
(CCTV) application that combines the advantages of digital video with the latest Web and
networking technologies.
You can configure Honeywell DVM so that it initiates recordings in response to specified
EBI alarms and events.
Also, because Honeywell DVM uses Station as its user interface, operators can seamlessly
switch between EBI and Honeywell DVM displays.
Honeywell Web Point Control
Honeywell Web Point Control provides a Web browser interface to EBI for limited
monitoring and control of selected points. Its primary use is to provide after-hours control
of lighting and air-conditioning (HVAC) services to tenants.
Honeywell Web Point Control also automatically calculates and collects billing data for
services used outside normal occupancy hours.
Integrated Maintenance Manager
Integrated Maintenance Manager (IMM) is a Web-based application that provides
a maintenance management database for your equipment.
IMM links to EBI point and history data and generates works orders for the equipment
based on run-time hours or specified events (such as a low value).
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IMM also allows users to track the status of each works order, which can be
Open, In Progress, or Closed.
Honeywell Energy Manager
Honeywell Energy Manager is designed to minimize the engineering effort required to set
up and maintain your energy information and control system.
Honeywell Energy Manager provides a set of tools to help you:
Model your energy system
Collect and store energy-related data
Transform raw energy data into user-friendly indicators to help you make
effective cost-reduction decisions
Phone Control
Phone Control allows callers to perform monitoring and control functions using a
standard touch-tone telephone.
For more details, see Phone Control on page 53.
About Standard Points
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 27
About Standard Points
This section describes how standard points (EBIs inbuilt points) are used to exchange data
between controllers and the server database.
Note This section is not applicable if you use point servers to integrate
field devices.
Mapping Controller Memory Locations to Standard Points
You use Quick Builder, a specialized configuration tool supplied with EBI, to map
controller memory locationswhich contain field valuesto standard points in the server
database. (You also use Quick Builder to configure the communications link between the
controller and the server.)
Note There is a separate reference for each interface/controller that
describes configuration tasks, including how to map memory locations to
standard points.
Types of Standard Point
EBI includes the following types of standard point, each of which is designed to map a
particular type of field value.
Type Description
Access Represents a card reader, such as the entrance reader in a car park.
Accumulator Represents total values. For example, the volume of water that has
flowed into a tank or the total number of cars that have entered a car
park over a period of time.
Analog Represents continuous values. For example, pressure in a boiler or
temperature in an office.
Container A point that ties together a set of related standard points so that you can
manage them as if they were one point. A container point is, in effect,
a user-defined point type that matches your data requirements for a
particular device type or scenario.
Status Represents digital inputs or outputs. For example, the on and off states
of a pump or light.
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Database Structure of Standard Points
Standard points have a composite data structure that allows each point to represent
multiple field values. (The individual data items within a point are called parameters.)
For example, an analog point contains the following parameters which enables it to
represent the variables in a control loop for room temperature:
Present value (PV) to record the current room temperature
Output variable (OP) to change the temperature of the room
Setpoint (SP) to specify the correct room temperature
Mode (MD) to change the loop from manual to automatic control (In automatic
mode, the controller logic automatically switches the output variable on and off. In
manual mode, the output variable is switched on and off by the operator.)
This composite data structure also makes it much easier for operators to monitor related
information.
Scanning
Scanning is the process by which EBI exchanges data between memory locations in the
controllers and the standard points to which those locations have been mapped.
EBI supports the following scanning techniques. You can use several scanning techniques
on the same controller, providing they are supported by that controller.
Scanning technique Comments
Periodic The server scans a point parameter at the specified interval.
For example, if a parameters scan period is 15 seconds, the
server scans the associated controller every 15 seconds for
the parameters value.
You can choose from a range of standard scan periods,
ranging from seconds to minutes, and you can assign a
different scan period to each parameter.
Periodic scanning:
Is supported by most controllers
Is simple to implement
Places a predictable, but potentially heavy, load on the
server
Demand The server only scans a point parameter when requested by
an operator, a report, or an application.
About Standard Points
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 29
Unsolicited Messaging
Some controllers support unsolicited messaging, where the controller, rather than
the server, initiates a communications session. Unsolicited messaging can
substantially reduce communications traffic, especially if the values do not
change frequently.
Check the manufacturers documentation to determine whether a controller
supports unsolicited messaging.
Point Algorithms
A point algorithm extends the functionality of a standard point by performing
additional processing on the point or executing a specific action (such as printing
a report) based on the points value, or both.
There are two types of algorithm:
PV. The algorithm is used every time the point is scanned. For example, to
monitor average temperature, you would use a PV algorithm that calculates
the average (based on the temperature at all the sensors). You would attach
this algorithm to a point so that the average temperature is re-calculated
each time the point is scanned.
Action. The algorithm is only used when the point value changes. For
example, suppose you need to print a report when a particular digital value
in a controller changes state. You would attach an Action algorithm to the
point in order to do this.
Exception The server polls the controller for any change-of-state data.
Exception scanning is thus triggered by events, not time.
Exception scanning is:
Not supported by all controllers
More difficult to implement than periodic scanning
because it usually requires additional logic in the
controller, additional configuration in EBI, or both
Scanning technique Comments
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Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 31
3 Using EBI
This chapter describes the basics of using EBI.
3 Using EBI
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Responding to Alarms and Events
EBI generates alarms and events when it detects specified changes in the field.
Alarms indicate unusual conditions, such as an unexpected change in
temperature or movement in a secure area, that require operator action. The
alarm remains until the condition that triggered the alarm returns to normal and
someone acknowledges the alarm.
All changes in the system, for example, alarm changes, operator changes, and
security level changes, are logged as events.
The following figure shows how EBI responds to a typical event (in this case, a card being
presented to a card reader).
All alarm conditions are recorded in the event log, including when an alarm is
generated, when it returns to normal, and when it is acknowledged.
Alarms are generally assigned different priorities to help you view critical alarms
first. The priorities are: Urgent, High, Low, and Journal. Journal alarms are
not shown on the Alarm Summary but are recorded as events.
Figure 3.1 Alarm/Event Generation

3. Alarms and events are displayed
in Station. (They can also be printed
as they occur and included in reports)
1. Someone presents card
to card reader
Station
Alarm!
Card status
"stolen"
Access Panel
Card Reader
2. Server determines whether
it should raise an
alarm or event
Printer
Server
Responding to Alarms and Events
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 33
Operators can:
View events and alarms on Stations. The Status Zone, beneath the display,
always shows the most recent (or oldest) and highest priority alarm that has
not been acknowledged.
Print a summary of alarms and events to an alarm/event printer. All alarms
and events are recorded in an alarm/event journal.
Managing Operator Response to Alarms
The Advanced Alarm Management option is used to provide operators with a
series of steps to follow for a particular alarm. When an operator acknowledges
an alarm, an alarm instruction display appears. In order to close the alarm, the
operator must complete an alarm response display.
Figure 3.2 A Typical Alarm Summary Display
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Analyzing System Data
You can use reports and trends to analyze system data.
Reports
EBI includes a comprehensive set of standard reports that are useful for analyzing and
monitoring alarms, events, points, cards, and so on. If necessary, you can create your own
custom reports using tools such as Microsoft Access or Crystal Reports.
You can request reports when you need them, or produce them automatically at
pre-defined times. You can also specify a reports destination: either a printer or
display.
Trends
You can use trends (specialized displays) to analyze changes in point values over
time. Trends can present information in several forms (such as lines or bars) and
and can show values for up to eight points.
Figure 3.3 A Typical Trend Display
Analyzing System Data
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 35
Storing Point History
EBI can store the values of points over time to create a history of the operations of your
site. There are three types of history:
Fast. Stores snapshots of a point parameter at the fast history interval
(configurable between 1 and 30 seconds, the default being 5 seconds).
Standard. Stores the following snapshots and averages:
1-minute snapshots
6-minute averages of the 1-minute snapshots
1-hour averages of the 1-minute snapshots
8-hour averages of the 1-minute snapshots
24-hour averages of the 1-minute snapshots
Extended. Stores the following history snapshots:
1-hour snapshots
8-hour snapshots
24-hour snapshots
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Archiving Point History and Events
Point History Archiving
EBI stores point history data in the server for a limited time, which is determined by the
default retention periods for the history interval being used.
If you want to keep point history data for longer periods, you must archive the
data to off-line media, such as tape or removable disk.
Event Archiving
EBI stores every event, such as point status changes or operator actions, in an event
database for a specified time.
Event archiving enables you to archive these events to disk or tape, where they
can be stored for future retrieval. For example, you can restore event archives so
that they can be included in standard reports.
Event archiving can be scheduled automatically, or an alarm can be generated to
alert the operator to archive the events.
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 37
4 Using EBI for Security
Management
This chapter describes how EBI is used for security management. It includes the following
topics:
Cardholder Management Concepts
Controlling Building Access
Access Control Concepts
This chapter supplements Using EBI on page 31.
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Cardholder Management Concepts
Access to a site or installation is usually controlled using access cards. Anyone
who requires access has a card that is imprinted with identification details. When
they use the card (at a door, for example), the access controller that has been
downloaded with the EBI cardholder database checks their access permissions, and grants
or denies access. Cardholders can only access an area if they have the required permissions
(and are seeking access during the appropriate shifts).
In EBI, access rights are easy to allocate and easy to maintain, and you can define your own
fields for cardholder information. You can even design and print your own access cards
(with photos, signatures, logos, and so on).
Cardholder Information in the Server Database
There are two kinds of information required for a cardholder: personal and
access.
Personal information includes the cardholder name, card identification number,
and other optional information such as employee number, department, phone
number, photographic images, and so on.
Access information for a cardholder includes the access levels assigned which
indicates the sections of the facility that can be accessed by that individual. The
current state of the card (active, lost, stolen, or inactive) is also entered. The types
of access controllers used at your site will determine what other attributes
associated with access can be entered for the cardholder.
Cardholder information is entered into the server database using special card
configuration displays on Station. The following figure shows the card details
display for an SE card assigned to a cardholder.
Cardholder Management Concepts
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 39
Integrated PhotoID
The Integrated PhotoID feature is used to create your sites access cards. You can
design the layout of the card (including the cardholders photograph, signature,
and other personal details) and then encode information onto the card using
magnetic stripes or barcodes.
The details of all access cards created using Integrated PhotoID are saved as part
of the cardholder database. In addition to the convenience of only having to
enter information once, you have a central location from which you can create
reports on cardholder information. This is particularly useful if you are using
Integrated PhotoID from a remote Station.
Integrated PhotoID can be used with a wide range of cameras, both digital and
video. To connect a video camera to the Integrated PhotoID system, a video
capture card is required.
Figure 4.1 Card Details Display
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Visitor Management
The Visitor Management feature enables you to track and report on visitors to your facility.
Your visitors can be given a temporary access card.
The information and permissions associated with visitor cards is much the same as regular
access cards. The major difference is that visitor cards have a limited life span. You can set
up the card so that it is automatically valid for a particular periodfor example, enabled
when the visitor is due to arrive, and disabled when they are due to leave. And because
cardholder details are saved independently of the card, you dont have to re-enter the details
of regular visitors at each visit. Instead, you can simply assign a new card based on the
existing details.
Controlling Building Access
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 41
Controlling Building Access
This section describes how operators use EBI to control and monitor building or
installation access.
Understanding Supervisory Control
The term supervisory control means control that originates from EBI (whether by an
operator or a program).
Supervisory control works by changing the values in controllers that are
associated with field devices. Usually control is performed by the internal logic of
controllers. An example of this is the remote locking of a door.
Supervisory control works as follows:
1 A new value is entered by an operator (manual mode) or an EBI program (automatic
mode).
2 The server relays the new value to the controller.
3 The controller outputs the control value to the field device.
Figure 4.2 The Process of Supervisory Control
Lock
Access Panel
Door Locking
Mechanism
1. Operator enters new
status point value
into server
2. Controller receives
new value from server
3. Command is
passed to field
Lock
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Server Control of Access
You can configure the server so that it automatically controls the commencement
and expiry of access card validity. Using the current system date, the server
checks to see if there are existing cardholders whose cards have reached either
their commencement date or their expiry date. When found, the server changes
the status to one of active or inactive and the modified card data is
downloaded to the controllers.
Downloading Access Information to the Field Device
Access information is configured on displays and then downloaded to the access
controllers providing the controllers with up-to-date information. You can choose
to download only single components, such as a new or deleted card, or all access
information. Downloading all information may take some time and, as access to
various locations in the site may be denied during the download, should only be
performed during off-peak times and when necessary.
Managing Alarms
If there is an attempt at security violation, EBIs alarm management ensures that operators
know about it instantly and know precisely how to react. If a number of alarms occur
simultaneously, EBI prioritizes them so that the important ones can be acknowledged and
actioned first.
If an operator does not respond to an alarm within a given time period, the
deadman timer triggers an alarm. This means that you can be sure that operators
are at their posts and that all alarms are acknowledged promptly. Additionally, all
actions are logged to an event file and are available for future reporting and
analysis.
EBI gives you the flexibility to choose precisely what constitutes an alarm. You can choose
its priority, and associate it with any or all point states. You can display an alarm on a
standard display, or you can create your own custom displays. You can even trigger an
audible tone or .wav file when an alarm occurs.
Access Control Concepts
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 43
Access Control Concepts
This section describes access control concepts.
Card Readers
A card reader is a hardware device that decodes the encrypted information stored
on an access card. A card reader connects to an Access Controller.
Normally card readers control doors, but they can also control turnstiles, lifts,
gates, or any other physical devices designed to control access. EBI includes interfaces to a
wide range of makes and models of card reader and access controller.
The decision to enable or deny access to a given card is made locally by the
access controller itself, using the configuration data EBI downloads to it. Each device must
be configured according to its hardware requirements. One issue to resolve during planning
is the limitation on how much configuration information your particular type of controller
can hold. You will need to plan your system very carefully to ensure that it does not try to
download more information to a given controller than can be stored.
Access Points
An access point represents a card reader which defines an entry or exit point to a
physical space. Access points are used to monitor card traffic at the card reader
by recording the card number and cardholder name, and whether or not access
was granted.
If two card readers were associated with one physical doorone to control entry
and one to control exittwo access points would be used to represent these two
card readers.
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Access points are configured using Quick Builder and downloaded to the server database.
Operators view information about the access point and make limited changes to the
configuration on the point detail display for the access point. Access point information can
also be printed from any of various reports.
Floor Points
A floor point represents a particular floor in a building served by elevators. Floor
points restrict access to certain floors of a building through control of the
elevators.
A floor point is a specialized status point. A floor is either in the access state,
allowing anyone to stop at the floor, or in the secure state, where only
cardholders with the required privileges can access the floor.
Zones
A zone represents a physical space which is totally enclosed by card readers. That is, in order
to enter a physical space, one must use an access card at a card reader which allows entry to
that space. It should not be possible to enter this physical space without using a card reader.
Figure 4.3 Access Point Detail Display
Access Control Concepts
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 45
A zone consists of a list of access points which represent the card readers which allow entry
to the physical space. An access point can only be included in one zone, because a card
reader can define the entry into only one physical space.
You can assign up to 128 access points to a single zone. The points can be those associated
with physical doors or with elevator floors. Zones are paired with time periods to create
access level definitions for site entry and exit control.
Access points are assigned to the same zones if they define entry into the same physical
space. In the following figure, for example, doors C, D, and F define entry into the Payroll
zone.
Figure 4.4 Zones and Zone Doors
Outside
Pay Office
Counter Area
Cash Room
Payroll
Reader A
B
C
D
K
L
G
H
E F I J
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Time Periods
A time period represents a period during which a person may have access to a physical
space.
For example, the time period Working Hours might be made up of days Monday to Friday
and times 9:00am to 5:00pm, excluding holidays.
Time periods are configured and modified on Time Period Configuration displays. The
time period details depend on the type of access controller you use: all controllers of the
same type store the same time period definitions.
Access levels
An access level represents a particular set of access control criteria.
Up to eight access levels are assigned to cards in order to specify where and when the
cardholder is granted access. The access level is made up of a number of pairs of zones and
time periods, where the zone defines the physical space and the time period defines the
times at which that physical space may be accessed.
For example, cards belonging to Managers might be assigned an access level which allows
access to all zones during working hours but cards belonging to Senior Managers might be
assigned an access level which allows access to all zones for 24 hours per day.
Perimeter Global Anti-Passback
Perimeter Global Anti-Passback (PGAP) prevents people from entering a facility, then
passing their card back to another person to enable them to enter as well.
You must establish a perimeter zone around the facility to which access is strictly
controlled; all entry and exit points of the perimeter must be controlled by card readers. A
cardholder can only enter if they are registered as being outside the perimeter, and they can
only exit if they are registered as being inside.
Access Control Concepts
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 47
Occupancy Reporting
Once your facility is divided into zones, you can report on which people are currently in a
particular zone.
This works best if both entry and exit points to the zone are controlled by card readers.
This enables EBI to determine when people have entered a zone and when they have
exited it, either by entering another zone or by exiting the whole facility. Without dual
readers, you can tell only which zone a person last entered; until they present their card to
enter another zone, you cannot tell if they have left.
Cardholder Reporting
Using EBIs pre-configured reports, you can produce a number of cardholder reports,
including:
Card Usage
Cardholder Details
Cardholder List
Cardholder Zone Summary
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Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 49
5 Using EBI for Building
Management
This chapter describes how EBI is used for building management. It includes the following
topics:
Accessing HVAC Information
Scheduling
Alarm Paging
Phone Control
Life Safety Management
This chapter supplements Using EBI on page 31.
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Accessing HVAC Information
The point detail displays provide easy and fast access to point values and point
control.
You can incorporate live point data into custom displays, such as floor plans and
schematics for optimal representation of the buildings HVAC performance. You
can also trend and archive all point parameters.
EBI includes point server interfaces for LonWorks and BACnet, popular HVAC
networking standards. LonWorks is, for example, used by Honeywells EXCEL 5000
system. (As described in Point Servers on page 11, point servers speed up configuration
tasks because they provide direct access to field values.)
If you have EXCEL 5000 or R7044 controllers, you can view and modify the
configuration parameters that control your HVAC system.
If you use the EXCEL 5000 Dial-up Interface, you can also monitor, control, and
acquire data from remote sites containing EXCEL 5000 series controllers, as if
each site was locally connected.
Scheduling
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 51
Scheduling
Point Control Schedules
A Point Control Schedule allows you to control a point at a specified time on
either a periodic or one-off basis. In the case of a building, for example, you
could have one schedule switch the lights on at 7 am each day and another
schedule to switch them off at 9 pm.
EBI provides its own point control scheduling interface, and access to control schedules
for EXCEL 5000 and R7044 controllers.
Global Schedules
A Global Schedule allows you to control a group of points. This means that you
can schedule a whole building or sections of a large facility, as well as scheduling
a single controller or point. Schedule actions can be one-shot, daily, work day,
weekend, or day of the week, and they can even be based on pre-defined shifts
or holidays.
If you have EXCEL 5000 controllers, you can use Global Schedules to
simultaneously configure their schedules.
5 Using EBI for Building Management
52 R300
Alarm Paging
The Alarm Pager option pages specified alarms to up to 100 pagers.
You can use two techniques to specify which alarms are paged:
Individually define each point and the minimum alarm priority that results in
a paged alarm
Specify the operators whose alarms are pagedthat is, alarms assigned to
areas for which operators are responsible are paged (Only applicable if you
use operator-based security.)
If the paging service provider allows, the Alarm Paging system sends multiple
message blocks at the same time, thus reducing the amount of times it has to ring
up the provider.
The Alarm Paging system supports the following protocols:
Paging Entry Terminal (PET) protocol
Telocator Alphanumeric Protocol (TAP)
Universal Computer Protocol (UCP)
The Alarm Paging system also supports sending messages as:
Email
SNMP messages
Phone Control
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview 53
Phone Control
Phone Control allows callers to perform monitoring and control functions using a
standard touch-tone telephone. Callers respond to voice prompts by pressing
keys on the telephone. For example, a caller could switch on the lights and air
conditioning after hours.
Phone Control includes the following configuration options:
Allows callers to control services in selected locations of the facility or all
the services within the facility. You can even limit them to specific services
within their particular location.
Prepares usage reports from your system log tables that show which callers
made requests and reveal usage patterns useful in plant management.
Generates billing reports that enable resource and utility consumption to be
charged back to the requesting cost centers.
Figure 5.1 Basic Phone Control System
Telephone
Network
Ethernet
Stations
Voice or sound
card
Control Server
5 Using EBI for Building Management
54 R300
Life Safety Management
The Life Safety option enables EBI to monitor XLS1000 Fire Panels. The Life Safety
displays provide operators with detailed information about the status of the fire and
emergency monitoring systems, including:
Panel Alarms
Panel Supervisory Alarms
Panel Troubles (indicates panel trouble)
Panel Monitoring (indicates if any XLS Panel on the channel goes into
monitor mode)
Comms Status (indicates Fire panel communications)
Operators can also issue panel commands, such as Initiate Fire Drill and
Reset Panel.
Figure 5.2 XLS Panel Status Display
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview Glossary - 1
Glossary
access card
An identity card issued to site personnel to allow access to certain doors at certain times,
and to deny access otherwise.
access control unit
An Access Control Unit (ACU) is an industry term that describes the field panel that
performs access control. An ACU is the interface between the access control data such
as card rights, door operating parameters, and so on, and the actual field hardware.
ACUs are sometimes called Controllers.
Generally card readers, door strikes, egress buttons, and switches are connected directly
to the ACU. The ACU works as a local standalone unit, performing access control, based
on operating parameters that have been downloaded from the server system.
access level
When an access level is assigned to a card, it defines when and where that card will be
granted access. An access level consists of zones with corresponding time periods.
access point
A point type associated with access card reader terminals. Access points represent the
details of doors controlled by the reader terminals. If a door has separate entry and exit
reader terminals, then two different access points are requiredone for each terminal.
When a card is presented to a reader, the access point will record the card point number
and name, and whether access was gained or why it was denied.
Access points used for Security Electronics and FS90 AMC controlled doors also contain
the necessary configuration information for the door.
accumulator point
A point type used to represent counters. Information contained in the accumulator point
can include: the raw value, a process value, a rollover value, a scale factor, and a meter
factor.
Glossary
Glossary - 2 R300
action algorithm
One of two types of algorithm you can assign to a point in order to perform additional
processing to change point parameter values. An action algorithm performs an action
when the value of the PV changes. Contrast with PV algorithm.
ACU
See Access Control Unit.
Advanced Alarm Management
A name given to either of two optional alarm management systems, Three Stage Alarm
Management and Structured Response Management. In both systems, an alarm
instruction display appears when an operator acknowledges an alarm. Operators must
carry out the instructions and enter a description of their actions in an alarm response
display.
alarm
An indicationvisual and/or audiblethat alerts an operator at a Station of an
abnormal or critical condition. Alarms can be assigned either to individual points or for
system-wide conditions, such as a controller communications failure
alarm/event journal
A file that records all alarms and events. It is accessed to generate reports and can also
be archived to off-line media.
alarm priority
The severity of the alarm, these being, from least to most severe:
Journal
Low
High
Urgent
algorithm
See point algorithm.
analog point
A point type that is used to represent continuous values that are either real or integer.
Continuous values in a facility could be: pressure, flow, humidity, or temperature.
Anti- Passback
Anti-Passback is an access control feature that is used to ensure that cardholders can
only enter an area if they are currently out of that area. It is usually applied in high
security installations to ensure that cardholders cannot compromise security by passing
their card back to another person who is not authorized for that area.
Glossary
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview Glossary - 3
API
Application Programming Interface.
application program
A user-written program integrated into EBI using the Application Programming Interface (API).
area
A logical sub-section of your system. Custom displays, points, and access configuration
may be partitioned by area. Operators or Stations can be assigned access to particular
areas only. Areas are generally aligned with physical areas of a building.
client software
An umbrella term covering EBI applications such as Station, HMIWeb Display Builder and Quick
Builder.
channel
A communications port used by the server to connect to a controller.
CCTV
Closed Circuit Television.
control level
A security level (a number from 0 to 255) assigned to a point. Only operators who have
been assigned a control level equal to, or higher than, a points control level can control
that point.
controller
A device that is used to control and monitor field equipment. The most common control
and monitoring device in a security and access control system is an access control
panel. Other devices include security monitoring panels, elevator controllers, and fire
monitoring devices.
DDE
Dynamic Data Exchange.
default
The value that an application automatically selects if the user does not explicitly select
another value.
display
Station uses displays to present information to operators in a manner that they can
understand. The style and complexity of displays varies according to the type of
information being presented.
Glossary
Glossary - 4 R300
Distributed System Architecture (DSA)
An option that allows you to integrate multiple EBI servers into a single operational system. DSA
is suitable for geographically distributed systems, as well as for logically separate EBI systems
located in different parts of a facility.
duress login
A duress login can be used by operators when forced to log on to the EBI under duress or when
they need to advise others of an emergency situation, such as a medical condition.
event
A significant change in the status of an element of the system such as a point or piece of
hardware. Some events have a low, high, or urgent priority, in which case they are
further classified as alarms. Events can be viewed on displays and included in reports.
Event Archiving
Event Archiving allows you to archive events to disk or tape, where they may be
retrieved if needed.
extended history
A type of history collection that provides snapshots of a point at a designated time
interval that can be:
1-hour snapshots
8-hour snapshots
24-hour snapshots
fast history
The type of history that collects snapshots of point parameter values at regular intervals.
(The interval, between 1 and 30 seconds, the default being 5 seconds.)
flexible point
A point on a point server. The database structure of a flexible point is determined by the point
server, rather than by EBI.
floor point
A status point that represents a particular floor in a building served by elevators. A floor
point restricts access to a floor through control of the elevators.
FS90 AMC
FS90 Fire and Security Panel. The Access Management Controller (AMC) portion allows
the panel to operate as a card reader.
Glossary
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview Glossary - 5
group
A group of up to eight arbitrarily chosen points that can be viewed by an operator on
the same display.
history
Point values stored to enable tracking and observation of long-term trends. Analog,
status, and accumulator point PVs can be defined to have history collected for
them.Three types of history collection are available:
Standard
Extended
Fast
HMIWeb Display Builder
The Honeywell tool for building custom displays.
HVAC
Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning.
Lift Access Control
A type of controller that controls access to floors of a building via card readers in the
elevator (lift) and a connection to the car floor pushbuttons.
MD
The abbreviation for the Mode parameter of a point.
MicroLPM
An access control panel by PCSC.
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange
A network option. This can be used to capture the most recent point and history
information in the server and display it in Microsoft Excel spreadsheets.
Mode
A point parameter which determines whether or not the operator can control the point
value. For example, in a status point, the mode determines whether the operator can
control the output value, and in an analog point the mode determines the control of the
setpoint. If the mode is set to manual, the operator can change the value.
occupancy
An access control feature that refers to a system capable of monitoring the location of
personnel within a site. The site is divided into separate zones and access control
readers are used for entry into and exit from each zone.
Glossary
Glossary - 6 R300
Occupancy is usually applied to security and safety applications where it is necessary to
be aware of the location of all personnel during emergency or security situations, but it
can also be used in a normal daily operations mode to allow the reporting of the
presence of certain classes of people within particular zones.
ODBC
See Open Database Connectivity.
ODBC driver
A driver that processes ODBC (Open Database Connectivity) calls, queries the database,
and returns the results. See also Open Database Connectivity.
OP
The abbreviation for the Output parameter of a point.
OPC
OLE for Process Control. OPC is a set of standards to facilitate interoperability between
applications within the Process Control Industry. These include automation/control
applications, field systems/devices or business/office applications.
Open Database Connectivity
A standard set of function calls for accessing data in a database. These calls include the
facility to make SQL (Structured Query Language) queries on the database.
operator ID
A unique identification assigned to each operator. If operator-Based security is enabled,
the operator must use this ID and a password to sign on to a Station.
operator password
A character string (not echoed on screen) used with the operator ID to sign on to
Station.
operator-based security
Operator-based security comprises an operator ID and password, which must be
entered in order to access Station.
OP
The abbreviation for the Output parameter of a point.
parameter
A point data item, such as its present value (PV) or its setpoint (SP).
Glossary
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview Glossary - 7
Perimeter Global Anti-Passback (PGAP)
A term used to describe the monitoring of a card for the purpose of preventing it being
used for re-entry before having passed through a card exit reader. To set up PGAP, a site
must have occupancy zones designated and those zones must be configured into access
points for card readers in those zones. See occupancy.
periodic scan
A defined regular interval in which the server acquires information from the controller
and processes the value as a point parameter. The scan period must be defined in Quick
Builder for each point source parameter value.
PIN
Personal Identification Number. A PIN is sometimes used in conjunction with an access
control card.
PLC
See programmable logic controller.
point
A data structure in the server database, usually containing information about a field
entity. See flexible point and standard point.
point algorithm
A set of rules that enhance a points functionality by operating on point data either
before or after normal point processing. There are two types of point algorithms: action algorithm
and PV algorithm.
point detail display
A display that shows the current point information.
point server
A high-level interface that allows EBI to exchange data with another application or sub-system
without the need for separately defining points in EBI. The database structure of a point on a
point server (called a flexible point) is determined by the application/sub-system, rather than by
EBI.
present value (PV)
The point parameter that represents an actual value in a process: a temperature, flow,
pressure, and so on. Present values may be sourced from another parameter and may
also be calculated from two or more measured or calculated variables using algorithms.
Glossary
Glossary - 8 R300
programmable logic controller (PLC)
A control and monitoring unit that connects to a field device and controls low-level
plant processes with very high-speed responses. A PLC usually has an internal program
that scans the PLC input registers and sets the output registers to the values determined
by the program. When connected to the server, the input and output values stored in
the PLC registers can be referenced, and the server can read and write to these memory
addresses.
PV
The abbreviation for present value parameter of a point.
PV algorithm
One of two types of algorithm you can assign to a point in order to perform additional
processing to change point parameter values. The result of a PV algorithm is stored in
the PV parameter of the point. Contrast with Action algorithm.
Quick Builder
The tool used to configure and integrate controllers with EBI. It is also used to configure Stations
and printers.
redundant server
A second server actively linked to the primary server and used as a backup system.
Active linking ensures that data in the second server is constantly updated to mirror the
primary server.
report
Information collected by the server database that is formatted for viewing. There are
several pre-formatted reports, or the user can customize a report. Reports may be
generated on demand or at scheduled intervals. Reports can be printed or displayed on
a Station.
scan
The technique used to read data from a controller. Scans are conducted for point
parameters with source addresses (for example, PV, SP and OP).
scan packet
A group of point parameter source addresses assembled by the server and used as the
basic unit of server data acquisition. The server groups points into scan packets based
on the controller address that they reference and the scan period defined.
scan period
The time interval that specifies the frequency at which the EBI server reads input values from the
memory addresses of controllers.
Glossary
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview Glossary - 9
scheduler
A facility used to schedule the control of a point on either a periodic or once-only basis.
script
A script is a mini-program that performs a specific task. In displays, for example, scripts
are often used to produce animations.
security level
Access to EBI functions is limited by the security level that has been assigned to each operator.
EBI has six security levels. An operator is assigned a security level and may perform functions at or
below the security level that has been assigned to that operator.
server
The computer on which the EBI database software and server utilities run.
Server software
An umbrella term used to refer to the database software and server utilities installed on
the EBI server computer.
setpoint
The point parameter that represents the desired value of a PV (present value) parameter.
SP
The abbreviation for set point parameter of a point.
standard history
A type of history collection for a point that provides one-minute snapshots and the
following averages based on the one-minute snapshots:
6-minute averages
1-hour averages
8-hour averages
24-hour averages
Station
The main operator interface to EBI. Station presents information as a series of displayseach
display is a control panel that shows a particular set or type of information, and has an
appropriate set of controls.
standard point
An EBI inbuilt point that is used to map memory locations in controllers, so that the server can
exchange data with the controllers. EBI includes the following types of standard point:
access point
Glossary
Glossary - 10 R300
accumulator point
analog point
status point
status point
A point type used to represent discrete or digital field values. The point can have input,
output, and mode values.
supervisory control
The action of writing information to a controller. EBI enables both automatic and manual
supervisory control. See Mode.
task
A task is any of the standard server programs or an application program that can be
invoked from a display.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. A standard network protocol.
terminal server
A device on the local area network (LAN) that connects to a controller by way of a serial
connection and enables the controller to talk to the EBI server on the LAN.
trend
A set of point parameter historical data, usually shown as a graph on a trend display.
Unreasonable High and Unreasonable Low alarms
Alarms configured for an unreasonably high value and an unreasonably low value for
the PV of an analog point.
"LPM
See MicroLPM.
zone
A defined space either inside or outside that has at least one entry.
zone doors
The controlled entries and exits for a zone. A door is identified by the door tag (access
point name).
zone ID
A unique identifier for a zone.
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview Index - 1
Index
A
Access and Control Security Guide, 2
access cards, 38
access control
alarms, 42
areas, 19
concepts, 43
downloading card details, 42
levels, 46
overview, 41
points, 43
zones, 44
access points, 43
action algorithms, 29
Advanced Alarm Management, 33
Alarm Paging, 52
alarms
access-related, managing, 42
Advanced Alarm Management, 33
described, 32
responding to, 32
algorithms, 29
analyzing history
overview, 35
trend displays, 34
archiving
event, 36
history, 36
areas, 19
B
building access, controlling, 41
building management
accessing HVAC information, 50
alarm paging, 52
Life Safety, 54
overview, 49
Phone Control, 53
scheduling, 51
Building Management Guide, 2
C
card readers
described, 43
downloading card details, 42
cardholders
database information, 38
management of, 38
reporting, 47
cards
access levels, 46
downloading access details to readers, 42
photos, 39
charts, 34
companion products, 25
Configuration and Administration Guide, 2
control
access point, 20
card access, 42
telephone, 53
controllers
connecting, 12
interfaces to EBI, 12
mapping memory locations to standard
points, 27
modem-connected, 15
unsolicited messaging, 29
custom applications, creating, 23
custom displays, 17
Index - 2 R300
Index
custom reports, 34
D
database, controlling access to, 19
direct serial connections to controllers, 14
displays
custom, 17
described, 16
system, 16
Distributed System Architecture (DSA), 10
documentation set, 2
downloading card details to readers, 42
duress login, 20
E
electronic signatures, 18
elevators, control of, 44
Energy Manager, 26
event archiving, 36
EXCEL 5000, 50, 51
exchanging data with other applications, 21
extended history, 35
F
fast history, 35
field values in controllers, mapping to standard
points, 27
Fire Management, 54
fire panels, 54
overview, 8
flexible points, 11
floor points, 44
G
Global Schedules, 51
graphs, 34
H
history
archiving, 36
overview, 35
types of, 35
Honeywell Digital Video Manager, 25
HVAC
information, accessing, 50
overview, 49
I
indirect serial connections to controllers, 13
Installation Guide, 2
Integrated Maintenance Manager, 25
Integrated Microsoft Excel Reports, 34
Integrated PhotoID, 39
L
levels, access, 46
Life Safety Management, 54
lifts (elevators), control of, 44
login, duress, 20
M
messaging, unsolicited, 29
Microsoft Excel Data Exchange, 21
mobile Stations, 18
modems, using, 15
N
Network API, 22
O
occupancy reporting, 47
ODBC Data Exchange, 21
ODBC Driver, 21
OPC, 21
client interface, 22
Index
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview Index - 3
Data Access Server, 22
operator-based security, 19
P
paging, alarm, 52
parameters of standard points, 28
Perimeter Global Anti-Passback, 46
periods, time, 46
PGAP, 46
Pharmaceutical Compliance option, 8
Phone Control, 53
Photo ID, Integrated, 39
photographs on access cards, 39
point servers, 11
points
access, 43
algorithms, 29
control access, 20
flexible, 11
floor, 44
parameters of standard points, 28
scanning standard, 28
standard, 27
products, companion, 25
PV algorithm, 29
Q
Quick Builder, 27
R
R7044, 50, 51
redundancy
server, 9
terminal servers, 14
reports
cardholder, 47
described, 34
occupancy, 47
responding to alarms, 32
S
scanning, 28
scheduling, 51
scripts, server, 23
security
electronic signatures, 18
operator, 19
Station
operator-based, 19
Station-based, 20
Security Management, overview, 37
servers
Distributed System Architecture (DSA), 10
point servers, 11
redundancy, 9
scripts, 23
signatures, cardholder, 39
signatures, electronic, 18
standard history, 35
standard points
described, 27
mapping to controller memory locations, 27
parameters, 28
types of, 27
standard reports, 34
Station-based security, 20
Stations
controlling access to, 19
described, 16
duress login, 20
electronic signatures, 18
mobile, 18
modem-connected, 15
supervisory control, 41
system data, analyzing, 34
T
tasks, 23
telephone control, 53
terminal servers
connecting controllers, 13
Index - 4 R300
Index
described, 13
server redundancy, 14
time periods, access control, 46
trends, 34
U
unsolicited messaging, 29
utilities, 23
V
visitor management, 40
W
Web Point Control, 25
X
XLS1000, 54
Z
zones, 44