Anda di halaman 1dari 16

COMMUNITY NEWS, CULTURE, COMMENTARY, COMMERCE FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2014 VOLUME III, ISSUE 46 FREE

RENTALS - SALES - SERVICE AS LOW AS $22/MO!


FOR HOMES - FOR INDUSTRY
Rust Filters - Drinking Water Systems - Water Softeners
Salt Delivery - Bottled Water - Expert Repair - Reverse Osmosis
1
2
0
4
#
1
7
9
www.highplainswater.com
845-1580
Toll Free 1-800-532-8649
RENTALS
TUESDAY
KIDS NIGHT:
5-7:30 PM
1066 W. Main
Valley City
701-845-4455
OPEN DAILY
11 AM - 9 PM
1
4
_
0
8
0
4
We deliver daily
from open to
close
Authorized
afliated dealer
TIRE SALES - MOUNTING - REPAIR
SHOCKS - STRUTS - BRAKES
ALIGNMENT - BALANCE - MORE!
1
2
0
4
#
1
8
6
GREAT GRAPES, pt 2
Bufalo vineyard adds value to ag biz
PAGE 7
WE ARE BUILDING COMMUNITIES
WWW.INDY-BC.COM
RECOGNIZED! Christy Olauson, center, was honored with the Valley City Area Chamber of Commerce Ambas-
sador Award for Customer Service for her work at Essentia Clinic in Valley City. According to the nomination
form, Olauson always has a smile on her face and she is always happy to help. She does an exceptional job at
what she does and often does more than expected. I think she deserves this award because its something to
be acknowledged when customers comment on her good work outside of the work place. Hard work deserves
recognition. (Photo submitted/Bret Haglund)
WHY DO THEY CALL IT RUSH HOUR WHEN NOTHING MOVES? ROBIN WILLIAMS
PAGE 02 the independent - 08.22.14
YOUR HEALTH
Assessing the bene ts of uoride
By Janie Wanek
F
luoride has long been used within
communities, dental of ces and for
at-home-use by both topical and
systemic methods.
Systemic delivery (i.e. ingestion of fuo-
ridated drinking water, fuoride supple-
ments and tablets) and topical application
use in the form of fuoridated toothpastes,
rinses and gels, either in lower dosage
over-the-counter products or higher level
prescription products have proven efec-
tive.
Fluoride reduces decay in three ways:
During tooth development the forma-
tion of fuorhydroxapate causes teeth to be
more resistant to acids.
Remineralization which occurs when
fuoride combines with tooth enamel
and tooth surfaces making them more
resistant by deterring acids which remove
minerals from tooth surfaces.
Topically applied uoride also in-
terferes with the bacterias ability to
metabolize carbohydrates which reduces
acid production also causing decay to be
reduced.
Professional topical application using a
higher concentration of fuoride than in
general public use should be applied by
dental professionals. Tese applications
were initially geared toward decay preven-
tion in children and were applied in gel or
foam formulas in a tray delivery system.
Te latest recommendation is for fuori-
dation of the adult mouth as well. It is
YOUR HEALTH: 16
H
ere is the latest news and informa-
tion from the Historic 1916 Bufalo
High School in Bualo, N.D.
Last week, the Shoppe
Girls, who are dedicated
volunteers, met at the old
school to plan activities and
events for the rest of year.
Tey decided to have a
special promotion in August
to help reduce inventory in
the Olde School Gif Shoppe
in order to be ready for the
upcoming fall and winter
season.
Te End of Summer Bar-
gains will feature handbags
and purses in all styles and
colors, fun and funky jew-
elry, kitchen gadgets, dishes
and decorations, baskets in
all shapes and sizes, and kids
play tents and sleeping bags.
Te Shoppe Girls also dis-
cussed the excitement cre-
ated by the new Man Cave
located in a small cloak
room in the foyer of the
school and the popularity
of engraved pocket knives.
Tey plan to continue hav-
ing interesting items avail-
able for men.
Te Gif Shoppe was
originally started as a garage
sale in the fall of 2011 as
a fundraiser for window
coverings in the west room
of the school.
Since then, this success-
ful project has evolved into
a charming boutique flled
with treasures both old
and new, with everything
repurposed and generously
donated for our fundraising
eforts. For a cash donation,
you can have fun shopping
in this unique gif shop
located in our historic high
school building and help
provide funding for the
many ongoing improve-
ments needed in the school.
Come for a visit and check
out our Gif Shoppe at 303
Pearl Street in Bufalo on
Tuesday mornings from 9
a.m. to noon and Tursday
afernoons from 3 to 7 p.m.
As always the cofee is on.
Please check out the web-
page at www.bufalond.com
or call me at 701-412-4485
to learn more about the His-
toric 1916 Bufalo High
School. LRS
CHALK ON
THE
BLACKBOARD
BY LIANE RAKOW STOUT
Proud supporter
of our communities
for more than a century.
1
4
_
0
7
2
3
#
1
5
4
KASOWSKI-GUBRUD
REPAIR
Flint & Deanna Mark & Carmen
3406 139th Avenue SE - Buffalo, ND 58011
CALL 701-633-5121
Tires
Engine Repair
Tune-Ups
27 Years
of QUALITY
SERVICE!
1
4
_
0
7
0
7
#
1
3
4
Happily Home Meal Solutions
Service Area: Valley City
and the surrounding
40-mile radius
Amber Kosse Havard
FOUNDER
Stay safely, and happily,
at home!
Why risk a fall? Let Happily Home plan your meals
based on your preferences and local grocery
sales! Your fridge will be stocked full of delicious,
ready-to-heat meals and appetizing, healthy
snacks. Additional at-home services available.
Details: www.ndhappy.com
Or Call Amber: 701-840-7918
1
4
_
0
8
0
6

CENTRAL AVENUE HEALTH MART PHARMACY
323 Central Ave N. Valley City OPEN M-F 9am-530pm & Sat 9am-1pm
701-845-5280 Business After Hours 800-689-5280
Visit us on the web ..... centralavenuehealthmart.com
YOUR ONLY LOCALLY OWNED PHARMACY
SALE
Try our Convenient Drive-Up
Window for Prescription Services
1
4
_
0
7
2
3
#
1
5
3
Wireless Notebook 79
Plastic 2 Pocket Folder 3/$2
Poly Portfolio 3/$2
Spiral 3 Subject Notebook 99
Scotch Tape 99
Colored Pencils 89
Water Color Paint Set 95
School Scissors 59
Cap Erasers, 30 ct 59
Washable Color Markers 99
Construction Paper, 36 ct 2/$3
FRIDAY, Aug. 22
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333
MUSEUM: The Litchville
Community Museum
remains open by appoint-
ment for the season. More
info: Myrna McGregor, Myr-
naMcG@drtel.net
COUNTY FAIR: The Ran-
som County Fair runs
Aug. 20-24 at the Ransom
County Fairgrounds in
Lisbon. More info: www.
ransomcountyfair.com
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
at Fellowship Corner, 320
2nd Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. Monday and Saturday
meetings are at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday meetings
are at noon and 7:30 p.m.
The Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
and last Saturday of the
month at 8 p.m. are open
speakers meetings for all to
attend, not just alcoholics.
A Friday 5:30 p.m. meeting
is held at Sheyenne Care
Center conference room.
More info: 701-845-2864.
SATURDAY, Aug. 23
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333.
PLANETARIUM: Two free,
30-minute programs,
Finding Polaris I and
Finding Polaris II, begin
at 1 p.m. and 1:30 p.m.,
respectively, in the Valley
City State University plan-
etarium, located in Room
309 (third oor) of the
VCSU Rhoades Science
Center. Finding Polaris I
introduces audiences to
ancient Greek and Roman
mythology as told from a
stars point of view. Find-
ing Polaris II offers a tour
of the major stars of the
springtime sky: Arcturus,
Spica, Regulus, Capella
and Thuban. Elevator
available at west entrance.
More info: Wes Anderson,
701-845-0966.
LEGO CLUB: Lego lovers
gather at the Valley City
- Barnes County Library
at 10:30 a.m. More info:
Steve Hammel, library-
director@vcbclibrary.org or
701-845-3821.
COUNTY FAIR: The
Ransom County Fair runs
Aug. 20-24 at the Ransom
County Fairgrounds in
Lisbon. More info: www.
ransomcountyfair.com
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Monday,
MORE: 4
08.22.14 the independent PAGE 03
PEOPLE WHO THINK THEY KNOW EVERYTHING ARE A GREAT ANNOYANCE TO THOSE OF US WHO DO. ISAAC ASIMOV
C O M M U N I T Y
C
ALENDAR
W G O A
ARTS COMMUNITY GROUPS GOVERNMENT SCHOOL MUSIC
List your
event
We welcome all submis-
sions for area events and
activities that are free or
low-cost and open to the
public. Calendar listings
in The Independent are
provided at no cost as a
public service to our read-
ers.
To have your listing
published, use our easy
online submissions form
at www.indy-bc.com or
email a complete descrip-
tion well in advance to
The Independents Cal-
endar Editor at: submis-
sions@indy-bc.com
Include the events
date, time, place, and
other relevent informa-
tion. Please also include a
contact name and phone
number and/or email ad-
dress.
NEW DEADLINE:
Calendar listings are due by
9 a.m. Wednesdays for that
Fridays publication.
08.22.14
the independent
A publication of
Smart Media LLC
P.O. Box 175
Valley City, ND 58072
Volume 3, Issue 46
All Rights Reserved
vitals
MISSION STATEMENT
To highlight and publicize
local contribution to educa-
tion, the arts, and quality of
life;
To provide quality news
content relating to the activi-
ties and concerns of the
local population;
To be a marketplace of
ideas; and a forum for free
debate;
To feature local talent and
achievers;
To provide a venue for
showcasing local products
and services through attrac-
tive and stimulating advertis-
ing.
CONTACT US
NIKKI LAINE ZINKE
Publisher/Founder
nlzinke@indy-bc.com
701-840-1045 - cell or text
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
advertising@indy-bc.com
701-645-8890
leave message if no
answer
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
classieds@indy-bc.com
701-645-8890
leave message if no
answer
WEBSITE
www.INDY-BC.com
ONLINE ALL THE TIME!
SUBMISSIONS
Your participation is
welcome at all levels.
Submit online at
www.INDY-BC.com
or via email at
submissions@indy-bc.com
DISTRIBUTION
THE INDEPENDENT is published weekly from
its Smart Media LLC home in Fingal, N.D., and
is available at designated distribution outlets in
the Barnes County and surrounding area. No
one is permitted more than one current issue of
THE INDEPENDENT without permission. Addi-
tional copies and back issues are available for
$5 prepaid. Theft of THE INDEPENDENT will be
prosecuted.
Saturday: Kids get in free
H
eres a family-friendly entertain-
ment option designed to go easy
on the wallet: Ransom Countys
Fair - in Lisbon - on Saturday.
Saturday is Kids Day at the fair, featur-
ing no gate admission for kids 17 and
under, and a day chock full
of great activities for the
younger set.
On tap: At 9:30
a.m., kids ages
2-4 can par-
ticipate in the
Kids Money
Scramble,
at the fair
sandbox;
a Pedal
Tractor
Pull for
kids ages
4-10 gets
underway
at 10:30
a.m. (with
registration
a hair ear-
lier, at 10 a.m.); if artsy activities appeal,
kids can try their hand at tie-ding from 10
a.m. to noon (bring something to dye, or
items available for purchase on site) at the
Ray Stroh Shelter; and at noon, kids get
a chance to win a free bicycle with
the fairs Kids Bike Giveaway.
If thats not
enough to wear them
all out, send the
kids to the car-
nival fairway,
which opens
at 2 p.m. and
closes at 11
p.m. Rides
available
for ticket
prices,
or buy a
wristband
and ride all
day only
$20 each.

NLZ
FROM 3
Wednesday and Saturday
at Fellowship Corner, 320
2nd Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. Monday and Saturday
meetings are at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday meetings
are at noon and 7:30 p.m.
The Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
and last Saturday of the
month at 8 p.m. are open
speakers meetings for all to
attend, not just alcoholics.
A Friday 5:30 p.m. meeting
is held at Sheyenne Care
Center conference room.
More info: 701-845-2864.
SUNDAY, Aug. 24
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333.
COUNTY FAIR: The
Ransom County Fair runs
Aug. 20-24 at the Ransom
County Fairgrounds in
Lisbon. More info: www.
ransomcountyfair.com
SENIORS: Buffalo Se-
nior Citizens meets every
Monday at the Community
Center, Buffalo, from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
LIONS CLUB: Valley City
Lions Club meets the sec-
ond and fourth Monday of
every month at 6:30 p.m.
at the VFW.
MONDAY, Aug. 25
LITCHVILLE: The Litch-
ville Community Center
hosts regularly scheduled
events, including: morning
coffee from 8 to 10 a.m.
Monday-Saturday; On
the Move exercise group
Tuesdays and Thursdays
at 8 a.m.; and cards (Hand
& Foot) with refreshments
Wednesday evenings at 7
p.m. No fee, but donations
accepted. More info: 701-
762-4856.
CANCELLED: English
Corner no longer meets
Mondays at the Valley
City-Barnes County Library.
A new meeting schedule
for fall will soon be estab-
lished. More info: 701-845-
4005.
LIARS DICE: Play progres-
sive liars dice at the Vault
in Valley City on Mondays
from 6 p.m. to midnight.
More info: Paul Stenshoal,
701-840-9313.
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333.
GENEALOGY: Members
of the Valley City - Barnes
County Librarys Geneal-
ogy Group meet at 6 p.m.
More info: Steve Hammel,
librarydirector@vcbclibrary.
org or 701-845-3821.
FARMERS MARKET: The
Valley City Farmers Market
takes place from 4 to 6
p.m. at the Rosebud Visitor
MORE: 5
PAGE 04 the independent 08.22.14
A DAY WITHOUT SUNSHINE IS LIKE, YOU KNOW, NIGHT. STEVE MARTIN
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Word Find Week of August 22, 2014
CATEGORY: IN YOUR DREAMS
CATNAP
DAYDREAM
DOZE
DREAM
DROWSY
EXHAUSTED
FANTASY
FATIGUED
FORTY WINKS
HIBERNATE
IMAGINATION
KIP
MIRAGE
NIGHTMARE
NOD OFF
RELAX
REPOSE
REST
SHUTEYE
SIESTA
SLEEP
SLUMBER
SNOOZE
STARGAZE
TIRED
VISION
WEARY
Walk Thru/Drive Thru 517 Main St. Lisbon 701-683-2276
I Scream, u Scream
Always Ice Cream - But Also Great Food!
100% ANGUS BEEF BIG DOGS - NO FILLERS!
1031#139
VFW Post 2764 - Valley City
Burgers, Cheeseburgers
Pork or Beef Sandwiches
Saturdays from 11 AM - 1:30 PM
VFW Post 2764 - Valley City
1
1
2
5
#
1
6
6
1
4
_
0
8
0
7
nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
n

n
n

n
DIGITAL
PROJECTION
STADIUM
SEATING
WALL-TO-WALL
SCREENS
DAILY MATINEES
$6 BEFORE 6PM
GIFT CARDS
AVAILABLE!
JAMESTOWN
BUFFALO
MALL
701-252-5688
WWW.BISON6CINEMA.COM nnn nnn
1
4
_
0
1
1
6
#
2
3
9
ShowtimeS AUG 22-26
*Asterisk denotes No Passes or Discounted Tickets
WHEN THE GAME STANDS TALL*- PG
Fri-Sun: 1:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:30
Mon-Thu: 4:20, 7:10, 9:30
IF I STAY* - PG-13
Fri-Sun: 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 9:40
Mon-Thu: 4:40, 7:30, 9:40
SIN CITY: A Dame to Die For* - R
Fri-Sun: 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 9:40
Mon-Thu: 4:50, 7:40, 9:40
EXPENDABLES- PG-13
Fri-Sun: 1:30, 4:00, 6:50, 9:30
Mon-Thu: 4:00, 6:50, 9:30
TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA
TURTLES- PG-13
Fri-Sun: 1:45, 4:10, 7:00, 9:30
Mon-Thu: 4:10, 7:00, 9:30
THE GIVER- PG-13
Fri-Sun: 2:10, 4:30, 7:20, 9:40
Mon-Tue: 4:30, 7:20, 9:40
STARTING WEDNESDAY, AUG. 27
NOVEMBER MAN- R
STARTING FRIDAY, AUG. 29
LETS BE COPS- R
1
4
_
0
6
1
6
#
1
2
2
1-701-845-2780 1-888-927-7103
www.millermtrs.com
08.22.14 the independent PAGE 05
IM AN IDEALIST. I DONT KNOW WHERE IM GOING, BUT IM ON MY WAY. CARL SANDBURG
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
407 MAIN STREET
BUFFALO, ND 58011
PHONE: 701-633-5317
1
4
_
0
7
0
9
#
1
4
1
week nights
HOUR
Happy
Windsor
Wednesdays
only $2.50
5:30-6:30 PM
75 cents off
TAPS, WELLS
& DOMESTICS

$
2

d
a
i
l
y

d
r
i
n
k

s
p
e
c
i
a
l
s
o
u
r

f
a
m
o
u
s



p
r
i
m
e

r
i
b
S
ervin
g A
ugust 2
2
now every monday!!
lg 1-topping pizza &
pitcher of beer - $19
FRESH, HOT PIZZA!
Dont Miss the Grape Stomp!
Red Trail Vineyard - August 16
NORTHWESTERN
INDUSTRIES
SUPPLIER TO THE
SHOOTING SPORTS
416 WEST MAIN STREET - VALLEY CITY, ND 58072
(701) 845-1031 OR (800) 286-1031 leon_nwi@hotmail.com
OWNER: LEON PYTLIK
WE BUY OR
PAWN GUNS
14_0220#270
FROM 4
Center parking lot. More
info: Norma Voldal, market
manager: 701-845-4303.
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
at Fellowship Corner, 320
2nd Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. Monday and Saturday
meetings are at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday meetings
are at noon and 7:30 p.m.
The Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
and last Saturday of the
month at 8 p.m. are open
speakers meetings for all to
attend, not just alcoholics.
A Friday 5:30 p.m. meeting
is held at Sheyenne Care
Center conference room.
More info: 701-845-2864.
TUESDAY, Aug. 26
LIBERTY: The Campaign
for Liberty group hosts its
monthly meeting at 7 p.m.
at the Kelly Inn in Fargo.
On the agenda: Com-
mon Core and property
taxes. More info: Charlene
Nelson, nelson.familynd@
gmail.com
KIWANIS: The Lisbon Ki-
wanis Club meets at noon
at Parkside Lutheran Home
in the dining room.
ROTARY: Valley City
Rotary Club meets every
Tuesday at noon at the Val-
ley City VFW.
BONE BUILDERS: Improve
balance, increase energy,
bone density, mobility
and lower blood pressure
with this free program.
Tuesdays and Thursdays
at 10:30 a.m. at Enderlin
Senior Center. More info:
701-437-2669.
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333.
OPEN MIC: Open Mic is
now being held at The
Vault in Valley City. Open
7:30 p.m. to close. The
Vault is located in the 200
block of Central Avenue
North.
MOVIE NIGHT: The Val-
ley City - Barnes County
Library hosts Teen Movie
Night, with a feature flm
based on the popular
Veronica Roth series. Big
screen and big sound!
Doors open at 6:15 p.m.;
movie starts at 6:30 p.m.
Enter through north en-
trance off the parking lot
directing into the Mary E
Fischer multipurpose room;
all other doors locked.
Bring a comfy folding or
camp chair. More info:
Steve Hammel, library-
director@vcbclibrary.org or
701-845-3821.
MEETING: The City-Coun-
ty Health Board meets at 4
p.m. on the fourth Tuesday
of each month. (Note that
meetings may be cancelled
for a lack of a quorum or
a lack of agenda items.)
More info: 701-845-8518.
GREAT BOOKS: Book lov-
ers and conversationalists
gather from 9:30 to 11
a.m. weekly in the West
Room of the 1916 Buffalo
High School to share their
thoughts about weekly
readings while enjoying tea,
coffee, cocoa and snacks.
Readings are: Aug. 26,
Mrs. Mike; Sept. 16, The
Young Pioneers; Sept. 23,
Rabbit Proof Fence; and
Sept. 30, planning for win-
ter reading selections. The
Historic 1916 Buffalo High
School is located at 303
Pearl Street, Buffalo. More
info: 701-633-5447.
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 27
SENIORS: Tower City
Senior Citizens group
meets every Wednesday at
the Community Center in
Tower City from 10 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. A meal is served.
More info: Betty Gibbons,
president, 701-840-0184.
STORY HOUR: Story hour
is every Wednesday at the
Valley City - Barnes County
Public Library. No circle
time for toddlers in August.
More info: Steve Hammel,
librarydirector@vcbclibrary.
org or 701-845-3821.
KIWANIS: The Valley City
Kiwanis Club meets every
Wednesday at 12:04 PM at
various locations in VCSU
Student Union. Use the
West door for entry.
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333.
BOOK CLUB: The Val-
ley City - Barnes County
Library s book discussion
club meets at 2 p.m. in
the library s multipurpose
room. More info: 701-845-
3294.
FARMERS MARKET: Page
Farmers Market runs
Wednesdays through fall,
MORE: 6
Plan ahead: We serve PRIME RIB
every second and fourth Friday!
FROM 5
from 5 to 7 p.m., located
just north of the Page Fire
Station on Morton Avenue.
CARDS: Texas Hold em
Tournament is every
Wednesday at 7 p.m. at
the Eagles Aerie, Valley
City. Open to all player
levels. More info: Richard
Hass: 840-2612. Free, for
people 21+.
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
at Fellowship Corner, 320
2nd Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. Monday and Saturday
meetings are at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday meetings
are at noon and 7:30 p.m.
The Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
and last Saturday of the
month at 8 p.m. are open
speakers meetings for all to
attend, not just alcoholics.
A Friday 5:30 p.m. meeting
is held at Sheyenne Care
Center conference room.
More info: 701-845-2864.
THURSDAY, Aug. 28
TOPS: Tops Club of
Enderlin meets every
Thursday at the Senior
Center in Enderlin. Weigh in
from 8:30 to 9 a.m.; meet-
ing at 9.
FARMERS MARKET: The
Valley City Farmers Market
takes place from 4 to 6
p.m. at the Shopko park-
ing lot. More info: Norma
Voldal, market manager:
701-845-4303.
QUILTS: St. Catherine
Quilters makes quilts for
those in need every Thurs-
day from 1 to 4:30 p.m.
and 6:30 to 9 p.m. in the
St. Catherine School gym
basement, Valley City. Any-
one is welcome; no experi-
ence necessary. More info:
Lela Grim, 701-845-4067.
MUSEUM HOURS: The
Enderlin Museum is open
through September from
1 to 4 p.m. on Thursday
and Friday and from 9 a.m.
to noon on Saturday. Also
open by special appoint-
ment. More info: 701-799-
0725 or 701-793-9743.
BONE BUILDERS: Improve
balance, increase energy,
bone density, mobility
and lower blood pressure
with this free program.
Tuesdays and Thursdays
at 10:30 a.m. at Enderlin
Senior Center. More info:
701-437-2669.
CELEBRATE RECOVERY: A
12-step, Christian-based
recovery program for those
18 and over for all habits,
hurts and hangups, begiing
at 6:15 p.m. with a small
meal. Group and worship
starts at 7 p.m. Located at
658 4th Street SW in Valley
City.
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open daily
1-4 p.m. through Labor
Day in Wimbledon. Open
other times by appoint-
ment. More info: 701-435-
2875 or 701-435-2333.
PINOCHLE: The Barnes
County Senior Center in
downtown Valley City hosts
a pinochle tournament
starting at 1:15 p.m.
V
a
l
l
e
y
Meat S
u
p
p
l
y
1269 Main St. W
Valley City, ND
845-4705
800-752-5142
ROD HAUGTVEDT
Owner
Locally Fed
& Grown
Order your
North Dakota Beef
SLAUGHTERING
TUESDAYS &
THURSDAYS
- Since 1976 -
AWARD
WINNING
BEEF
STICKS
JERKY
SAUSAGE
Labor Day
Grilling
Favorites
A Full Service
Old-Fashioned Meat Market
STEAKS
BABY BACK RIBS
SPARE RIBS
THICK-CUT PORK
CHOPS
HOMEMADE
BAKED BEANS
POTATO & CRAB SALAD
You Deserve
QUALITY BRATS!
ORIGINAL
JALAPENO
CHEDDAR CHEESE
SAUERKRAUT
Try our BACON!
ORIGINAL BACON
PEPPER BACON
Mmmm...
SO GOOD!
COUNTRY-STYLE SAUSAGE
COWBOY SAUSAGE
OPEN
M-F: 8AM-6PM
SAT: 8AM-5PM
CLOSED LABOR DAY
1
4
_
0
1
0
4
#
2
0
6
PAGE 06 the independent 08.22.14
BEHIND EVERY GREAT MAN IS A WOMAN ROLLING HER EYES. JIM CARREY
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
MISSION
Our mission is
to nurture the
healing ministry
of the Church by
bringing it new
life, energy and
viability in the 21st
century. Fidelity to
the Gospel urges
us to emphasize
human dignity and
social justice as we
move toward the
creation of healthier
communities.
MERCY HOSPITAL 570 Chautauqua Blvd.
valley City (701) 845-6400 or 1-800-371-9177
14_0616#119
14_0723#155
Vintage Variety
A little bit of everything
LOTS OF BARGAINS
701-840-2361
219 Central Ave Valley City
1
4
_
0
8
0
8
Sheyenne Valley Friends of
Animals are prepping for a busy
September, with the groups an-
nual annual Walk & Wag-A-
Ton Fundraiser set for Sunday,
Sept. 14, and Spay/Neuter Week
to follow from Sept. 15-19.
To join the annual Walk &
Wag-a-Ton, to be held on the
Barnes County Courthouse
lawn, pick up pledge sheets at
Valley City Park and Rec, Val-
ley Ofceworks, or fnd them on
SVFAs Facebook page. Registra-
tion for the Sunday walk starts at
1 p.m., with the walk following
at 1:30 p.m. Te frst 50 to reg-
ister get a free T-shirt. Te event
will feature food, music, door
prizes and games for canine and
companion.
If your pet needs to be desexed,
nows a very good time to get it
done. SVFA, in partnership with
Valley City Veterinary Hospital,
are ofering a total of 35 signif-
cantly discounted procedures
during Spay/Neuter Week. Pets
shots must be current, or will be
provided at owners expense.
To claim your spot, make an
appointment by calling the Val-
ley City Veterinary Hospital at
701-845-3662; mention Spay/
Neuter Week to take advantage
of the discounts. -NLZ
SVFA: Spay/Neuter, Wag-a-thon on tap
WEATHER FORCAST FOR TONIGHT: DARK. GEORGE CARLIN
08.22.14 the independent PAGE 05
L&H SHOE
SHOP
125 CENTRAL AVE. S. - VALLEY CITY, ND 701-845-2087 OR 701-845-2378
METATARSAL
PROTECTING
FOOTWEAR
SHOE REPAIR & SALES
HUNTING & FISHING
EQUIPMENT
ZIPPERS & REPAIR
GUNS:
BUY, SELL, TRADE
0
1
0
6
#
2
1
0
0
1
1
3
#
2
3
1
Jeffrey A. Nathan
Dawn J. Mathias
(Licensed Directors)
251 Central Ave. S.
Valley City, ND 58072-3330
oliver-nathanchapel@csicable.net
www.oliver-nathanchapel.com 701-845-2414
1
1
0
6
#
1
4
8
SERVICES OFFERED FREE OF CHARGE
ABUSED PERSONS OUTREACH CENTER, INC.
24-Hour Crisis Line
701-845-0072
(collect calls accepted)
Valley City
Crisis Center
701-845-0078
Terry Lee
Cornell II
(Photo/
BCSD)
THE MOST WANTED LIST
The Barnes County Sheriffs Department seeks the publics
assistance in locating individuals who have felony warrants
issued for their arrest. If you have any information on the
whereabouts of any of these individuals, contact the Barnes
County Sheriffs Department at 701-845-8530 or via email at
investigate@barnescounty.us Anonymous tips accepted!
Terry Lee Cornell II
Terry Lee Cornell II has had his probation revoked
and a order to apprehend warrant has been issued.
Cornell is described as a 41-year-old white male,
weighing approximately 200 pounds and standing
5-foot 10-inches tall. He has brown hair and hazel
eyes.
COLD WAR. Barnes County Senior 4-Hers toured the historical Oscar-Zero and Novermber-33
missile sites north and east of Cooperstown, witnessing rst-hand the front lines of the cold war
between the U.S. and Russia. Pictured are (from left): Mariah Schroeder, Tessa Schroeder, Erik
Milender, Shannon Bryn, and (back row) Darris Thoreson, Laura Thoreson.
Our Senior 4-hers were amazed that these top-secret facilities were literally in our back yard, said
Susan Milender, Barnes County extension agent. The trip was part of 4-Hs recent expansion into
science, technology, engineering and math focuses. According to Milender, the trip to Cooperstown
concentrated on the history of the cold war as well as the science and engineering that went into
missile technology in the 1960s. To nd out more about 4-H, call Barnes County Extension Service
at 701-845-8528. (Photo/submitted)
Great
Grapes!
Part 2
W
hat started out in
2003 as an effort to
supply hardy wine
grapes to a nearby Casselton
winery has since blossomed
for Buffalos Rodney and Su-
san Hogen into an exceptional
example of tourism-based
agriculture.
Besides the multiple variet-
ies of hardy wine grapes the
Hogens grow and metamor-
phose into handcrafted North
Dakota wines, the couple has
has also transformed the prop-
erty theyve dubbed Red Trail
Vineyard into a fashionable
destination for visitors from
far and near.
Rodneys a people person
and is a great storyteller,
says vineyard fan Liane Stout
of Buffalo. A glass of wine
goes well with that.
That, and a guitar, which
Rodney is known to pull out
during the vineyards frequent
Friday Night Suppers, events
Rodney calls country com-
fortable and which feature
a casual dining menu such
as Juicy Lucy burgers along
with, of course, Red Trail
Vineyard wines.
We started off just growing
grapes, then it was tastings,
now its events, Rodney
says.
The vineyards latest offer-
ing, Friday Night Suppers,
draw the hungry and the curi-
ous mostly from Valley City
and Fargo, Rodney says, but
out-of-staters on tour pop in
for a bite, a swirl and a spit,
as well.
Nowadays, when people
tour the state, they kind of
know where theyre gonna go
and what theyre gonna do.
We get a lot of them, says
Rodney, whose efforts at the
vineyard are considered cut-
ting edge for North Dakota
agriculture.
WINE: 15
the independent 08.22.14
THEY SAY MARRIAGES ARE MADE IN HEAVEN. BUT SO IS THUNDER AND LIGHTNING. CLINT EASTWOOD
PAGE 08
I
should warn
the reader that
we are dealing
with a time before
television, video
games and smart-
phones, a time
when the whole
countryside was a
Wellness Center
for active people, and people were
mostly pretty active. A healthy diet
was pretty much determined by
what was in season, in commercial
cans and packages, or put up for
the winter.
Choice was limited. Healthy
food meant having enough to
avoid starvation with enough vari-
ety to avoid the diseases of malnu-
trition, and enough quality control
to avoid ptomaine poisoning and
trichinosis. Vegans ate pickles. By
todays standards, danger lurked
everywhere yet liability was a
rare concern.
Tis state of afairs went on for
decades. It was a miracle anyone
survived, but I swear that they had
more fun.
Not only did our forebears have
a lot of fun of the sort that is now
largely lost to all but a few, but
as the enthusiasm generated by
the annual Chautauqua Assem-
bly demonstrated they seem to
have had much higher standards
with regard to culture and educa-
tion.
Valley Citians established an op-
era house, created a serious library,
and brought in frst-rate talent and
programs from near and far. Te
architecture of the town was excel-
lent and impressive. One looks at
photographs of how local people
dressed just to go downtown and
it becomes clear that the notion of
progress has since taken an odd
turn.
Within that vast natural Well-
ness Center, a.k.a. the Sheyenne
Valley, were pockets of focused
learning and recreation, and one
of those places was Chautauqua
Park.
Chautauqua Park is where I
learned to swim, and where I did a
great deal of fshing. I still remem-
ber with regret losing what must
have been at least a 20-pound pike
near the mouth of the N.P. Creek,
just across the river from the north
side of the park. Tat was the time
my father taught me how to set the
hook in a Big One. He suggested
that when the cork went under, I
should imagine myself casually
fetching a pack of cigarettes out of
my pocket, tapping one out, put-
ting it to my lips, returning the
pack of cigarettes to my pocket,
taking out my lighter (or match),
lighting up, taking a drag, then
setting the hook. Since I never
smoked cigarettes, this required
a lively, yet disciplined, imagina-
tion.
I also have pleasant memories of
annual picnics put on by, I believe,
the Jaycees who, not having carrot
juice, celery sticks and energy bars
available, made do with free ice
cream and lemonade. Tis event
included, besides the usual fshing,
boating and swimming, at least a
couple of sofball games, horse-
shoes for the men, and doubtlessly
something for the women but, of
course, I would not remember
that.
Perhaps the biggest event at
Chautauqua Park was the Chau-
tauqua Annual Assembly, which
took place annually during the
summers from 1911 to 1932.
Chautauqua Assemblies in-
volved a 17-day program of lec-
tures, classical music, readings,
movies and drama. Tere was a
Dairy School, a Poultry School, a
Farm Boys Encampment, a Barnes
STILLINGS: 9
Chautauqua Park recreation 100 years ago: Part 1
By Dennis
STILLINGS
MUSEUM WITHOUT WALLS
ABOVE: Parking at Chautauqua
Park about 1920. (Photo/BCHS)
LEFT: The Chautauqua Pavilion
as it looked in 1919.
(Photo/Dennis Stillings collection)
BELOW: Inside the original Chau-
tauqua Assembly Tent ca. 1913.
(Photo/BCHS)
ALL GENERALIZATIONS ARE FALSE, INCLUDING THIS ONE. MARK TWAIN
08.22.14 the independent PAGE 09
T
h i s
we e k s
t i me l y
article was
found in the
Sept. 2, 1915,
issue of Te
Enderlin Inde-
pendent and
gives us some
insight about the opening of
the school year in the early
days.
ooo
SCHOOLS OPEN NEXT
TUESDAY:
Prospects for the Most Proft-
able School Year in the History
of Tis City
Provision is being made in
every way for the opening of the
Enderlin schools next Tuesday
morning, September 7. During
the summer the building has
been thoroughly disinfected,
blackboards re-slated, foors
freshly oiled and various nec-
essary repairs made. Teachers
are already arriving and by
next Monday afernoon, when
the frst regular teachers meet-
ing of the year will be held, all
are expected to be on hand.
Te schools are open to all
over 6 years of age. Pupils
should bring tablets and pencils
and be prepared for work the
frst morning. In the grades, free
text books are furnished. In the
high school, pupils furnish their
own texts and will be directed
what to secure at the frst class
register. Grade pupils should
bring promotion cards whether
entering from Enderlin or else-
where. Pupils in the high school
are requested to being their copy
of the school hand-book. High
school pupils expecting to take
a university or other advanced
course should read carefully the
college entrance requirements
as stated in the hand-book and
elect work accordingly. Some
of our farmer graduates have
been refused entrance to cer-
tain colleges because they have
failed to observe the require-
ments. Enderlin being a state
high school of the frst class, the
tuition in the high school is free.
In the grades a nominal charge
is made to partially cover the
annual expense. Inquiries
from new students regarding
the courses have been unusu-
ally numerous this year and the
greatest enrollment in the his-
tory of the school is expected.
ooo
Sues Comments: Te prepa-
rations for a new school year
included jobs that sound
strange to us nowadays, such
as re-slating blackboards and
oiling foors!
Other events are still
SCHLECHT: 16
DID YOU KNOW?
By Susan
SCHLECHT
STILLINGS: From 8
County Girls Domestic Science School, and activi-
ties for children all over the place.
(A brief history of the Chautauqua Movement
may be read at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chau-
tauqua.)
Attendees at these Assemblies numbered a few
thousand, and came from all over Barnes County
and the surrounding area. Tents could be pur-
chased or rented from A. J. Wright ofMoorhead,
which located on site. Food was delivered to the
campgrounds by Valley City merchants at city
prices. Tere was also a restaurant (see photo of
menu at left).
Te Assembly program was held in a large tent
until 1914 when a pavilion was constructed. It be-
came available for Chau-
tauquas in 1915. Tis
new Chautauqua Park
pavilion could seat 3,500
people.
Te annual Chautau-
qua Assemblies ceased in
1932, I suspect at least in
part due to the Great De-
pression.
In 1945, the Chautau-
qua Park Pavilion was
sold to the Winter Show,
and in 1947 the circular
auditorium was moved
from Chautauqua Park to
the Winter Show prop-
erty between Second and
Tird Streets Northeast
and between Fifh and
Sixth Avenues Northeast.
ABOVE: Camping in Chautauqua Park circa 1915. (Pho-
to/BCHS)
T
he Gospel of Mat-
thew records for us
a number of events
on the night in which Jesus
was betrayed. One of them is
when Jesus and His disciples
went to the Garden of Geth-
semane.
Te word Gethsemane
means olive press. Tis was
a location on the Mount of Olives that
overlooked Jerusalem from the east. And
we might say that in this place there was a
crushing, pressing of sorts that did occur.
On that night, Jesus said that His soul
was sorrowful, even to death (Mt. 26:38). It
was on this occasion that Luke tells being
in agony he (Jesus) prayed more earnestly;
and his sweat became like great drops of
blood falling down to the ground (Luke
22:44).
Jesus had gathered these friends with
Him and had asked them to watch with
Him (Mt. 26:38). But having gone away to
pray for a time, He came back to fnd them
sleeping. And so, you and I who call upon
the name of Jesus Christ recognize that
even those who are closest to Jesus are still
troubled by our weak fesh.
Jesus asks Peter, So, could you not watch
with me one hour? (Mt. 26:40). Peter
showed how quickly he failed afer having
just proclaimed that he would never fall
away from Jesus. He was weak.
To his friend who had shown his weak-
ness Jesus says, Watch and pray that you
may not enter into temptation. Te spirit
FAITHFULLY: 12

PO Box 78
ENDERLIN
First Lutheran Church
326 Blu St
(701) 437-3317
Sundays at 9:30 a.m.
Pastor Thea Monson
First Methodist Church
228 5th Ave
(701) 437-3407
Trinity Lutheran Church
319 Fourth Ave.
(701) 437-2433
Hope Lutheran Church (AFLC)
(meets at Enderlin Methodist)
Sunday School@10 a.m.
Worship Service@11 a.m.
701-437-3777
Pastor Dennis Norby
thenorbys@msn.com
FINGAL
Holy Trinity Catholic Church
419 1st Ave.
(701) 924-8290
FORT RANSOM
Standing Rock Lutheran Church,
136 Mill Rd.
(701) 973-2671
KATHRYN
St Pauls Lutheran Church
(701) 796-8261
11546 52nd St SE
LEONARD
Bethel Moravian Church
15407 49th St SE
(701) 645-2287
Leonard Lutheran Church
PO Box 279
(701) 645-2435
St Peters Lutheran Church
(ELCA)
4713 150th Ave SE
(701) 347-4147
LISBON
Assembly Of God
1010 Forest St.
(701) 683-5756
First Baptist Church (ABC)
401 Forest St.
(701) 683-4404
First Presbyterian Church
10 6th Ave. West
Pastor Juwle S. Nagbe
(701) 318-4273
Sunday Worship 11:15 a.m.
Trinity Lutheran Church
418 5th Ave W.
(701) 683-5841
United Methodist
(602 Forest St.
701) 683-4479
St Aloysius Catholic Church
102 7th Ave W.
(701) 683-4584
Redeemer Lutheran Church
803 Forest St.
(701) 683-5347
LITCHVILLE
First Lutheran Church
(701) 762-4297
506 5th St
Trinity Lutheran ELCA
5809 Co. Rd. 60 SE
(701) 669-2282
MARION
North Marion
Reformed Church
(701) 669-2557
4430 99th Ave SE
NOME
St Petri Lutheran Church
12505 52nd St SE
(701) 924-8215
ORISKA
St Bernard Catholic Church
(701) 845-3713
606 5th St
SANBORN
Our Saviors Lutheran Church
Sunday service 9 a.m.
Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Pastor Mark Haines
Sacred Heart Catholic Church
(701) 646-6306
711 4th St
TOWER CITY
St. Pauls Lutheran Church
(701) 749-2309
401 Broadway St
www. splbl.org.
VALLEY CITY
All Saints Episcopal Church
516 Central Ave. N
701-845-0819
Calvary Baptist Church
(Independent)
2030 West Main St.
701-845-8774
Congregational United Church
of Christ
217 Fourth St. NW
701-845-1977
Epworth United
Methodist Church
680 Eighth Ave. SW
701-845-0340
Evangelical Free Church
1141 Ninth St. SW
701-845-1649
Faith Lutheran Church
575 10th St SW #3
701-845-4390
First Baptist Church
3511 S. Kathryn Rd.
701-845-4500
First Church of the Nazarene
913 Riverview Drive
701-845-4193
Grace Free Lutheran Church
(AFLC)
2351 West Main St.
701-845-2753
Mercy Hospital Chapel
570 Chautauqua Blvd.
701-845-6400
New Life Assembly of God
520 Winter Show Rd.
701-845-2259
Our Saviors Lutheran
138 Third St. NW
701-845-1328
Rivers Edge Ministry
(Interdenominational)
348 E. Main St.
St. Catherines Catholic Church
540 Third Ave. NE
701-845-0354
St. Pauls Evangelical Lutheran
Church (WELS)
202 3rd St NW
701-845-0702
Sheyenne Care Center Chapel
979 Central Ave. N.
701-845-8222
Southwest Bible Chapel
826 Fifth St. SW
701-845-2792
Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA)
499 Fourth Ave. NW
701-845-3837
Valley Apostolic
Sunday School 10AM
Sunday Worship 11AM
Pastor Tony Puckett
215 Fourth Ave. NW
(701) 845-9590
pastor@valleyapostolic.com
Valley Baptist Church
204 5th St. NW
701-845-6950
PAGE 10 the independent 04.18.14
WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO WORSHIP AT THE CHURCH OF YOUR CHOICE.
Make Our Home,
Your Home
CALL FOR A TOUR
24-hour trained staff
3 home-cooked meals
a day
701-845-8945
570 13th St NE Valley City
0610#570
THRIFT-E-SHOP
ARC Thrift-e-Shop
141 2nd St NE
Valley City, ND
845-4189
Mon,Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat
9:30 am to 5:30 pm
Thur 9:30 am to 8 pm
Senior discount: 20%
off EVERY TUESDAY
GRANNYS CLOSET
12:30 pm to 5:20 pm M-F
Costume Rentals
shopping with a
purpose. every day.
0
1
0
6
#
2
0
8
Heat your entire home,
domestic water and more
with the Classic OUTDOOR
WOOD FURNACE from
Central Boiler. Dual fuel ready
models available. Call Today!
RLH Enterprises
Fingal, ND Dealer
CALL: 701-412-3143
OR EMAIL:
rlh.enterprises@yahoo.com
CONTACT
1
4
_
0
2
0
4
#
2
4
8
CHURCH DIRECTORY
To include your
churchs weekly
worship sched-
ule in this direc-
tory and/or up-
date the listed
i n f o r ma t i o n ,
please send an
email with com-
plete information
to submissions@
indy-bc.com
BUFFALO
Bualo Lutheran Church
(701) 633-5302
505 3rd St N
www. splbl.org.
First Presbyterian Church
P.O. Box 146
701-633-5410
Service 10:00 a.m. Sun-
days
St. Thomas Church
(701) 633-5150
1160 W. Main
Valley City, ND
701-845-3786
0
4
2
2
#
4
7
4
342 CENTRAL AVE. N.
VALLEY CITY, N.D.
701-845-5013
0320#421
Janice, Nancy & Seth
will help you with all your
Home Furnishings!
TWIN SIZE
Starting at $99* each piece
FULL SIZE - $269
QUEEN SIZE - $292
KING SIZE - $599
(*when sold in set)
Armstrong
Funeral Home
Your Concern
Is Our Concern
Enderlin Lisbon Gwinner
701-437-3354
701-683-4400
Charlie & Debbie
Armstrong
1
0
1
0
#
1
1
1
OPEN
MONDAY-SATURDAY
301 CENTRAL AVE. N
VALLEY CITY
701-845-1022
0
3
2
0
#
4
2
4
CONSIGNMENT
& EMPORIUM
THERE IS NOTHING BETTER THAN A FRIEND, UNLESS IT IS A FRIEND WITH CHOCOLATE. LINDA GRAYSON
PAGE 10 the independent - 08.15.14
BUFFALO
Buffalo Lutheran Church
(701) 633-5302
505 3rd St N
www. splbl.org
First Presbyterian
Church
P.O. Box 146
701-633-5410
Service 10 a.m. Sundays
St. Thomas Church
(701) 633-5150
PO Box 78
DAZEY
St. Marys Catholic
Church
Sunday Mass: 10:30
a.m.
ENDERLIN
First Lutheran Church
326 Bluff St
(701) 437-3317
Sundays at 9:30 a.m.
Pastor Thea Monson
First Methodist Church
228 5th Ave
(701) 437-3407
Trinity Lutheran Church
319 Fourth Ave.
(701) 437-2433
Hope Lutheran Church
(AFLC) (meets at Ender-
lin Methodist)
Worship Service: 10 a.m.
701-437-3777
www.hopeluther-
anenderlin.org
Pastor Dennis Norby
thenorbys@msn.com
FINGAL
Holy Trinity Catholic
Church
419 1st Ave.
(701) 924-8290
FORT RANSOM
Standing Rock
Lutheran Church,
136 Mill Rd.
(701) 973-2671
KATHRYN
St Pauls Lutheran
Church
11546 52nd St SE
(701) 796-8261
KENSAL
St. Johns Catholic
Church
Sunday Mass:
8:30 a.m.
LEONARD
Bethel Moravian Church
15407 49th St SE
(701) 645-2287
Leonard Lutheran
Church
PO Box 279
(701) 645-2435
St Peters Lutheran
Church
(ELCA) 4713 150th
Ave SE
(701) 347-4147
LISBON
Assembly Of God
1010 Forest St.
(701) 683-5756
First Baptist Church
(ABC)
401 Forest St.
(701) 683-4404
First Presbyterian
Church
10 6th Ave. W.
Pastor Juwle S. Nagbe
(701) 318-4273
Sunday Worship 11:15
a.m.
Trinity Lutheran Church
418 5th Ave W.
(701) 683-5841
United Methodist
(602 Forest St.
701) 683-4479
St Aloysius Catholic
Church
102 7th Ave W.
(701) 683-4584
Redeemer Lutheran
Church
803 Forest St.
(701) 683-5347
LITCHVILLE
First Lutheran Church
506 5th St
(701) 762-4297
First Reformed Church
210 8th Ave
Worship: 9:30 a.m.
701-762-4440
Trinity Lutheran ELCA
5809 Co. Rd. 60 SE
(701) 669-2282
MARION
North Marion Reformed
Church
4430 99th Ave SE (701)
669-2557
NOME
St Petri Lutheran Church
12505 52nd St SE
(701) 924-8215
ORISKA
St Bernard Catholic
Church
606 5th St
(701) 845-3713
PILLSBURY
Baldwin Presbterian
Church
Service 9:30 a.m.
Sundays
SANBORN
Our Saviors Lutheran
Church
Sunday service: 9 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:30
a.m.
Pastor Mark Haines
Sacred Heart Catholic
Church
711 4th St
(701) 646-6306
TOWER CITY
St. Pauls Lutheran
Church
401 Broadway St
www. splbl.org
(701) 749-2309
VALLEY CITY
All Saints Episcopal
Church
516 Central Ave. N
701-845-0819
Calvary Baptist Church
(Independent)
2030 West Main St.
701-845-8774
Congregational United
Church of Christ
217 Fourth St. NW
701-845-1977
Epworth United
Methodist Church
680 Eighth Ave. SW
701-845-0340
Evangelical Free Church
1141 Ninth St. SW
701-845-1649
Faith Lutheran Church
575 10th St SW #3
701-845-4390
First Baptist Church
3511 S. Kathryn Rd.
701-845-4500
First Church of the
Nazarene
913 Riverview Drive
701-845-4193
Grace Free Lutheran
Church (AFLC)
2351 West Main St.
701-845-2753
Mercy Hospital Chapel
570 Chautauqua Blvd.
701-845-6400
New Life Assembly of
God
520 Winter Show Rd.
701-845-2259
Our Saviors Lutheran
138 Third St. NW
Worship 8:30 and 10
a.m.
701-845-1328
Rivers Edge Ministry
(Interdenominational)
348 E. Main St.
St. Catherines Catholic
Church
540 Third Ave. NE
701-845-0354
St. Pauls Evangelical
Lutheran
Church (WELS)
202 3rd St NW
701-845-0702
Sheyenne Care Center
Chapel
979 Central Ave. N.
701-845-8222
Southwest Bible Chapel
826 Fifth St. SW
701-845-2792
Trinity Lutheran Church
(ELCA)
499 Fourth Ave. NW
701-845-3837
Valley Apostolic
Sunday School 10AM
Sunday Worship 11AM
Pastor Tony Puckett
215 Fourth Ave. NW
(701) 845-9590
pastor@valleyapostolic.
com
Valley Baptist Church
204 5th St. NW
701-845-6950
WIMBLEDON
St. Boniface Catholic
Church
Saturday Mass: 7 p.m.
CHURCH DIRECTORY
OPEN
MONDAY-SATURDAY
301 CENTRAL AVE. N
VALLEY CITY
701-845-1022
1
4
_
0
4
0
4
#
2
0
CONSIGNMENT
& EMPORIUM
Armstrong
Funeral Home
Your Concern
Is Our Concern
Enderlin Lisbon Gwinner
701-437-3354
701-683-4400
Charlie & Debbie
Armstrong
1
4
_
0
4
1
7
#
4
0
342 CENTRAL AVE. N.
VALLEY CITY, N.D.
701-845-5013
1
4
_
0
4
1
0
#
2
5
Janice, Nancy & Seth
will help you with all your
Home Furnishings!
TWIN SIZE
Starting at $99* each piece
FULL SIZE - $269
QUEEN SIZE - $292
KING SIZE - $599
(*when sold in set)
Heat your entire home,
domestic water and more
with the Classic OUTDOOR
WOOD FURNACE from
Central Boiler. Dual fuel ready
models available. Call Today!
RLH Enterprises
Fingal, ND Dealer
CALL: 701-412-3143
OR EMAIL:
rlh.enterprises@yahoo.com
CONTACT
1
4
_
0
5
1
3
#
8
7
When you need a
helping hand....
MARYHILL MANOR
Long-term Care Facility
Enderlin 701-437-3544
1
4
_
0
7
1
0
#
1
4
5
THRIFT-E-SHOP
ARC Thrift-e-Shop
141 2nd St NE
Valley City, ND
845-4189
Mon,Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat
9:30 am to 5:30 pm
Thur 9:30 am to 8 pm
Senior discount: 20%
off EVERY TUESDAY
GRANNYS CLOSET
12:30 pm to 5:20 pm M-F
Costume Rentals
shopping with a
purpose. every day.
1
4
_
0
7
1
6
#
1
5
0
FAITHFULLY
Pray: Lead us not into temptation
By the Rev.
Dennis NORBY
Is your church missing from the
Independent church directory?
Have the leader of your church
submit the information to
submissions@indy-bc.com
and well add it to our listings.
W
hile I have
had many
kinds of
conversations since I
arrived here in Valley
City, most pleasant, and
a few not, it is time I had
a conversation with all
of you readers that you
may not like. Yes, thats
right, trash talk. No, not the conversa-
tion where we stand around and call
each other names, throw around slurs
and epitaphs. You know, trash talk, gar-
bage talk, rubbish.
Recently, I have been getting more
and more calls concerning people put-
ting their garbage in someone elses
trash containers. Usually, these are the
larger trash containers that are used
by our local businesses, apartment
complexes, and other concerns, and
are placed in some dark corner of the
property where they are out-of-sight
and out-of-mind.
Te typical complaint I receive is that
someone is observed driving onto the
property of another, driving over to
the trash containers, and then empty-
ing the contents of their car, pickup
truck, trailer, etc., into the container.
You might be surprised to know, if you
are the person doing this, that you have
committed a crime.
North Dakota Century Code 12.1-
23-03, Tef of Services, states: a per-
son is guilty of thef if: 1. He intention-
ally obtains services, known by him to
be available only for compensation, by
deception, threat, false token, or other
means to avoid payment for the servic-
es; or 2. Having control over the dispo-
sition of services of another to which
he is not entitled, he knowingly diverts
those services to his own beneft or
to the beneft of another not entitled
thereto.
I live in Valley City, and like most
of you who live here too, and I pay my
monthly bill for trash collection ser-
vices. I also know, that like all of you
residential customers, I am entitled to
have picked up two (2) 32-gallon trash
cans each week for the monthly fee and
that for each extra can above the two, I
THOMPSON: 12
J
ust months ahead of a
November vote on a bal-
lot measure to dissolve
the existing State Board of
Higher Education and re-
place it with something new,
North Dakotans have gotten
a glimpse behind the public
all is wall facade they get
from their university system.
What they saw wasnt pretty.
What you get almost makes you want
to lose your will to live on this board, past
board president Grant Shaf told his fellow
board members during a not-public public
meeting held at the University of Mary at the
end of July.
We know that Mr. Shaf said this that
the board members and their consultant said
many eyebrow-raising things because I
fled an open meetings complaint with the
Attorney Generals ofce afer the public was
ordered out of the room during the meeting.
Board President Kirsten Diederich told the
audience that the meeting was still techni-
cally open to the public, but that the board
would appreciate it if the public lef so they
could have a private conversation with con-
sultant Tom Meredith, a former chancellor
of the Mississippi university system.
But afer a reader tipped me of to Dieder-
ichs strange request, I got the audio, because
the meeting was always public, and despite
subsequent claims from university ofcials
its clear they never intended their comments
to be public.
By the way, this has got to be like Las Ve-
gas, Meredith told the board members in
the room afer the public lef, referring to the
famous What happens in Vegas stays in Ve-
gas tagline. Its in here. Anybody violates
that [inaudible].
Meredith said this just as he launched into
a description of problem university presi-
dents who were running amok, and when he
said it, none of the board members can be
heard objecting.
Why would they? Afer all, Mr. Shaf took
the opportunity to say that the state of afairs
in the university system makes him not want
to live any more (lets hope thats merely hy-
perbole).
Teres more:
Te board is running scared, Mer-
edith told the board members, noting that
they arent standing up to the university
PORT: 15
W
ith the trade of
Josh Willing-
ham to Kansas City, the
most recent of many,
the U.S. Justice Depart-
ment is going to charge
the Twins with human
trafcking because they
dont show any evidence
of being in baseball.
If not trafcking, theyve been in the
cellar so long perhaps they are in the
mushroom business. For Slugger Will-
ingham, the Twins got two batboys and
a two cases of bubblegum.
It proves that the world has been go-
ing downhill since the invention of the
iron plow.
Washington lawyers are lobbying for
lighter sentencing guidelines for white
collar crime. Te church people are ec-
static. Tey think it will let them of the
hook.
A proposal to change the name of
North Dakota to just Dakota was con-
sidered and defeated in the 1947 leg-
islative session. Some of us are still
thinking about it. Maybe we should
bring the problem to the NCAA. Tey
have a way of dealing with names.
Te North Dakota Petroleum Coun-
cil fnanced a study to prove that Bak-
ken crude is not as volatile as claimed
by the federal government. Ten why
is it supporting a proposal to outlaw all
smoking west of Garrison?
While our planes were dropping food
and water to the folks trapped on Sinjal,
they could have solved two problems
at once by dropping Ebola on Islamic
Staters. It would have been more deadly
than airstrikes.
Te small town of Cormorant, Min-
nesota made news by electing a dog for
mayor. What is so unusual about that?
A lot of towns have done that.
North Dakota celebrated its 125th
OMDAHL: 12
I REFUSE TO JOIN ANY CLUB THAT WOULD HAVE ME AS A MEMBER. GROUCHO MARX
08.22.14 the independent PAGE 11
OPINION: ROB PORT
By Rob
PORT
Higher Ed faces major
integrity problem
OPINION: LLOYD OMDAHL
A lighter look at the really big news
By Lloyd
OMDAHL
DISTRICT 24
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
T
he 2015 session of the North
Dakota Legislature is months
away. As in the past, the is-
sues confronting the next session
are many and they are complex.
Legislators have been meeting with
their respective interim commit-
tees throughout the past number
of months since the adjournment
of the 2013 session in an attempt to
fnd possible resolution to many of the challenges
the next session will face.
Needless to say, there are more questions than
there are answers.
One of the most challenging issues facing our
state (and most others) is maintaining our sys-
tem of roads and bridges. Te Upper Great Plains
Transportation Institute at North Dakota State
University in Fargo released a preliminary report
recently during a meeting of the Budget Section of
the legislature. Te Budget Section is comprised
of legislative leadership and the members of both
the House and Senate Appropriations Commit-
tees. Te report was preliminary due to the fact
that we are yet to hear from Congress on what the
federal highway funding level will be for the next
budget cycle. With reductions in federal funding,
more and more pressure is placed on the state and
our political subdivisions. Te Upper Great Plains
Transportation Institute did report that it will take
hundreds of millions of dollars to maintain our
system of roads and bridges for our state, counties,
cities and townships. Tis is a result of an aging in-
frastructure, increased trafc counts, heavier trafc,
and signifcant increases in the construction costs.
Infrastructure concerns are just one of many
challenges the legislature will face. Tere are
serious challenges with the care of the mentally
ill across our state. In many instances, folks wait
months for access to professional services. North
Dakota is aso dealing with a critical shortage of
addiction counselors and treatment services in
general. Te issue is very serious. Action by the
2015 session is a high priority.
Funding for K-12 Education is also an issue fac-
ing the legislative assembly. Although signifcant
increases in state funding have been made in recent
years, a number of schools with declining enroll-
ment have faced serious budget difculties. Tis is
due to a per pupil funding formula. It is expected
that the legislature will attempt to take steps neces-
sary to address this important issue.
Higher Education is facing signifcant deferred
maintenance of facilities across the state. A recent
report identifed a total of $900 million in deferred
maintenance issues across the university system.
Te report suggested that the system would need
ROBINSON: 12
The issues are many...
By Sen. Larry
ROBINSON - D
OPINION: LETTER TO THE EDITOR
By Fred
THOMPSON
Police Chief: Lets talk trash
THOMPSON: From 11
will be charges an additional $5.
Using my trash as an example, lets say I
place my two, 32-gallon trash cans out to
the curb on Tursday night, my pick-up
day is Friday, and one can is full, and the
other is half-full. Sometime late Tursday
night, someone flls the half-full can to
the brim with their trash. Friday morn-
ing when I take out more of my garbage,
lets say about a half-can worth, out to the
trash, there is no room in my trash cans.
Tis would cause me to place an additional
trash can out there, which in turn causes
me an additional charge.
Any way you look at this, the person who
put their trash in my trash can has stolen
from me services that I am paying for and
a crime has been committed.
Whether the owner of the trash can,
dumpster, bin or container is a residential
customer like me, or a business customer
like Burger King, John Deere or Leevers
grocery store, the same logic stands.
Some of these illegal trash dumpers do
this because the material they are dumping
is hazardous, or has some other restriction
that would cause them additional expense
that they care not to spend. Maybe they are
just lazy. Illegally dumping hazardous trash
of any kind would subject the dumper to
additional charges and penalties over and
above the thef of services charge, not to
mention the danger that this type of dump-
ing presents to anyone near the material.
To go with this, the person or business
responsible for that trash container is now
responsible for whatever fees and charges
are necessary for the proper disposal of the
hazardous material. Depending upon the
material, this could cost thousands of dol-
lars.
Tere will be those who say, Why doesnt
the PD go afer real crimi-
nals like burglars and
robbers, instead of these
garbage dumpers? First,
the dumping of hazardous
waste in a manner that is
not prescribed by law is a
health and safety violation
and a danger to everyone.
Second, VCPD is sworn
to uphold all the laws of
the State of North Dakota,
not just all of them except
the thef of services or
trash dumping. Lastly, the
public we serve is getting
tired of these dumpers taking advantage of
them. I know this because I get the phone
calls.
So before you dump your garbage in
someone elses trash containers, think
about the possibility of being issued a ci-
tation, or arrested and taken to jail, be-
cause you chose not to take care of your
own trash in the manner prescribed by law.
People are watching and they will contact
VCPD and we will investigate, and charge
appropriately. I dont take my trash to your
house; please dont take your trash to my
house, or anyone elses.
ALWAYS REMEMBER THAT YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY UNIQUE, JUST LIKE EVERYONE ELSE. MARGARET MEAD
PAGE 12 the independent - 08.22.14
FAITHFULLY: From 10
indeed is willing but the fesh is weak (Mt.
26:41). In this we are reminded that we are
as believer made up of spirit and fesh. As
believers, we are given a new spirit that
desires to do that which God commands
and says is good. Our old fesh however,
is weak as Jesus says. Tis weakness is
shown here in the disciples falling asleep.
Our feshs weakness is shown in neglect-
ing many good things. We dont pray or
read Gods word; we skip church for vari-
ous reasons, we dont serve our neighbors
as we should. Our fesh is weak.
To the weak Jesus says, watch and pray
that you may not enter temptation. Te
weak (people like us) need this reminder
from the Savior. We are not above being
reminded. We are ofen falling asleep and
neglecting prayer but Jesus comes to us in
His word and calls us to prayer, which as
we looked at last week, is to approach the
throne of grace (Hebrews 4:16).
Tis text in Matthew shows the weak-
ness of the disciples but also clearly shows
the strength of Jesus. He prayed that the
will of God would be done. Tat even
though the sorrow was great and the cup
of Gods wrath was going to be poured
out completely on Him He would submit
to Gods will. He prayed that Gods will
would be done and it was. Te perfect
lamb of God, Jesus Christ was sacrifced
to ransom us who have weak and sinful
fesh. So now we pray, as Jesus taught His
disciples in the Lords Prayer, Lead us not
into temptation.
Reach the Rev. Dennis Norby by email:
thenorbys@msn.com
ROBINSON: From 11
$250 million per biennium not to fall any fur-
ther behind! Serious discussion will also take
place on the issue of tuition increases for the
students in the system.
As is the case with road construction costs,
most, if not all, water projects across the state
are experiencing signifcant increases in con-
struction costs. At a recent meeting of the State
Water Commission, we were informed that al-
most all water projects have experienced signif-
icant cost over runs. Te State Water Commis-
sion informed us that it typically includes a 10
percent cushion in its planning of water proj-
ects. Unfortunately, costs have been exceeding
that amount by an additional 20 percent! Tis
obviously makes planning and budgeting very
difcult.
Te legislature will also face challenges with
the shortage of afordable housing and daycare
needs across the state. Tese shortages are hav-
ing signifcant impacts on employers attempt-
ing to attract workers to our communities. Te
issue is not confned to western North Dakota.
Local fre departments will likely be seeking
additional fnancial support from the state as
well. In many communities, there are few, if any,
volunteers lef to respond to emergencies. As a
result, the responsibility ofen shifs to a neigh-
boring department placing additional burdens
on that department for labor and equipment.
Te care of our most vulnerable will always
be a challenge for the legislature. With an aging
population, and the challenge in many rural ar-
eas to access medical services, this is an issue we
cannot ignore. Te funding for our DD provid-
ers, longterm care, and our veterans, is a high
priority for the legislature. We are fortunate to
have a strong program of public transportation
and senior services in most parts of the state,
but that system needs fnancial support as well.
Transit costs continue to rise. Unfortunately,
reimbursement costs dont always keep pace.
Property tax continues to be a concern in the
state. Eforts are underway to address this visit
this issue again next January. Tis is an impor-
tant issue which we must monitor closely in the
coming months.
I could go on and on. Tis is by no means a
complete listing of the multitude of issues we
will face next January. As you can see, the 2015
session of the North Dakota Legislative Assem-
bly will be faced with many challenges. Some
old and some new. Some have suggested that
with the current furry of activity in our state,
not only in the west, but indeed across the state,
it may well be time to consider an abbreviated
session of the legislature in even numbered
years. Te session could make important bud-
get adjustments and address other pressing
needs that should not be put of until the reg-
ular session. Tat debate has been with us for
years. I expect it to intensify.

Reach Sen. Larry Robinson, D-District 24, by email at
lrobinson@nd.gov
n A story on Tunderbird Ranch by Roger Bluhm ap-
pearing on page 2 of the Aug. 1 edition of Te Independent
contained an error. Tunderbird Ranch gourmet food
products are distributed at Pride of Dakota shows, not
Dakota Pride shows as reported in a quotation.
n Submitted information published in a caption under a
photo on page 1 of the Aug. 15 edition of Te Independent
was incorrect. Te phone number for Organic Cupboard
in Enderlin is 701-437-2280. For more information on the
Organic Cupboard, see its webpage at www.organiccup-
board.com
Te Independent sincerely regrets these errors.
CORRECTIONS
OMDAHL: From 11
birthday a few days ago even though the
states birthday is really in November. But
who wants a party on the capitol lawn in
November?
Te oil companies are in competition
with the Legislature to see who can waste
the most gas.
Even the legislators who denounce so-
cialism love the Bank of North Dakota.
However, they think we ought to sell the
Mill & Elevator to the Russians. Not be-
cause it is socialism but because it doesnt
make enough money.
Te Bible is true but how do I reconcile
Noahs Ark with dinosaurs? Maybe they
were created of-camera.
Some believers are now building a rep-
lica of the Ark in Kentucky so they can
prove that the dinosaurs ft. Afer he land-
ed, Noah must have spent weeks cleaning
the place up.
Dinosaurs were the least of Noahs prob-
lems. It was getting those two cats on
board.
Apartments are so expensive in Williston
that landlords are thinking of renting them
by 8-hour increments. Some Eastern pub-
lication has claimed that rent is higher in
Williston than in New York City. But New
York is not close to an oil feld so it comes
out about even.
Te EPA has set CO2 reduction goals for
all the states. Even though North Dakotas
goal is lower than other states, the coal
folks are up in arms. EPA is putting their
feet to the fre, so as to speak.
Unless we use some of the oil money to
fnd a solution for this CO2 problem, coal
is going to end up as the Edsel of the en-
ergy industry - 350 billion tons of coal and
no place to burn.
Cows are now being blamed for earth
warming. Scientists claim that cows release
100 kg of Methane yearly 23 times more
damaging than CO2. Dont be alarmed.
Tey are experimenting with Rolaids and
Beano as feed additives.
Better have your steak now just in case.
www.indy-bc.com in print. online. always free.
PROCRASTINATION IS THE ART OF KEEPING UP WITH YESTERDAY. DON MARQUIS
THEME: THE FIFTIES

ACROSS
1. Gold measurement
6. *Trans World ___lines or
TWA
9. Daughter of Zeus
13. Broadcasting sign
14. *Watsons and Cricks
model
15. Alternative to truths
16. Bug
17. Denouement
18. Beginning of a sickness
19. *1950s car feature
21. Aroused
23. + or - atom
24. Montana tribe
25. Pecking mother
28. Do over
30. Genufect in submission
35. Spill the beans
37. *McCarthys foes
39. Wither from heat
40. Fairytale beast
41. Anklebone
43. Crunchable info
44. New World parrot
46. Acute
47. Grand ____
48. In need of fxing
50. Brooklyn team
52. Big fuss
53. Minor damage
55. Beehive State native
57. *Type of skirt popular in
1950s
60. *First man-made satellite
to orbit earth
64. Schoolmarms whip
65. Rainy
67. *It supported the North in
Korean War
68. Brandish
69. Sodium hydroxide
70. Piece of cake
71. Approximately
72. Coniferous tree
73. Indian _____
DOWN
1. *Nixons respectable Re-
publican cloth ____
2. ____ Karenina
3. Hindu princess
4. Garlicky mayonnaise
5. Make an attempt
6. Yemeni port
7. *Holiday ___ motel chain
8. Highway patrolmans gun
9. *Slugger ____ Aaron de-
buted in 1954
10. Gaelic
11. ___ there, done that
12. C___ la vie!
15. *The Platters sound
20. Dead to the world
22. Moo goo gai pan pan
24. Young codfsh
25. *Thermonuclear weapon
26. Pomp and Circumstance
Marches composer
27. Narcotics lawman
29. Wanted state in old west?
31. Bankrolls
32. ___-__-la
33. Eight Is Enough group,
e.g.
34. *Frisbee and Hula Hoop
maker
36. Yellow on bald eagle
38. Absolutely!
42. Get something ready
45. Tied the knot
49. Not a thing
51. Exterior plaster
54. Very recently
56. Set of principles
57. Lucy and Ricky, e.g.
58. Has a mortgage
59. *1952 Olympic site
60. Like soup, but thicker
61. Supreme Court count
62. Ancient Peruvian
63. *Newsweek sports editor,
Boys of Summer author
64. Pencil type
66. *CBS unveiled this logo in
1951
CROSSWORD SUDOKU
CROSSWORD
SOLUTION
SUDOKU
SOLUTION
Directions: Fill in the blank squares in
the grid, making sure that every row,
column and 3-by-3 box includes all
digits 1 through 9.
Dairy Queen Brazier
909 Central Ave N 701-845-2622
1
4
_
0
4
2
9
#
6
3
08.22.14 the independent PAGE 13
www.bakkegardandschell.com
Serving You
Since 1978
701.845.3665 OR 800.560.3665
BAKKEGARD & SCHELL
159 12th Avenue SE Valley City, ND
What We Do
Installation & Service
Commercial Residential
New Construction Remodels
Heating Refrigeration A/C
24 Hour Service
Free Consultations
Our mission is simple:
Provide a quality product and personal, professional
service to our customers.
We are committed to quality service and customer satisfaction!
We support our employees and are committed to our community!
Established in 1978
Our mission is simple: Provide a quality product & personal professional service .
We are committed to quality service & customer satisfaction!
We support our employees & are committed to our community!
1
4
_
0
2
0
6
#
2
5
7
www.bakkegardandschell.com
Serving You
Since 1978
701.845.3665 OR 800.560.3665
BAKKEGARD & SCHELL
159 12th Avenue SE Valley City, ND
What We Do
Installation & Service
Commercial Residential
New Construction Remodels
Heating Refrigeration A/C
24 Hour Service
Free Consultations
Our mission is simple:
Provide a quality product and personal, professional
service to our customers.
We are committed to quality service and customer satisfaction!
We support our employees and are committed to our community!
Established in 1978
WOMEN AND CATS WILL DO AS THE PLEASE, AND MEN AND DOGS SHOULD RELAX AND GET USED TO THE IDEA. ROBERT A HEINLEIN
PAGE 14 the independent - 08.22.14
MEET & GREET ADOPTION CENTER
These lovable animals, available through Sheyenne Valley Friends of Animals,
are hoping youll give them a happy new home!
To inquire about an adoptable pet seen here, contact SVFA (Sheyenne Valley Friends of Animals)
OR GET INVOLVED: 701-840-5047 SPAY & NEUTER GROUP: 701-840-1334 Email: info@svfanimals.org
SASHA
Sasha, age 6, was recently
surrendered to SVFA with Cody and
Sadie. Shes a black lab with hip
dysplasia. But, that doesnt keep her
from LOVING playing in the water! It
just means she cant run as much as
many other labs her age. Shes great
with kids and dogs, but should not
go to a home with cats or chickens.
Sponsored by
Dr. Dawns Pet Stop
Your Pets Deserve the Best!
NutriSource-Tuffys-Diamond
151 9TH AVE. NW
VALLEY CITY - 845-0812
1
4
_
0
6
1
0
#
1
1
1
SADIE
Meet Sadie! She was recently
surrendered with Cody and
Sasha. She is a 4-year-old lab mix
who does well with kids and
dogs, but shouldnt go to a home
with cats or chickens.
Sponsored by
Dakota Plains Cooperative
All SVFA pets are
up-to-date on routine
shots, microchipped
and spayed or neu-
tured, if old enough.
ADOPTION
FEES:
Dogs $75
Cats $50
0
8
2
2
You Pet Vet Dr. Dawn Entzminger
1202 12th Ave SE Jamestown www.drdawnspetstop.com
HOURS
Mon-Fri
8-5
14_0710#143
ARTIE
Artie and Baby are mother and son and a
bonded pair. They love to hang out with
anyone who will pay attention to them. When
they came to SVFA, they were being fostered
separately and a little anxious being apart,
but now that theyre back together, they are
happy little dogs. Because theyre a bonded
pair, were offering a discounted adoption fee
so they can spend the rest of their lives
together in their forever home. Both Baby, 8,
and Artie, 7, are house trained.
Sponsored by
Weltons Tire Service Inc.
BABY
Artie and Baby are mother and son and a
bonded pair. They love to hang out with
anyone who will pay attention to them. When
they came to SVFA, they were being fostered
separately and a little anxious being apart,
but now that theyre back together, they are
happy little dogs. Because theyre a bonded
pair, were offering a discounted adoption fee
so they can spend the rest of their lives
together in their forever home. Both Baby, 8,
and Artie, 7, are house trained.
Sponsored by
Valley City Veterinary Hospital
BARNES COUNTY
AMBULANCE
914 11th Ave SW
Valley City, ND 58072
701-845-2220
EMERGENCY
DIAL
911
1
4
_
0
4
1
4
#
2
9
CODY
This is Cody, a 6-year-old black
lab. Hes a guy who is great with
kids and dogs, but shouldnt go
to a home with cats or chickens.
Sponsored by
Valley Officeworks
GEORGIA
If youre looking for the life of the
party, 4-year-old Georgia is your gal!
She loves people. Shes staying with
a dog and rabbit, and doesnt bother
either. Found abandoned in a house,
she over groomed herself, so her
belly is bald. But, that doesnt stop
her from hamming it up, and into
your heart!
Sponsored by
Barnes County Ambulance
WELTONS TIRE SERVICE INC
209 MAIN ST. - LISBON, N.D.
OUR HOURS:
M-F: 8 AM to 6 PM
Sat: 8 AM to 3 PM
CONTACT US: 701-683-5136 701-683-5177 800-342-4672
1
4
_
0
1
0
7
#
2
1
8
1
4
_
0
4
0
4
#
1
7
I LIKE LONG WALKS, ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY ARE TAKEN BY PEOPLE WHO ANNOY ME. FRED ALLEN
08.22.14 the independent PAGE 15
PORT: From 11
presidents who have now pushed out two
chancellors in less than a decade.
When you say we need to work with
our experts on the campuses and things
like that, I agree with that, but Im not so
sure this board is able to completely trust
the information that comes up from the
campuses, Shaf told Meredith at another
point in the conversation, calling a recent
report from the campuses on admissions
bunk.
Tats right. Bunk. As in, Shaf doesnt
feel he can trust the universities to pro-
vide the board with accurate informa-
tion. Instead, Shaf seems to feel that the
universities serve up self-serving, well,
bunk.
Even the most ardent apologist for the
universities must admit thats a pretty fun-
damental breakdown in governance. And
when Shaf made these remarks, none of
the other board members objected.
It gets worse.
Tis board has never known how to
hold anybody accountable, Shaf said.
Hes right. One need look no further
than the Dickinson State University di-
ploma mill fasco where the only man
fred was the president, Richard McCal-
lum, as if he single handedly doctored the
grades and transcripts upon which those
hundreds of phony degrees were based.
Short of a crime, nobody gets held
accountable here, Shaf went on to say,
but even thats understating it. Clearly, at
Dickinson State, some administrators did
get away with a crime. Nobody has ever
been charged for that fraud.
Your retention rates and graduation
rates are just abysmal, Meredith told
board members, stating a fact obvious to
everyone outside of the university system
but refuted by defensive university of-
cials. Tey just are, he said of the self-
evident truth.
Meredith summed it up with one of his
fnal comments to the board during the
closed meeting: Youve got to step up.
Te public is crying for you to step up.
Hes right. And if this board doesnt
step up in a big way, the public can fre
them come November.
But that might not be enough. What we
learned from this audio is the real prob-
lem in the university system lays with ar-
rogant university-level leadership.
classied advertising
SERVICES
CALL THE INDY TO PLACE ADS: 701.645.8890
NEW DEVELOPMENT IN DEVILS
LAKE: Ackerman Valley, 20,000-
25,000 sq ft lots available to ac-
commodate campers, park models,
manufactured or stick-built homes.
Prices range from $17,500-$20,000.
Resort access optional. Call for de-
tails, 701-739-6325. 14_0530#7
When you rent a house or apart-
ment, you want affordability, choic-
es, great locations, and friendly ser-
vice. Cornerstone Rentals LLC offers
all this and more, including some pet
friendly options. Call 701-845-APTS
(2787) or email trishia@propertiesby-
cornerstone.com today. 14_0616#15
Medicine for the soul. In-
scription over the door of the
Library at Thebes. Ye Olde
Books & Curious Goods. 226 E.
Main St., Valley City. 701-845-
8721; yeoldebooks@yahoo.com
14_0314
HOUSING / REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
Publishers Notice: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18
living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call
North Dakota Fair Housing Council Toll-free 1-888-265- 0907. HUD Toll free 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
For sale: Struts for 96 Bonnev-
ille, good used $40.00 701-437-
2863.
FOR SALE: Blue 50cc Lance
Scooter. - Low Miles - Good Con-
dition. - Call 701 840-8141 to take
a look.
1209 5th Ave. SE
Jamestown, ND 58401
www.LiechtyRealEstate.com
$125,000 MLS #14-71
Once in a lifetime
opportunity
Turn-Key operation
Real Estate
Included
DUCK INN LOUNGE
Updated Building &
Equipment
Main Street Corner Lot
Outdoor Area for Events
B
USINESS F
OR SALE
Marion, ND
14_0708#139
HELP WANTED
Does your job got you down?
Looking to do something more fullling, meaningful, and gratifying?
You can make a difference in our residents lives.
Working with our residents is both gratifying and fun.
The Sheyenne Care Center has openings in multiple depart-
ments. Openings include a Neighborhood Assistant in Ac-
tivities, Dryer in Laundry, Nutrition Assistant and Dish-
washer in Dietary, and both day and night position for
Nurses and C.N.A.s. Contact Jessi Hill at 701-845-8222 or Jessica.
hill@smphs.org if interested. Applications can be picked up at 979 Cen-
tral Ave N, Valley City, or online at
http://www.sheyennecarecenter.
com/employment.htm You can
also submit your application via
fax to 701-845-8249.
1
4
_
0
6
2
3
#
2
0
Maryvale Convent is seeking a
PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY/BOOKKEEPER
FOR 32 HOURS A WEEK. Benets included.
Knowledge of Quickbooks and computer skills needed.
Salary competitive.
Please email resume to suzanne.stahl@smphs.org
by Aug. 27th
1
4
_
0
8
2
0
WINE: From 7
Thats not because North Dakota-grown and
produced wine is rare not now, anyway. Today,
there are six vineyards in Cass County alone.
But most would argue thats because the Hogens
have largely led the way... starting with Rodneys
stint in 2006 and 2007 as president of the then-
newly formed North Dakota Grape Growers As-
sociation; followed by the construction of an on-
premises tasting room and commercial kitchen at
the vineyard; followed by the founding of Red
Trail Vineyards Annual Grape Harvest Festival
and Grapestomp (just held last weekend, by the
way); and now... its suppers.
You know why we call them Friday Night
Suppers, instead of Dinners? Because the country
folk think dinner is at noon and the city folk think
dinner is at 6, quips Rodney.
Problem solved. Supper it is.
If youd like to join the Hogens for what theyre
calling The Last Supper of the season, reserva-
tions are required, with room for only 25-30 peo-
ple per supper.
Save a spot by phoning Rodney: Red Trail
Vineyard Tasting Room, 701-633-5392; or Rod-
neys direct line, 701-238-3337; or shoot him an
email at rehogen@yahoo.com
Or pop by the vineyards wine tasting room
from noon to 4 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays or Sun-
days and give Red Trails handcrafted vino a try.
Currently available for tasting and purchase are
the following Red Trail labels: Frontenac Gris;
Red Trail Red (a Frontenac thats been sweet-
ened); Red Trail White (a blend); Alpha Rose;
and Valient (made from an old grape, frst pro-
duced in the 40s).
Three additional wines are also in the works,
now available for tasting and, if youre lucky,
also for sale: a red wine made from the Petite
Pearl grape; 2-1-17, an experimental sauvignon;
and 1-1-34, also experimental.
Theyre all too new to have a name, Rodney
says.
The Petite Pearl introduction is nine years in
the making.
Production is slow coming. You plant the
vines, then after four or fve years, hopefully you
have a little to sell, Rodney says.
Red Trail Vineyard is located at 3510 142nd
Ave. SE, Buffalo. NLZ
WHATS ANOTHER WORD FOR THESAURUS? STEVEN WRIGHT
08.22.14 the independent PAGE 16
YOUR HEALTH: From 2
believed fuoride can aid adults with
dry mouth, gum recession, root expo-
sure, sensitivity and dietary factors. Al-
though gels and trays can still be used,
a newer delivery system to be recom-
mended is a fuoride varnish. Tese
varnishes are approved by the FDA to
reduce tooth sensitivity and as a cavity
liner. Although not labeled for cavity
protection, varnishes are considered ac-
ceptable for that use.
Tese newer fuoride var-
nishes applied in a dental
ofce are now easy to use,
taste better and a smaller
amount is needed for efec-
tiveness.
Fluoride varnish can be
used for both adults and
children. Varnishes are a
safer recommendation for
young children because the
quantity used is less and
there is minimal ingestion
since the varnish adheres to
the teeth. Te adhesive fac-
tor also extends delivery of
the fuoride to the enamel
which maximizes the up-
takes and thus the beneft.
Varnishes are usually ap-
plied two to four times per
year depending on the de-
cay risk of the individual.
Again fuoride varnish can
be used for both adults and
children and can be part of
public health programs for
prevention of decay.
Although fuoride has been available
in various forms for a long time and
remains an efective means for decay
prevention throughout a persons life
span, good communication is necessary
between dental health professionals and
the community to maximize benefts
and minimize risk.
Janie Wanek is a registered dental hygienist at
Concept Dentistry in Valley City. Your Health
is coordinated by Mercy Hospital.
EAGLES AERIE 2192
345 12TH AVE. N.E.
VALLEY CITY, ND
CALL US
845-2192
YES, WE ARE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!
DINING ROOM OPEN TUESDAY - SATURDAY.
BASKETS AVAILABLE IN LOUNGE.
FULL SALAD BAR THURSDAY - SATURDAY.

E
V
E
R
Y
S
ATURDAY NIGHT 5
-9
P
M
!
1
4
_
0
7
2
4
#
1
6
1
Helping Families
Honor, Connect & Remember
For Over 70 Years
In Your Time of Need...
We can help
Serving You
Michael Lerud & Allen Schuldt
Owners & Funeral Directors
515 Central Ave N - Valley City, ND - 701-845-3232 - www.lerudschuldt.com
1
4
_
0
7
2
4
#
1
5
6
INDUSTRIAL RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
WHATEVER YOUR NEEDS, WE HAVE YOU COVERED
SPIRITWOOD // VALLEY CITY // GWINNER // WEST FARGO // WAHPETON
701.845.3010 WWW.GROTBERGELECTRIC.COM
1
4
_
0
7
0
8
1
3
6
SCHLECHT: From 9
common practice today, such as teacher meetings or work-
shops and the need for student handbooks.
It is interesting to note that high school students could
take university or advanced courses much the same as to-
days students can take dual credit classes. From an article
Sept. 9, 1915, we learn that the total enrollment on opening
day in 1915 was 385 students with only 63 in high school
and the rest in grades 18.
Tis was before the addition was added at the Enderlin
School a few years later, doubling the size of this frst brick
school building, so students were grouped with multiple
grades to a classroom, much like the old country schools.
Because of the large enrollment, they had to order more
seats and textbooks.
Sue Schlecht is co-director of the Enderlin Historical Society and Museum. Reach
her by email: swschlecht@mlgc.com
A total of 40 people volunteered to donate blood, and 34 were able to give during an Aug. 11
blood drive held at the VFW in Valley City.
Five people gave blood on United Blood Services automated 2RBC machine, which collects two
units of red blood cells during the donation, so a total of 39 products were collected. One of the
donors was a frst-timer.
Rose Wendt coordinated the drive, and the AmVet Ladies Auxiliary sponsored and assisted
with recruiting donors, publicity, providing refreshments, and registering donors. Others who
assisted the day of the drive were: Lucile Riden, Edna Elsner, Lorraine Jenson, Kathy Brobst and
Connie Ertelt.
Space to hold the drive was provided at the VFW.
AmVet Ladies blood drive a success