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SNAPSHOT from the UNFPA


INDONESIA YOUTH MONOGRAPH

Youth = 26% Indonesian population

Projection: Youth = 70 million in 2035

Youth literacy rate is over 98%

3.4 million rst time job seekers in August


2012

60% of males and 43% of females aged


20-24 lived with parents

Of all women aged 20-24: 54% in rural


areas and 32% in urban areas are mothers
http://goo.gl/xV66J4
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UN IN INDONESIA
IN THIS ISSUE
Youth Role in 2014 Elections
Aceh+10: Interviews with UN staff
Young Entrepreneur
Twitter & Food Prices
Child Labour & Social Protection
Latest Refugee Statistics Report
Month-long Celebration of Young
People in Indonesia
UN agencies and partners: Invest in
youth, understand their needs

Jakarta Talk about youth in Indonesia and
inevitably the phrase demographic bonus
comes up. Over the next couple of decades,
experts agree, Indonesias 63 million young
people currently aged 10-24 more than a
quarter of the countrys population will be the
most crucial demographic group to ensure the
countrys healthy growth and sustainable
development.

Given the importance of Indonesias youth,
Indonesia ttingly marked the UNs World
Population Day (WPD) not with a single day
event but with a month-long series of activities
focused on Investing in Young People. The
campaign kicked off in Jakarta last month with
a seminar attended by representatives of
Government and civil society -- opened by the
UN Resi dent Represent at i ve Dougl as
Broderick together with the representative from
the Ministry of Youth and Sports. The event
also included the launch of the UNFPA Youth
Monograph (see sidebar story).

We want to fully involve young people in the
development process, said Pak Fasli Jalal,
Chairman of the National Population and
Family Planning Agency (BKKBN), at the WPD
launch press conference in the Borobodur
Hotel. Pak Fasli singled out health issues
facing young people as the being especially
important, given their impact on the nations
productivity and young peoples transition into
the workforce.
(continues on page 2)
Tune in to #UNYouthEnvoy
https://www.facebook.com/UN4Youth
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Month-long celebration of Indonesias Youth
(continued from page 1)
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With the right investments, todays young people
can reach their full potential as individuals, leaders
and agents of progress, says Jose Ferraris, the
UNFPA Representative in Indonesia. The world
clearly needs their energy, their participation and
their skills, Mr. Ferraris said, underlining the
sometimes difficult process of transition that young
people undertake as they move from school to work,
and towards forming their own families. There are
risks in the transition process from childhood to
adulthood, including early and unwanted pregnancy,
and violence against women and girls, Mr. Ferraris
said. Young people should be given the space to
address these important issues.

How should Government respond?, asked Sri
Moertiningsih Adioetomo (Ibu Tuning), of the
Universitas Indonesia Faculty of Economics. The
labour market is going to be more demanding in
terms of IT skills, she said, and early age marriage
is still prevalent. My conclusion is that young
people in Indonesia are not prepared, and that the
Government needs to support their transition.

The Vice Minister of Finance H.E. Bambang
Brodjonegoro spoke of the lower middle-income
trap and using the demographic bonus to help
propel Indonesia towards a more prosperous future.
Citing the example of the Republic of Korea (aka
South Korea), one of Asias poorest countries in the
1950s, the Vice Minister emphasized the need to
develop intellectual capital as a way to switch from a
commodity-based to process-based economy.

Handry Satriago, the Chief Executive Officer of
General Electric Indonesia, warned young people
that you have to be ready for a world that is running
and faster everyday. Among the factors most
needed t o be compet i t i ve, he si ngl ed out
communications and leadership skills -- to persuade
people, sell ideas and maintain innovation.

Additional speaker included teen idol
singer Vidi Aldiano, in the photo above,
Dr. Sonny H.B. Harmadi of Universitas
Indonesia and Prof. Dr. Prijono
Tjiptoharijanto, chairman of the
Association of Indonesian Demographic
Experts and Supporters (IPADI).
An estimated 1500 young Indonesians packed Balai
Kartini in Jakarta on 9 August to celebrate the
Youthnesian Festival and Concert, presented by
UNFPA and the Ford Foundation.
Youth Hangouts featured young speakers on a range
of different issues. H.E. Dr. Nafsiah Mboi, the Minister
of Health, and Dino Patti Djalal, the Deputy Minister of
Foreign Affairs were both present.
Booths from civil society organizations and UN
agencies in Indonesia enlivened the atmosphere at the
Youth Fair. Performances by three young Indonesian
singing talents -- Vidi Aldiano, Maudy Ayunda, and
Raisa -- capped the festivities.
YOUTHNESIAN FESTIVAL
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YOUNG UN @ YOUTHNESIAN
Voting for their future young Indonesians voice their priorities in the My World 2015 Survey
collected at the Youthnesian Festival and Concert in Balai Kartini, Jakarta (9/8). The survey was
conducted by young staff and volunteers of UNIC Jakarta, UN RC ofce and UNICEF at the Youth
Fair. More than 28,000 votes have been collected in Indonesia, and the process will go on until
2015. Based on the survey results in Indonesia, young voters have so far identied education as
the most important priority, an honest responsive government as their second, and better
healthcare as their third.
MORE FROM OCHA! Launch of a new data platform
OCHA launched a new humanitarian data platform at the Open Knowledge Festival in Berlin in June.
The Humanitarian Data Exchange (HDX) aggregates preexisting data from over 20 sources (such as
World Bank, UNHCR, WFP, and many others), creating one place to go to nd humanitarian data.
The service also provides tools for analysis and visualization of data. HDX will use open-source,
open content, and open data as often as possible to reduce costs and in the spirit of transparency.
http://hdx.rwlabs.org/launch/?1/home
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#HumanitarianHeroes
There is a humanitarian in all of us.
The UN Ofce for Coordination of
Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) has launched an
online community: Messengers of Humanity.
The community will consist of global
advocates that will take action on major crises
and events by sharing inspiring content on
social networks.
Please visit http://worldhumanitarianday.org
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Jakarta During the build up to the presidential
elections, a group of young Indonesians would
regularly gather in a caf in South Jakarta to
watch and discuss the political debates
between the Presidential candidates.

The events were organized by Ayo Vote, an
initiative to encourage young people to
participate in elections. According to the
organizations website it was not aligned to a
particular party or candidate but aimed to be a
source of open and balanced information.

As most of the mainstream media outlets had
already picked sides, Indonesias youth turned
to the internet and social media to nd a more
unbiased take on the debates. Young people
have been a particularly important demographic
in the recent elections: There are roughly 55
million young voters aged 18-30 in Indonesia.
says 24 year ol d Di sna Har vens, a
representative of Ayo Vote. These young
voters tend to be swing voters or undecided
voters, many of whom are active on social
media.
According to Facebook, more than half of the
64 million users in Indonesia are 16 to 24 years
old. Jakartans also tweet more than any other
urban population in the world, with some 87
percent of tweets sent over mobile phones.
Social media is the easiest tool for promote
something, especially in Indonesia. It is the
most accessible and also cheap says Disna.
Even so, social media does not yet reach far
beyond the urban areas in the sprawling
vastness of the Indonesian archipelago. "It can
only reach audiences in big cities, Disna
continues.
The right to participate is one of the guiding
principles of the Universal Declaration of
Human Rights, says Michele Zaccheo, Director
of the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC)
in Jakarta. From a UN perspective its
absolutely vital that young people have access
to the tools that allow them to stay informed
and access to their civil rights, he adds.
Ayo Vote isnt the only online community
encouraging youth involvement in elections.
Transparency International Indonesia, for
example, launched multiple campaigns such as
a website where voters could check the
credentials of candidates, held a youth camp
about the election, and surveyed young people
on their perceptions of integrity. According to
Disna, Indonesia has its own version of Rock
the Vote, organized by Center for Election and
Political Party (CEPP). There is also Celup
Kelingking and Jari Ungu. These movements
serve as a forum for sharing ideas and try to
educate, encourage, and involve young people
as much as possible.
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Above: An Ayo Vote yer advertises a
screening of a debate between the
candidates for Vice-President
First time voters capturing the moment
with their ink-dipped nger
#Pemilu
Youth Participation & Social Media in the 2014 Elections
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Tell us about yourself and how you found
yourself in Aceh?
I am a medical doctor and graduated from
Airlangga University in Surabaya. After
graduating I undertook the mandatory work for
the Government of Indonesia for three years as
the head of a Puskesmas (Public Health
Center) in Madura Island. In 2001 there was an
ethnic conict (Dayak Sambas) that caused a
big displacement of people there. For the rst
time I found myself involved in humanitarian
work with an international NGO providing
reproductive health (RH) services for the
Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) from
Madura.
I have been working for humanitarian affairs for
more than 10 years now: with the World Bank
and World Health Organization (WHO), before
joining UNFPA. When the tsunami struck Aceh,
I was with WHO, and then in 2005 I joined
UNFPA as the adviser on Reproductive Health
(RH) for the UNFPA tsunami programme.

What was your role?
To provide overall substance and technical
assistance in Reproductive Health, the biggest
component of the UNFPA tsunami emergency
programme, and to coordinate on RH with
organizations both in Aceh and Jakarta. Later I
was assigned to lead the team, until the project
was closed in 2006. UNFPA did not have a
Humanitarian Unit before the Aceh tsunami,
but we learned from that experience that
having one is important. UNFPA has since
specically introduced a humanitarian unit for
24/7 emergency preparedness and response.
(continues page 7)
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RESILIENT INDONESIA
ACEH +10 UN VOICES FROM THE TSUNAMI
In our last newsletter, we began a series of interviews with UN staff who worked on relief,
recovery and reconstruction in Aceh after the devastation of the Tsunami.
Some are still with the UN in Indonesia. Some joined the UN after the tsunami. Others left
Indonesia, but have come back. All have a story to tell.
Rosilawati
Anggraini
National
Humanitarian
Programme
Ofcer,
United Nations
Population
Fund (UNFPA)
Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you
nd yourself in Aceh?
I was in Morocco having breakfast one day,
watching the news and then I heard about this
tsunami. I was managing a project in ILO
headquarters at the time and I was asked to do
a rst mission for possible ILO activities in Aceh.
I arrived in Aceh seven weeks after the tsunami
and I was stationed for two months in Banda
Aceh to coordinate setting up our programme.
They asked me if I could extend my stay for a
year but I couldnt because of the project in
headquarters. I later joined ILO Jakarta as the
Deputy Director, in September 2007. In August
2010 I became the Director.
What was your primary role in Aceh?
I was the senior programme ofcer who
coordinated ILO work in Aceh and Nias for the
rst two months. We had quite a lot of people
arriving there for assessments and ad hoc
activities. Starting work about a week after I had
arrived on employment services. Then through
our programmes, not only to connect the
communities but also the livelihoods -- what we
call local economic development -- we provide
support consultations and training to start their
own businesses, access to nance like micro-
credit, vocational training so that people have
technical skills to make products or to give
products more value.
(continues next page)
Peter
Van Rooij
Director,
International
Labour
Organization
(ILO)
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How did you approach the community?
I should say this unique to the ILO. As a tripartite organization - our anggota (members) are not only
pemerintah (government) but also buruh (labour) and pengusaha (employers). So we are used to
consultations and dialogue -- which we also did in Aceh and Nias. For example: the infrastructure work that
we did. We were involved because it was an opportunity to involve local labour more. And because of that
from the beginning we have close consultations with local communities not only so that they can provide
our labour as much as possible, so that more cash goes into that community, but they also have ownership.
What was most remarkable thing about your experience there?
It was very intense, we would work seven days a week, which is not healthy. We didnt have to work seven
days a week to help the people in Aceh but we all felt guilty to take a day off. So even on Sundays we were
all working. But we would play football in the sawah (rice eld) outside the guesthouse and the ball would
go everywhere because its not a straight eld. The kids were very enthusiastic, even more at the end where
we would have something to drink and to eat. They played with their bare feet, and were better football
players than us. It was great: good memories, wonderful people. On the other hand it was very emotional
as well to see half a city destroyed, seeing body bags -- and yet people trying to move on with life and
trying to make the best out of it. I remember I met with the head of the employers, who showed me photos
of his ofce destroyed, photos of his Mercedes destroyed, photos of his son killed, and he was just going
on as if the house, the car, and the son is all in the same category. Its not, but he probably told that story
so many times that it became a routine. By the way, in Aceh we had a 30 percent quota for women -- it was
said that women cant make bricks. But it was a very successful project. I realized that perhaps it was
about people having something to do and not sitting around the whole day and just be reminded the whole
day of what happened. Work shifted the mindsets.
What is the value to Indonesia of the UN experience?
Capacity development. The UN did provide a very important contribution in terms of quantity, but also in
terms of quality. The UN has a number of comparative advantages on specic themes technically, but also
in terms of how we approach things: being neutral, being guided by our Member States, as a convener, as
a facilitator. So I think the contribution of the UN was key -- but it was not the UNs programme, and we
should not pretend that it was.
How would you describe the successes and challenges of ILOs effort at that time?
The challenge was staff turnover; many organizations sent people for a week or two weeks. You have
people who come in and dont know anything about the topic and you try to share best practices. Before
they get it, they move out and new colleagues come, and then you start from scratch. But overall I think
this was one of the better examples in the world of commitment nationally and internationally, led by local
people, of unifying to respond to major disasters in a very positive way. I think thats why Indonesia is
rightfully quite proud of this and has been promoting this work to other countries. There was excellent
coordination and leadership by the government instead of letting everybody do their own thing. There was
effective coordination by government under the Indonesia's Reconstruction and Rehabilitation Agency
(BRR). Its a real success story for Indonesia by Indonesia. As UN agencies we worked together, on the
ground, and I think this was the best of two worlds.
UN VOICES FROM THE TSUNAMI: Peter Van Rooij (ILO)
It was great: good
memories, wonderful
people. On the other
hand it was very
emotional as well to see
half a city destroyed...and
yet people trying to move
on with life and trying to
make the best out of it.
- Peter Van Rooij
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UN VOICES FROM THE TSUNAMI: Rosilawati Anggraini (UNFPA)
What were the professional challenges?
It was not easy building the trust with the Acehnese especially after the years of conict there. We
had to slowly build trust. We rented houses where we both lived and worked. Communication
devices, such as mobile phones, were not useable at the time.
UNFPA didnt implement the programme directly but through implementing partners, including
provincial and district ofces who were overwhelmed with the tsunami aid. Eventually Indonesia
became the example and others wanted to learn from its Aceh tsunami experience. But before,
Indonesia did not have any standard procedures in handling disasters. There were too many
humanitarian organizations who provided support and worked with the same local partners, and
therefore it was very difcult to ensure timely, quality programme implementation.

What was most remarkable about your experience there?
I never had been to Aceh before the Tsunami. I was deployed just four or ve days after the disaster
when I still could see the devastation, including the dead bodies everywhere. I experienced the
aftershocks and tremors. I also experienced the biggest earthquake in my life: the Nias earthquake of
2005 with a magnitude of 8.6 on the Richter scale. For the rst time I was so scared for my own life
when responding to a disaster!
It was also my rst time being involved with a big humanitarian project with a large amount of funding
and so many staff. My two-year involvement with the tsunami emergency was not only part of my
personal development (like attending two years intensive humanitarian course), it made a big change
to my life. After completing the tsunami emergency programme, I decided to continue my
professional career as a humanitarian worker, to this day.

Looking back now, how would you describe the successes and challenges?
UNFPA restored the function of ten public health centers and ve hospitals to provide quality
reproductive health services.In 2005, for the census, UNFPA supported BPS-Statistics Indonesia
(Badan Pusat Statistik) in conducting a population census to get accurate demographic data on
post-Aceh Tsunami. The census (known as SPAN) covered Aceh and Nias. Before the tsunami, due to
the conict, the census coverage for Aceh was at most only 60 percent, but SPAN was able to get
100 percent coverage in Aceh province, which was very useful during the rehabilitation and
reconstruction phase. The tsunami was also the wakeup call for Indonesia and also for UNFPA to
better prepared to anticipate major disasters in the future considering our countrys vulnerability to
disaster.
What was the value to Indonesia of UN support in the relief and reconstruction efforts?
I think that the UN efforts contributed a lot to build back Aceh, better. Before the tsunami, Aceh
was considered as a disadvantaged area, left behind compared with other provinces in Indonesia.
But through the tsunami programmes implemented by different UN agencies, Aceh province
could catch up. For example, under the UNFPA reproductive health programme, the Acehnese
were able to have better access to quality RH services.
It made a big
change to my life... I
decided to continue
my professional
career as a
humanitarian
worker, to this day.
-Rosilawati Anggraini
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Jakarta - Keeping track of changing prices
at the food market is not easy for anyone, but
can the analysis of social media help?
Thats the question being asked at Pulse Lab
Jakarta (PLJ), where data scientists are
testing the hypothesis that Twitter activity
can help estimate food prices on a daily
basis by mining mentions of prices of three
key commodities: beef, chicken, and onion.
The project is being carried out together with
the Ministry for National Development
Planning (Bappenas) and World Food
Programme (WFP).
Indonesia is an ideal place to test this
hypothesis, as it ranks among the top ve in
the world for total number of Twitter users.
The vast archipelago also makes for a
challenging geography to collect data.
PLJs analysis shows that it is possible to nowcast
food prices - but with some important caveats.
It appears that people were reactive on social media
to noticeable increases in price, but not to
decreases or to long-term price stability.
PLJ found that Indonesians do tweet about food
prices in real time, creating data that could perhaps
be used to provide early warning for unexpected
spikes.
Could the model be applied to other commodities?
Are there sufcient signals to investigate regional
variations in prices?
These are some of the areas of further research that
PLJ are looking into.
http://nowcasting.unglobalpulse.org/
Can Twitter data be used to track Changing Food Prices?
managerial challenges. "Fortunately, I had the chance to participate in ILOs training with 19 other
young entrepreneurs in Yogyakarta, he says. I learned so much about starting and improving my
business. I also learned about business planning, nancial planning, purchasing, costing, packaging,
marketing, and promotion," he added.
Yoi was also able to access post-training support an after-training support. "As a result my business-
earnings have increased from 18 million IDR to 40 million IDR per month! By the end of 2014, I am
targeting to reach 60 million IDR." Yoi has also increased his labour force from two employees to 15.
His goal for the future? I want to open my business up to other entrepreneurs who want to learn how
to manage and improve a business, Yoi says.
Young Entrepreneur Turns Waste into Money, with Style
A young entrepreneur in Yogyakarta has found an interesting way
to recycle waste leather. Yoi Yohanantoko's start up rm called
Bucini Footwear fashions footwear out of discarded leather.
Bucini Footwear: The Beauty of Leather was selected out of
more than 100 appl i cati ons to benet f rom a j oi nt
entrepreneurship development pilot, using the ILOs Start Your
Business (SYB) modules.
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Yogyakarta - Yoi explains that he rst got this idea by observing
his father, who ran a leather bag production business. Coming
from a business-oriented family, Yoi thought that the waste
leather created during production at his father's factory "would
be more valuable and marketable if turned into an product with
economic value, like shoes."
While further developing his idea, Yoi encountered several
INNOVATION
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Child Labour Day Raises Awareness of Social Protection
Jakarta - The number of refugees, asylum-
seekers, and internally displaced people in the
world has, for the rst time in the post-World War
II era, exceeded 50 million people.
This shocking statistic was contained in a report
by the UN High Commission for Refugees
(UNHCR) released as part of the World Refugee
Day commemoration on 20 June. An estimated
51.2 million people were forcibly displaced at the
end of 2013, fully six million more than the 45.2
million reported in 2012.
This massive increase was driven mainly by the
war in Syria, but major new displacement was
also seen in Africa notably in Central African
Republic, and towards the end of 2013 in South
Sudan as well.
In Indonesia, as of the end of June 2014, there
were 3,830 recognized refugees from 22
countries registered with UNHCR, with the
largest numbers coming from Afghanistan,
Myanmar, Sri Lanka and Somalia. The number of
asylum seekers registered with the Ofce stood
at 6,286 people; mainly from Afghanistan, Iran,
Iraq and Pakistan.
The National Museum in Jakarta, jointly with
UNHCR, organized an event which was attended
by more than 200 refugees and asylum seekers
who put on various cultural performances and
exhibitions that showcased their artwork and
handcrafts.
World Tally of Refugees Now Exceeds 50 million
Latest report shows six million new refugees worldwide
Jakarta - Instead of attending school, 16-
year-old Tommy Wahyudi used to work two
jobs: as a singer on the streets of Jakarta and
as worker at a plastics factory. He was just
one of the 3.2 million children between the
ages of 10 to 17 involved in child labour in
Indonesia.
Tommys life changed when he joined
Yayasan Sekar, a social programme created
by the Ministry of Social Affairs to provide
street children with scholarships, skills
training, and food. Through Yayasan Sekars
one-month bridging programme Tommy was
able to make the difcult transition back into
education, one that is likely to improve his
long-term employment prospects. His story
was one of many that provided inspiration for
the celebration of the World Day Against
Child Labour on June 23 by Yayasan Sekar
and the International Labour Organization
(ILO) with the theme of Combatting Child
Labour through Social Protection.
According to the ILO, Indonesia has made
signicant progress towards preventing child
labour since the establishment of the National
Action Committee on the Elimination of Worst
Forms of Child Labour in 2001. More than
16,000 child labourers are expected to
reintegrate in the education system in 2014.
10
UN
Calendar
The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reect the ofcial views or policies of the
United Nations. The information herein may be freely reproduced. UN IN INDONESIA is published
electronically by the United Nations Information Centre, Jakarta.
e-mail: unic.jakarta@unic.org
DID YOU KNOW?
Of all age groups youth have the highest rates of internal migration in Indonesia and main ows are from
rural to urban settings where education and work opportunities are greater. Youth with high levels of
educational were more likely to move to another district than those whose education was low. (UNFPA)
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August
15 Special Event Devoted to First Observation of the World Day Against
Trafcking in Persons in UNIC, Jakarta
19 UN-NGO Donor Coordination Meeting
20 Launch of New Study on Labour Market (ILO, Asian Development Bank,
Jakarta)
20-21 Global Health Agenda Meeting
21 Sustainable Palm Oil Platform Launch UNDP
21 Sustain-EU-ASEAN Media Training in Bogor
21-25 Asia-Pacic Training of Youth on Media and Participation - The training
# aims to bring together young men and women from the region to share
# youth experiences, promote the culture of peace, develop practical
# action plans, and explore the opportunities that new media provides to
# enhance youth participation and civic engagement.
26-28 Global Media Forum in Bali - The forum will bring together journalists
and media practitioners from around the world and aims to dene the
role of media in the development agenda that will continue the efforts of
the Millennium Development Goals after the year 2015.
28 Public Dialogue OCHA with HFI and Pramuka: Retracing the Footsteps
of Harmony in Asia: Model for Conict Resolution in the Asian Peninsula
28-30 United Nations Alliance of Civilizations in Bali - With its theme of Unity
# in Diversity: Celebrating Diversity for Common and Shared Values the
# forum will be attended by the UN Secretary-General, President of
# Indonesia, heads of UNESCO, FAO, and IOM, and other dignitaries.
September
5 International Day of Charity
15 International Day of Democracy
23 Climate Summit in New York
27 World Tourism Day
October
1-24 UN4U Campaign
20 Bali Democracy Forum (TBC)
22 Inauguration of the new Cabinet
21-24 UNAIDS Coordinating Broad Visit in Jakarta and Denpasar
24 United Nations Day