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COMMUNITY NEWS, CULTURE, COMMENTARY, COMMERCE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2014 VOLUME III, ISSUE 48 FREE

American Family Mutual Insurance


Company and its Subsidiaries
American Family Insurance Company
Home Ofce - Madison, WI 53783
2012 006441 - 9/12
Jerry G Bennefeld Agency
1251 W Main St
Valley City, ND 58072
CALL ME TODAY FOR A FREE QUOTE.
ALL YOUR PROTECTION UNDER ONE ROOF.
R
American Family Mutual Insurance
Company and its Subsidiaries
American Family Insurance Company
Home Ofce - Madison, WI 53783
2012 006441 - 9/12
Jerry G Bennefeld Agency
1251 W Main St
Valley City, ND 58072
CALL ME TODAY FOR A FREE QUOTE.
ALL YOUR PROTECTION UNDER ONE ROOF.
R
1204#177
CALL ME TODAY FOR A FREE QUOTE.
701-845-2861
Authorized
afliated dealer
TIRE SALES - MOUNTING - REPAIR
SHOCKS - STRUTS - BRAKES
ALIGNMENT - BALANCE - MORE!
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STOP OVERPOPULATION
SVFA, vets promote spay/neuter week
PAGE 3
WE ARE BUILDING COMMUNITIES
WWW.INDY-BC.COM
SUPPORT. Dacotah Bank of Valley City has made a commitment to Valley City State University through the V-500
Scholarship Program, Century Club, and Turf Project, as well as sponsoring the 21st Annual VCSU Scholar-
ship Auction.We are very appreciative of the continued support from Dacotah Bank says Jeremy Wiebe (left),
assistant director of annual giving at the VCSU Foundation. Because of alumni, friends, and businesses like
Dacotah Bank, we are able to award competitive scholarships and keep up with growing enrollment at VCSU.
Also pictured: Dick Gulmon, Dacotah Bank president (center) and VCSU Athletic Director Jack Denholm.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
L
ike a lot of people
my age and older, my
early impression of a
wildlife professional was the
Marlon Perkins/Jim Fowler
Wild Kingdom type who
millions of people got to see
working directly with wild
animals in exotic places.
At age 18, in my frst sum-
mer of feld work for the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service,
I quickly
learned that
what I had
seen on TV
was not re-
ality. Sure, I
had some fun
like dragging
grass felds
looking for
duck nests, and counting
breeding ducks in spring,
but I also recall stringing
miles of barbed wire and
pounding posts for days on
end and by myself much of
the time.
Fixing fence, replacing
and repairing signs, and re-
moving piles of debris from
public property were not
exactly what I envisioned
when I signed up for a career
in wildlife management.
With schools back in ses-
sion and hunting seasons
starting to roll, I think of the
seasonal workers, many of
them students, who do this
kind of work for the North
Dakota Game and Fish De-
partment and other agencies
during the summer months.
Te Game and Fish
LEIER: 9
TIME YOU ENJOY WASTING IS NOT WASTED TIME. MARTHA TROLY-CURTIN, PHRYNETTE MARRIED
09.05.14 the independent PAGE 16
Helping Families
Honor, Connect & Remember
For Over 70 Years
In Your Time of Need...
We can help
Serving You
Michael Lerud & Allen Schuldt
Owners & Funeral Directors
515 Central Ave N - Valley City, ND - 701-845-3232 - www.lerudschuldt.com
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T
his weeks article was
found in the April
4, 1935 issue of Te
Enderlin Independent and
contains a name familiar to
many of us.
ooo
HARVEY MEN PUR-
CHASE PETERSON FUR-
NITURE STORE
------------
Deal and Cummings Are
New Owners; Took Posses-
sion Monday
-------------
A deal of
considerable
importance
was trans-
acted here
recently
when the
well known
Teo. W.
Peterson
furniture store and under-
taking establishment was
purchased by two Harvey
men. Te new owners, Don
E. Deal and Byard Cum-
mings, took possession last
Monday. Messrs. Deal and
Cummings are experienced
business men, and Mr. Deal
has for a number of years
been the undertaker for
the Harvey Hardware and
Furniture company. Tey
have been busy since their
arrival in rearranging the
merchandise and giving the
building a general cleaning.
Tey intend to carry one of
the most complete lines of
furniture in this part of the
state and expect their frst
shipment of goods within a
few days.
Besides a well
stocked furniture store the
new frm will continue in
the undertaking business
for which they are fully
equipped at the present time.
Mrs. Deal will join
her husband here as soon as
suitable living quarters have
been found. Mrs. Deal is a
daughter of Mr. Henry Noss
of Harvey and is known to
many Enderlin people.
Te public is cordially
invited to come in and make
their acquaintance with the
new frm.
ooo

Sues Comments: Again
we fnd the undertaking
business connected with
a furniture store, which
was common in the early
years. Byard Cummings
was owner of Cummings
Furniture in Enderlin for
many years, although it
did not always include the
undertaking business. We
will learn more about Mr.
Cummings next week!
A little research revealed
that the term undertaker
refers to the person who
under took responsibility
for funeral arrangements.
Many of the early undertak-
ers were furniture makers
because building caskets
was a logical extension of
their business. For them,
undertaking was a second-
ary business rather than a
primary profession.
DID YOU KNOW?
By Susan
SCHLECHT
The Game and Department relies heavily on 50 or so temporary workers who put in
thousands of hard hours each year, and its not just putting up signs. (Photo/NDGF)
NORTH DAKOTA OUTDOORS
By Doug
LEIER
Credit seasonal workers for enjoyable outdoor activities
FOLKS ARE USUALLY ABOUT AS HAPPY AS THEY MAKE THEIR MINDS UP TO BE. ABRAHAM LINCOLN
09.05.14 the independent PAGE 15
FAITHFULLY: From 10
theorem was said with a kid-
ding tone because the teach-
er knew that as studentS we
would need more support
than just because I said so.
Tis was the case because we
knew the teachers limita-
tions and how even as a de-
cent teacher his word did not
just make things be true or
happen.
Matthew 5:43-44 says, You
have heard that it was said,
You shall love your neighbor
and hate your enemy. But I
say to you, Love your ene-
mies and pray for those who
persecute you.
Notice that in these verses
Jesus is asserting His word
and His authority over and
against those things that had
been heard in the past.
Who was Jesus to say this?
What authority does He
have?
He was the Son of God
who was sent by the Father
to bring about life and for-
giveness through His death
and resurrection. In the fnal
chapter of Matthew (28:18),
Jesus says all authority in
heaven and earth have been
given to me. It is God alone
who creates when He speaks
(Genesis 1-2). When God
declares something it is true.
When He commands that
something happen it hap-
pens.
So in this passage in Mat-
thew 5 when we hear Jesus
telling us to love our enemies
and pray for those who per-
secute us we are hearing
an authoritative and strong
word. It is proclamation that
should drown out all the
other statements telling us
to act with revenge or retri-
bution. Jesus is saying that
even as people continue to
persecute and hate us we are
to continue to love and pray
for them. As we consider
this be reminded that Jesus
did this in our place as our
substitute--perfectly. Even as
He was being placed on the
cross He prayed, Father, for-
give them, for they know not
what they do (Luke 23:45).
And His blood was shed for
us.
Reach the Rev. Dennis Norby by email:
thenorbys@msn.com
SPAY/NEUTER: From 3
large breed animal. You are doing them,
and the community, a favor by getting them
spayed (females) or neutered (males).
Veterinarians will also check records for
all animals undergoing a discounted de-
sexing procedure to ensure that a rabies
vaccination has been administered and is
current.
If your pet has a current rabies vacci-
nation that was given at another facility,
please provide proof of that shot. Other-
wise, a rabies shot will be given to the pet
and the cost will be assessed to the owner
and will not be a part of the discount pro-
gram.
SVFA is a proponent of all domestic
animals having a current rabies shot, said
Sheryl Solberg, president of the organiza-
tion. All animals that come under SVFAs
care are immunized before they enter fos-
ter care. We encourage all pet owners to
have their animals vaccinated.
For more information regarding spay-
ing/neutering, contact the Valley City Vet-
erinary Hospital at 701-845-3662.
YOUR HEALTH: From 2
Te TakeAway Environ-
mental Return System was
started so people could
take unused or expired
medications to their local,
participating pharmacy
for convenient disposal. If
your pharmacy does not
participate in the Take-
Away program, you can
still bring your unused
medications to the Valley
City Police Department
or Barnes County Sherifs
Ofce as part of the Drug
Take Back Program.
NEVER give the medi-
cation to a friend, family
member, or anyone else.
Te medication was given
specifcally to your needs
and medical history, and
giving someone else a drug
prescribed to you, no mat-
ter what your intentions
are, can be very harmful to
another person.
For any questions re-
garding what you should
do with medicines you no
longer take or are expired,
you can always contact
your pharmacy. Be sure to
properly dispose of medi-
cations you no longer need
to keep them out of the
wrong hands.
Carly Trowbridge is an NDSU
pharmacy student working with Amy
Noeske, Pharm.D., RPh at Mercy
Hospital (CHI Mercy Health). YOUR
HEALTH column is coordinated by
Mercy Hospital.
For sale: Struts for 96 Bonnev-
ille, good used $40.00 701-437-
2863.
FOR SALE: Blue 50cc Lance
Scooter. - Low Miles - Good Con-
dition. - Call 701 840-8141 to take
a look.
LADIES OAK rolltop desk,
$225; Kitchen Aid pots and pans
in red - utensils - $75; Kitchen Aid
mixer in cobalt blue, $200. Like
new condition. Call Brook: 701-
689-6480.
2006 DODGE RAM 1500 crew
cab, big horn sts hemi. Drives and
runs good. 158,000 miles. $8,250.
701-689-6587. Alice, N.Dak.
indy ads
work
classied advertising
SERVICES
CALL THE INDY TO PLACE ADS: 701.840.1045
Medicine for the soul. In-
scription over the door of the
Library at Thebes. Ye Olde
Books & Curious Goods. 226 E.
Main St., Valley City. 701-845-
8721; yeoldebooks@yahoo.com
14_0314
FOR SALE
Publishers Notice: All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which
makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limita-
tion or discrimination based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an
intention, to make any such preference, limitation or
discrimination. Familial status includes children un-
der the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women and people securing custody
of children under 18. This newspaper will not know-
ingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available
on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimi-
nation, call North Dakota Fair Housing Council Toll-free
1-888-265- 0907. HUD Toll free 1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.
HELP WANTED
When you rent a house or apart-
ment, you want affordability, choic-
es, great locations, and friendly ser-
vice. Cornerstone Rentals LLC offers
all this and more, including some pet
friendly options. Call 701-845-APTS
(2787) or email trishia@propertiesby-
cornerstone.com today. 14_0616#15
REAL ESTATE
Does your job got you down?
Looking to do something more fullling, meaningful, and gratifying?
You can make a difference in our residents lives.
Working with our residents is both gratifying and fun.
The Sheyenne Care Center has openings in multiple depart-
ments. Openings include a Neighborhood Assistant in Ac-
tivities, Dryer in Laundry, Nutrition Assistant and Dish-
washer in Dietary, and both day and night position for
Nurses and C.N.A.s. Contact Jessi Hill at 701-845-8222 or Jessica.
hill@smphs.org if interested. Applications can be picked up at 979 Cen-
tral Ave N, Valley City, or online at
http://www.sheyennecarecenter.
com/employment.htm You can
also submit your application via
fax to 701-845-8249.
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REALTY
FARMS - HOME - RECREATIONAL - COMMERCIAL
409 4th St. NE PO Box 1030
Jamestown, ND 58402-1030
mike@dardisrealty.com
www.dardisrealty.com
Bus: 701-252-5761
Cell: 701-320-3241
Toll Free: 1-800-201-5761
Fax: 701-252-3449
MICHAEL J. SWARTZ
REALTOR

BROKER
REALTY
FARMS - HOME - RECREATIONAL - COMMERCIAL
409 4th St. NE PO Box 1030
Jamestown, ND 58402-1030
mike@dardisrealty.com
www.dardisrealty.com
Bus: 701-252-5761
Cell: 701-320-3241
Toll Free: 1-800-201-5761
Fax: 701-252-3449
MICHAEL J. SWARTZ
REALTOR
BROKER
REALTY
FARMS - HOME - RECREATIONAL - COMMERCIAL
409 4th St. NE PO Box 1030
Jamestown, ND 58402-1030
mike@dardisrealty.com
www.dardisrealty.com
Bus: 701-252-5761
Cell: 701-320-3241
Toll Free: 1-800-201-5761
Fax: 701-252-3449
MICHAEL J. SWARTZ
REALTOR

BROKER
212 FIRST AVE. SOUTH
SPIRITWOOD LAKE
3 BR cabin on wooded
1.6 Ac. lot. Toys included!
$259,000
FOR SALE
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HOUSING
PORT: From 11
North Dakota voters cast
their ballots to, you know,
keep it local afer opponents
of Measure 2 branded mov-
ing local spending to the
state budget extremism.
How is the state buying
up local spending keeping
it local?
Its not.
What Dalrymple,
Rauschenberger and other
proponents of these prop-
erty tax buy downs are do-
ing is good short-term poli-
tics.
As long as the state bud-
get is overfowing with rev-
enue surpluses its easy to
solve local property tax
problems by having the
state buy them up. You just
hide the spending in the
states revenue surpluses
and call it tax relief. And
in the short term, property
owners will see their taxes
go down, because the lo-
cal spending burden will
be disappearing into the
surplus of taxes individuals
and businesses are paying
into state cofers.
But this is poor long-
term policy.
Te state wont have
soaring revenues forever.
Eventually, those revenue
gains are going to plateau,
and perhaps even decline.
What well be lef with then
are new obligations to local
governments in the state
budget. Lawmakers will ei-
ther have to keep funding
these local property tax
relief obligations, putting
upward pressure on state-
level revenue streams like
the sales/income taxes, or
stop funding them.
Which shoves all that
accumulated burden back
onto property owners, who
would no doubt be looking
at hefy increases.
Te 2012 ballot measure
to eliminate property taxes
would have also moved
the burden for a lot of lo-
cal spending to the state
budget. But it would have
had the beneft of eliminat-
ing the property tax. As it
stands now, what were go-
ing to end up with is a shif
in huge amounts of local
spending to the state while
keeping the property tax in
place.
Tats the worst possible
outcome. Whats more, if
the executive branch is go-
ing to be pushing the Legis-
lature to continue pouring
money into this property
tax shif, you can expect
theyll be hostile to other
eforts for actual tax relief.
Like, say, eliminating the
income tax which many
lawmakers including
some in leadership posi-
tions tell me is their pri-
ority.
Rob Port is editor of SayAnything-
Blog.com
Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.
Find out why the INDY is the best marketing vehicle for your business.
701.840.1045 -nikki
FOR EVERY MINUTE YOU ARE ANGRY YOU LOSE SIXTY SECONDS OF HAPPINESS. RALPH WALDO EMERSON
PAGE 14 the independent - 09.05.14
MEET & GREET ADOPTION CENTER
These lovable animals, available through Sheyenne Valley Friends of Animals,
are hoping youll give them a happy new home!
To inquire about an adoptable pet seen here, contact SVFA (Sheyenne Valley Friends of Animals)
OR GET INVOLVED: 701-840-5047 SPAY & NEUTER GROUP: 701-840-1334 Email: info@svfanimals.org
SASHA
Sasha, age 6, was recently
surrendered to SVFA with Cody and
Sadie. Shes a black lab with hip
dysplasia. But, that doesnt keep her
from LOVING playing in the water! It
just means she cant run as much as
many other labs her age. Shes great
with kids and dogs, but should not
go to a home with cats or chickens.
Sponsored by
Dr. Dawns Pet Stop
Your Pets Deserve the Best!
NutriSource-Tuffys-Diamond
151 9TH AVE. NW
VALLEY CITY - 845-0812
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SADIE
Meet Sadie! She was recently
surrendered with Cody and
Sasha. She is a 4-year-old lab mix
who does well with kids and
dogs, but shouldnt go to a home
with cats or chickens.
Sponsored by
Dakota Plains Cooperative
All SVFA pets are
up-to-date on routine
shots, microchipped
and spayed or neu-
tured, if old enough.
ADOPTION
FEES:
Dogs $75
Cats $50
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You Pet Vet Dr. Dawn Entzminger
1202 12th Ave SE Jamestown www.drdawnspetstop.com
HOURS
Mon-Fri
8-5
14_0710#143
ARTIE
Artie and Baby are mother and son and a
bonded pair. They love to hang out with
anyone who will pay attention to them. When
they came to SVFA, they were being fostered
separately and a little anxious being apart,
but now that theyre back together, they are
happy little dogs. Because theyre a bonded
pair, were offering a discounted adoption fee
so they can spend the rest of their lives
together in their forever home. Both Baby, 8,
and Artie, 7, are house trained.
Sponsored by
Weltons Tire Service Inc.
BABY
Artie and Baby are mother and son and a
bonded pair. They love to hang out with
anyone who will pay attention to them. When
they came to SVFA, they were being fostered
separately and a little anxious being apart,
but now that theyre back together, they are
happy little dogs. Because theyre a bonded
pair, were offering a discounted adoption fee
so they can spend the rest of their lives
together in their forever home. Both Baby, 8,
and Artie, 7, are house trained.
Sponsored by
Valley City Veterinary Hospital
BARNES COUNTY
AMBULANCE
914 11th Ave SW
Valley City, ND 58072
701-845-2220
EMERGENCY
DIAL
911
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CODY
This is Cody, a 6-year-old black
lab. Hes a guy who is great with
kids and dogs, but shouldnt go
to a home with cats or chickens.
Sponsored by
Valley Officeworks
GEORGIA
If youre looking for the life of the
party, 4-year-old Georgia is your gal!
She loves people. Shes staying with
a dog and rabbit, and doesnt bother
either. Found abandoned in a house,
she over groomed herself, so her
belly is bald. But, that doesnt stop
her from hamming it up, and into
your heart!
Sponsored by
Barnes County Ambulance
WELTONS TIRE SERVICE INC
209 MAIN ST. - LISBON, N.D.
OUR HOURS:
M-F: 8 AM to 6 PM
Sat: 8 AM to 3 PM
CONTACT US: 701-683-5136 701-683-5177 800-342-4672
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TO BE HAPPY, WE MUST NOT BE TOO CONCERNED WITH OTHERS. ALBERT CAMUS
THEME: MOVIE QUOTES
ACROSS
1. Newton or Stern
6. *Heres looking at ___
9. Face-to-face exam
13. Bake, as in eggs
14. Even, to a poet
15. Madama Butterfy, e.g.
16. *Show me the _____!
17. Sculptor Hans/Jean ___
18. Nobody _____!
19. Penalize
21. For peeping
23. It can be red or black
24. Lab culture
25. In the past
28. Emeralds and rubies
30.*Elementary, my dear
______
35. Ringo Starrs instrument
37. ___ Verde National Park
39. Dancing with the Stars
number
40. Supposed giant Himalayan
41. Subculture language
43. *You sit on a throne of
____
44. Peer-conscious group
46. Apartheid opponent Des-
mond ____
47. Formerly
48. *Yo, ______!
50. To represent in drawing or
painting
52. *Are you the ___master?
...I am the gatekeeper
53. About ____ Night
55. *Sheep be true! ___-ram-
ewe!
57. *___ ____ handle the truth!
61. Toy weapon
64. Unwelcome computer mes-
sage
65. Reef dweller
67. Match play?
69. Spent
70. E in BCE
71. Plural of lepton
72. Cobblers concern
73. Wine quality
74. Piglike
DOWN
1. Any doctrine
2. ____ till you drop
3. Hokkaido native
4. Gladiators battlefeld
5. *Theres no ______ in base-
ball
6. Uh-huh
7. ___ the land of the free ...
8. Remove pegs
9. Moonfsh
10. First female Attorney Gen-
eral
11. Seed coat
12. Add booze
15. #15 Across, pl.
20. Flower holders
22. Swerve
24. Batterys partner?
25. Temples innermost sanc-
tuaries
26. *_____, for lack of a better
word, is good
27. Kind of space
29. Patty ____
31. Tall one is a lie
32. To be wiped off a face?
33. Corpulent
34. Foul
36. Small British car
38. Opposed to
42. Louisiana dish
45. As opposed to hourly pay
49. Grandmother in Great
Britain
51. *I love the smell of ______ in
the morning
54. Knights mount
56. Acquiesce
57. Evergreens
58. Three-ply snack
59. Eurasian mountain range
60. Apple leftover
61. *____ it, Sam
62. Mail agency
63. Haves and have-____
66. Make #64 Across
68. Ayes opposite
CROSSWORD SUDOKU
CROSSWORD
SOLUTION
SUDOKU
SOLUTION
Directions: Fill in the blank squares in
the grid, making sure that every row,
column and 3-by-3 box includes all
digits 1 through 9.
Dairy Queen Brazier
909 Central Ave N 701-845-2622
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09.05.14 the independent PAGE 13
www.bakkegardandschell.com
Serving You
Since 1978
701.845.3665 OR 800.560.3665
BAKKEGARD & SCHELL
159 12th Avenue SE Valley City, ND
What We Do
Installation & Service
Commercial Residential
New Construction Remodels
Heating Refrigeration A/C
24 Hour Service
Free Consultations
Our mission is simple:
Provide a quality product and personal, professional
service to our customers.
We are committed to quality service and customer satisfaction!
We support our employees and are committed to our community!
Established in 1978
Our mission is simple: Provide a quality product & personal professional service .
We are committed to quality service & customer satisfaction!
We support our employees & are committed to our community!
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www.bakkegardandschell.com
Serving You
Since 1978
701.845.3665 OR 800.560.3665
BAKKEGARD & SCHELL
159 12th Avenue SE Valley City, ND
What We Do
Installation & Service
Commercial Residential
New Construction Remodels
Heating Refrigeration A/C
24 Hour Service
Free Consultations
Our mission is simple:
Provide a quality product and personal, professional
service to our customers.
We are committed to quality service and customer satisfaction!
We support our employees and are committed to our community!
Established in 1978
ITS A HELLUVA START, BEING ABLE TO RECOGNIZE WHAT MAKES YOU HAPPY. LUCILLE BALL
PAGE 12 the independent - 09.05.14
GADFLY: From 11
harmless and mindless entertainment and sports activities.

In Huxleys World: Procreational Sex Is Banned, Recreational Sex Is Encouraged
Huxleys citizens are raised in human hatcheries through processes related to cloning.
Te intelligence, physical strength, and emotions are controlled by the amount of oxygen
and nutrients the babies receive in their birth decanters. Afer hatching the fve classes
are carefully prepared for their roles in the world. Te Alpha class is the top class, prepared
to be world controllers and city and plant managers. Tey are the clever ones. Te next
four classes-Betas, Deltas, Gammas, Epsilons-are prepared to handle the regular functions
and the menial scutwork of society. Alphas wear grey, Betas mulberry, Deltas khaki,
Gammas green, and Epsilons black. Each of the fve classes have Pluses and Minuses. As
an example, the lowest class, Epsilon Minuses, are only capable of running elevators, a
make-work job to keep that class busy. Other classes do construction, sanitation, sewer,
and data processing jobs.
Te lower the caste the shorter the exposure to oxygen, which frst afects the brain. At
70 percent of oxygen the skeleton is afected and decanted babies turn to dwarfs. Te lower
classes are taught to hate books and fowers through loud noises and electric shocks. Tey
are also taught to hate country life and love all kinds of sports. Sports are emphasized to
keep citizens occupied. Lower classes are obliged to work about four hours a day because
they cant handle more leisure time.
George Orwells Big Brother, Google, Is Now Following Your Every Step
Over 80 years ago Huxley predicted what the world would look like in 2495 Anno Do-
mini or 632 Afer Ford. Te evidence is growing that he may have missed many elements
of his predictions by hundreds of years. Te Pentagons Defense Advanced Research Project
has developed a bullet which can go around corners. Wall Street has developed high speed
trading equipment which can conduct complicated stock trades in three-thousandths of
a second. Wall Street banks have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on fber optics and
computers so they can make billions making trades that take three milliseconds.
In the July 22 issue of USA Today, reporter Tyler Wells Lynch reported that by 2020 we
may have over 50 billion city things connected to the Internet. Doors, thermostats, dish-
washers, and other appliances will be operated by your computer. Your fridge will be able
to tell you when youre out of milk. GPS data will be determining trafc congestion you
can avoid by coordinating trafc patterns. Park benches are now wired to charge all kinds
of battery-operated electronic devices. Te frst one was installed by the White House.
Tey are called Soofas. Cities have been using smart trafc lights and solar-powered
trash compactors for years. We are on the threshold of reducing and changing many jobs.
Tis century will be both scary and exciting for the young, particularly if you are Alphas
or Betas.
We now have surveyor drones for farms that can measure soil conditions such as PH
and nitrogen levels and organic matter in one pass over felds. According to an article in
the May 22 issue of the Guardian we have a group of architects, designers, and scientists
who are now planning a modern starship-ark that could be sent into space in 100 years.
It would act as a sort of lifeboat for some on earth, capable of sustaining life for many
generations. Several designs include complex ecosystems of plants, microbes, and some
animal life.
Te Creative Minds Of Huxley And Orwell
By 632 Afer Ford English cities had paving machines called Crucibles that melted solid
rock and poured new roads for vehicles. Everyone lived to 60 in perfect health and then
was cremated. Have to make room for all those babies in the decanters. By a four-stage
process 98% of the minerals and chemicals in the human body were recovered for indus-
trial use and for plant fertilizer. Monorails carried thousands to and from tennis courts
and other athletic felds so caste members could participate with their own kind in lei-
sure activities.
In 1949 George Orwell published 1984, another dystopian novel about perpetual war
and its afermath that resulted in a totalitarian state similar to Huxleys answer to war in
Brave New World. Big Brother is the dictator of Oceania (Planet Earth), presiding over a
cult of government emphasizing NSA-type surveillance and propagandistic public manip-
ulation of all citizens. Big Brother is everywhere, listening, spying, recording, and taping.
In 1955, courtesy of the Marine Corps, I spent about a week in Santo Domingo, Domini-
can Republic. Te ruler of the Dominican Republic at the time was Rafael Trujillo, who
even changed the name of the capital Santo Domingo to Ciudad (city of) Trujillo. He was
a very brutal Big Brother. Every public place and private residence had to have his picture
displayed in a prominent place. Trujillo slogans were displayed on banners in the streets
and churches. I remember watching his son practice polo. Tere was a guard about every
15 feet around the feld. Mardi Gras was celebrated while I was there. One of his daughters
was named Queen. One soon learned not even to whisper about the government in this
Big Brother state.
Now Google Wants To Be Our Big Brother
I use Google every day. It is my dictionary, history book, encyclopedia, speller, source
of breaking news, thesaurus, chronicleand Big Brother. And it wants to be my new brave
new world Controller and even bigger Big Brother in my future. It wants to be my driver,
my perpetual GPS, my trafc controller, my ignition key, and the unit that recognizes my
face so I can perform certain tasks. It wants me to have a fridge that tells me Im out of
milk and eggsand cofee creamer. It wants to run my house, operating the heat and AC,
the lights and drapes, the security system, the windows whether opaque or clear, whether
open or shut. Google wants to smartify everything through a type of governance called
algorithmic regulation. Im not going into the details, but it is the method that makes Wall
Street fortunes in three-millesecond trading.
Observer reporter Evgeny Morozov wrote a fascinating article Te Rise of Data and
the Death of Politics describing the Brave New World and Big Brother technology that
is bringing us ever closer to Centrifugal Bumble Puppy, Orgy Porgy, Soma, cloning of
humans (the Bokanovsky Process), and the Malthusian Belt to carry contraceptives. Ev-
eryone needs to read 1984 and Brave New World because thats where we are going,
like it or not. England is now equipping sections of its interstate with sensors that will
monitor trafc through auto smart phones. A centrally controlled system will impose vari-
able speed limits during rush hours and will also force driverless cars to change routes in
case of accidents or unforseen heavy use. Speed will be constantly managed by the sensors.
Police will be able to stop all cars using remotes if European governments have their way.
Intel and Ford are developing a system that will use face recognition technology before you
can start your car. Apple is working on a smart phone that you can use to text only if you
stop the driverless car. Proctor and Gamble has developed and put in to use the SafeGuard
Germ Alarm. If you leave a restroom without using soap and water to wash your hands,
an alarm will sound and lock doors until you actually do it. Welcome. We are already in
the future.
What Will Happen To Te 99 Percent?
We already have nursing home residents snuggling up to SociBot, social robots capable
of mimicking others, detecting gestures and movements, and judging human emotions.
Developed by the English for use in nursing home situations, they have two cameras in the
head and multiple sensors in the chest area. Selling for about $22,500, the designers say
they have tried to make it as human as possible. It can tell how the resident is feeling and
knows how to respond accordingly. It does not get a paycheck.
Te Associated Press has started using reporter robots to write 4,400 quarterly U.S. cor-
porate earnings reports. Robot developers suggest that up to 80 percent of construction
and factory jobs could be handled by robots. A 20-f tall 3-D printer is now producing
walls of buildings that can be made into a 13-room house. Te word robot comes from
the Czech language meaning drudgery and servitude.
We have about 25 percent of our population in underemployed and unemployed ranks.
If we didnt have millions of employables involved in national defense, whether military or
civilian, what would we do with all of those people?
In the highly technical world of Brave New World the Controllers keep one-third of
the population producing food by hand. Machines are banned because they replace too
many workers. We presently involve only about two percent of our population and we ship
our surpluses around the world.
Our Alphas represented by the rich One Percent will probably be our controllers because
they have had their full portions of oxygen and nutrition through their inherited wealth.
Te Betas will probably fll most of the other necessary jobs. What do we do with our
Deltas, Gammas, and Epsilons who have oxygen and nutrition-starved brains and bodies,
poor educations, and food-insecure, poverty-stricken living conditions? Even now, other
countries are beginning to experiment with six and four-hour working days for workers.
Te world will have to feed over seven billion people instead of the two billion in Brave
New World. Can we put three billion back on farms with hoes and rakes afer we have used
60-foot seeders and 40-foot combines?
Huxley took his title from Mirandas speech in Shakespeares Te Tempest when she
celebrates her marriage to Ferdinand: O wonder! How many goodly creatures are there
here! O brave new world! Tat has such people in it! Huxley and I say: Yah. Right.
M
easure No. 2 on this
Novembers election
ballot is a constitu-
tional amendment proposed
by the Legislature to prohibit
the state or any political subdi-
vision from imposing a tax on
mortgages.
Heres an example of how a
mortgage tax works. If a person
purchased a house for $200,000
and needed a mortgage in the
amount of $100,000, a one-time
tax would be imposed on the
mortgage amount.
State and local governments
now imposing a mortgage tax
include Minnesota, Alabama,
Florida, Kansas, New York,
Oklahoma, Tennessee and Vir-
ginia. Some other states impose
a recording fee.
In Minnesota, the rate is .0023
with an additional levy of .0001
in Hennepin and Ramsey coun-
ties. On a $100,000 mortgage,
the tax would be $240.
New York is a little more ex-
pensive. Te state collects 75
cents per $100 of the mortgage,
with another 25 to 50 cents in
various counties. On a $100,000
mortgage, the
purchaser could
end up paying
$1,000.
Te North
Dakota realtors
convinced the
2013 Legislative
Assembly that
future legisla-
tures may be seized by taxma-
nia even though revenue from
oil and gas taxes is predicted
to remain high for another 60
years.
Measure No. 2 falls into the
category of unfounded fear, re-
sulting in the same panic that
spawned several other ballot
measures in recent years.
Farm folks were afraid they
would lose the right to farm so
they secured a constitutional
amendment to protect agricul-
ture, this in a state that pampers,
honors and worships farming.
Te hunting people feared
losing their hunting rights
so they got a constitutional
amendment to guarantee the
right to hunt, this in a state with
more gun owners than found in
North Korea.
Sherifs became alarmed and
got constitutional language to
guarantee that sherifs will for-
ever be elected in every county
of the state. Tis in a state that
wont reduce the number of
elected ofcials even though it
has twice as many as the aver-
age state.
So now we worry about pas-
sage of a mortgage tax in a state
that has more money than it
knows how to spend or man-
age. Obese chance! (It used to
be a fat chance but this one is
obese.)
But the precedent has been
established. Citizens dont trust
the government; the Legislature
doesnt trust the Legislature.
In our distrust, we are passing
constitutional amendments to
allay unfounded fears.
If we are going to laden the
constitution with legislative
material, there are a few more
suggestions.
We need a constitutional
amendment to prohibit the
legislature from adopting an Is-
lamic Shariah laws. Christians
may be outnumbered in the de-
cades ahead and the Legislature
may fall in the hands of radical
Islamists.
We should have a general
constitutional provision reiter-
ating our commitment to the
right to vote. Afer all, the more
restrictive easier than pie ID
voting requirement may be just
the frst step toward abolishing
elections.
A constitutional amendment
declaring that Rugby shall for-
ever be the Geographic Center
of North America would be
good. Tis is necessary because
someone in Jamestown made
the comment that the Center
would be nice located beside
the big bufalo.
Get the idea? We will never
adopt Shariah laws, end voting,
move the Geographical Center,
or impose a mortgage tax.
It may not be necessary but
it isnt going to harm anyone
so here is a one measure some
folks may support just to calm
the fears of their neighborhood
realtors. We need more mea-
sures like that.
R
emember when North
Dakotans shot down
a ballot measure
to abolish property taxes
in 2012, buying into the
keep it local argument put
forward by a well-funded
coalition of special interest
groups and local govern-
ment lobbyists operating
under the banner of Keep It Local ND?
Youll remember it as Measure 2 on the
June ballot that year, and citizens voted it
down because they were afraid of replac-
ing local property tax revenues with state
appropriations given that the Legislature
might not be so responsive to local needs.
Tat argument was so compelling that,
for better or worse, more than 75 percent of
North Dakotans voted against eliminating
the property tax.
Ironically, since then our states leaders
including Gov. Jack Dalrymple and the
Republican majority in the Legislature
have continued to address property tax re-
lief by transferring huge amounts of local
appropriations to the state budget. During
the 2013 legislative session Dalrymple pro-
posed, and the Legislature approved, $853
million in property tax buy-downs includ-
ing $653 million in shifed school funding
(from local budgets to the state budget) and
a $200 million, one-time buy down.
Now, since hes on the ballot for the frst
time, Dalrymple has allowed his appointed
Tax Commissioner Ryan Rauschenberger to
announce his property tax scheme for the
coming Legislative session and surprise!
its more buy-downs. Tis time $1.36
billion worth, or about $500 million more
than last session.
Which is disappointing afer Dalrymples
property tax reform task force came up with
some common sense reforms for how the
property tax is implemented. It would be
nice if common sense could make a debut
when it comes to reforming property tax
burdens.
Te proposal would give owners of a
$200,000 home an average of $2,000 in
annual tax savings, wrote the Bismarck
Tribune in an approving editorial about the
latest proposed buy down.
What is amazing is nobody points out the
obvious hypocrisy in these ever-increasing
state buy-downs of local taxes. In 2012
PORT: 15
HAPPY PEOPLE PLAN ACTIONS, THEY DONT PLAN RESULTS. DENNIS WAITLEY
09.05.14 the independent PAGE 11
OPINION: ROB PORT
By Rob
PORT
More bad property tax
solutions proposed
OPINION: LLOYD OMDAHL
Mortgage tax measures unnecessary, but harmless
By Lloyd
OMDAHL
OPINION: THE GADFLY
I
n preparing to write a dys-
topian (negative) response
to H.G. Wells utopian
(positive) novel of the future
called Men Like Gods, British
novelist Aldous Huxley decided
to visit America because he had
heard so many negative things
about our culture prior to 1930.
He ofen criticized the youth cul-
ture, the materialism, the sexual
promiscuity, and the me-me-
me attitude of capitalist Amer-
icans, and many English did
not want to beAmericanized.
Huxley concentrated on one of
the richest men in the world,
Henry Ford, reading his books
and studying the genius of Ford
assembly lines and worker wage
structures. He
saw our talk-
ies movies, lat-
er turning that
new flm form
into feelies
movies in his
novel Brave
New World.
In feelies the
viewer feels the emotions and
the physical reactions acted on
the screen. Sex scenes in fee-
lies aroused theater audiences
in his book. Huxley: Teres a
love scene on a bearskin rug.
Tey say its marvelous. He
turned the American habit of
chewing gum into the necessary
chewing of sex hormones in his
future world.
Many of the predictions
Huxley made for 632 Afer Ford,
or 500 years from now, are com-
ing true within this century.
Published in 1932, the intro-
duction to Brave New World
has a great summary: Te sto-
ry is set in London six hundred
years in the future, People all
around the world are part of a
totalitarian state, free from war,
hatred, poverty, disease and
pain. Tey enjoy leisure time,
material wealth, and physical
pleasures. However, in order to
maintain such a smoothly run-
ning society, the ten people in
charge of the world, the Con-
trollers, eliminate most forms
of freedom and twist around
many traditionally held human
values....Tese controllers cre-
ate human beings in factories,
using technology to make 96
people from the same fertilized
egg and to condition them to
their future lives. Children are
raised together and subjected
to mind control through sleep
teaching to further condition
them. As adults, people are con-
tent to fulfll their destinies as
part of fve social classes, from
the intelligent Alphas, who run
the factories to the mentally
challenged Epsilons, who do
the most menial jobs. All spend
their free time indulging in
GADFLY: 12
Whats the difference between Anno Domini 2014 and After Ford 632?
By Ed
RAYMOND

PO Box 78
ENDERLIN
First Lutheran Church
326 Blu St
(701) 437-3317
Sundays at 9:30 a.m.
Pastor Thea Monson
First Methodist Church
228 5th Ave
(701) 437-3407
Trinity Lutheran Church
319 Fourth Ave.
(701) 437-2433
Hope Lutheran Church (AFLC)
(meets at Enderlin Methodist)
Sunday School@10 a.m.
Worship Service@11 a.m.
701-437-3777
Pastor Dennis Norby
thenorbys@msn.com
FINGAL
Holy Trinity Catholic Church
419 1st Ave.
(701) 924-8290
FORT RANSOM
Standing Rock Lutheran Church,
136 Mill Rd.
(701) 973-2671
KATHRYN
St Pauls Lutheran Church
(701) 796-8261
11546 52nd St SE
LEONARD
Bethel Moravian Church
15407 49th St SE
(701) 645-2287
Leonard Lutheran Church
PO Box 279
(701) 645-2435
St Peters Lutheran Church
(ELCA)
4713 150th Ave SE
(701) 347-4147
LISBON
Assembly Of God
1010 Forest St.
(701) 683-5756
First Baptist Church (ABC)
401 Forest St.
(701) 683-4404
First Presbyterian Church
10 6th Ave. West
Pastor Juwle S. Nagbe
(701) 318-4273
Sunday Worship 11:15 a.m.
Trinity Lutheran Church
418 5th Ave W.
(701) 683-5841
United Methodist
(602 Forest St.
701) 683-4479
St Aloysius Catholic Church
102 7th Ave W.
(701) 683-4584
Redeemer Lutheran Church
803 Forest St.
(701) 683-5347
LITCHVILLE
First Lutheran Church
(701) 762-4297
506 5th St
Trinity Lutheran ELCA
5809 Co. Rd. 60 SE
(701) 669-2282
MARION
North Marion
Reformed Church
(701) 669-2557
4430 99th Ave SE
NOME
St Petri Lutheran Church
12505 52nd St SE
(701) 924-8215
ORISKA
St Bernard Catholic Church
(701) 845-3713
606 5th St
SANBORN
Our Saviors Lutheran Church
Sunday service 9 a.m.
Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Pastor Mark Haines
Sacred Heart Catholic Church
(701) 646-6306
711 4th St
TOWER CITY
St. Pauls Lutheran Church
(701) 749-2309
401 Broadway St
www. splbl.org.
VALLEY CITY
All Saints Episcopal Church
516 Central Ave. N
701-845-0819
Calvary Baptist Church
(Independent)
2030 West Main St.
701-845-8774
Congregational United Church
of Christ
217 Fourth St. NW
701-845-1977
Epworth United
Methodist Church
680 Eighth Ave. SW
701-845-0340
Evangelical Free Church
1141 Ninth St. SW
701-845-1649
Faith Lutheran Church
575 10th St SW #3
701-845-4390
First Baptist Church
3511 S. Kathryn Rd.
701-845-4500
First Church of the Nazarene
913 Riverview Drive
701-845-4193
Grace Free Lutheran Church
(AFLC)
2351 West Main St.
701-845-2753
Mercy Hospital Chapel
570 Chautauqua Blvd.
701-845-6400
New Life Assembly of God
520 Winter Show Rd.
701-845-2259
Our Saviors Lutheran
138 Third St. NW
701-845-1328
Rivers Edge Ministry
(Interdenominational)
348 E. Main St.
St. Catherines Catholic Church
540 Third Ave. NE
701-845-0354
St. Pauls Evangelical Lutheran
Church (WELS)
202 3rd St NW
701-845-0702
Sheyenne Care Center Chapel
979 Central Ave. N.
701-845-8222
Southwest Bible Chapel
826 Fifth St. SW
701-845-2792
Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA)
499 Fourth Ave. NW
701-845-3837
Valley Apostolic
Sunday School 10AM
Sunday Worship 11AM
Pastor Tony Puckett
215 Fourth Ave. NW
(701) 845-9590
pastor@valleyapostolic.com
Valley Baptist Church
204 5th St. NW
701-845-6950
PAGE 10 the independent 04.18.14
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BUFFALO
Bualo Lutheran Church
(701) 633-5302
505 3rd St N
www. splbl.org.
First Presbyterian Church
P.O. Box 146
701-633-5410
Service 10:00 a.m. Sun-
days
St. Thomas Church
(701) 633-5150
1160 W. Main
Valley City, ND
701-845-3786
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PAGE 10 the independent - 09.05.14
BUFFALO
Buffalo Lutheran Church
(701) 633-5302
505 3rd St N
www. splbl.org
First Presbyterian
Church
P.O. Box 146
701-633-5410
Service 10 a.m. Sundays
St. Thomas Church
(701) 633-5150
PO Box 78
DAZEY
St. Marys Catholic
Church
Sunday Mass: 10:30
a.m.
ENDERLIN
First Lutheran Church
326 Bluff St
(701) 437-3317
Sundays at 9:30 a.m.
Pastor Thea Monson
First Methodist Church
228 5th Ave
(701) 437-3407
Trinity Lutheran Church
319 Fourth Ave.
(701) 437-2433
Hope Lutheran Church
(AFLC) (meets at Ender-
lin Methodist)
Worship Service: 10 a.m.
701-437-3777
www.hopeluther-
anenderlin.org
Pastor Dennis Norby
thenorbys@msn.com
FINGAL
Holy Trinity Catholic
Church
419 1st Ave.
(701) 924-8290
FORT RANSOM
Standing Rock
Lutheran Church,
136 Mill Rd.
(701) 973-2671
KATHRYN
St Pauls Lutheran
Church
11546 52nd St SE
(701) 796-8261
KENSAL
St. Johns Catholic
Church
Sunday Mass:
8:30 a.m.
LEONARD
Bethel Moravian Church
15407 49th St SE
(701) 645-2287
Leonard Lutheran
Church
PO Box 279
(701) 645-2435
St Peters Lutheran
Church
(ELCA) 4713 150th
Ave SE
(701) 347-4147
LISBON
Assembly Of God
1010 Forest St.
(701) 683-5756
First Baptist Church
(ABC)
401 Forest St.
(701) 683-4404
First Presbyterian
Church
10 6th Ave. W.
Pastor Juwle S. Nagbe
(701) 318-4273
Sunday Worship 11:15
a.m.
Trinity Lutheran Church
418 5th Ave W.
(701) 683-5841
United Methodist
(602 Forest St.
701) 683-4479
St Aloysius Catholic
Church
102 7th Ave W.
(701) 683-4584
Redeemer Lutheran
Church
803 Forest St.
(701) 683-5347
LITCHVILLE
First Lutheran Church
506 5th St
(701) 762-4297
First Reformed Church
210 8th Ave
Worship: 9:30 a.m.
701-762-4440
Trinity Lutheran ELCA
5809 Co. Rd. 60 SE
(701) 669-2282
MARION
North Marion Reformed
Church
4430 99th Ave SE (701)
669-2557
NOME
St Petri Lutheran Church
12505 52nd St SE
(701) 924-8215
ORISKA
St Bernard Catholic
Church
606 5th St
(701) 845-3713
PILLSBURY
Baldwin Presbterian
Church
Service 9:30 a.m.
Sundays
SANBORN
Our Saviors Lutheran
Church
Sunday service: 9 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:30
a.m.
Pastor Mark Haines
Sacred Heart Catholic
Church
711 4th St
(701) 646-6306
TOWER CITY
St. Pauls Lutheran
Church
401 Broadway St
www. splbl.org
(701) 749-2309
VALLEY CITY
All Saints Episcopal
Church
516 Central Ave. N
701-845-0819
Calvary Baptist Church
(Independent)
2030 West Main St.
701-845-8774
Congregational United
Church of Christ
217 Fourth St. NW
701-845-1977
Epworth United
Methodist Church
680 Eighth Ave. SW
701-845-0340
Evangelical Free Church
1141 Ninth St. SW
701-845-1649
Faith Lutheran Church
575 10th St SW #3
701-845-4390
First Baptist Church
3511 S. Kathryn Rd.
701-845-4500
First Church of the
Nazarene
913 Riverview Drive
701-845-4193
Grace Free Lutheran
Church (AFLC)
2351 West Main St.
701-845-2753
Mercy Hospital Chapel
570 Chautauqua Blvd.
701-845-6400
New Life Assembly of
God
520 Winter Show Rd.
701-845-2259
Our Saviors Lutheran
138 Third St. NW
Worship 8:30 and 10
a.m.
701-845-1328
Rivers Edge Ministry
(Interdenominational)
348 E. Main St.
St. Catherines Catholic
Church
540 Third Ave. NE
701-845-0354
St. Pauls Evangelical
Lutheran
Church (WELS)
202 3rd St NW
701-845-0702
Sheyenne Care Center
Chapel
979 Central Ave. N.
701-845-8222
Southwest Bible Chapel
826 Fifth St. SW
701-845-2792
Trinity Lutheran Church
(ELCA)
499 Fourth Ave. NW
701-845-3837
Valley Apostolic
Sunday School 10AM
Sunday Worship 11AM
Pastor Tony Puckett
215 Fourth Ave. NW
(701) 845-9590
pastor@valleyapostolic.
com
Valley Baptist Church
204 5th St. NW
701-845-6950
WIMBLEDON
St. Boniface Catholic
Church
Saturday Mass: 7 p.m.
CHURCH DIRECTORY
OPEN
MONDAY-SATURDAY
301 CENTRAL AVE. N
VALLEY CITY
701-845-1022
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CONSIGNMENT
& EMPORIUM
Armstrong
Funeral Home
Your Concern
Is Our Concern
Enderlin Lisbon Gwinner
701-437-3354
701-683-4400
Charlie & Debbie
Armstrong
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342 CENTRAL AVE. N.
VALLEY CITY, N.D.
701-845-5013
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Janice, Nancy & Seth
will help you with all your
Home Furnishings!
TWIN SIZE
Starting at $99* each piece
FULL SIZE - $269
QUEEN SIZE - $292
KING SIZE - $599
(*when sold in set)
Heat your entire home,
domestic water and more
with the Classic OUTDOOR
WOOD FURNACE from
Central Boiler. Dual fuel ready
models available. Call Today!
RLH Enterprises
Fingal, ND Dealer
CALL: 701-412-3143
OR EMAIL:
rlh.enterprises@yahoo.com
CONTACT
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When you need a
helping hand....
MARYHILL MANOR
Long-term Care Facility
Enderlin 701-437-3544
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THRIFT-E-SHOP
ARC Thrift-e-Shop
141 2nd St NE
Valley City, ND
845-4189
Mon,Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat
9:30 am to 5:30 pm
Thur 9:30 am to 8 pm
Senior discount: 20%
off EVERY TUESDAY
GRANNYS CLOSET
12:30 pm to 5:20 pm M-F
Costume Rentals
shopping with a
purpose. every day.
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FAITHFULLY
Because I said so, thats why...
By the Rev.
Dennis NORBY
Is your church missing from the
Independent church directory?
Have the leader of your church
submit the information to
submissions@indy-bc.com
and well add it to our listings.
I
do not remember much
about my high school
geometry class. Te years
have passed quickly and
most of the postulates and
theorems we spoke about are
basically forgotten. I think
I remember the shapes and a
few other random things but
most topics have faded from
memory. However, I remember a couple of
things from my teacher. Tey were really
tangential to the class.
Te frst was that he had a terrible
toupee. It had no parallel. It was bad
enough and he heard enough snickers from
students that the next year he decided to
forego the toupee and let the top of his
head shine forth.
Te second thing was one of the theo-
rems that he came up with. I forget the
exact context but my teacher was up in
front writing things on the chalkboard in
front of the class. He came to a point in
class where he took a step back and the
students saw, written in large letters B. I.
S. S. Te class was confused and perhaps
a little obtuse; we wondered what this was
about. He clarifed by saying that this was
his Because I Said So theorem.
He continued saying that sometimes
when questioned about a class rule or why
something was assigned, this theorem
would ofen go into efect.
As a parent I have contemplated using
the B.I.S.S. theorem with my children. I
will likely keep it handy just in case. Te
FAITHFULLY: 15
IVE GOT NOTHING TO DO TODAY BUT SMILE. PAUL SIMON
09.05.14 the independent PAGE 09
INDUSTRIAL RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
WHATEVER YOUR NEEDS, WE HAVE YOU COVERED
SPIRITWOOD // VALLEY CITY // GWINNER // WEST FARGO // WAHPETON
701.845.3010 WWW.GROTBERGELECTRIC.COM
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EAGLES AERIE 2192
345 12TH AVE. N.E.
VALLEY CITY, ND
CALL US
845-2192
YES, WE ARE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!
DINING ROOM OPEN TUESDAY - SATURDAY.
BASKETS AVAILABLE IN LOUNGE.
FULL SALAD BAR THURSDAY - SATURDAY.

E
V
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ATURDAY NIGHT 5
-9
P
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LEIER: From 16
Department has not quite
160 full-time employees, so
the agency relies heavily on
another 50 or so seasonal,
temporary workers who put
in thousands of hard hours
each year, and its not just
putting up signs.
In the Bismarck ofce
temporary employee give
educational tours and pre-
sentations, and there are
others who help enter data
from tens of thousands of
deer, turkey and antelope
applications in preparation
for lottery drawings.
Summer fsheries workers
help maintain or improve
boat access at North Da-
kotas many fshing waters.
Others help with lake sur-
veys, which sounds kind of
fun until you spend the bet-
ter part of a 90-degree day
detaching hundreds of small
bullheads or perch from a
survey net.
As you drive across the
prairies this fall or any
time of year for that mat-
ter youll see an array of
signs that indicate public
land, or private land opened
to hunting access through
the Game and Fish Depart-
ments PLOTS program. Te
signs are necessary so hunt-
ers can frst fnd the land,
and then know where the
boundaries are so they dont
accidentally stray onto adja-
cent private land.
Between state-owned or
managed fshing access ar-
eas, wildlife management ar-
eas, and land in the PLOTS
program, Game and Fish
needs to maintain hundreds
of miles of fence, and thou-
sands of boundary or regu-
latory signs. It just wouldnt
be possible to keep up with
that without seasonal em-
ployees.
Most hunters and anglers
probably dont think about
signs and fences much. But
they probably do notice if
they arent properly main-
tained. People would be
confused about boundaries,
or where to park, or any spe-
cial rules for certain areas.
Fences keep out livestock
from adjoining lands, and
keep vehicles from damag-
ing valuable habitat.
Its been awhile since I
pounded posts and fxed
fence, but Id be lying if I
said I dont miss it once in
awhile. Because of that kind
of feld work, I also had op-
portunities to observe a
baby duck hatching out of
an egg, witness a new-born
deers clumsy frst steps, and
develop camaraderie and
friendship through cleaning
out an old boundary fence.
Tis fall, when you hunt
public lands, or launch a
boat for fshing or other rec-
reational purpose, its likely
a seasonal worker helped
make it possible. While the
work may not have been as
glamorous as theyd have
imagined, its just as impor-
tant.

Leier is a biologist with the Game and
Fish Department. He can be reached
by email: dleier@nd.gov
STILLINGS: From 8
Since some of the playground games
were rather roughcertainly by todays
wimpy standardsskinned elbows and
knees were quite common, and once or
twice a year, during the winter, one or two
of the slower students would take the dare
of licking the steel Jungle Gym. Children
can have a cruel streak.
One game I remember being popular
was Red Rover. Red Rover is played be-
tween two lines of players, about thirty
feet apart. Te game starts when the frst
teamusually called either the East
team or West teamcalls a player out
with the chant Red Rover, Red Rover, let
[name of classmate on the opposite team]
come over.
Te person called is to run toward the
other team and break through the teams
chain (formed by the linking of hands). If
the person called fails to break through,
that player joins the other team. However,
if a player successfully breaks the chain,
that player may select either of the two
links broken by the successful run, and
take them to join his or her team. Te oth-
er team then takes its turn calling out Red
Rover for a player on the other team, and
play continues.
When only one player is lef on a team,
they also must try and break through a
link. If they do not succeed, the opposing
team wins. Otherwise, they are able to get
a player back for their team. Pom-pom
pull-away is a similar playground game.
After the Lincoln School building was abandoned in 1967 and demolished the
following year, a new school with the same name was located on Granger Hill.
This last incarnation was closed in the early 70s and Lincoln School was no
more. The building is currently inhabited by the Sheyenne Valley Area Career
and Technology Center. (Photograph by Dennis Stillings)
I
n celebration of
the new school
year, Im taking a
break from our his-
torical journey up
and down the Shey-
enne River to pay
tribute to my grade
school alma mater. I
promise to get back
to my tour of the Sheyenne before
it solidifes.
Construction of Lincoln School
was completed in the late summer
of 1907. It was located where the
home of Oscar Jacobson formerly
stood, at 332 SE 3rd Street, a short
block northwest of the mill.
I recently obtained a postcard
postmarked Valley City, August 12,
1907. Te card is from a mysterious AE. A. and is addressed
to Miss Inga Jaten of Cleveland, Ohio. Te writer is heading out
for a week-long vacation at Spiritwood Lake with Miss Niel-
son and her Sunday School Class. Te writer continues: Tree
more weeks and school begins. Tey expect the new building to
be complete then. Te South side school [Lincoln] will be where
Oscar Jacobson now lives. (I would guess Oscar Jacobson would
have to be packing up pretty soon.)
I am quite sure that the writer is referring to Minnie J. Nielson,
who was to become a well-known North Dakota educator and
County Superintendent of Schools. Miss Nielson was a Congre-
gationalist and Sunday School teacher.
My grade school years ran from 1947 to 1952. To the best of
my recollection, my teachers were Mrs. (Tom) Elliott (Kinder-
garten), Mrs. Finley (First Grade), Mrs. Newman(?)(Second
Grade), Mrs. Ward (Tird Grade), Mrs. Eckel (Fourth Grade),
Mrs. Baarstad (Fifh Grade), and Mrs. Kanwischer (Sixth
Grade). Tis is what I remember of the top of my head, so there
may well be a couple of errors. Of course, I didnt know their frst
names then (except for Ruby Baarstad), and I wouldnt use them
now, even if I knew what they were. It would be wrong.
Juvenile wits from other parts of town occasionally referred to
our school as Stinkin Lincoln, doubtlessly due to bitter jealou-
sy of what they knew to be a superior educational institution.
I recall that the playground was in rather rough condition
mostly dirt and gravel with some tufs of grass here and there.
STILLINGS: 9
the independent 09.05.14
YOU CANNOT PROTECT YOURSELF FROM SADNESS WITHOUT PROTECTING YOURSELF FROM HAPPINESS. JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER
PAGE 08
Lincoln
School
revisted
By Dennis
STILLINGS
MUSEUM WITHOUT WALLS
Lincoln School shortly after completion. There is no playground equipment to be seen. (Dennis Stillings Collection)
The old Spiritwood Pavilion on Spiritwood Lake, once a very popular vacation destination. (Dennis
Stillings Collection)
FROM 6
Valley City - Barnes County
Public Library. No circle
time for toddlers in August.
More info: Steve Hammel,
librarydirector@vcbclibrary.
org or 701-845-3821.
BENEFIT: A benet supper
for Tammy Richman, who
is battling cancer, runs from
5 to 8 p.m. at the Tower
City Community Center.
Hamburgers, hotdogs,
brats, bars, salads. Freewill
offering. Proceeds will help
offset medical expenses.
MEETING: The Barnes
County Soil Conservation
Board meets every second
Wednesday of the month
at 4 p.m. at the Barnes
County SCD ofce, 575
10th St. S.W., Valley City.
More info: 701-845-3114,
Ext. 3.
FARMERS MARKET: Page
Farmers Market runs
Wednesdays through fall,
from 5 to 7 p.m., located
just north of the Page Fire
Station on Morton Avenue.
CARDS: Texas Hold em
Tournament is every
Wednesday at 7 p.m. at
the Eagles Aerie, Valley
City. Open to all player
levels. More info: Richard
Hass: 840-2612. Free, for
people 21+.
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
at Fellowship Corner, 320
2nd Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. Monday and Saturday
meetings are at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday meetings
are at noon and 7:30 p.m.
The Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
and last Saturday of the
month at 8 p.m. are open
speakers meetings for all to
attend, not just alcoholics.
A Friday 5:30 p.m. meeting
is held at Sheyenne Care
Center conference room.
More info: 701-845-2864.
THURSDAY, Sept. 11
TOPS: Tops Club of
Enderlin meets every
Thursday at the Senior
Center in Enderlin. Weigh in
from 8:30 to 9 a.m.; meet-
ing at 9.
FARMERS MARKET: The
Valley City Farmers Market
takes place from 4 to 6
p.m. at the Shopko park-
ing lot. More info: Norma
Voldal, market manager:
701-845-4303.
WORKSHOP: Sanford
Healths free Better
Choices, Better Health
Workshop, is Thrusdays
from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the
Trinity Lutheran Church
in Valley City. For any-
one with ongoing health
problems. Effective self-
management skills have
been proven to help people
with arthritis, bromyalgia,
heart disease, depression
and many other ongoing
conditions. Classes will be
Sept. 11, Sept. 18, Sept.
25 and Oct. 2, Oct. 9 and
Oct. 16. More info: Sanford
Health, 701-234-5570.
HEART PROGRAM: Enderlin
Senior Center with free bin-
go at 1 p.m. and birthday
celebrations at 2:15 p.m.
More info: 701-437-2669.
EXHIBIT: The Olde School
in Buffalo celebrates
the 50th Anniversary of
the National Plowing
Contest with a his-
toric Plowville USA Exhibit
Thursdays in September
from 3 to 6 p.m. Located
at 303 Pearl Street,
Buffalo, N.D. More info:
Liane,701-412-4485, or
Hattie 701-633-5234.
QUILTS: St. Catherine
Quilters makes quilts for
those in need every Thurs-
day from 1 to 4:30 p.m.
and 6:30 to 9 p.m. in the
St. Catherine School gym
basement, Valley City. Any-
one is welcome; no experi-
ence necessary. More info:
Lela Grim, 701-845-4067.
BONE BUILDERS: Improve
balance, increase energy,
bone density, mobilty and
lower blood pressure
with this free program.
Tuesdays and Thursdays
at 10:30 a.m. at Enderlin
Senior Center. More info:
701-437-2669.
CELEBRATE RECOVERY: A
12-step, Christian-based
recovery program for those
18 and over for all habits,
hurts and hangups, begiing
at 6:15 p.m. with a small
meal. Group and worship
starts at 7 p.m. Located at
658 4th Street SW.
HAPPINESS IS HAVING A LARGE, LOVING, CARING, CLOSE-KNIT FAMILY IN ANOTHER CITY. GEORGE BURNS
09.05.14 the independent PAGE 05
L&H SHOE
SHOP
125 CENTRAL AVE. S. - VALLEY CITY, ND 701-845-2087 OR 701-845-2378
METATARSAL
PROTECTING
FOOTWEAR
SHOE REPAIR & SALES
HUNTING & FISHING
EQUIPMENT
ZIPPERS & REPAIR
GUNS:
BUY, SELL, TRADE
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THE MOST WANTED LIST
The
Barnes County
Sheriffs Depart-
ment seeks the
publics assis-
tance in locating
individuals who
have felony war-
rants issued for
their arrest. If
you have any information on the whereabouts of
this person, contact the Barnes County Sheriffs
Department at 701-845-8530 or via email at
investigate@barnescounty.us
Anonymous tips accepted!
Tony Sabastian Tatarelli Jr
Tony Sabastian Tatarelli Jr is described as a 20-year-old
white male standing 601 and weighing 175 pounds. He
has brown hair and brown eyes.
Tatarelli is wanted on a bench warrant for failure to ap-
pear for Order to Show Cause hearing. Original charges:
Physical Obstruction of Government Function, a misde-
meanor.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
V
a
l
l
e
y
Meat S
u
p
p
l
y
1269 Main St. W
Valley City, ND
845-4705
800-752-5142
ROD HAUGTVEDT
Owner
Locally Fed
& Grown
Order your
North Dakota Beef
SLAUGHTERING
TUESDAYS &
THURSDAYS
- Since 1976 -
AWARD
WINNING
BEEF
STICKS
JERKY
SAUSAGE
Labor Day
Grilling
Favorites
A Full Service
Old-Fashioned Meat Market
STEAKS
BABY BACK RIBS
SPARE RIBS
THICK-CUT PORK
CHOPS
HOMEMADE
BAKED BEANS
POTATO & CRAB SALAD
You Deserve
QUALITY BRATS!
ORIGINAL
JALAPENO
CHEDDAR CHEESE
SAUERKRAUT
Try our BACON!
ORIGINAL BACON
PEPPER BACON
Mmmm...
SO GOOD!
COUNTRY-STYLE SAUSAGE
COWBOY SAUSAGE
OPEN
M-F: 8AM-6PM
SAT: 8AM-5PM
CLOSED LABOR DAY
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FROM 5
is held at Sheyenne Care
Center conference room.
More info: 701-845-2864.
TUESDAY, Sept. 9
NARFE: The Valley City
NARFE Chapter holds its
regular monthly meeting at
noon at the Senior Center
in Valley City. Please join
us for food, conversation
and a short program. You
may bring an item for the
food pantry. All prospec-
tive members are welcome.
More info: Mary Ann Leier,
maleier@yahoo.com
SALINITY: NRCS, NDSU
and the Barnes County 319
Watershed Project host a
workshop on Getting a
Grip on Salinity, from 8:30
a.m. to noon on Highway 1,
6.5 miles south of Interstate
94 On the schdule:. 8:30
Registration & Welcome;
9:10 Why we are Bat-
tling Salinity: Abbey Wick
(NDSU) Use landscape to
show seeps, ditch, etc.;
9:30 Demos to show how
salts are moving: Abbey &
Lee Sponge demo, capil-
lary tubes; 10:00 Get your
Number: Chandra Heglund
(NDSU) EC meter demo;
10:20 Approaches; To Tile
or Not: Andrew Fraase
(Centrol Drainage) Keifert s
Experience, helping land-
owners make decisions;
10:40 Cropping Systems
to Manage Salinity: Lee
Briese (Centrol); 11:00 Us-
ing Cover Crops: Amanda
Brandt (NRCS), Mike
Berntson (Producer); 11:15
Maximizing the Approach:
Joe Breker (Producer) Using
a combination of approach-
es to get what you want;
11:45 What Happens if
you Don t Actively Manage
Erosion: Hal Weiser (NRCS)
Rainfall simulator on saline
bare, tilled, barley @ & cover
crop residue; 12:30 Lunch.
More info: 845-3114 Ext. 3,
RSVP by Sept 5th for meal.
KIWANIS: The Lisbon
Kiwanis Club meets at noon
at Parkside Lutheran Home
in the dining room.
ROTARY: Valley City Rotary
Club meets every Tuesday
at noon at the Valley City
VFW.
BONE BUILDERS: Improve
balance, increase energy,
bone density, mobilty and
lower blood pressure with
this free program. Tuesdays
and Thursdays at 10:30
a.m. at Enderlin Senior
Center. More info: 701-437-
2669.
OPEN MIC: Open Mic is
now being held at The Vault
in Valley City. Open 7:30
p.m. to close. The Vault is
located in the 200 block of
Central Avenue North.
LIBRARY BOARD: The Val-
ley City - Barnes County
Library Board meets at 5:15
p.m. on the second Tues-
day of every month in the
Mary E. Fischer multipur-
pose room. Enter through
the north door. More info:
Steve Hammel, librarydirec-
tor@vcbclibrary.org or 701-
845-3821.
GREAT BOOKS: Book lov-
ers and conversationalists
gather from 9:30 to 11
a.m. weekly in the West
Room of the 1916 Buffalo
High School to share their
thoughts about weekly
readings while enjoying tea,
coffee, cocoa and snacks.
Readings are: Sept. 16,
The Young Pioneers;
Sept. 23, Rabbit Proof
Fence; and Sept. 30,
planning for winter read-
ing selections. The Historic
1916 Buffalo High School is
located at 303 Pearl Street,
Buffalo. More info: 701-
633-5447.
MEETING: The Buffalo
Community Health Ministry
board meets the second
Tuesday of each month.
More info: Parish Nurse
Gwen Fraase, 701-633-
5533.
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10
SENIORS: Tower City
Senior Citizens group meets
every Wednesday at the
Community Center in Tower
City from 10 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. A meal is served. More
info: Betty Gibbons, presi-
dent, 701-840-0184.
STORY HOUR: Story hour is
every Wednesday at the
MORE: 7
PAGE 06 the independent 09.05.14
NO MEDICINE CURES WHAT HAPPINESS CANNOT. GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
14_0125#242 JOIN US FOR OUR
BURGERS & BEANS BONANZA
Sunday, Sept. 7 5-7 PM Freewill offering
Kathryn at St. Pauls Church
B
U
R
G
E
R
S

and
B
O
N
A
N
Z
A
!
SPONSORED BY MESSIAH, ST.PAULS, ST.PETRI,
AND WALDHEIM CHURCHES
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FROM 4
7 to 9:30 a.m.; Parade:
10:39 a.m. (Sunday only).
More info: 701-973-4331
or go to ransomcountynd.
com
COUNTRY ROUND-UP:
Enjoy free BBQ and games
starting at 4:30 p.m. at
Baxter Park in Enderlin,
followed at 6:30 p.m. with
free live country music and
a special speaker to be ap-
pear in the historic Enderlin
Auditorium. Picnic to be
held at City Hall in the case
of inclement weather. More
info: Debbie Armstrong,
701-680-0544.
MONDAY, Sept. 8
MEETING: The Barnes
County Water Resource
District Board meets at 8
a.m. on the second Mon-
day of each month at the
county Highway Depart-
ment, 1525 12th St. N.W.
in Valley City. More info:
701-845-8508.
CONCERT: VCSU Perform-
ing Arts presents James
Adams on trombone and
Nick Meyers on percus-
sion, beginning at 7:30
p.m. at Froemke Hall on
the campus of Valley City
State University. Admis-
sion: $5 adults; students,
VCSU staff, faculty and
students admitted free.
More info: Paula Larson,
paula.larson@vcsu.edu
SENIORS: Buffalo Se-
nior Citizens meets every
Monday at the Community
Center, Buffalo, from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
LIONS CLUB: Valley City
Lions Club meets the sec-
ond and fourth Monday of
every month at 6:30 p.m.
at the VFW.
MEETING: The Ransom
County Fair Associa-
tion meets every second
Monday of the month in
the offce of the Ransom
County Expo Center,
Lisbon. Meetings from
November through March
start at 7 p.m.; meetings
from April through October
are at 8 p.m. More info:
Robbi Hopkins, secretary,
701-683-4218.
MEETING: The next regu-
lar Page City Council meet-
ing begins at 7 .m. More
info: auditor@pagend.com
MEETING: Buffalo City
Council meets at 6:30 p.m.
in teh north room of the
community center. Final
budget meeting. More info:
701-633-2356.
LITCHVILLE: The Litch-
ville Community Center
hosts regularly scheduled
events, including: morning
coffee from 8 to 10 a.m.
Monday-Saturday; On
the Move exercise group
Tuesdays and Thursdays
at 8 a.m.; and cards (Hand
& Foot) with refreshments
Wednesday evenings at 7
p.m. No fee, but donations
accepted. More info: 701-
762-4856.
EAGLES AUXILIARY: The
Lisbon Eagles Auxiliary
meets the second Monday
of each month at 7 p.m. at
the Lisbon Eagles Club.
LIARS DICE: Play progres-
sive liars dice at the Vault
in Valley City on Mondays
from 6 p.m. to midnight.
More info: Paul Stenshoal,
701-840-9313.
MEETING: Oriskas town
board meets. More info:
Katie Pommerer, Auditor,
oriskaauditorkp@gmail.
com
FARMERS MARKET: The
Valley City Farmers Market
takes place from 4 to 6
p.m. at the Rosebud Visitor
Center parking lot. More
info: Norma Voldal, market
manager: 701-845-4303.
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
at Fellowship Corner, 320
2nd Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. Monday and Saturday
meetings are at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday meetings
are at noon and 7:30 p.m.
The Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
and last Saturday of the
month at 8 p.m. are open
speakers meetings for all to
attend, not just alcoholics.
A Friday 5:30 p.m. meeting
MORE: 6
08.05.14 the independent PAGE 05
HAPPINESS IS A WARM PUPPY. CHARLES M. SCHULZ
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
0
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Jeffrey A. Nathan
Dawn J. Mathias
(Licensed Directors)
251 Central Ave. S.
Valley City, ND 58072-3330
oliver-nathanchapel@csicable.net
www.oliver-nathanchapel.com 701-845-2414 14_0723#155
Vintage Variety
A little bit of everything
LOTS OF BARGAINS
701-840-2361
219 Central Ave Valley City
Ready to do some last-minute
xes before winter? We can
help! With rates still incredibly
low for signature loans and
home equity loans, now is a
great time to start those fall
projects around the house.
WINDOWS SIDING HVAC INSULATION REMODELING PROJECTS MORE
PAGE FINGAL
701-668-2261
701-924-8824
www.qualitybanknd.com
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SERVICES OFFERED FREE OF CHARGE
ABUSED PERSONS OUTREACH CENTER, INC.
24-Hour Crisis Line
701-845-0072
(collect calls accepted)
Valley City
Crisis Center
701-845-0078
FROM 3
Annual Sodbuster Days
runs 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sat-
urday, Sept. 6, and 7 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept.
7, at Fort Ransom State
Park. Schedule of Events:
Kids Crafts: 11 a.m.;
Wheelwright Demo: noon;
Horsepowered Threshing:
1 p.m.; Haying Demo: 2
p.m.; Kids Games: 1 p.m.
(tug-o-war, watermelon
seed spitting); Pie Auction:
4 p.m. (Saturday Only);
Old Time Jam Session &
Dance: Saturday night at 8
p.m.; Pancake Breakfast:
Sunday Morning from 7 to
9:30 a.m.; Parade: 10:39
a.m. (Sunday only). More
info: 701-973-4331 or go
to ransomcountynd.com
AIRSHOW & MORE: The
annual Wings and Wheels
Airshow returns to the
Barnes County Municipal
Airport in north Valley City.
Gates open at 10 a.m.,
Bridge City Cruisers Show
and Shine car show and
Kids Infatable Games start
at noon, and the Airshow
gets underway at 2:30
p.m. Tickets available at
the gate for $15; kids 12
and under free. More info:
Jamie Brynn, 701-840-
2324.
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
at Fellowship Corner, 320
2nd Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. Monday and Saturday
meetings are at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday meetings
are at noon and 7:30 p.m.
The Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
and last Saturday of the
month at 8 p.m. are open
speakers meetings for all to
attend, not just alcoholics.
A Friday 5:30 p.m. meeting
is held at Sheyenne Care
Center conference room.
More info: 701-845-2864.
SUNDAY, Sept. 7
BEANS & BURGERS: St.
Pauls Lutheran Church
hosts its fall Bean & Burger
Bonanza in Kathryn from
5 to 7 p.m. On the menu:
Grilled burgers, beans
and salads. Sponsored by
Kathryn, Nome-Fingal Lu-
theran Churches: Messiah,
St.Pauls, St.Petri, and
Waldheim. More info: Ann
Wendel, 701-924-8878 or
ann.prestrude@gmail.com
SODBUSTERS: Fort Ran-
som Annual Sodbuster
Days runs 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, and
7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 7, at Fort Ransom
State Park. Schedule of
Events: Kids Crafts: 11
a.m.; Wheelwright Demo:
noon; Horsepowered
Threshing: 1 p.m.; Hay-
ing Demo: 2 p.m.; Kids
Games: 1 p.m. (tug-o-war,
watermelon seed spitting);
Pie Auction: 4 p.m. (Satur-
day Only); Pancake Break-
fast: Sunday Morning
MORE: 5
PAGE 04 the independent 09.05.14
THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS TO ENJOY YOUR LIFE - TO BE HAPPY - ITS ALL THAT MATTERS. AUDREY HEPBURN
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Word Find Week of September 5, 2014
CATEGORY: GOLFERS
ADAM SCOTT
ANDERS HANSEN
BRANDT SNEDEKER
BUBBA WATSON
CHARLS CHWARTZEL
DAVID TOMS
DUSTIN JOHNSON
FRANCESCO MOLINARI
GRAEME MCDOWELL
HUNTER MAHAN
IAN POULTER
JASON DAY
JIM FURYK
KIM KYUNG-TAE
KJ CHOI
LEE WESTWOOD
LUKE DONALD
MARTIN KAYMER
MARTIN LAIRD
MATT KUCHAR
NICK WATNEY
PAUL CASEY
PHIL MICKELSON
RETIEF GOOSEN
ROBERT KARLSSON
RORY MCILROY
STEVE STRICKER
THOMAS BJORN
WEBB SIMPSON
ZACH JOHNSON
Walk Thru/Drive Thru 517 Main St. Lisbon 701-683-2276
I Scream, u Scream
Always Ice Cream - But Also Great Food!
CHILI BIG DOGS - CHILI PUPPY DOGS - CHILI CHEESE FRIES!!
1031#139
VFW Post 2764 - Valley City
Burgers, Cheeseburgers
Pork or Beef Sandwiches
Saturdays from 11 AM - 1:30 PM
VFW Post 2764 - Valley City
407 MAIN STREET
BUFFALO, ND 58011
PHONE: 701-633-5317
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week nights
HOUR
Happy
Windsor
Wednesdays
only $2.50
5:30-6:30 PM
75 cents off
TAPS, WELLS
& DOMESTICS

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2

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p
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ervin
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ep
tem
ber 12
now every monday!!
lg 1-topping pizza &
pitcher of beer - $19
FRESH, HOT PIZZA!
Dont Miss the Grape Stomp!
Red Trail Vineyard - August 16
NORTHWESTERN
INDUSTRIES
SUPPLIER TO THE
SHOOTING SPORTS
416 WEST MAIN STREET - VALLEY CITY, ND 58072
(701) 845-1031 OR (800) 286-1031 leon_nwi@hotmail.com
OWNER: LEON PYTLIK
WE BUY OR
PAWN GUNS
14_0220#269
FRIDAY, Sept. 5
TAILGATE: The Valley
City Hi-Liner Booster Club
hosts a tailgate party from
5:30 to 7 p.m. at Hanna
Field, prior to the Hi-Liner
football game. Serving
brats, burgers and chips
with free will donations
benetting Hi-Liner Ath-
letics. More info: Dawn
Mathias, 701-840-2279.
FUNDRAISER: The Abused
Persons Outreach Center
(APOC) hosts a Fundraiser
Dinner and Silent Auction
at the VFW in downtown
Valley City from 4 to 7:30
p.m. Adults: $9; child: $5.
More info: Virginia Sven-
ningsen, 701-845-0078 or
vcapoc@gmail.com
MUSEUM: The Midland
Continental Depot Trans-
portation Museum Featur-
ing Peggy Lee is open by
appointment. More info:
701-435-2875 or mary_
beth_orn@hotmail.com -
freewill admission.
AA: Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets every Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday
at Fellowship Corner, 320
2nd Ave. S.E. in Valley
City. Monday and Saturday
meetings are at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday meetings
are at noon and 7:30 p.m.
The Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
and last Saturday of the
month at 8 p.m. are open
speakers meetings for all to
attend, not just alcoholics.
A Friday 5:30 p.m. meeting
is held at Sheyenne Care
Center conference room.
More info: 701-845-2864.
SATURDAY, Sept. 6
SENIOR DANCE: A dance
featuring the musical styl-
ings of Jerry Bierschbach
runs from 2 to 5 p.m. at
the Tower City Commu-
nity Hall. Admission: $7.
Lunch available. More info:
Eugene Rohrbach, eugen-
erohrbach@outlook.com
BENEFIT: A BBQ & Silent
Auction Benet for the fam-
ily of the late Julie Gilbert
Rosenberry, of the Ender-
lin/Sheldon area, runs from
5 to 8 p.m. in the Sheldon
Community Center. Julie
was diagnosed with ovar-
ian cancer in early 2013,
went through treatment,
but had a reoccurence
in 2014. Despite several
medical treatments and
multiple hospital stays, she
died Aug. 3. Donations
raised will help Julies family
pay for medical and travel
expenses incurred during
her care. Family members
include husband Rogert
and two children, Garrett,
21, and Karley, 16, Benet
will also include a bake
sale and rafe. Donations
also accepted at: Benet
for Julie Rosenberry, First
State Bank of ND; PO Box
386, Lisbon, ND 58054.
More info: Amber Hovde,
701-219-3881.
SODBUSTERS: Fort Ransom
MORE: 4
09.05.14 the independent PAGE 03
COUNT YOUR AGE BY FRIENDS, NOT YEARS. COUNT YOUR LIFE BY SMILES, NOT TEARS. JOHN LENNON
C O M M U N I T Y
C
ALENDAR
W G O A
ARTS COMMUNITY GROUPS GOVERNMENT SCHOOL MUSIC
List your
event
We welcome all submis-
sions for area events and
activities that are free or
low-cost and open to the
public. Calendar listings
in The Independent are
provided at no cost as a
public service to our read-
ers.
To have your listing
published, use our easy
online submissions form
at www.indy-bc.com or
email a complete descrip-
tion well in advance to
The Independents Cal-
endar Editor at: submis-
sions@indy-bc.com
Include the events
date, time, place, and
other relevent informa-
tion. Please also include a
contact name and phone
number and/or email ad-
dress.
NEW DEADLINE:
Calendar listings are due by
9 a.m. Wednesdays for that
Fridays publication.
09.05.14
the independent
A publication of
Smart Media LLC
P.O. Box 175
Valley City, ND 58072
Volume 3, Issue 48
All Rights Reserved
vitals
MISSION STATEMENT
To highlight and publicize
local contribution to educa-
tion, the arts, and quality of
life;
To provide quality news
content relating to the activi-
ties and concerns of the
local population;
To be a marketplace of
ideas; and a forum for free
debate;
To feature local talent and
achievers;
To provide a venue for
showcasing local products
and services through attrac-
tive and stimulating advertis-
ing.
CONTACT US
NIKKI LAINE ZINKE
Publisher/Founder
nlzinke@indy-bc.com
701-840-1045 - cell or text
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
advertising@indy-bc.com
701-645-8890
leave message if no
answer
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
classieds@indy-bc.com
701-645-8890
leave message if no
answer
WEBSITE
www.INDY-BC.com
ONLINE ALL THE TIME!
SUBMISSIONS
Your participation is
welcome at all levels.
Submit online at
www.INDY-BC.com
or via email at
submissions@indy-bc.com
DISTRIBUTION
THE INDEPENDENT is published weekly from
its Smart Media LLC home in Fingal, N.D., and
is available at designated distribution outlets in
the Barnes County and surrounding area. No
one is permitted more than one current issue of
THE INDEPENDENT without permission. Addi-
tional copies and back issues are available for
$5 prepaid. Theft of THE INDEPENDENT will be
prosecuted.
SPAY/NEUTER WEEK SEPT. 15-19
S
heyenne Valley Friends of Animals
(SVFA) and the Valley City Veteri-
nary Hospital are ofering a great op-
portunity for people to get their dog or cat
spayed or neutered at a discount rate dur-
ing their annual Spay/Neuter Week Sept.
15-19.
Valley City veterinarians are ofering a
15 percent discount and SVFA is provid-
ing an additional $25 incentive per proce-
dure. Te fnal cost depends on the type,
sex and weight of the animal.
Tere are a limited number of appoint-
ments available, so those who are interest-
ed should contact the Valley City Veteri-
nary Hospital at 701-845-3662 to schedule
a time and day. Individuals must mention
they want this Spay/Neuter Week special
when they arrange an appointment.
If you have put of having your pet
spayed or neutered, now is the time to
take advantage of this special ofer, said
Angie Martin, chair of SVFAs Spay/Neu-
ter and Humane Education Committee.
Puppies and kittens are cute and cud-
dly, but fnding homes for them can ofen-
times be dif cult, particularly if they are a
SPAY/NEUTER: 15
HAPPINESS IN INTELLIGENT PEOPLE IS THE RAREST THING I KNOW. ERNEST HEMINGWAY
PAGE 02 the independent - 09.05.2014
YOUR HEALTH
When you no longer need that Rx
H
ere is the latest news and informa-
tion from the Historic 1916 Bufalo
High School in Bufalo, N.D.
Every Tursday afer-
noon, from 3 to 6 p.m. dur-
ing the month of September,
we will be celebrating the
50th Anniversary of the
National Plowing Contest.
You are invited to come
for a visit with our special
guest Ramona Fraase and
see her collection of historic
photographs and memora-
bilia from Plowville USA,
which was held exactly 50
years ago in 1964 on
Sept. 17, Sept. 18 and Sept.
19.
Ramona and Elmer Fraase
were chosen to host the
plowing contest at their
farm located southeast of
Bufalo. Tey prepared by
planting 300 acres in alfalfa
to use for a runway, park-
ing lot and a huge tent city
flled with farm displays and
exhibits.
More than 100,000
visitors from all over North
Dakota and the United
States attended the event,
including Barry Goldwater
and Hubert Humphrey!
Anyone living in the area
during 1964 will remem-
ber the National Plowing
Contest and would enjoy
looking back at this era of
farming.
You are also invited to
a special Cake and Cofee
Reception on Tursday,
Sept. 18, starting at 3 p.m.,
to commemorate North
Dakotas 125th Birthday.
Ramona remembers that 50
years ago on this day, she
served a large tiered cake
at her farm home to over
300 dignitaries and guests
for North Dakotas 75th
Birthday.
She is delighted to again
celebrate the history of our
state and help serve cake
and cofee to our visitors.
As always the cofee is on
and Te Olde School Gif
Shoppe is open Tursday
afernoons, 3 to 6 p.m.
Please check out the web-
page at www.bufalond.com
or call me at 701-412-4485
to learn more about the
Historic 1916 Bufalo High School.
-LRS
CHALK ON
THE
BLACKBOARD
BY LIANE RAKOW STOUT
Proud supporter
of our communities
for more than a century.
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KASOWSKI-GUBRUD
REPAIR
Flint & Deanna Mark & Carmen
3406 139th Avenue SE - Buffalo, ND 58011
CALL 701-633-5121
Tires
Engine Repair
Tune-Ups
27 Years
of QUALITY
SERVICE!
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By Carly
TOWBRIDGE
D
o you have medicine
in your house that
have expired or your
doctor has told you to stop
taking? Read below to how
to safely get rid of these un-
used, unwanted and expired
medicines and keep your
family safe.
Tere are a lot of reasons
you may not need to take a medication
anymore. Your doctor might change
the dose or how ofen you should take a
medicine. If it has not been working for
you, your doctor might tell you to start
taking a diferent one altogether. Another
reason would be if you bought medicine
over-the-counter, and did not use it all up
before the expiration date.
Here are some tips for getting rid of un-
used, unwanted, and expired medicines:
1. Check the label. Sometimes the label
on the bottle or the medication informa-
tion sheet you get from your pharmacy
will have instructions for how to safely
destroy or get rid of your medicine.
2. DO NOT fush your medication
down the toilet unless the directions on
the bottle or on the information sheet
tell you to do so. Te FDA (Food and
Drug Administration) website has a nice,
easy-to-read list of medicines that are ac-
ceptable to fush. Tis information can be
found by googling the words: medicines
recommended for disposal by fushing.
3. North Dakota has developed a
program to make it easier for people to
discard their unneeded medicines. Tere
are two programs that North Dakota
participates in called the Take Back Pro-
gram (for drugs that are controlled) and
the TakeAway Environmental Return
System.
4. If your pharmacy does not partici-
pate in the TakeAway Environmental
Return System, they may suggest you
take all unneeded medications to the
Take Back Bin at your area police sta-
tion.
Te Drug Take Back Program is
sponsored by the North Dakota Attorney
General. Collection bins are located at
police stations throughout the state for
both controlled and uncontrolled medica-
tions that are unused or expired. Doing so
is totally anonymous.
Te types of medications that can be
brought to Drug Take Back bins include:
controlled prescription medications
uncontrolled prescription medications
over the counter medications
all liquid medications
inhalers and nebulizers
Te Drug Take Back Program does
NOT accept lotions, creams or powders.
Te program is especially important be-
cause controlled medications can NOT be
just thrown away or brought to a Take-
Away location because they carry a bigger
risk of addiction and misuse than other
medications.
In the Valley City area, both the Barnes
County Sherifs Of ce and the Valley City
Police Department participate in the Drug
Take Back Program.
YOUR HEALTH: 15
Happily Home Meal Solutions
Your recipes.
Or ours.
When you
need us.
Shopping
included.
Service Area: Valley City
and the surrounding
40-mile radius
Details: www.ndhappy.com
Or Call Amber: 701-840-7918
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