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Task 2 Physical Activity
Part A Summary Gap Fill Time Limit: 15 minutes
Instructions
Complete the following summary using the information in the texts for this
task.
Skim and scan the texts to find the information required.
Gaps may require 1, 2 or 3 words.
Write your answers in the appropriate space in the column on the right hand
side.
Make sure your spelling is correct.
Summary Answers
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

Promoting Physical Activity

In Australia and many other (1) ____countries, lack
of physical activity in a serious problem. Current
figures indicate that only (2)____ of women and
(3)____of men do sufficient physical activity to
maintain good health. Insufficient physical activity
(4)____of various (5)____ including heart disease ,
stroke, diabetes and obesity. In addition, it places a
significant burden on the (6)____ due to the costs of
treatment, (7)____and reduced quality of life.






To address this situation, a recent study by Cobaic,
Vos and (8)____investigated the (9)____of a range
of intervention strategies designed to (10)____the
Australian public of the advantages of regular
(11)____.




The six intervention strategies selected include GP
prescription which involves screening patients when
they visit their (12)____. This is effective for the
(13) ___age group and the estimated cost is
(14)____. Another intervention strategy is a mass
media-based campaign involving various forms of
mass media such as (15)____.





15.
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Part A Answer Sheet continued

Summary Answers
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.


Other aspects of this campaign are promotional
material and (16)____. The advantage of this
strategy is that it will reach (17) ____of the 25~60
population. The cheapest intervention strategy was
found to be the (18)_____ but it only reaches (19)
____of the population over 15. (20)_______was
found to be an effective strategy for urban areas but
it was the (21)____ in terms of cost at $412 million.








From a health sector perspective, the results of the
study are encouraging as there are (22)____in costs
for treatment for several major diseases. Therefore
intervention to promote physical activity should be
encouraged (23)____variability of evidence
regarding the (24)____of intervention as well as (25)
___regarding the long-term prospects of behavioural
changes. Overall improvement in (26)____ while
saving costs are major benefits of this strategy.











TOTAL SCORE




OET Online OET Preparation Material

This resource was developed by OET Online
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Part A
Time Limit: 15 minutes

Instructions
Complete the summary on the answer page using the information in
the four texts below.
Skim and scan the texts to find the information required.
Write your answers in the appropriate space in the column on the
right hand side.
Make sure your spelling is correct.


Promoting Physical Activity


Text A

Title: Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions to Promote Physical Activity
Linda J. Cobiac, Theo Vos, Jan J. Barendregt (2009)

Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of various intervention strategies
aimed at informing the Australian public of the benefits of physical activity and
derive the optimal pathway for implementation. Method Based on evidence of
intervention efficacy in the physical activity literature and evaluation of the health
sector costs of intervention and disease treatment, we model the cost impacts and
health outcomes of six physical activity interventions, over the lifetime of the
Australian population. Results Intervention to encourage an increase in physical
activity participation is highly recommended in Australia. Potential reductions in
costs of treating ischaemic heart disease, stroke, diabetes, breast cancer, and colon
cancer mean that there is a high probability of cost-savings from a health sector
perspective.
Conclusions: Intervention to promote physical activity is recommended as a public
health measure. Despite substantial variability in the quantity and quality of evidence
on intervention effectiveness, and uncertainty about the long-term sustainability of
behavioural changes, it is highly likely that as a combination of interventions could
lead to substantial improvement in population health at a cost saving to the health
sector.


OET Online OET Preparation Material

This resource was developed by OET Online
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Text B
Intervention strategies
GP prescription. Patients are screened opportunistically when visiting their general
practice; inactive patients receive a physical activity prescription from the GP and
follow-up phone call(s) from an exercise physiologist.
GP referral to exercise physiologist. Screening questionnaires are mailed to all
patients on the GP patient list; inactive patients are invited to attend a series of
counselling sessions with an exercise physiologist at their local general practice.
Mass media-based campaign. A six-week campaign combines physical activity
promotion via mass media(television, radio, newspaper, etc.), distribution of
promotional materials, and community events and activities.
TravelSmart. An active transport program targets households with tailored
information (e.g., maps of local walking paths, bus timetables) and merchandise (e.g.,
water bottles, key rings) as an incentive and/or reward for reducing use of cars for
transport.
Pedometers. A community program encourages use of pedometers as a
motivational tool to increase physical activity (e.g., to 10,000 steps per day).
Internet. Participants are recruited via mass media to access physical activity
information and advice across the internet via a Web site and/or email.


Text C
Effects of Physical Inactivity
Physical activity occurs during work, transport, domestic, and leisure-time activities.
Too little physical activity increases the risks of ischaemic heart disease, stroke, colon
cancer, breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes, as well as obesity and falls in later life. The
World Health Organization recommends at least 30 minutes of regular, moderate-
intensity physical activity on most days to reduce the risk of disease and injury.
Lack of physical activity is a problem in many developed countries, and a growing
concern for developing countries adopting a progressively Westernised lifestyle.
Australia is no exception, with only 44% of men and 36% of women achieving
sufficient physical activity for health. This inactivity contributes 7% of Australias
disease burden and 10% of all deaths, mostly due to cardiovascular disease and
diabetes. It also places a substantial burden on the Australian economy through the
costs of treatment for physical activityrelated disease and injury, lost productivity,
and diminished quality of life.

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Text D
Intervention Target Group Cost (AUS $million)
GP Prescription 35% Population aged 40~79 (14) $250
GP referral to exercise
physiologist.
11% Population aged over 60 $190
Mass media-based campaign 100% of population aged
25~60
$160
Internet 2% of population (internet
users) aged over 15
$21
Pedometers 13% of population aged over
15
$53
TravelSmart 57 % of population in urban
areas over 15
$412

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Promoting Physical Activity

Answer Sheet
1. developed
2. 36%
3. 44%
4. increase the risks
5. diseases/illnesses (not in text, necessary to deduce the word based on context.
It must be plural)
6. Australian economy
7. lost productivity
8. Barendregt
9. cost-effectiveness
10. inform(necessary to change verb form for grammatical correctness)
11. physical activity
12. general practice/practitioner/doctor
13. 40~79
14. $250 million (must include million)
15. television, radio, newspaper
16. community events
17. 100%
18. Internet
19. 2%
20. Travel Smart
21. most expensive/dearest/ (need to deduce meaning)
22. potential reduction
23. despite
24. effectiveness
25. uncertainty
26. population health
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Part A
Time Limit: 15 minutes

Instructions
Complete the summary on the answer page using the information in
the four texts below.
Skim and scan the texts to find the information required.
Write your answers in the appropriate space in the column on the
right hand side.
Make sure your spelling is correct.


Promoting Physical Activity


Text A

Title: Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions to Promote Physical Activity
Linda J. Cobiac, Theo Vos, Jan J. (8)Barendregt (2009)

Objective To determine the (9) cost-effectiveness of various intervention strategies
aimed at (10)informing the Australian public of the benefits of (11)physical activity
and derive the optimal pathway for implementation. Method Based on evidence of
intervention efficacy in the physical activity literature and evaluation of the health
sector costs of intervention and disease treatment, we model the cost impacts and
health outcomes of six physical activity interventions, over the lifetime of the
Australian population. Results Intervention to encourage an increase in physical
activity participation is highly recommended in Australia. (22)Potential reductions in
costs of treating ischaemic heart disease, stroke, diabetes, breast cancer, and colon
cancer mean that there is a high probability of cost-savings from a health sector
perspective.
Conclusions: Intervention to promote physical activity is recommended as a public
health measure. (23)Despite substantial variability in the quantity and quality of
evidence on intervention (24)effectiveness, and (25)uncertainty about the long-term
sustainability of behavioural changes, it is highly likely that as a combination of
interventions could lead to substantial improvement in (26)population health at a cost
saving to the health sector.


OET Online OET Preparation Material

This resource was developed by OET Online
Website: http://oetonline.com.au Email: oetonline@gmail.com
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Text B
Intervention strategies
GP prescription. Patients are screened opportunistically when visiting their
(12)general practice; inactive patients receive a physical activity prescription from the
GP and follow-up phone call(s) from an exercise physiologist.
GP referral to exercise physiologist. Screening questionnaires are mailed to all
patients on the GP patient list; inactive patients are invited to attend a series of
counselling sessions with an exercise physiologist at their local general practice.
Mass media-based campaign. A six-week campaign combines physical activity
promotion via mass media (15) (television, radio, newspaper, etc.), distribution of
promotional materials, and (16)community events and activities.
TravelSmart. An active transport program targets households with tailored
information (e.g., maps of local walking paths, bus timetables) and merchandise (e.g.,
water bottles, key rings) as an incentive and/or reward for reducing use of cars for
transport.
Pedometers. A community program encourages use of pedometers as a
motivational tool to increase physical activity (e.g., to 10,000 steps per day).
(18)Internet. Participants are recruited via mass media to access physical activity
information and advice across the internet via a Web site and/or email.


Text C
Effects of Physical Inactivity
Physical activity occurs during work, transport, domestic, and leisure-time activities.
Too little physical activity (4)increases the risks of ischaemic heart disease, stroke,
colon cancer, breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes, as well as obesity and falls in later
life. The World Health Organization recommends at least 30 minutes of regular,
moderate-intensity physical activity on most days to reduce the risk of disease and
injury.
Lack of physical activity is a problem in many (1)developed countries, and a growing
concern for developing countries adopting a progressively Westernised lifestyle.
Australia is no exception, with only (3)44% of men and (2)36% of women achieving
sufficient physical activity for health. This inactivity contributes 7% of Australias
disease burden and 10% of all deaths, mostly due to cardiovascular disease and
diabetes. It also places a substantial burden on the (6)Australian economy through the
costs of treatment for physical activityrelated disease and injury, (7)lost productivity,
and diminished quality of life.

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Text D
Intervention Target Group Cost (AUS $million)
GP Prescription 35% Population aged
(13)40~79
(14) $250
GP referral to exercise
physiologist.
11% Population aged over 60 $190
Mass media-based campaign (17)100% of population aged
25~60
$160
Internet (19)2% of population
(internet users) aged over 15
$21
Pedometers 13% of population aged over
15
$53
(20)TravelSmart 57 % of population in urban
areas over 15
$412