Anda di halaman 1dari 44

FEBRUARY 1984

VOL. 48, No. 1


,
ISSN 0194-3405

f
"Jo

ALL BOOKS LISTED BELOW A E PRICED AT $2.95 EACH


^m &-*>•

4f, p'\

HA ^ • :
r^Hv
•Ktti
i r Iki
_ * |r, .•• • ««F *

ST..

MINES
Dfthe
ALL OF THESE BOOKS ARE EXCELLENT WORKS ON NOJAVE
MINES AND MINING IN THEIR AREAS, THEY ARE
ALSO A GOOD SOURCE TO MAKE TRAVEL AND
EXPLORATION PLANS FROM. UNTIL APRIL 15,
1984, SHIPPING ON THESE WILL BE ONLY 75£.
~)ER BLANK IS ON PAGE 30,
DW GRANTHAM, Editor
M. BANDIN1, Photo Editor
P. RICHARDS, Circulation

Volume 48, No. 1


February, 1984

CONTENTS
THE QUEEN AND HER CAMEL AT THE FAIR Front Cove r Desert Staff
RIVERSIDE COUNTY'S DATE FESTIVAL 4 Desert Staff
WHAT TO SEE & DO IN THE COACHELLA VALLEY 6 Desert Staff
FIG TREE JOHN'S LOST GOLD MINE 9 M. Bandini
DATE QUIZ 16 The Staff
WHITE MAN'S PUEBLO 18 Laura Raef
EDITOR'S LETTER 20 DW G r a n t h a m
BOOK REVIEWS 20 DW G r a n t h a m
HIDDEN TOWN NAMES PUZZLE 21 The Staff
HISTORICAL MAP OF THE COACHELLA VALLEY 22 The Staff
THE MEDJHOOL, DESERT DELICACY 24 Lee Birch
DATE RECIPIES 26 Various Contributors
LAND OF LITTLE SUMMERS 28 Lowe L L Bean
DESERT PLANT LIFE 31 Jim Cornett
HARRY OLIVER, MIRAGE SALESMAN 32 P. Ri chards
COACHELLA VALLEY'S GHOST TOWN 36 P. Wight
TOWNS AND PLACES OF THE COACHELLA VALLEY 38 DW G r a n t h a m
CAMEL RACES AT THE FAIR Rear Cover The Staff

DESERT MAGAZINE (US?S 535230) is published every ocher (even numbered)


month. Application for reentry pending at Desert Hot Springs, Calif.
92240. EDITORIAL, CIRCULATION', and ADVERTISING offices are located ac
11213 Palm Drive, Desert Hot Springs, Calif. 92240, Telephone (619)
251-1150. Please address all mail Co Post Office Box 1318, Pale Desert
Calif. 92261. Subscription rates: $15.00 USA. $18.00 foreign, per year.
See subscription form in this issue. POSTMASTER: Send change of address
by Form 3579 to DESERT MAGAZINE, P. O. Box 1318, Palm Desert, Cal. 92261.
Copyright 1983 by DESERT MAGAZINE. All rights reserved. No part of this
publication may be reproduced in any manner without securing written
permission from the publisher. CONTRIBUTIONS: The editor welccses
unsolicited manuscripts and photographs but they can be returned ONLY if
accompanied by a fully postage paid return envelope. While we treat sub-
missions with loving care, we do not assume responsibility for loss or
damage. Writers Guide is free with large S.A.S.E., with sample copy of
magazine, $2.00. Please have a nice day.
RIVERSIDE COUNTY'S NATIONAL DATE ESTIVAL

There are no flying carpets or Harry Oliver (see the story in this issue)
camel caravans to Southern California who designed it and supervised the const-
but each year thousands of winter ruction. Harry was an early Hollywood set
vacationers find ways to get to that designer who won one of the motion picture
part of the Southwest Sunbelt where industry's first awards for his design of
a major entertainment attraction is the set for the original "Ben Hur".
the county fair built around an Built on several levels, the stage has
Arabian Nights fantasy theme. an array of Obelisks, staircases, spires,
Riverside County's National Date mospues, and a towering mineret from which
Festival, held in mid February each the muezzin makes his nightly call to the
year, celebrates an annual date har- faithful. In the case of the Arabian Nights
vest that produces a gross value of Pageant, the faithful include a volunteer
around $35 million. It is the only cast of up to 100 costumed singers, dancers,
significant commercial date harvest and other performers. Music is arranged
outside the Arab world. Table grapes and scores adapted from the most popular
and citrus are the other economically songs of all-time hit musical comedies and
important crops produced in the operettas.
Coachella Valley. Queen Scherehazade and her Court of
Date palms were introduced into Beauty wear their elegant costumes as they
the Coachella Valley in 1899 as part tour the fairgrounds several times daily.
of a federal program to diversify Un- Photography buffs take note of that. In
ited States agriculture. Experimen- addition, there are afternoon camel and
tal plantings in other states were ostrich races. They have no counterpart
largely unsuccessful. in the Arabian Nights stories, but are a
Origin of the date palm from the lot of fun to watch.
countries of old Arabia gave the Coachella Valley residents held a "Date
NationaL Date Festival its Arabian Festival" in 1910 to celebrate their first
Nights theme which is carried out by date harvest. Similar celebrations have
an outdoor Arabian Nights Pageant been held through the years and the Arabian
fantasy, camel and ostrich races Nights theme was adopted in 1947.
(note the picture on the next page), Arabian Nights fantasy and whimsy does
the Queen Scheherazade Court of Bea- not diminish the fact that the National
uty, exhibits of dates, citrus, and Date Festival is the Riverside County Fair.
other farm crops of the valley. There is a junior fair and livestock show
Between Palm Springs and the Sal- along with one of the finest industrial arts
ton Sea are about 5,000 acres of date shows. In addition, there are also a large
groves which produce 23 varieties of gem and mineral show, home arts exhibits and
dates, although one variety is pre- contests, agriculture and horticultural
dominant. Date harvest normally displays, food, fun, and a carnival for all
starts in late September and to enjoy.
continues into February. Information on next years Date Festival
There is a hugh outdoor stage that may be obtained by writing the Date Festival
is a replica of an old Arabian Nights at Box NNNN, Indio, Calif. 92201.
village as envisioned by the late
-

OSTRICH RACES ARE POPULAR AT THE DATE FESTIVAL.


BROOM IS USED TO STEER OSTRICH; NOT AS A WHIP.
FOCUS ON FUN
WHAT TO DO AND S E IN "HE COACHELLA VALLEY

In addition to the areas featured in this issue, cultural places for family fun in and around the
there are many more recreational, scenic and Coachella Valley, some of which are listed here.

PALM SPRINGS TRAMWAY

From the Valley Station, 2000 feet Indians to preserve their culture and
above sea level and Palm Springs, the history, and to acquaint others with
Palm Springs Aerial Tramway cable cars their tribe. The Cahuillas lived in
carry passengers in just 18 minutes to Riverside County long before the Spanish
the 8000 foot station in the senic San first came through the area in the 1770's.
Jacinto Mountains where a panoramic There are more than 3000 artifacts,
view of the Coachella Valley is match- the majority of which were donated by
ed only by the sight of the San Bern- individual Indian families. The basket
ardino Mountains more than 50 miles collection is especially fine.
away.
During the ride from the valley to BERGMAN MUSEUM
the mountain station, four complete
geological life zones—the equivalent The late Harry Bergman spent more
of life changes observable on a motor than 50 years of his life collecting
trip from Sonora, Mexico to the Arctic artifacts and historical objects from
Circle in Alaska, can be seen. The the Western world. Many of the relics are
Mountain Station has an Alpine Rest- from the immediate vicinity and include
aurant, cocktail lounge, gift and Indian artifacts and objects left by
apparel shops. Hiking trails lead to the early Spaniards. The charm of this
Long Valley and 11 campgrounds. museum is the helter-skelter and hodge-
The tramway is located in Chino podge displays. It has one of the best
Canyon, off Highway 111 on the north Indian arrowhead collections in Calif.
side of Palm Springs. Hours are 10 It is located on Highway 71 between
a.m., weekdays, 8 a.m., weekends. Aguanga Valley and Anza, only an hours
Mid October to April. Last car up drive from Palm Springs. Take Highway
is at 7:30 p.m., last car down is at 74, the Palms to Pines Highway to the
9:15 p.m. Ask about their ride and junction with Highway 71, turn left and
dine (at the top) special. Tele- follow the highway until the museum.
phone (619) 325-4227
WHITEWATER TROUT RANCH
MALKI MUSEUM
Open the year around every day except
Located on the Fields Road turn- Monday, this is an excellent picnic and
off from Interstate 1 0 , between one day outing spot for the family. A
Banning and Cabazon, the Malki mountain setting with lakes, meadows,
Museum was established by the Cahuilla and brooks is located here in a thumbnail
setting. Fishing is allowed (fee charged)
and no license is required. There is
a modest fee for use of the picnic area.
From Interstate 10, a few miles north- PALM SPRINGS DESERT MUSEUM
west of Palm Springs, take the White
Water offramp and go north about 5 mites. The Desert Museum in Palm Springs is
not a museum from the literal or static
INDIAN CANYONS sense of the word. It is a living mus-
eum—an institution of ideas rather
Ancient Indian canyons, once home to than things which are constantly being
the Agua Caliente band of CahuilLa Ind- changed to create adventures into the
ians, Line the nearby mountains around past, present and future.
Palm Springs. These canyons are stark A few of the services and exhibits
reminders of the country before develop- offered by this unusual non-profit,
ment. They are both quiet and beautiful, non-municipal museum include Fine Art,
rugged and colorful. Primitive and Folk Art Shows; Natural
The Agua Caliente canyons begin five History and Scienific Exhibits;
miles south of downtown Palm Springs. Auditorium Lectures and Concerts;
Here can be seen relics from the Film Series; Field Trips and Nature
Indians' history—pictographs, bedrock Walks; Publishing of Scientific Books;
mortar holes for grinding grain, and Art Classes and a Reference Library.
stone houses and shelters built high
on the cliff walls centuries ago and SALTON SEA
attesting to the working life and
culture that formerly existed. Fed by the affluent waters of the
Palm Canyon is one of the most canals and ranches of the Imperial
famous of the picturesque Indian Valley and the runoff from the Choco-
canyons. It has been praised in news- late and Santa Rosa Mountains, Salton
paper and magazine articles around Sea is more than 30 miles long and 15
the world and used for natural sett- miles wide. It is located between
ings for several motion pictures. Indio and Brawtey with State 86 on the
A constant stream of icy mountain west and State 111 on the east.
water flows through Palm Canyon. A year around camping, recreation,
Andreas Canyon, named for "Captain" and fishing area, the Salton Sea was
Andreas of the Cahuilta Indian Tribe, formed in 1905 when the Colorado River
has a perpetual, icy, sweet stream broke its banks and flooded much of the
winding through a dense growth of area. For more information, see the
alders, willows, sycamores, thick December 1983 issue of DESERT.
tangles of wild grape and mesquite
and groves of stately, skirted SANTA ROSA MOUNTAINS
Washingtonia palms.
Andreas, Palm, and Murray canyons The Palms to Pines Highway (State
are open to the public. They are 74) is one of the most scenic routes
located on South Palm Canyon Drive, in Southern California. It leaves the
one-half mile south of the Americana desert floor at Palm Desert and winds
Canyon Hotel. Admission is charged through the Santa Rosa Mountains as
to Palm Canyon. There is a souvenir cacti are replaced by the flora of
shop offering antique postcards higher elevations, including yucca,
depicting Indian history, Indian agave, mesquite, and then, reaching
jewelry, snacks and cold drinks. the 5000 foot mark, are the verdant
The canyons are open from October pine covered meadows and mountain slopes.
to June. During the summer it is a welcome
respite from the hot desert and in the
winter the snow covered area offers
family fun and sledding. The community
of Idyllwild has facilities for travelers
both in winter and summer.
CABOT'S OLD INDIAN PUEBLO

Cabot's is an Indian puebLo style Features include exhibits of live native


building with 35 rooms, 65 doors, and mammals and reptiles, a visitors' center
150 windows. For more information, with geological exhibits of the Coachella
please see the article in this issue. Valley and a combination bookshop-gift
Located in Desert Hot Springs at shop. Their botanical gardens depict
67-616 East Desert View Avenue. several types of North American Deserts.
There are six miles of nature trails,
DATE GARDENS a picnic area and patio for resting and
contemplating the serenity of the desert.
The Coachella Valley is known as the It is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Date Capital of America, for it is but closed during the summer.
where the only commercial date crop
in America is produced. Located along MOORTEN BOTANICAL GARDENS
Highways 111 and 86 are numerous
"Date Gardens", stores that sell This is Palm Springs' internationally
various date and citrus products. famous living, growing museum. Features
Unique to the valley are Date Milk nature trails among over 2,000 varieties
Shakes and date crystals. Shields of giant cacti, flowers, trees, birds,
Date Gardens on Highway 111 in Indio succulents, and such. Open daily from
offers a free slide show on the "sex 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Located at 1701 South
life of the date". Palm Canyon Drive in Palm Springs.
KINGDOM OF THE LIVING DOLLS LAKE CAHUILLA
This is a museum of hundreds of One of the newest Riverside County
handmade dolls outfitted in authenic parks, featuring fishing, boating,
costumes from 11 different periods in swimming and picnicking. Lake is stock-
history. Among the detailed settings ed by Fish and Game Department (license
for the dolls are a Turkish mosque, a required). Non motorized boats only.
midieval castle, a Southern plantation. Picnic grounds with barbecues and tables.
The minature world is the only one Park open 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Admission
of its kind in the United States and and fishing fees charged. Located in
took over 18 years to create. It was La Quinta, six miles south on Jefferson
created by Mrs. Betty Hamilton. It Street from Highway 111.
is open noon to six, Tuesday to Sun-
day. Admission charged. Located in MISS CORNELIA WHITE'S HOUSE
Desert Hot Springs at 66071 Pierson.
Built in 1894 from railroad ties, the
LIVING DESERT RESERVE house is located in the Village Green
next to The Vineyard Shopping Center on
The Living Desert Reserve is South Palm Canyon Drive in Palm Springs.
located 2 miles south of Highway 111 It contains such historically unique
on Portola Street in Palm Desert. items as Miss Cornelia's bibles, paint-
It is a 900 acre desert interpretive ings by Carl Eytel, and the first tele-
center. The Reserve is situated on phone in Palm Springs. Maintained by
an expanse of open desert surrounded the Palm Springs Historical Society.
by the ever awesome Santa Rosa Mount- Closed Monday and Tuesday. Open from
ains. October through May.

8
FIG TREE JOHN'S LOST GOLD M I E
AND A TRIP TOFIND IT 60 YEARS AGO

Gold you say?? And near Indlo?? It Is raw, undeveloped country with
Surely you must have been out Ln no freeways, no motels, not even an
the sun too Long. Or have you?? It Howard Johnsons or gas station. Its
Ls not just the magic word Itself population Ls mostly animals and
that quickens the pulse. There Is Indians. And then comes the deserts.
a lure to It like nothing else. A
pick and a "frying pan strapped to The deserts and fierce Indians.
the back of a grizzly prospector's One morning there Is the streak of an
burro. It's adventure, uncertainty, arrow screaming towards the wagon train,
and riches. If you are one of the the spLne-chllllng yells breaking the
fortunate. If you find It, you can stillness of the glistening sands that
buy all that your heart desires, means Indians on the attack. The whole
after making a contribution to the affair does not take long. The travelers
Internal Revenue Service. don't have a chance against the greater
number of Indians on their superior
And If you don't find It?? knowledge of the area and attack abili-
Well, there has been the fun of ties. The wagon train Is now a smoking
looking for It and just because heap under the same blue sky that
you didn't find any paying color earlier smiled at the travelers. The
doesn't mean that Lt Isn't some- Indians have left now, taking their
where out there Ln the hills. booty with them. But, what Ls the spot
Someday you will go back for on the horizon??
another try.
A survivor?? Yes. A survivor, runn-
Let's go back Ln time say 130 ing aimlessly across the burning sands,
years ago on so. The place Ls unseen by the attackers. Tears In his
St. Louis, Missouri. A wagon train eyes, fear Ln his heart, he runs as
has just left for the new land Ln fast as he can. He Is a five year old
the west. Wide open spaces, clean boy. But what Ls this?? An Indian on a
fresh air, a new life, and maybe pony Is swiftly approaching. Quickly he
riches—GOLD had been discovered Is scooped up by a strong bronze arm
Ln California. and held to Its rider.
It Ls a hard journey but the The pony and Its rider rejoin the
travelers always have their eyes other Indians galloping across the
on the far horizon that never seems desert towards the low foothills to the
to end on the plains of Kansas and south. The hills close Ln behind them.
Oklahoma, but which gradually dis- The wagon train Ls now only a mess of
appear as the Rocky Mountains come glowing embers. The thoughts of a new
Ln to view. life and riches have gone up In smoke.
The time Is now about 1880. A man After all, he confided to Mrs. Bruckman,
knocks on the door of a St. LouLs his has been a hard life with his
boarding house run by a Mrs. Bruckman. father and mother taken from him when
The man Ls Looking for room and board he was five. But beyond that unhappy
and he appears very weary and sick. bit of Information, he Is quiet about
He walks with a very notlcable limp. his past.
His skin Is brown from many years of
Then one day the stranger becomes
sun In the desert. He Is very muscu-
very III and the doctor who Is called
lar and appears to be used to hard
In gives the Bruckmans little hope of
work. Mrs. Bruckman shows him the rear
his recovery. Good care and good food
room, which he takes without discussion.
have brought only a temppcrary Improve-
All he wants at this particular ment. The stranger Ls going to die.
time Is peace and quiet and to a few
One evening shortly after the
well Intended questions from Mrs.
doctor's visit, he asks Mrs. Bruckman
Bruckman, he has few answers. He will
and her daughter to sit with him for
pay her well. He takes a bag from his
a while. He has something he wants to
old suitcase and scatters some shin-
tell them and something to give them
ing rocks on the table. She may have
also. He tells them the story of the
them all If she will just Let him
lost wagon train, his boyhood spent
rest for a while.
with the Indians who carried him off
Mrs. Bruckman goes down to the that terrible day, and speaks of such
kitchen with a frown On her usually names as Fig Tree John, which means
placid forehead. She talks to her nothing to the women from St. Louis.
young daughter, Ellen about their
Had Mrs. Bruckman been familiar
new boarder. There Is a mystery a-
with the history of the Coachella
bout him and she openly wonders If
Valley In California and the Cohullla
she should have taken him In. They
Indians, she would have known of that
have no man In the house to protect
famous old Indian character. Fig Tree
them. There Ls no doubt that the man Ls
John, who disappeared at Intervals
ILL. Maybe he Ls just too sick to act
only to return with his pockets bulg-
friendly. So, with a shrug of her
ing with gold studded nuggets. But
shoulders, she puts doubts and fears
this Ls St. LouLs, Missouri, and no
aside. But mystery and the spell of
one has heard of such a desert valley
the unknown are at work today.
as the Coachella, much less Fig Tree
There Ls a quickened light In John.
Mrs. Bruckman's eyes. Life goes on day
The stranger asks her to bring him
In and day out without much of anything
a pencil and paper and slowly he starts
to break the monotony. This stranger
drawing lines on the piece of paper.
spells adventure—the mystery of
Then he hands It to her. It Ls a map,
adventure--and that Ls something, even
he says. A map to a gold mine In the
In St. Louis.
mountains near a large dry lake on the
The man shows Improvement after desert. There Ls much gold there and
a time under the understanding and he wants her to have the map and maybe
kindly care of Mrs. Bruckman and her somehow she can get out there and get
daughter. He has gained weight and seme of the gold. There Ls too much
started to talk about leaving as soon gold that they could live any place
as he Is able to travel again. And he they wanted to. Ellen can go to a young
has been most generous In his apprecia- wemens college and have beautiful
tion of the hospitality that the clothes. Mrs. Bruckman could live like
Bruckmans have given him. He has also a real society lady.
been generous with the yellow colored
nuggets from still other bags In his
suitcase.

10
His stony Ls Like a •fantasy to
the Bruckmans. The stranger tells her
to guard the map carefully and not to
tell strangers about It; to tell no
one about It. A fortune Ln gold lies
within the grasp of the person who
follows the map. Almost as he cau-
tions her, he passes away. Mrs.
Bruckman folds the map up and places
the pages In her family Bible.
Between those pages lie adventure,
riches, fame, and maybe death. Look
what happened to the stranger. She
begins to think of people she can
trust with her secret but a fear and
suspicion new to her nature Is born
In her mind and she and Ellen decide
to keep their secret until someone
comes along who can help them. Time
passes and Mrs. Bruckman dies.
The map remains In the Bible for
many years, and It Intrigues Ellen.
FIGTREE JOHN
She still has several of the gold
nuggets the stranger gave her mother.
lAILthln her grasp Is everything she
would like to have, thanks to the
map. The spell of mystery and adven- But her efforts are not rewarded as
ture grow with each passing day and time passes and she grows older, she
finally she leaves the city of St. becomes less physically able to con-
Louis for the far west, where gold tinue her search. It Ls then that
just lies on the ground to be picked Ellen decides she will never enjoy the
up by the finder and magically turn- riches of that fabulous lode of gold
ed Into money to buy all things one the stranger had so painstakingly
could want. mapped for her mother back Ln St. Louis
so many years ago. And, Incidentally,
With time, Ellen arrived by train
there Ls a code required to translate
Ln Indlo, California. She proceeded
the locations and reference points on
to search, always alone, for the
the map. She must decide what to do
location of the gold. She dares not
with the map and code.
tell anyone her secret. The days
pass and the gold eludes her search. It Ls Ln 1923 Ln the little town of
She studies the map and the code Palm Springs that Ellen's friendship
carefully and with each new trip she with Mrs. ZaddLe Bunker and her husband
seems to draw closer to the location Ed, prompts her to talk about the lost
Indicated on the map and the two mine. It could be one others have
pine trees that mark the spot. looked for. It was, she believed, the
long lost Fig Tree John Mine. Gold Is
Tired and dlshartened, but not
supposed to lie on top of the ground
discouraged, Ellen moves to Los
waiting for someone to pick It up.
Angeles, California and takes up
Just like the stranger said In St.
residence. Each year, when the heat
Louis.
leaves the valley, she returns to
search more.

11
Mrs. Bunker accompanied ELLen Just Ln case, however, they bring an
to her bank Ln Los AngeLes and emergency supply of water. Just 10
they removed the map from Lts years ago, Ulysses S. Grant's grand-
resting place In a saFe deposit son had almost perished Ln this area
box. With a quickened anticipation, for lack of water.
they unfolded the now-yellowed
sheet and looked at the curving It Is a slow, uphill journey all
lines, the crosses, the marks that the way but they have no difficulty
Indicate the railroad tracks and finding the lancharks Indicated on
the strange groups of figures: 880 the yellowing map. Nature seems to
149 880 049 separated by three have stood still In her growth, or
dots within a circle. Then she change Ln this area, but then the
looks at the code. It seems as desert changes very slowly, naturally.
though surely It won't be too hard By sunset on the second day they find
to read. And Mrs. Bunker tells the spring shown on the map. It Ls a
Ellen that she and Ed and her perfect spot for a new base of opera-
friend Cornelia White will search tions and they set about gathering
for the lost mine. And when they wood for the stove and fire. So far,
find It, they will take her to It fortunately, everything has tallied
so she may have the thrill of with the map. The three buttes, the
standing at last on the site of high mountain to the northwest, the
the fabulous treasure of gold. It spring. Surley they will find Ellen's
Is her mine, after all, and when mine for her.
she Is physically able to stand They are up with the sun to find
another trip Into the mountains of mountain sheep drinking at the spring.
the desert, they will Insist she The sky Ls a faint blush of pLnk and
come with them. they are tense with excitement for
Mrs. Bunker watches as Ellen they really have started Ln earnest
tears out pages from a notebook, Ln their quest for the lost mine.
each bearing the explanation of They keep their eyes to the ground
the groups of figures. The Last looking for an outcropping that will
page of the notebook Is left Ln appear to be gold-bearing ore. The
the safe deposit box with the stranger told Mrs. Bruckman that the
understanding It will be brought precious metal was lying around on
out when the mine Is found. top of the ground. There were a
great many pieces of broken Indian
And so on a clear, warm day pottery half burled Ln the ground,
In May, the three, Mr. and Mrs. evidence of one time Indian habita-
Bunker and Cornelia White, set tion. However, as yet, nothing resem-
out for a spot believed to be Ln bling this had appeared.
the vicinity of a big dry lake.
However, by this time, the Sal ton It Ls possible that the band of
Sea has been created and the big Indians that attacked the wagon train
dry lake Is now full of water. lived Ln these canyons or that they
They rent two burros to pack had been the home of the boy they
their provision and equipment on. raised. But wagon trains were rare Ln
Using a ranch near Oasis as their the Coachella Valley and the Indians
base camp, they start out on foot not often warlike. There are many
with the burros. stories of Indians Ln the vicinity
with rich quantities of gold Ln their
They enter a wide canyon which possession, sometimes In the form of
Is followed until nightfall and black metal, generously sprinkled with
camp Is then made. They realize free gold that was readily passed for
they must find water, but accord- currency at the country store.
Ing to the code and the map, by
the end of the second day, they
should find the spring shown on
the map.
12
©
PAUM SPfctNG-5

ne»v may be.


•the place. uiher« FioTVeeTSVtvu
1 .> ^i
+ooncf ar,1 Supply yj? „
gold g
OF SCARCE,

THIS MAP INDICATES THE PATH TAKEN IN 1923 TO FIND THE


LOST GOLD MINE OF FLG TREE JOHN

The trail became Increasingly Returning to the summit the next day,
steep and dl-f-flcult to travel and the three branch out In another
after five days they reached the direction. For several days, they
spot vJhere the pines are shown on repeat this procedure, but nothing
the map. Here, there Is a great Is found.
amount of underbrush, many trees,
and such, so It Is decided to find Short of food and with the May hot
a high point -fran which they may spell upon them, they return to the
obtain a perspective of their lo- Oasis Ranch. From there they travel
cation. They know they are close to back home to Palm Springs. There they
where the mine Is. And the May sun get news that ElLen has passed away.
Is hot. Mrs. Bunker remembers the Last page
of the notebook, but Is unable to go
They push through the under- to Los yVigeles to try to retrieve It.
growth, startling a young mountain
sheep with a badly swollen jaw. The map and code remained In the
"Frobably snake bite", says Mr. possession of Zaddle Bunker for many
Bunker. They reach the surnnlt, years. Thus there Is some physical
exhausted fran the heat and dripp- evidence to this treasure tale. No
ing with perspiration. They eagerly one seems to question that Fig Tree
Look for the pine trees. But there John had easy access to some fountain
are none. Without the 2 pine trees, of great wealth. His existence and his
they are without a map point and habits were known to at least a few
Lost. FVovlslons are running Low so pioneer people of the Coachella Valley.
they return to the base camp to rest He possessed gold nuggets and he found
and study the map for a possible mis- them somewhere not too far from where
reading or error. he lived In the "dry wash" area near
the present day Sal ton Sea.

13
When he needed goLd, he would from this, there Is also the
disappear for three or four chance that the old man who died In St,
days, returning with his poc- Louis all those years ago did know, as
kets •filled with nuggets. One somebody must have known then, that
would wonder, however, If he gold actually was found In the desert
were actually 135 years old hills, and If It was there then, j,-fc
when death finally claimed him. must still be there. And how can one
explain the accuracy of the points
It Is quite true that many of on the map??
the old desert prospectors became
quite unreliable, after years In There Is no question about the age
the sun and seasons spent alone of the map. It was Inked on a paper
with only a burro for a living that was commonly used In the 1870 -
companion. The constant thought 1880 era. The notebook adds further
of finding that evasive treasure credence to the accuracy of the time
kept them going against all odds. element. The notebook had printed
It could be that an old prospec- dates at the top of each page. The
tor might Imagine he knew just year was "1871".
where that mine was located. He
could very well draw a map, and For all of those readers who long
he could quite accurately remem- to find a long lost treasure, the
ber places he had visited afoot reproduction of the map on the follow-
and possibly many times. However, ing page may lead you to finally
the area around the Coachella or discover the true source of the
Sal ton was not a mining area In mysterious wealth of "Fig Tree John"
the 1850-1870 era. But gold has and the stranger. If you find It, at
been found In the Julian area, least bring us a sample of the nuggets.

YEARS LATER, A GROUP HIKED IN FROM THE BORREGO SIDE, BUT FOUND NOTHING,
THE MAP BELOW INDICATES THEIR ROUTE.

ZSJlZ+Ftt*

anyw
i « 4 •% :
k b » fI

** r
..•••-\

:-• ...
I

\ 9"

IS THE MAP USED BY THE BUNKERS AND C. WHITE ON THEIR


EXPEDITION TO FIND THE LOST GOLD MINE IN 1923
15
DATE QUIZ
£)CES A LIST of date varieties read like Morocco. They now produce 95% of the
an Arabian Boy Scout roll call to you? dates grown in the United States.
Are you a pointer—do you enter a date
shop and say, "Cjimme a pound of these, The following quiz will provide an
a pound of those, and toss in a few of opportunity for you to prove whether
them there?" If so, you should save wear you are date-wise or otherwise. Please
and tear on your index finger by learning do not be disturbed if you are unsure
the names of a few popular varieties of of the answers—the author was unsure
dates. of the questions until he cornered
Roy W. Nixon (horticulturist with the
Since the beginning of the 20th
United States t)epartment of Agriculture)
century, date growers in the Coachella
and Hillman JJowell (Marketing Services
Valley of Southern California have
Manager of the California t)ate Growers
concentrated on improving the quality of
Association.)
the various types originally imported
from Algeria, Iraq, Egypt, Arabia and A Deglet Noor Date Orchard

(To complete the test, indicate your


selection by checking one of the three
possible answers to each question.)
1. Which of the following date varie- 6. Can you select, from these three,
ties is the leader in sales, and is the inverted sugar date that is suit-
the only date with a large amount able for enjoyment by diabetics?
of cane sugar?
A. Khadrawy C. Saidy
A. Maktocm C. Deglet Noor B. Zahidi
B. Amir Hajj
7. One of these is known as a bread
2. One of these has the reputation, in date. Which one?
the Persian Gulf, of being the most
delicious date in the world. (It is A. Medjool C. Thoory
grown here.) B. Barhee
A. Khalasa C. Rhars Which of the following is a dark
B. Kustawy colored (almost black) date?
3. Check the date that has been devel- A. Dayri C. Hilali
oped into the largest sized of all B. Ashrasi
of the imported varieties grown in
the United States. 9. Check the popular date that is
A. Halawy C. Medjool frequently used for cooking.
B. Sayer
A. Kustawy C. Khalasa
4. A popular soft date is round in B. Halawy
shape and is one of the best
dessert dates. Can you name it?
10. Which date is the sweetest? It is
A. Khir C. Iteema large and is brown in color.
B. Barhee
5. Which date, in its highest quality, A. Rhars C. Hayany
is transluscent? Its seeds can be seen B. Saidy
when the date is held up to a light.
A. Hay any C. Tazizoot
B. Deglet Noor Answers are on Page 30

16
• •
'Ate;-; -•
HW
• • •

*-.'! i
J£fe££

V.
llfi:
^HvW5^"
*

• • .

i? !

• '

:3tfi»»i Bi
m
.-;-;5&;
,.

PI
">*
<«&
m-r\;*.^:w~r

17
White
Man's
Pueblo
birth of the city—now known for its heal- Valley. However, the canyon opens out
by Laura Raef toward Mt. San Jacinto which gives every
thy mineral waters—and continued to
build, adding room after room, for a room a view of Riverside County's high-
total of 24 years. est mountain.
Yerxa deviated only slightly from the The castle is built over a hot water
Hopi Indian style of construction. One well. The pump, located in Yerxa's work-
change he made was building stairways shop, lifts the 128 degree water to a tank
inside rather than the Indian-style lad- behind the pueblo. The building is 300
ders on the outside. Ancient dwellings feet above the desert floor but only 140
had only one window and one door in feet to water.
each room, but Yerxa included two and
T HE UNIQUE pueblo "castle-turned-
museum" jutting out of the side of
a mountain in Desert Hot Springs, Cali-
sometimes three in most of his—with ex-
ception of the cave rooms which have
When he started construction, he had
no money for tools. Using a second-hand
pick and shovel, he started digging. For
fornia, is best described as an extremely none at all. a solid year, he dug a deep cavern in the
remarkable feat—as extremely remark- The east wall on the ground floor is mountainside. With the dirt, he filled up
able as its builder, Cabot Yerxa. 24 inches thick at the bottom and 10 or the canyon in the front of the mountain,
From a distance, this Hopi-designed more inches at the top. It has no doors which later became his front yard.
cliff dwelling practically camouflages it- nor windows. The sun rises but does not In his Model T Ford, he hauled sand,
self with its own muted, gray-like hues shine into the downstairs rooms until rocks and cement—along with barrels of
which blend with those of the surround- sunset. water—up to the mountain peak. Unable,
ing desert. Then, like a genie popping All 35 rooms of the four-story ramb- financially, to buy materials, he scoured
out of a bottle, the rambling pueblo ling cliff dwelling have a different roof the desert collecting old railroad ties,
emerges from out of the mountainside in- level. Altogether there are 150 windows used nails and anything else which might
to a spectacular view. and 65 doors and 17 of these doors lead be of possible value.
Cabot Yerxa, famous in the desert for to the outside. Excepting for a very short time when
his paintings of Indians, designed his Yerxa included four small apartments he had the help of one man, he did the
Pueblo from ancient cliff dwellings of inside his pueblo. These were often oc- work alone—even hand-mixed his ce-
the New Mexico Indians who lived over cupied by artist friends. His fourth floor ment. As soon as the construction de-
a thousand years ago. studio towers above the canyon walls, veloped to crude livability, Yerxa and his
He Started his building before the bringing into view nearly all of Coachella wife, Portia, moved in.

18
\**-y
The late Cabot Yerxa
and his famous Indian pueblo
into which he built part
of his soul.

fought against General Custer, are in the But a little more than 1 7 years ago,
museum. the desert lover's blunted pick and shovel,
As the fantastic cliff dwelling grew along with a few other crude tools, lay
larger and larger, the public clamored to idle in his workshop. To the end, he was
see the inside. Reluctantly, Yerxa opened true to his word. He continued to build
a part of the castle to sightseers, con- for 24 years, until his death at the age of
ducting tours. 83.
Yerxa first came to the desert as early After his death the building was empty
as 1913, with only a paper bag of food until a group of professional and business
and a quart of water and minus a blanket. men formed an organization called the
Keeping warm at night by campfire he Landmark Conservators, a non-profit cor-
slept during the day on the sand while poration devoted to restoring and pre-
the sun warmed his body. serving landmarks of America.
His first desert home was a hole dug They have not only restored the build-
in a bank with no roof, no door, no fur- ing, but have added many new artifacts
niture—only the hole in the earth. Next and things of historical interest. Now
he built a one-room cabin to be followed called Cabot's Old Indian Pueblo, the
shortly by what he named as the "Eagle's building is open for public tours every
Nest." This was half underground and day of the week except Mondays from
had one door and one window, also atop 9:30 A.M. to 5 P.M. Desert Hot Springs
Miracle Hill. There was a fireplace and is a few miles north of Interstate 10
this is where he brought his bride home near Palm Springs.
to live before he started his castle. When visitors tour the strange castle,
Somewhere along the way, one room Having sunk his roots deep in the des- climb the narrow cement steps, try to un-
became an art gallery where hung paint- ert, Yerxa spent much time with Indians, derstand its peculiar structure, they are
ings of his as well as his artist friends. sometimes living with them and going to almost certain to feel the personality and
He also turned one room into a trading places never before seen by white man. presence of the man who gave over a
post where he displayed handwork of Consequently, he became a prolific "teller third of his lifetime to its construction.
Indians as well as Mexican artisans, of tales," having been steeped in Indian With every shovelful of earth he dug,
hooks and many desert souvenirs. lore. with the driving of every nail and with
In Alaska during the gold rush days, A native of Minnesota, he was a des- the crude hand-mixing of every bag of
Yerxa had collected many things used cendant of John Cabot, the discoverer of cement, there went into the castle, bit by
by Eskimos living near the Arctic Circle. Newfoundland. He came by his reputa- bit, year by year, along with the man's
These included animal skins, metate tion as an adventurer early in life. Having strength, his very heart, soul and spirit.
stones, pack saddles, animal traps and left home at the tender age of sixteen, he The Cabot castle-turned-museum atop
many pictures taken during the gold rush drifted to Alaska. Friends say he operat- Miracle Hill stands—a tribute to a re-
to Cape Nome in the 1900s. ed a cigar store there during the gold markable man who created a remarkable
A museum of early day relics, Indian rush and made a fortune. Later, he lived spectacular! •
artifacts and beautiful bead work of for two years in an Eskimo village. Then
Northern Indians, was established inside he came to Desert Hot Springs and start-
the castle alfO. Here, he displayed a tom- ed his castle.
ahawk and buffalo leather shield taken He never stopped building, adding
from a dead Indian on the Custer Battle- room after room. He was often heard to
field. A pair of red moccasins, decorated say, "I'll never stop building and adding
with porcupine quills, worn by Red on to the castle—as long as I keep build-
Cloud, leader of a band of Sioux who ing I'll never die!"

19
EDITOR'S LETTER
MAGAZINE OF THE SOUTHWEST

MANY READERS HAVE ASKED IF DESERT MAGAZINE COULD BE PUBLISHED


EARLIER IN THE MONTH. PRESENTLY, DESERT MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED ON
THE LAST DAY OF EACH EVEN NUMBERED MONTH,
WELL, WE HEAR YOU OUT THERE. IN STAGES, WE ARE ADVANCING OUR
PUBLICATION DATES. YOUR APRIL, MAY WILL BE MAILED AROUND APRIL 15
AND THE JUNE AROUND JUNE 1. INCIDENTALLY, JUNE WILL FEATURE A
RETURN TO FULL COLOR.
WE ARE STILL LOOKING FOR MANY FORMER SUBSCRIBERS, IF YOU KNOW
OF ANY, LET THEM KNOW DESERT IS BACK. IF ALL GOES AS PLANNED, WE
WILL INCREASE OUR FREQUENCY TO 9 TIMES A YEAR LATER IN 1984.
THIS ISSUE IS DEVOTED TO THE COACHELLA VALLEY OF CALIFORNIA.
AS SUCH IT IS A SPECIAL ISSUE. WE WILL RETURN TO A GREATER
GEOGRAPHICAL VARIETY OF ARTICLES NEXT ISSUE. A SPECIAL DEATH
VALLEY ISSUE IS ALSO PLANNED FOR LATER THIS YEAR.
I HOPE YOU ENJOY DESERT AS MUCH AS I DO.

BOOK. REVIEWS
NEVADA POST OFFICES, AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY B Y PAHER AND GAMETT
THIS BOOK IS INTENDED FOR THE PHILATELIST OR POSTAL HISTORY
STUDENT. BUT IT IS MOST USEFUL TO THE GHOST TOWN BUFF OR NEVADA
HISTORIAN. IT LISTS SOME 760 TOWNS THAT ARE AND WERE IN THE
SILVER STATE. DATES OF ESTABLISHMENT OF THE POST OFFICES AND
DATES THEY WERE CLOSED ARE LISTED. THESE USUALLY CORRESPOND WITH
THE MOST ACTIVE PERIOD OF THE TOWN, EACH OFFICE IS LISTED ALPHA-
BETICALLY AND BY COUNTY OF LOCATION. ILLUSTRATIONS ARE NOT REAL
CLEAR BUT NEVERTHELESS INTERESTING, SEVERAL MAPS SHOW THE APPROX-
IMATE LOCATIONS OF THE TOWNSLBUT SEVERAL ARE MISSING). THIS BOOK
IS RECOMMENDED AS A GOOD ADDITION TO A NEVADA REFERENCE LIBRARY.
AVAILABLE AT THE DESERT BOOKSTORE FOR $30.00 PER COPY, A PRICE
WHICH WILL PROBABLY DECREASE THE APPEAL OF THE BOOK, BUT WORTH IT,

20
HIDDEN TOVIN IWES PUZZLE
Desert readers will remember some of the brainteasers of times past. Here is a
new twist—for the historians. There are 33 names of towns or settlements or
stations in the Coachella Valley that have or had United States Post Offices.
They may read forward, backward, up, down, or diagonally. Answers are on Page
37 and are based on the article "Towns and Places of the Coachella Valley Past
and Present", beginning on Page 38 in this issue.

GOOD LUCK

N 0 R T H E B C Q D E S E R T S A N D R
0 0 Y A L C 0 0 B E R M U D A D U N E S
R G R R L R G A 0 S C P A L M C I T Y u
T I A T B E I C X E 0 S R E T L A W L c
H L N H H I E H A R A B I A G W A T E R
Y B C 0 B P L E R T J K 0 K E L L G K w
T Y H U E A A L S H I L L T H E R M A L
I G 0 S R L Q L R 0 C K I R A M 0 N G T
M A D M U A M T X H WE L L 0 0 U T
P-i

C
L A I N 0 R I A 0 S WU M A C I T Y A T
A L R D 0 E N D w P P A L M D A L E E Y
R M A P C T T A K R A R X N S E A N D T
D D G A A R A E L I K E I N Y 0 R Z 0 I
E E E L M E E M I N M WV N U A K E M C
R E E T G R A Y N G 0 L D E N
p-i

H S R M
T E 0 S C R R D E S A L T 0 N S E A C 0
A R D W C H I R I A C 0 S u MM I T C T
C T 0 w P A L M S P R I N G S U N R A L
I N D I A N W E L L S K Y V A L L E Y A
s E R 0 H S H T R 0 N E E R T E K 0 M S

21
<*AT*eiteD fY r*e ceHtmAce O
W%L &%*
THE Hftt. LOLtrA MAt> STc*i»tej> * J < ) FAU-CV /AJro CACTUS AfJI> u/As siou/ioa •J^-
ioU.
A peio vtices Mourn at* T>Ve p/res #e stfor Me*. AKII> M£At>c^> T o
Be i iH ''LA.TS . 7/"if<V "onrMeAVT To
T TVe B/ -/OIO M T+l SSOUTH
9 P

H0TOAI rs wesr
rXA/L
s*/7&ouoa ACJTOSS

ro
TMAr
MofAJrA/fJ
se
** rtia-H As e
£An.
75"
*> AT eve PO/AJT,
re: AmeisrteD T
wtu-ie aov h < »•
AS s-£/ey Jbeb A*Jt>
s/k>r
/iXr e+teAb lecru
THAT KJ/i-C/e BOY »At> SAM
03 TO H
BY ATT/Ait- -rue- 10-30 His Ae*tx GO&DNIO KAX*
>ITH MiS KCrToe. n,i9rrr.
£^g
^ T
aunotrr
MibTKC
U~J.
^rvyZl
m Ii: *%£C <^
^
.^k •2^€. ^
^^
*&
J \H SfPTCMSEK. OF
UMMAY
l»«.l WAMUH HAU. 4Mb
N wiLKtttson pmovr A 1
CABOT'S OLt> IHHAH
OH lTM« SiMDIMAW * M k POOM i «
AHCtLAS TO LA M X f 4 CO4CM <<M»
S;x Homis) . Ttvtt-ve r . *-i5 CALieurEf me
MMirri/nc T«*V AHAIMCD IT TH£
tut/em. Aub MAbe A asTvA-Aj k CAHVILLA /MW/M/7
T*IP WITH *S,OOO IN doLb OAUXD IT"S*CHftttt> , TU-rvuftsb oil A
IH OMLY too*. DAYS. FAKM. yVA? \ imiur A MATH none
t+o.oo Ann on one -ra/» »r L Of** THI HOT POOLS CoACMlUA V S
MOfU ,7** bAtv&t AM A A i 1871. TVe MbtAtllt^Jht. 8&U&MW RMb WHS „ ,
CMINAMAN 1^1 Ate TUt JoutA/<r. _^r,
A moMTH urrelt HALL AKID K I U ^ I omu ALL ivm-Numau - ^ BKHMBb »y WILLIAM HAAtSHAW I
tmiorJ <*fSU. /€/iMtb MY A SrATIOKl * * * . ' . IN / K l frVlOtWMfi btKSCTlOHS VVOlI
MH. HUH »K A MAKICOT* IMblAH. KUC-
KtMWt. in sAn Goaaonio PAH. TMC
tflUJCH WAS TgltP Anb AOQUITTCb, •MiTum
i JVr,
"* FHotA L.A. TO THt SOU>
•S DOeVC THIS r>OAb FteM
"• UNTIL. '977 THCSMte
it- Tf mtST lonirf MAH To WINS- *£PLAC£t>
MAX* A K6COKI>*X> nur -mtoml JUtll U>u
cover* CA*nio*i. PvmiiUfr*m
tnatrats m m*. He wAt mmeC fur/on of me iU
TO TAHe Tt. THg MO*4Tk*i B£- UltlTLOOATom fYMb/Tro*J -1*1*0
•mn A**A i*J rrr¥. rue AIIXT <nm.
to Ltb -me

'• SUITES e^T


* CAHYOH
Wit, |W
1CAHVOH
THirtwATtg.
f CANVOH

SNOW atsei
p1 ^ ^ Z&-
L^C-
6b AT^AKNta'i I TOKO
iHiHO 7wey Btoom sutn*
. CAWOH

^
' CAM1OH \ MI n*fo*nmr vme rltty M^
neAcntb %tu oie*o. r/ fH)N JAUUAHV It *
u>Aff tw«f eubeb MJb -me _
£BSS •STATION J/fc M« FIO-HTlUCt. THtY HlBGC hlMM+et> OtJT
jvw 16,'ti-f. M4A>y OP -me M«AJ « r "
Mrrii/ow < v /• WM>N
T*»/i THKOO^I itoyt
cAMvorO CHTHC WAI TO

UHQurrx- B4CK: 7t> UTAH OH UOttTH TO F/K>b * SAM hlg+C To Flttr THf
JA) ICTbtSlt OP Itn MOtT Of Tilt Mi W C 4 M S . Sir MtMtlAb
CAtiVOti AOJUvcb IU SALT LAH€ HAUSY Atlb
#^ T*l* FA*.-
[l*PK£A* -« -me 'si
.CAHYOH
Yn*~~THK *»*AI •nOfr~*iMAi*iet> /*>
PALM S(*M6-S
,/****• "*Jf* OALIFOtAJIA FOVVi> €M*LOYM€HT I*J
|J»«V 11 ATTAOCt* 9)1 SACttAMMHTO VAUtY AT %vrr€H'* MILL.
[IMP
> CANYON
**mnioGAm,
l
»*«*jf
Tut AorHtAiric O&TE OF me >nxmr
op ««wj *r Sirmie's MILL WAS m- '5
•^s?
WXLLS »Ot , MS W# « ^s
*»rm*mi> ovt*iAtJt> MAIL
IPTU M s t »
•num. Ht k i t /« M«> ^ ^ TO •SAH r
^ ~ t*rr AM-
\QoA tHLce.
r. IT
iia-nK , /
AT r W avrlMMAK « « n t f c m - UMK<
/ o r T*M S7MM rntrmtJI ftu. INTO T*£ ^
Vt OF TMIC «»tfTX H0*U ^
%SwMM^
nfue NAME "•coAoieuA"IS of unmoved
J'OKIO-IH. Tiue THCOIUEi AK OlvlM
and region TUlf "STAAMte NAMt. THC FltiT It 7JMT
"CBACMCLLA "

O P MI/CM OF -rw«" i/Attf y it conot-


•SEA IUH/CH CovKlteb MUCH Of
I-L>INDV)IM McMAUty serneb /A) ts Ttteatv n THAT
Keys tiveb /w -rue AUA THAT
JOSHUA T « f NATIONAL MOU0- rt A cotutoPTiou o
A CArrue ROSTL£* Aht HtXXTHtlF. Of MAMS " CAMIULMA " O * - COAMIUA
is -me I M M C OF TMC /UHHAH IMHABUAUTS
TUf SIX It)

eu mtceb HIM.
Pieces

J Ht 5»w AHoeeAs FAVVT if TME MOST txjuinAur FAULT


IHOAtiKoitHIA IT IS MAbe UP of A t-AK&C

TMtr fiAvi-r is TMOI»HT TO B€ JLO em. 3e>


X>€eF> trJro Tfte SAltrtH ciei/sr. f*o?r f*ivrH--
r e v
FAULT rf/ts aeeto p o i
' MOST b£ST/tue-TlU£ CAKrH&AltCS.
m trAoeij
HfA* M4t£ /MAM ntHeSilfr /A/ irs-7,
91 THt FACT TWdT Tf«J FAMOUt f/^AOUS I1O&
BAZTQUAfCE /A* WHICH
PfATONMl-'TY OtACKeo
Z TW< 7 X H M <
(MHICH

srnihira on rut

I N I1OC A
*AMb O P mve
UP A ttTAcMMtMT OP
)l£ LAST STAUiJH SfueKAl- f

HCTItSATCb Ttt*OOt,H w*s O S I « M U & THC


LOiT/Al A, STDlC*)
OoU> OO/AJ THIS VAUtY TV evxtC IHTO
VUMA . POOR, OtX>

f. GET AUJAY WITH Trte doLb St£sr*)CT£t> AlteA

£l£A*JCb

•SKBj

WAS
J . THote i"iw w«f « c me
OF AfMH/bs . A CAMOIUA
-rut •SiMtmuArtit ocAti . ue w»u A
SICK, -mr MAT, Aub A tin*- We
WAt teiUCr C/\JIL UJAH COAT
^Cb TVC UHT HIT* it IT
uitTH A cAut in one HAnp ANO TottAv, eve*
•me Futvr WAOOH . . . taoes in-nte omeR, pneeti- SCA LMMGU.VtAS
rtmwr -ml D,Nir ro «•& MAAEFoer. liitunne vAs
A B« » f
> •ACAU.Y JUAN HAZ.au AAJ* He. iOAS
of THt GULF
/ 7 » / /»*lb J>/«£ OF A*> ATTACK AS M*m /(« TW/3 LAKfiUb
Of Ttf£ FLU AHUL. 11/1X7 AT If Of UJtteAi TMC C4L4XA1K,
136 VfAltS. X4/J o«T OF OOWT/Wi. »*JJ>
TWt SAITOH I A S / " T O /TS
*r SIZJB . A TOtm-i AHbA
t-is geufATH IT% n
"Fig Tnte 3oh«
H&tt CMJAH.lCjtHT.

23
ESERT
ELIEAEY
D O YOU know you can eat a fruit that
has been relished by sheiks and sul-
tans at their sumptious banquets dating
These trees are so important a food
source in the world that they are a con-
sistent reservoir of income for their own-
troubled French occupied country.
During this delay, Swingle became ac-
quainted with the Sharif of Bou Denib,
back to biblical days? ers, and most groves in Africa are hand- who invited Swingle to dinner. This Shar-
If you've never eaten a date large as a ed down from father to son. The date is if was also a Hajji and as such was the
prune, a date so plump and succulent that amply supplied with protein and sugar religious and civil head of the oasis, hav-
you can bite into it and miss the seed-- pectin; so much so that a half pound of ing complete authority there. A Sharif is
then you have a treat in store. The Ameri- dates and a glass of milk make a full nu- a lineal descendant of Muhammad and a
can public is just beginning to get ac- tritional meal. Hajji is one who has made a pilgrimage
quainted with the Medjhool date and for Nothing is left to chance with this to Mecca.
those who have, it is truly an unforgettable precious food supply. The fear of famine Over a dinner ot roast lamb, kous-kous
experience. is so great in Africa that even an extra and tea, Swingle discussed the Medjhool
The Medjhool date palm originated in supply of pollen is saved from one year to date with the Sharif, knowing that about
Africa and was brought from Morocco the next as a precautionary measure in 100 miles west of Bou Denib was Tafila-
through the efforts of an American from case of adverse weather conditions. Each let, the greatest date oasis of them all and
the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He season every tree is hand pollinated to get especially noted for its Medjhool dates.
had eaten some Medjhools in London and the full benefit of ten to fifteen clusters To Swingle's surprise, he learned from
had fond memories of them. Later, when of dates, weighing from 300 to 500 the Sharif that the Arabs were paid two
opportunity knocked, this foresighted pounds per tree. Also, at different times, cents a pound for the same dates he had
man took advantage of the circumstances the clusters must be thinned, air circula- paid 24 cents a pound for in London. He
to introduce Medjhools into the United tion provided and the dates covered for informed the Sharif of the London price
States. protection from the weather. In Southern and told him that he thought the price
Date palms have been in existence for California the picking normally starts in of two cents was not high enough. Swin-
more than 8,000 years and there are many September. gle added that he felt if the dates were
references to it in the Bible. Its fringed In May of 1927, an American, Mr. graded for moisture content and size and
leaves have long been tokens of victory Walter T. Swingle, of the U.S. Depart- were protected from insects, they should
and beauty. It is known that it will bear ment of Agriculture, was invited to join ask three to four cents more per pound.
fruit for 200 years, not counting the sev- representatives of various countries as a Pleased with the prospects of more in-
en years it usually takes for it to start pro- commission to investigate the Baioudh come and grateful for the information,
ducing fruit. A date palm will grow from disease infecting the date palms in Mo- the Sharif was glad to show the Ameri-
60 to 100 feet high. The sex of a date rocco. By chance, this was the same man can the operation of their Medjhool gar-
palm is unknown until it flowers if the who had previously bought Medjhools dens, listening attentively for any other
shoot is not attached to the parent palm. in London. In their travels, the commis- suggestions he might have. Swingle then
As the male tree does not bear fruit, the sion saw the destruction wrought by the asked the Sharif if there was a way to
best way to insure planting a tree that parlatoria scale (which had been intro- buy some Medjhool offshoots to take back
does is to plant the suckers that grow duced from Algeria at Colomb Bechar) to America since we did not have that
from the base of a female tree. This and were on their way farther south when variety. Happy to return a favor, the Sharif
method provides reproduction of the they were delayed several days at Bou Den- and Swingle went through orchard after
prime bearers as well. ib waiting for a military escort into the orchard searching for a grove that did

24
not have any evidence of the yellowing The male and female bloom
center in the top of the trees, the sign of of the date palm, which must be
the Baioudh disease. They finally found hand pollinated.
what seemed like a healthy garden, and
the native workmen hastily cut six uni- date palms. Besides a favorable climate,
form offshoots, breaking off five more however, dates not only require a sandy
little shoots in the process. When packed alkaline soil, they need lots of water which
for shipping, the five small offshoots were meant more searching. Finally a farm
used to help fill in the spaces around the was found that had a well which could
six larger shoots and Mr. Swingle was assure a good water supply. It was owned
charged only for the six larger offshoots by an Indian who was amiable to raising
of standard planting size. the offshoots for the government.
Five weeks later, 11 Medjhool offshoots After all this seeking and appraisal, it
arrived unheralded in Washington. Fear- was learned the farmer's land was not
ful of the Baioudh disease, the authorities within the Mojave Indian Reservation
decided that the plants would have to be and the Indian farmer had no title to his new homeland.
grown under strict supervision and con- land! So the government changed the re- At long last, in 1936 the quarantine
ditions for several years in a remote area servation boundary officially to include it! period was over and the nine Medjhool
away from other palms to prevent con- The 11 offshoots were first fumigated palms and their offshoots were brought
taminating American groves. and then planted on July 4, 1927 and they to the Indio Date Garden of the U.S. De-
Meanwhile in Morocco, they had stop- all grew. One day, however, while the partment of Agriculture where they thriv-
ped planting Medjhools because of their farmer was away, his dog dug up two of ed and provided more offshoots for plant-
susceptibility to the Baioudh disease. the little shoots which died, leaving nine ing other groves.
Where to find an area with a climate plants. Today you can find Medjhools growing
acceptable for growing dates where no A few clusters of dates and some new from Indio to Yuma. People who have
date palms had ever grown, seemed an im- suckers had grown by the third year. To never cared for dates before drive miles
possible task. But found it was. The south- bear fruit this early was very rare, especial- out of their way to buy them. For this
ern tip of Nevada was discovered to be ly with heavy sucker growth, so it was an rare and royal gift, our thanks to an en-
nearly ideal in climate and Nevada had no indication that they would do well in their terprising American. Q

CONSECRATION
THIS ANCIENT LAND
By MADELEINE FOUCHAUX
Los Angeles, California
MY DESERT
By HARRIETT FARNSWORTH
By CATHRYN ADAMS
Loma Linda, California
Waked from slumber, wrapt in wonder,
From my veranda where the hanging olla Lancaster, California Just as dawned the new-born day.
Offers its wind-cooled water close at In the breathless morning magic,
hand, Oh give me the desert with the double glow From the sand on which I lay.
I look across the arid miles where cholla Of sunset at eventide; From the white sand, clean and drifted
And Joshua cast blue shadows on the And snow-capped peaks hemming me in There I saw the desert pray;
sand. A world that's friendly and wide. Saw ten thousand arms uplifted,
Silhouettes against the sky;
Between the dunes of spiny vegetation, When the sun slips over the Joshua tops Saw ten thousand mute forms standing.
Washing the dust of centuries away, In a sea of rose and gold, Unaware of such as I.
A river runs in my imagination; My thoughts drift back to other lands Filled my heart with strange elation,
A window opens into yesterday. In memories I cherish and hold. Viewing there such consecration.
• • •
Marshes and lakes with tree-ferns at the Oh give me the desert with camp-fire nights
edges Warm, friendly stars overhead; CONTRAST
Shine in the valley's Mesozoic light. Where the far-off wail of the coyote's call By KATHRYN AINSWORTH GROVER
There giant saurians wallow in the sedges Woos sleep to my earthy bed. Alhambra, California
And queer, reptilian birds take clumsy • • • A city house shut up and locked
flight. TREASURE I think looks empty only,
By DORA SESSIONS LEE A desert home looks near to tears
A million years have passed. The window, And oh, so very lonely.
closing, Prescott, Arizona
Returns me to the desert, hot and dry. From all the treasure of this earth
Where have the monsters gone? A lizard, These I would choose and more—
A bit of jade from the sands of time
dozing,
Wakes up and mocks me with an ancient On a burnished desert floor. FACE LIFE
eye. By TANYA SOUTH
A chastened view of the distant peaks Weep not, nor grieve, oh soul of mine,
• • • Where greed's hidden treasures lie; For that which now you reap.
MASTER MOLDER A fortune wrought of the desert gold Life is a wondrous great design
By MILDRED C. TALLANT When the Sun-God rides on high. For souls who climb the steep.
Glendale, California Face life with courage squarely, then,
The Molder of Mountains one aeon, A calm content with my desert home And bravely upward tread.
Pushed a thumb-print deep in the clay; A peace that no gold can buy; There's no advance without its pain,
Impressions then fired in earth crayons A heart serene and a trust divine But there is Light ahead.
Formed deserts, vermilion and grey. And a tranquil desert sky.

25
DATE SAUCE SCHEHERAZADE
V2 cup fresh dates
VA cup whipping cream
V2 teaspoon instant coffee powder
1 can (8-oz.) butterscotch sundae
sauce
Finely chop dates. Combine with
cream, coffee powder and butter-
scotch sauce. Spoon over firm ice
cream, baked custard, rice pudding
or bread pudding. Makes about 1
cup sauce.
LEMON-DATE LAMB
1 leg of lamb, 5 to 7 lbs. 1 tablespoon prepared mustard
Salt 3 or 4 lemons CHOCOLATE DATE SQUARES
l/2 teaspoon pepper 1 cup water Vz cup shortening
Y2 cup sugar 12 fresh California dates 1 square chocolate
1 tablespoon cornstarch Parsley sprigs % cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon sweet basil 2 eggs, beaten
Rub lamb with 1 teaspoon salt and pep- Brush some of sauce over lamb every 10 1 cup sifted flour
per and place on rack in roasting pan. minutes during last 30 minutes roasting- Vi teaspoon salt
Insert meat thermometer in center of time. Slice 2 lemons into 6 slices each, 1 teaspoon vanilla
meaty part, not touching bone. Roast in discarding ends. Snip dates lengthwise Vi cup chopped dates
325-degrees (moderately slow) oven 2 with kitchen scissors; flip out pits. Ar- 1 cup chopped nuts, pecan or
to 2I/2 hours or until thermometer regis- range lemon slices in shallow pan; top walnut
tes 170 to 180 degees F. for rare or until each with date. Brush with sauce and place Melt the shortening and chocolate to-
well done lamb as you prefer. Meanwhile, in oven with lamb during last 10 minutes gether. Add sugar and mix well. Add
beaten eggs and stir thoroughly. Add
blend sugar, cornstarch, I/2 teaspoon salt, roasting-time. Transfer lamb to warm flour, salt, vanilla, dates and nuts.
basil and mustard in small saucepan. serving platter; arrange lemon-date slices Pour batter into greased 8x8-inch pan
Squeeze 1 or 2 lemons for 14 cup juice; around lamb. Garnish with parsley. Serve and bake in 350 F. oven for 30 min-
blend juice and water into sugar mixture. with remaining sauce. Makes 10 to 12 utes. Cut into squares.
Cook, stirring, over medium heat until servings.
sauce comes to boil and is thickened.
STUFFED DATES
Prepare fresh dates for stuffing by
BANANA DATE APPETIZER Jj snipping off one side with scissors,
1 lift out pit, or buy pitted dates. Stuff
1/2cup pitted fresh California dates dates with:
2medium-size bananas * Crystallized ginger
1teaspoon grated lemon rind Blanched almonds
3tablespoons fresh lemon juice Crunchy peanut butter
Iceberg lettuce Pimento cheese
14 cup salad oil Cream cheese, chopped maraschino
2 teaspoons finely chopped onion cherries mixture
Mayonnaise or salad dressing
4 walnut halves DATE AND NUT BREAD
Slice dates crosswise into rings. Peel ban- 1 cup sugar
anas and cut into halves; split halves 1 tablespoon butter
lengthwise. Roll in mixture of lemon 2 cups flour
rind and juice. Arrange lettuce cups on 1 teaspoon salt
4 salad plates; shred 2 cups lettuce and 1 egg
place l/2 cup in each. Mix remaining lem- Pour 1 cup boiling water over 1 cup
on juice mixture with oil, dates and onion. chopped dates and 1 cup chopped
nuts, add 1 teaspoon soda. Let this
Place 2 pieces banana in each lettuce cup; cool. Then add to first mixture and
ladle dressing over. Dab with mayonnaise; place in greased loaf pan. Bake at
garnish with walunts. Makes 4 servings. 300 degrees for about an hour.

26
FROSTY DATE SALAD

1 cup fresh dotes
2 pkg. (3-oz. each) cream cheese -4. I
1 can (8% oz.) crushed pineapple
Vi cup chopped maraschino
cherries
2 tablespoons syrup from cherries
Vi cup whipping cream
Salad greens
Slice dates. Gradually blend soften-
ed cream cheese with undrained DATE APPLE BREAD
pineapple. Add cherries, syrup and 1 or 2 apples teaspoon ground nutmeg
dates. Whip cream until stiff, and
fold into cheese-fruit mixture. Turn 2l/7 cups sifted flour 1/2 cup butter or margarine
into refrigerator tray and freeze until 3 teaspoons baking powder % cup sugar
firm. Slice and serve on salad 1 teaspoon salt 2
eggs
greens. 1/2 teaspion cinnamon 1/3 cup milk
1/7 teaspoon ground mace or V4 1 cup packaged diced dates
Core and finely chop e n o u g h apple t o apple. Turn into greased and floured 9 x
DATE AND NUT TORTE measure i y 2 cups. Sift flour with baking 5 x 3-inch loaf pan. Bake in 350-degree
Beat thoroughly 4 eggs. Gradually powder, salt, cinnamon and mace. Cream (moderate) oven 1 hour and 15 minutes
beat in 1 cup sugar. Mix together and butter with sugar, then beat in eggs. Beat or until bread tests done. Cool 10 minutes
stir in 1 cup fine bread crumbs, 1 flour mixture into creamed mixture al- in pan, then turn out and cool on rack.
teaspoon baking powder. Add 2 ternately with milk; fold in dates and Makes 1 (9x5x3-inch) loaf.
cups pitted dates, finely chopped, 1
cup chopped walnut meats. Spread NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION
in well-greased 9-inch square pan. Domestic Dates* (wi thouf pits) Natural and Dry Ingredients in Edible Portion of 1 Ib. of Dates
Bake in 350 degree oven for 35 min-
Protein 1 0.0 grams Potassium 2939.0 mg
utes until set. Cut into oblongs 2x3 Fats 2.3 grams Vitamin A 230.0 units
inches and serve cool with whipped Carbohydrates 330.7 grams Thiamine .40 mg
cream or ice cream topping. Calcium 268.0 mg Riboflavin .44 mg
Phosphorus 286.0 mg Niacin 9.6 mg
Iron 13.6 mg Food Energy 1243 calories
Sodium 5.0 mq
* Source—Agr icultural Handbook No. 8, United States Department of Agriculture
SPICED DATE CAKE
1 Vi cups sugar SHEIK'S DATE CURRY
1 cup salad oil 1 cup California dates
3 eggs 6 tablespoons butter or margarine
2 cups sifted flour 2 teaspoons curry powder
1 teaspoon soda 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
2 teaspoons salt 2 onions, sliced
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups water 1/3 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon nutmeg
2 teaspoons grated lemon rind
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 lbs. fresh deveined shrimp
1 teaspoon allspice
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 cup buttermilk
2 tablespoons water
1 cup chopped nuts
1 cup pitted chopped dates Quarter dates crosswise. Melt butter in
1 teaspoon vanilla large skillet. Stir in seasonings and onion.
Combine sugar, oil a n d eggs. Beat Saute onion 2 or 3 minutes. Add 2 cups
until smooth a n d creamy. Sift together water, lemon rind and juice and shrimp.
dry ingredients a n d a d d alternately Bring just to a boil. Cover and reduce
with buttermilk to creamed mixture. heat; simmer 5 to 7 minutes, until shrimp
Mix until smooth. Stir in nuts, dates
is tender. Blend cornstarch with 2 table-
and vanilla. Turn batter into a
greased a n d floured 9x13x2 inch pan. spoons water. Stir into shrimp mixture.
Bake at 300 degrees for 55 to 60 min- Cook until sauce is thickened. Add dates
utes. Cool cake in pan. Spread with and heat a few minutes. Serve over hot
icing. rice or noodles as desired.
27
LAND OF LITTLE SUMMERS
BY LOWELL BEAN AND WILLIAM MASDN

THIS ARTICLE WAS


WRITTEN 20 YEARS
AGO,

Research for new material on Coachella Valley's first inhabitants initiated in 1962 by the
Palm Springs Museum resulted in the Museum's new Cahuilla Room. Lowell Bean, cura-
tor, tells here of previously uncovered records which are of special importance to the project.

NE OF THE most exciting finds turned up by the After stopping at San Bernardino Rancho to rest
O Palm Springs Museum's research into Coachella
Valley history is the recently discovered diary of
their horses, the men struggled onward into rugged San
Gorgonio Pass. The Indians they encountered there
Brevet Captain Jose Romero. Although this gentleman's were a Cahuilla group, known at the Wanikik Cahuilla,
history, as an individual, remains a mystery (no known who had already been visited by white men—Franciscan
records exists of his origin and demise), well-documented priests of the San Gabriel Mission who established the
descriptions of his penetration into Coachella Valley San Bernardino Rancho in 1819 and the Rancho at San
have contributed much to the area's vague history. Gorgonio shortly thereafter.
Fearful of English, Russian and other foreign enter- From San Gorgonio Pass the expedition dropped into
prises around California in 1822, the Mexican govern- Whitewater Canyon to pasture their horses. Although
ment instituted a series of inquiries seeking an overland this initiated the first recorded visit to Coachella Valley
route to California from Sonora whereby troops and by civilized men, there is tangible suggestion that others
supplies could be transported rapidly in case of trouble. had preceded them. For one, Romero's diarist and
Opportunely, a Cocomaricopa Indian appeared in Los assistant, Commander Lieutenant Jose Maria Estudillo,
Angeles at this time to acquire beads and cloth that a noted the day before the expedition's arrival in Palm
Cahuilla Indian had told him might be found there. Springs (December 28, 1823) that there would be no
Realizing that he had bypassed dreaded Yuma territory water or pasture until Agua Caliente was reached. This
without harm, his alliance was cultivated by the Mexi- implies that he knew of the hot spring's existence before-
cans and word was sent to Tucson instructing Brevet hand and it was not a discovery of this expedition.
Captain Jose Romero to seek this inland route to Cali- Further indication that Palm Springs, or Agua Cali-
fornia. Records of Romero's trek westward are incom- ente as it was then called, was known to priests as well
plete, but after his arrival in Los Angeles he organized as to the military is apparent in the fact that, upon Ro-
an expedition of 50 men and several hundred horses and mero's return trip in 1824, he encountered a cattle drive
proceeded again into the Colorado desert. between Palm Springs and San Gorgonio Pass guarded

28
through the waterless wastes to Coachella Valley on Janu-
ary 8th. A fortuitous discovery of Canyon Springs by
Private Juan Higuera may have saved several hundred
of the thirsty animals, for enroute they were without
water for five days.
Gratefully, the expedition reached Coachella Valley
where there was water and an occasional chance to pas-
ture animals. A little difficulty with Cahuilla-Mexican
relations transpired at various rancherias where horses
had been left to be cared for by the Indians. Some were
missing (perhaps enjoyed at Cahuilla banquets). This
angered Estudillo, who demanded their return and took
as hostages a chief and his family. The next day, how-
ever, the horses were returned, with only a few missing,
the Indians released. Whether the Indians stole mission
cattle from San Gorgonio in this period is not known,
but cattle and horses must have been a great temptation
to people who relied on rabbits, and other small game,
with only an occasional deer and mountain sheep, for
meat. If the cattle were brought down frequently from
San Gorgonio to the Coachella region, the mesquite
beans—a Cahuilla staple—must have been depleted, which
could have resulted in forays on mesquite-fattened cattle.
On January 15, 1824, Estudillo introduces an impor-
tant fact in his diary. He writes that the expedition re-
turned to the spot known as "los Veranitos" by the sol-
diers who were impressed at the sight of corn, pumpkins,
melons and other summer crops cultivated by the Indians
growing in mid-winter. Thus they christened the spot
"Veranitos," meaning "little summers."
This is important because it proves that the Desert
Cahuilla practiced agriculture at an earlier date than
formerly believed. How long they had planted seeds, or
where they acquired the innovation is not certain. Per-
CABEZON, CAHUILLA CHIEF OF THE IATE 1STH CENTURY. HE WAS haps the San Gabriel mission had inspired them to prac-
SON OF CHIACHIA, ONE OF THE CHIEFS WITH WHOM ROMERO SPOKE. tice agriculture, or perhaps agriculture had been trans-
mitted from the Colorado River tribes such at the Hal-
chidum or Yuma. Inasmuch as the crops mentioned by
by the Indian vaqueros of the San Gorgonio Ranch who
had driven the cattle to Agua Caliente in search of
pasture. Also, San Gabriel baptismal records note that
Indians from Whitewhater Canyon were baptised as
early as 1809.
Romero's journal is of special interest to the Palm
Springs Desert Museum because of its detailed reference
to Indians and geography of the Coachella Valley. The
day after the troup's arrival at Palm Springs, the men
explored Palm Canyon where they met two Cahuilla
Indians with Christian names—Jose and Vicente—who
had been employed on mission ranches and were friendly
to the Mexicans.
From December 28 to January 1, the Romero Expe-
dition passed through what is now Indian Wells, then
veered southeast a little below the site of Indio, passing
through what is now Thermal, Mecca and finally Fish
Creek Springs where they rested for a time. In their
journey they met three prominent chiefs of rancherias—
Juamey, Chiachia and Tujuma Abali.
The diary tells of an incident where a horse fell in
one of the deep Indian wells and drowned. The Mexicans
gave it to the Cahuillas and it was eaten by the Indians
with great relish. After establishing rapport with the
principal chieftains of the area, the expedition left sev-
eral tired horses with them and proceeded onward to
Dos Palmas, marching through the dry bed of Salton
Sea, as that body of water was then non-existent. Turn-
ing into the Orocopia Mountains, the soldiers searched THE WALK-IN WATER WELL INTO WHICH ONE OF ROMERO'S HORSES
for the Colorado River, but failing to find it, returned FELL. CAHUILLA INDIANS BUILT RAMPS LEADING INTO THEIR WELLS.

29
Estudillo were found growing in Yu-
knan garden patches at the time of
first Spanish contact by Anza in 1774, £|CpeS«iiony anh
it is more plausible that the Cahuillas
obtained the science of agriculture tfjrouyfj
from their Halchidum allies, who
grew the same crops as their Yuman
enemies.
On January 20th, the expedition
left the Coachella Valley. En route
they were aided by Indian vaqueros
of the San Gorgonio Rancho who
gave the famished soldiers two cattle
to augment their exhausted food sup-
ply. The Romero expedition of 1823-
24 finally returned to San Gabriel on
January 31st, but a year later, in
December, Romero and his men ven-
tured to the Colorado River. This
time they were successful. The route
was carefully surveyed and mapped
by Lieutenant Romualdo Pocheco,
who also kept a diary. Probably much
more material concerning the Coach-
ella Valley lies buried in various ar-
chives waiting to be uncovered. La-
mentably little has been found record-
ed, so far, about the period of
Cahuilla Indian history after 1834, Thus, a new era of the desert's ABOVE MAP SHOWS TRAILS BROKEN THROUGH
when the Desert Cahuilla united with history has been opened for viewing IND1AN
COUNTRY BY EARLY PIONEERS.
other Cahuillas in war against the and the Cahuilla—its first masters-
Mexicans, possibly in protest to the are now known as friends of strangers,
secularization of San Gabriel mission agriculturists, and skilled in socio-
in that year. political matters of their time. / / /

Desert Magazine Book Shop


A Gift of Books Will Be Remembered Long After ANSWERS TO DATE QUIZ
the Occasion is Forgotten.
Name
Address .
Gtv _Scate_ 1. C. 6. A
iip.
I enclose $_ -(check, money order or charge) 2. A. 7. C
MY CHARGE: O 3. C. 8. A
4. B. 9. B
Credit Card No. |_
5. B. 10. B
Expiration Date I MasterCharge |
Month/Year I 7 I Interbank No. I 100 points: You must have peeked at
the answers.
Signature
90 points: No one could be so smart.
(charge not valid unless .signed)
80 points: You should be operating a
date shop.
70 points: Congratulations — you are
almost an expert.
60 points: So you missed a few—we
all do.
California residents add 6% sales tax 50 points: Oh well — you can't win
Enclose Self-Addressed. Stamped \o. 10 $1.50
Postage/handling
Envelope/or Our FREE 10-Page Catalog. TOTAL them all.
Ordering Information 40 points: Not bad — but not good.
SI.M) pusuee and handling per ordet NOT each item.
Use the convenient o r d e r form. Prim ail information Nomuilv we ship within <*8 hours of rweinnif >our order. 30 points: Better start asking questions.
dearK In the event of i dela\ exceeding w o * « k s . vou »iil Lv
()ti orders exceeding S-0 00 [Suited Parcel Service is used. notified as to its a u s e . 20 points: Might as well face it — this
California residents please add h". >aies tax. Pncn art
rrquinni: a dehverv address and NOT j hox number.
Ml orders shipped tn padded containers or canons Add suhieci to change and Mipplies limitd to avaitahU SIOCK.
isn't your field.
Mail tod.IV to:
10 points: So you picked it by accident.
Desert Magazine Book Shop P.O. Box 1318. Palm Desert. California 92261 0 points: Better return to your kum-
quats!
30
Water Witching and Drilling
No Water . . . No Charge
Also, we Dowse
for Minerals and Oil

CHARLES W.
SHAW
Phone (714) 262-2260
or leave message' 262-5483
1205 46th St., San Diego, CA 92102
J
p*- T# • <? ••*•** £ \

CLASSIFIED ADS

Desert Magazines For Sale;


333 Issues, 1949 to 1974
Some extras. Asking $135.00
Dale Tanoy
1844 Retter Drive
Pasadena, Cal. 91106
(213) 795-3846
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
w
WESTERN 8 Latin Americana
Send $1.00 for rare book
catalogue,

E
VEN PERSONS normally uninterest- cating summer days. Thus, the plant it-
Jane Zwisohn
ed in wildflowers fall in love with this self actually "avoids" the arid condi-
524 Solano Drive NE
plant during spring. The Hairy Sand- tions, growing only during the compara-
Albuquerque, New Mex.
verbena (Abronia villosa) often forms tively cooler spring months when ground 87108
thick carpets in many desert localities. moisture is still present as a result of
The rich rose-purple hues stun all on- winter rainfall. * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
lookers regardless of tastes. The verbena is a member of the plant
Winter rains are required to bring out family known as Nyctaginaceae. This is MAGAZINES FOR SALE;
this low-lying annual in all its grandeur. quite a mouthful so perhaps it is best to Desert, Treasure, Western
Sparse and erractic precipitation may remember the English equivalent, rare back issues for sale.
bring forth a few plants, but several " F o u r - o ' C l o c k . " Unfortunately, this Send want list to:
inches must fall before the lavender plant is not a true "verbena." Its com- Harold Moody
fields arise. As the moisture sinks into mon name is a misnomer in that the true
the ground, the dormant seeds take in
Box 803
verbenas are of a completely different Project City, Cal. 96079
some of this water readying themselves
family known to scientists as Verbena-
for the onset of warm weather which
ceae," an appropriate designation. * ************
stimulates germination. If conditions are
There is some resemblance between a
favorable, the new sprout will break
few members of both families, but there WANTED:
through the sandy soil and begin
are also many differences. Most notable Treasure, True Treasure
creeping along the ground. Soon, the
is the fact that in the Southwest all mem- magazines, books on lost
xerophyte (plant adapted to arid condi-
tions) will have stems leading in several bers of the true verbena family are per- mines and railroads.
directions, each of them hugging the ennials whereas the Hairy Sand-verbena Write, telling me what you
ground quite closely. is an annual. have.
Botanists call the Hairy Sand-verbena
You won't have to search long to find Michael
a drought avoider. As May approaches, this plant each spring. Any creosote-dot- P. 0. Box 799
the plant dries up leaving only its seeds ted basin with lots of wind-blown sand is North Palm Springs, Cal.
as a reminder of its presence. The seeds, sure to have at least a few of these flow- 92258
not the plant, withstand the hot, desic- ers adorning the countryside. • **************

31
Harry Of iver
of 3 Mirage
Harry (Harold G.) Oliver
purchased a small parcel of
land at Thousand Palms, Cal.
on March 27, 1943 for $10.00.
(Editors note: that same
parcel is for sale today at
a price of $45,000). He then
^set about building what would
be known as Old Fort Oliver.
There he launched what was
to become his famous DESERT
RAT SCRAPBOOK. Harry, as he
preferred to be called, pub-
lished 44 editions, composed
of 11 pouches (envelopes) of
4 issues each. The first
issue came out in the fall of
1946, shortly after the com-
pletion of Old Fort Oliver.
Harry's scrap book was
printed on a light tag board
paper and billed as "the only
paper in the world that you
can open in the wind." Early
editions cost ten cents. As
an indicator of Harry's approach
to life, the last page read:
"POSTMASTER—DO NOT—send this
back—if the subscriber don't
know where he lives, I sure
as heck don't either."
In his first issue, Harry
stated "I will keep people
interested in the plants,
animals, and beauty of YOUR
desert. I will say nice things
about the folks that love the
desert and just not talk about
those that don't understand it.
I will tell only authenic lies.
I will be the best gold-dern
Harry Oliver, at Old Fort Oliver, who proclaimed himself Pegleg Smith's press publicity agent for Your
agent, and was one of the two founders of the Pegleg Liars' Contest and Trek. Harry desert You ever had."
is touching up one of the wooden peglegs he produced to further the Pegleg legend.
Harry scattered a number of these through the Borrego Badlands through the years Continued on page 41
to encourage hunters for the Pegleg Gold.

32
&£8-DH S"3^.o5- H>^ag zgM
&: to

i Co
o
I
>^
g- 8.
Cla
ins are

S'
o 5
H
a-
s-
CD
ook

1
I
I
X b*
ai
fed
c» o ("™l i I
• ^ ^ 1 1 i -

CJ ra i T^^SZ?
bd

^^riyi^^
Bid SHOWS HAVE SIMPLE IDEAS 2ND MOUNTAIN BACKGROUNDS • B . 0 . 1 W
I HAVE MAILED THIS TO THE EDITORS OF "BARTLETTS QUOTATIONS" TO ADD TO MY EVER GROWING LIST OF QUOTES.

1
Smallest newspaper In the world and th« only
t pass one. (Not a Texaa Bossl)

Peg Leg Smith


The P.T.Barnum of Desert Ghosts Two Thousand Wfld Buffalo Stam-
peded past the Grandstand In the last
THINGS JUST HAPPEN IN 'Act.1—Can yon Just see JJ.C. of M.G.M.
taking 2000 Wild Bofalo to Rome,—<I
Packet 1 of Pouch 10 BORREGO DESERT can't).
"Where?" — Up in Belle Fourche.
Thla paper la not entered aa second daaa In the year 1836 an earthquake shook-up South Dakota, "The Black Hills Round-
mail. It'i a flrat claaa newspaper. this desert valley and from Coyote Mountain up," stages a Great Show here at this
a large boulder was detached and rolled out place in the spectacular Bad Lands,
on the edge of the valley {where the view is (July 3-5).
good and the parking grand) in the next hun- "Gee"—2000 is a lot of Buffalo.
* • •
dred years, the hot summer sun and the cool In this edition you will find many
Published at Fort Oliver winters caused this boulder to disintegrate and Shows of The Old West with names
decompose into fragments,—the base of the and places you should know more
THOUSAND PALMS, CALIFORNIA
Peg-Leg Monument today. about
I can't begin to list them all—A chain
Four Times a Year This all happened the same year Peg-Leg of Missions, many Great Parks, Ghost
ON THE NEWSSTAND 10c A COPT Smith came West and found and also lost bis Towns, numerous Cavalcades, Indian
fabulous GOLD, {the most noteworthy col- Pow-Wow's, and Frontier Days.—I pick
But sometime! they don't have them. them for showmanship and unforget-
ourable Desert fantasy we have today.) A table names.—-So I say, "Take a few
MAILING PRICE $1.00 A YEAR little less than a hundred years later, I, Harry years off and see them alL"
After the Democrats get rid of Sum- Oliver, homesteaded in Borrego. The survey
merfield and stamps come down in showed this disintegrated rock to be on the
price, I will go back to 50c a year. section line, the East boundary of my 160
acres, along side of the H.O. Ranch adobe
Peg-Leg in New York
This offer expires when 1 do house. My 25 years as Press Agent for a
Asbestos editions will Peg Leg Ghost has at long last caught
be forwarded in case you wasIn started,—at
the year of 1916 the Peg Leg Smith Club the attention of New York.
first just talk, Doc A. A. Frank Scully, writing in the New
don't make it. Beatty was the Boss Tall Tale Teller, Roy York Variety, May 25, 1955, says, and
I quote—"Wonder if Oliver ever heard
Published by Brininger, second best, The Kelseys and Jack of the silver pegleg that was buried
Dickerson, Harry Woods and the DuVall's with Peter Stuyvesant, once a mayor
and others kept it going. of New York? If he ever does, he may
HARRY O L I IVM VER
It was about 20 years later (1935) that I Wm. do for the silver market what even
Jennings Bryan couldn't do."
188* got to know Peg Leg {and learned I could
Fort Commander
Publisher tune-in and talk to the Old Gold-Finding-
Distributor Ghost) 6 shots of old Bourbon was all it took
Lamp Lighter to make contact—8 shots and he would come
Editor
Artist
and sit beside me. This Bourbon stuff is
Payola, unpaid as—YET. Wests Greatest Actors
Janitor The Burro
PRESS AGENT FOR A GHOST hiding b e h i n d
Gardener his absurd face
Owner It was after we talked, sitting on the frag- has a keen intel-
ments of the rock, that I started as his Press lect, Is a great
Agent and went to work on getting the Monu- actor, a n d h a s
ment started. l o n g taken his
p a r t i n enter-
As to what has been done over the last 25 tainment. S o m e
There Is nothing bigger than the years I suggest you read Bert Fireman, of the are used frankly
"out-doors." a s ra u 8 e u m
"Phoenix Gazette," his story, on the next pieces. O w n e r s
Nature teaches beasts to know their page, Bert is Arizona's top historian and as- of roadside es-
friends. sayer of "Lost Mines." tablishments i n
the Southwest often park one or two
HAPPY OLD GHOST outside to lure tourists. Rodeo clowns
And I just wonder if he don't know where train them as comedy mounts, and
they are used for laughs In Softball or
his lost mine is,—Why else does he always basketball games where the players are
hang around Borrego? mounted. A burro race is staged in
As I await the word from Clyde E, Strickler Colorado each year, from Leadviile to
People ask me how I get my name Fairplay. Also Death Valley has Its
In the papers so often. It is so easy— Park Supervisor—that,—at long-last, (after 25 Burro-Flapjack race. In the dude and
all you do Is build yourself the most years effort) The San Diego County Land pack-trail business, eleven burros pack
colorful place to live in all the whole Marks Society, — will accept The Peg-Leg about as much as six horses, eat less,
county—then live in it 20 years or so and are surer-footed. Several outfits
with a startling horde of screw-ball Monument. And after endless requests the including the Sierra Club, of San Fran-
animals—and if you do not give the Historical Society will adopt Mr. Thomas L. cisco, use burros for pack animals
Animals "last names"—your name is Smith as a sure-enough Borrego Desert Pioneer. on hiking trips over the John Muir
sure to be used every time they do Trail. Burros are also standard equip-
the unexpected—and who is to know— / am happy as I know, the Old Ghost himself ment without which no buried-treasure
you kinda set-the-stage—abit— told me, it will be.) expedition would be official. qc
Coachella Valley's Ghost Town the District road system. The original
roads were first prospector's trails, then
By Phyllis Wight "scratch" roads built by the District.
Prior to that, the only State highway able
to serve any of the camps east of White-
p water was old Highway 99 and its
branch from Coachella to BIythe, called
the Sunkist Trail. In addition to roads,
the District installed power lines, tele-
phone lines, and water lines with wells
and pumping equipment before construc-
tion could start.
It is evident that the roads in various
stages of construction were not too
smooth. An editorial in the old Coachella
Valley Submarine described a trip to visit
the Berdoo Camp, commenting that the
men would be glad to stay in camp once
they got there! Meanwhile, Coachella
and Indio merchants outdid themselves
trying to get business from the camps.
This same editor also stated that "Coa-
chella built a road into town from the
aqueduct while Indio argued as to how
to spend its money."
Berdoo Camp in 1936 The buildings in Berdoo Camp were
of various types. The layout plan shows

I F YOU'RE the kind of person who


always has to find out what's at the
end of "that little road," you belong to
two small washouts here, but with rea-
sonable care a passenger car can detour
around the bad spots. When you have
different-sized dormitories—one to house
40 men, one for 28, several for 20, a
couple for eight and a number housing
an ever-growing breed of weekend ex- reached the top and parked your vehicle, only four. Again quoting the Report,
plorer who spends all free time on the you've arrived within easy walking dis- the District charged a little more for the
desert. Some prospect, some look for tance of "Berdoo Camp." privilege of listening to fewer snores, as
purple bottles, others just look, but one Built when the Metropolitan Water the larger dormitories charged 20c per
thing they have in common. They want District was constructing the aqueduct to day for lodging, and the cottages charged
to know why the unexpected things they carry water from the Colorado River to 25c and 35c!
inevitably find, are there. Los Angeles, substantial buildings with A 9-room guest house was maintained
Just such a place lies less than a dozen all possible conveniences were construct- at the camp for use of visiting members
miles from Indio. This isn't a hidden ed to accommodate the men who worked of the District organization and guests,
spot—it's not possible to hide vast ce- the desert project. with $1 per person per night the rental
ment foundations with stairways leading Eight other camps were established in fee. A large mess hall served meals to
nowhere still intact. Rather, it's well on Coachella Valley to facilitate the project the men with hours according to the
the way to becoming an historic spot, —Fargo Canyon, Yellow Canyon, Push- shifts being worked. Nine meals a day
with a history reaching back some 30 awalla among them—but Berdoo Camp were not unusual. These meals cost each
years. was the largest and most costly. The sum man $1.15 per day. Each camp also
For those of you who haven't visited of $148,000 was spent to complete it. operated a commissary where toilet ar-
this ghost town, take Highway 60 out Considering the low cost of construction ticles, tobacco and cigarettes and so forth
of Indio a mile and a half to Dillon in the early '30s, that was a large sum could be purchased at small cost.
Road, follow Dillon seven miles and of money. There were more than 40 The Division Headquarters Office was
turn right at the San Bernardino Can- buildings plus necessary improvements— in a large building near the northern
yon sign. Watch for a left turn a little even fire plugs on the hilltop! boundary of the camp, at the edge of the
more than three miles up the Canyon. Roads had to be provided prior to work ravine. The superintendent's residence
After you turn, the road forks and you on the aqueduct itself. The building of was above and to the right of the office,
will notice a chain across the right fork the first section of road, 35 miles along and there were other buildings used as
which leads to what is left of the old the north side of Coachella Valley, be- an auto repair shop, car shed, tool shed,
tween Garnet and Indio, was completed machine shop and general utility buildings.
change house and warehouse, but the
road you will follow turns sharply to in 1933. Each road built by the District One of the largest buildings, at the
was planned to connect with state high- upper end of the camp near the "U" turn,
the left, under the spot where the rail-
ways, with paved branch roads to the divi- was a 27-bed hospital. While other
road trestle used to be. This winds sion camps and the aqueduct intakes. camps had emergency first-aid stations,
around and up a short hill, and, oddly Then stub roads were brought to the indi- the hospital was located at Berdoo Camp
enough, this road is paved. There are vidual contractor's camps to complete where accident (and other) cases were

36
brought by ambulance. T. Sheridan
Carey, M.D., of Los Angeles, was sur-
geon-medical officer for this class A in-
dustrial hospital, with one assistant sur-
geon and 14 registered male nurses as
staff. The air-conditioned hospital was
equipped with a modern operating room,
X-ray plant, diet kitchen, general offices
and other modern facilities. Each em-
ployee was charged 5c per working day
for medical service. It was decided, as
the Coachella tunnels neared completion,
to expand the medical facilities at Ban-
ning. Accordingly, the Berdoo hospital
was closed in October '36 and all equip-
ment moved there.
Foreground foundation was jour-man dormitory.
The camp buildings were of frame,
sheeted with plaster wallboard outside While you consider the busy camp's
and insulating wallboard on the interior. short history you can't help but speculate
Each building was sprayed with light The placing of concrete in the Coa- upon what could be done with the slabs
brown lacquer, wired for electricity and chella tunnels was finished on May 8, of concrete still intact? On a large one
equipped with modern plumbing. They 1937, with the completion of the lining at the "topside" of the camp, wouldn't
were heated by gas radiators supplied of the east heading at Berdoo Camp. At it be fun to build your own Berdoo Camp,
with gas piped from a liquid butane that time, passages were closed off in enjoy the breeze in the evening, and
plant; the dormitories were cooled in the Yellow and Pushawalla tunnels with
watch the lights come on over the valley ?
summer by air forced through insulated heavy concrete plugs. At Fargo and
A parody of a Julia Carney poem goes:
ducts from a centrally located plant Berdoo, doors were set in the tunnel
lining and the passages (adits) were to "Little drops of water
where coils were cooled by water cir-
culated from a cooling tower. be maintained as entries to the tunnel On little grains of sand,
for inspection. In December of that Make a lot of difference
Although the roads were rough and
year, the Coachella Headquarters Office In the price of land."
summer weather hot, the men didn't
was closed. Some day, no doubt, old Berdoo will
suffer for want of entertainment. One
event was Indio's two-day Miner's Day (Three of the tunnels have been in- be awakened from her long rest by an
Celebration. Work on the tunnels was spected and re-opened to be used as air ambitious dreamer who will discover her
suspended so the men might attend. raid shelters through an agreement be- magnificent view when he innocently
Along with boxing, sack races and so tween the Civil Defense office in Indio follows a rainbow to "the end of that
on, a contest was held to determine the and the Metropolitan Water District.) little road." •
best rock-drilling team (driller and
chuck-tender) from the various camps.
A prize of $1,000 was donated by Indio
business men. This contest involved two
blocks, one weighing 41 tons and the RMUDADU f
other 37, with the idea being to drill a A L M C. T/ T7Tm
hole completely through each of the
solid concrete blocks in the shortest
time possible. The winning team came
from the Wide Canyon Camp, with
Berdoo coming in second. The winning
time was 5 minutes, 42 seconds.
All entertainment wasn't so innocent
though. In May of 1934, Chief Sanford
of Indio inaugurated a general clean-up
of card rooms and saloons, where fre-
quent brawls proved upsetting to the
community. Some of the "hardrock"
men objected to this and made strong
comments through the newspapers about
the enforced "loss of recreation."

D T A N W F. T7T33>K Y V A L L E 1
O U S H T R O N f l E E R T E K 0M
ANSWERS TO PUZZLE ON PAGE 21
37
TOWNS AND PLACES OF THE COACHELLA VALLEY
BY D. W. GRANTHAM

Many areas of the Coachella Valley have had names which enabled the visitor or
resident to specifically identify that area. Some have even had several names.
However, few of these places have had sufficient economic resources or population to
warrant attaining official recognition of their place—by having a United States Post
Office.
In times past, the destiny of a community was decided by the presence or absence
of a Post Office. It gave a sort of permanence to the community. Often the Post
Office served as the social center for the community—a place to gather, meet friends,
and pass current news.
The Coachella Valley was no different in this respect. Many of the communities
that received post offices still exist today. And many of the names give us an idea
of why these towns were named.
The valley also has numerous areas—that have never had a post office but are
still recognizable—such as Myome, Painted Hills, and Seven Palms.
To explore the Postal history of our t)esert Valley is to recall these communities
and their locations. Some of the inactive offices are clues to perhaps a ghost town
such as Berdoo Camp or a "lost" settlement such as Pierce. The Coachella Valley has
had at least 3f post offices. Let's see what these 3f offices are:

ARABIA BERDOO CAMP


Office opened August 22, 1913. Office opened May 18, 1934-. Was a construc-
Was also a station name for the tion camp for the Los Angeles Metropolitan
Southern Pacific Railroad. Town Water t)istrict aqueduct. Berdoo is a slang
was named for its similiarity to name for San Bernardino. Office closed
Arabia. Had a small business July 15, 1937. Site is North of Indio. Many
district. Office closed October ruins are there.
30, 1915. Town was located 3 miles
South of Thermal .

BERMUDA DUNES CATHEDRAL CITY


Office opened September I, 1961. Office opened September 27, 1928. Town
Is a real estate promotion name. named for a nearby Cathedral like rock
Office closed 1977. Site located formation. Located 6 miles South of Palm
*f miles northwest of Indio and Sprirvjs.
I mile east of Palm City.

CHIRIACO SUMMIT COACHELLA


Office opened November 30, 1901. The name
Office opened August 1, 1959.
comes from a Spanish word "conchilla" which
Named for Joseph L. Chiriaco,owner
means sea shells. The area was a part of
of the site and service station.
ancient Lake Cahuilla at one time. Location
It is a travellers stop on Inter-
is 3 miles Southeast of Indio.
state 10. Located 30 miles east
of Indio.

38
DESERT HOT SPRINGS
Office opened August 1, Office opened August 28, 1913. Location
Named for its location on the desert was originally next to the Southern Pacific
and presence of hot water springs. Rai Iroad Right-of-Way but was moved in 1938
'Earlier area was called Coffee's to a site 3/4- mile northwest of the original
for a spa located there. Location location. The name is Hebrew for "reddish".
is 12 miles North of Palm Springs. Located 9 miles east of Palm Springs. Office
closed June 1, 1939. Name changed to
GARNET Thousand Palms.
Office opened June 18, 1927.
Named for a nearby hill where GRAY
garnets (stones) may be found. Office opened August 8, 1913. Named for
Area also known as Seven Palms. Hilda M. Qray, who applied for the job of
Located 6 miles north of Palm Springs. postmaster but did not get i t . Located 11
Office closed August 4, 1943. miles Northwest of Edam along the Southern
Pacific Railroad. Office closed May 10, 1918
INDIAN WELLS through a name change to Noria.
Office opened July 9, 1915.
Closed December 30, 1933. Reopened INDIO
September I, 1968. Named for wells Office opened July 3, 1888. Name is a
dug by the Cahuilla Indians for Spanish term for Indian. Location is 7 miles
water. Located 7 miles west of east of Indian Wells. Was a active railroad
Indio and 4- miles east of Palm t)esert. town.

KOKELL LAQUINTA
Office opened May 10, 1901. Town Office opened November 22, 1930. Name is
adopted the name of the Southern Spanish for a retreat or stopping place to
Pacific Railroad Station but its rest. Also translates as "fifth day", a
source is still unknown. Location place to rest on the 5th day of travel.
is 6 miles north of Mecca. Was a Located 9 miles South and West of Indio.
townsite. Office closed June 7, 1902
and name changed to Thermal.
NORIA
ECCA Office opened May 10, 1918. formerly known
as (qray. Origion of name unknown. Located
Office- opened September 26, 1903.
11 miles northwest of Edam along the rail-
Named for a date orchard planted
road. Office closed September 30, 1920.
from shoots imported from Mecca,
formerly known as Walters. Most of
the town is below sea level. Located
13 miles Southeast of Indio.

NORT^ PALM SPRINGS NORTH SHORE


Office opened February 16, 1950. Office opened April 2, 1962. Named for
Named for its geographical its physical location—on the North shore
location North of Palm Springs. (side) of the Salton Sea. Located 10 miles
formerly known as Qarnet Qardens. Southeast of Mecca.
Located 6 miles north of Palm
Springs.

39
OASIS PALM CITY
Office opened as a branch of Office opened October 15, 1962. Named for
another office. Located in the a real estate promotion decorated with
"Oasis" area, so named because palm trees. Located 7 miles Southeast of
it was a watering spot for Thousand Palms. Area is locally known as
travellers on the road from Indio Palm t)esert Country Club now.
to El Centro. Located 6 miles
Southwest of Mecca.

PAODALE DESERT
Office opened March 9, 1883. Office opened July 16, 194-7 through the
Named for the nearby oasis of efforts of Randal I Henderson who moved
Palm Springs. Was an agricultural t)esert Magazine there. Named for its
community, raising grapes and location on the t)esert with Palm trees.
oranges. Located 3 miles north of Located 12 miles Southeast of Palm Springs.
Palm Springs. Office closed May 12,
1890 when the post office was
physically moved 3 miles south and
renamed Palm Sprirxjs.

PALU SPRINGS PIERCE


Office opened May 12, 1890 when
Office opened December 16, 1898. Named
moved there from Palmdale.
for the family, Pierce, who owned the
Originally located in San t)iego
ranch where the Post office was located.
County before Riverside County
Located 2 miles West of Palm Springs and
was formed. Named for the warm
23 miles Northwest of Indio. Closed April
springs located by Palm Canyon.
30, 1902.
Area formerly known as Aqua
Caliente. Located 12 miles North-
west of Palm tiesert.

RANCHO MIRAGE SALTON


Office opened february 1, 1951 . Office opened february 4, 1889, originally
Named for a real estate promotion in San t)iego County before Riverside County
project. Located 10 miles South- created. Named because it was a shipping
east of Palm Springs. point for salt. Site is now under the waters
of the Salton Sea. Located 25 miles Southeast
of Indio along the railroad. Office closed
April 30, 1906.

SALTON CITY SKY VALLEY


Office opened July 8, 1961. Office opened June 10, 1959. Named because
Named for its location along of geographical location in a valley high
the Salton Sea. Site is actually above the desert floor that enables one to
in Imperial County, 30 miles "look" down from the sky onto the desert
south of Thermal. below. Located 11 miles Southeast of
tiesert Hot Springs. Office closed June 5t
1969.
SMOKE TREE SNOW CREEK
Office opened September 16, 1968 Office opened April 25, 1914-. Named for
as a branch of Palm Springs. the creek, flowing past the area, which is
Named for the ranch located there, seasonal and fed by melting snow from Mt.
which was probably named for the San Jacinto. Located 5 miles Southwest of
trees of the area, called Whitewater. Office closed July 31, 1918.
Smdketrees. Located 2 miles
Southeast of Palm Springs.

THERMAL THOUSAND PALMS


Office opened June 7, 1902. Office opened June 1, 1939. formerly
Previously known as Kokell. known as Edam. Named for the many fan
Ncmied for the Thermal wells palms growing in the area. Located 9
drilled to obtain water. Located miles east of Palm Springs.
7 miles south of Indio.

WALTERS WHITEWATER
Office opened February 25, 1896. Office opened May 3, 1926. Named for
Named after the owner of the the nearby Whitewater River, whose waters
townsite. Located 13 miles appear milky as they flow over a sandy
Southeast of Indio. Office closed river—bed. Located 10 miles north of
September 26, 1903. Palm Springs.

HARRY OLIVER, continued from page 32

When a subscriber complained that Harry once told Tom Murray, "I've lived in
his news was not too fresh, Harry various deserts for years, and I can tell you
told him, "The news in this paper that Death Valley is King. I, as most people,
has been tested by time. You should like the mystery of the desert. The desert
subscribe to this paper and save the tolerates the invasion of people, but it never
packets for junior...cuz no one is reveals its secrets."
going to be crazy enough to print In 1965, after 21 years as Fort Commander,
stuff like this when I'm gone." And artist, publisher, editor, and desert rat,
he was ever so right. Harry Olive bade farewell to his old Fort
Many of his sayings have contained Oliver and retired to the Motion Picture Co-
bits of wisdom that have endured the untry Home in Woodland Hills, Calif. He
test of time. For instance, "In bait- passed away there on July 4, 1973, the very
ing a mouse trap with cheese, always day he had predicted he would pass on.
leave room for the mouse." Or, "Never Old Fort Oliver remained vacant for the
speak loudly to one another unless the next six years. The elements took their toll
shanty is on fire." on the buildings and numerous brainless
And then there was the time Harry vandals destroyed everything they could. The
decided to help all those people who once proud fort became an eyesore. The County
were running around looking for the building department tried to condemn it. It
lost Peg Leg Smith gold. Harry went was restored for a time, but then again fell
out and had a number of peg legs made. into disuse and ruin. Finally, it was leveled.
He then took them out into the desert Desert is proud to present a copy of a side
and scattered them about. For some of one of Harry Olivers' DESERT RAT SCRAPBOOK
time thereafter, prospectors were on pages 34 and 35. Reading it will enable you
"close" to finding the lost gold bec- tp gain an insight into Harry Oliver, the desert
ause they had found Smith's peg leg. rat and philosopher.
Great Way to Save COMING SOON IN DESERT
Your Back Issues of THE PONY EXPRESS IN NEVADA
Desert Magazine HISTORY OF THE OWENS VALLEY ACQUEDUCT
DESERT VISITS JULIAN
MORE ON FIG TREE JOHN AND HIS GOLD MINE
A VISIT TO AN ARIZONA GHOST TOWN
AND MUCH MUCH MORE

Magazine • Since 1937


The best way that we know
of to preserve and protect
those issues you want to
save—Desert Magazine's
handsome, durable binder
in brown vinyl with gold
Desert logo imprint. Keeps REPLACEABLE SUBSCRIPTION FORM
your back issues in order • Check here if you
for easy reference when wish this issue replaced.
you want to plan your next
P. O. Box 1318. Palm Desert, California 92260
trip or research clues to
that lost gold mine. An at- Q ENTER A NEW SUBSCRIPTION Q RENEW MY PRESENT SUBSCRIPTION
tractive addition to your NAME
bookshelf, too.
ADDRESS

Each binder holds twelve ZIP CODE


issues.
U SEND GIFT SUBSCRIPTION TO:

Order Yours Today! NAME

ADDRESS
Please send Desert Mag-
azine Binder(s) @ $6.00 + $1.00
postage & handling.
D Payment enclosed $ Sign Gilt Card: "From
D Charge to my VISA or Master-
charge
D VISA n MASTERCHARGE NAME
ACCOUNT NO.
ADDRESS
EXPIRATION DATE:
Signature
Name (PRINT)
Sign Gill Card: "From
Address
City _ One Year $15.00 • PAYMENT ENCLOSED
State -Zip D ALSO SEND DESERT'S 12-ISSUE
Desert Binders HANDSOME BROWN VINYL BINDER FOR
Post O f f i c e Box 1318
Palm Desert, Cat. 92261 Date Blnder(a) with Year(s) D Undated

42
$2.95 41,9

GRAND
o JEE?
TREKS Rim
Harvey gufefcorJ

, >-• -

$1.50

$1.25

>

$1.95

ORDER FORM IS ON PAGE 30

Minat Terkait