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LOCAL GIRLS SCOUTS CONVERGE ON CITY HALL/PAGE 3

Friday, September 26, 2014 u One dollar


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our er i
Claremont
claremont-courier.com
LETTERS/ PAGE 2, 7
CALENDAR/ PAGE 16
So many letters. Dont miss a thing.
Visit claremont-courier.com.
POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4
OBITS/ PAGES 11, 12
t
t
COURIERphotos/Steven Felschundneff
Claremont Mayor Joe Lyons presents Moralia Herrejon-Rutte and her brother Gael with a certificate from the city during the city council meeting on Tuesday. The
children were recognized for their lifesaving efforts when their father Juan Herrejon nearly drowned in the familys pool on July 27. Behind the two children are their
parents and members of the Los Angeles County Fire Department engine crew that responded to the emergency.
WOLFPACK WEEKLY SPORTS ROUND-UP/ PAGES 21, 22
Preparing for a night Under the Lights
t
PAGE 5
The kindness of a stranger
Dear Editor:
I am a junior at Scripps College in Clare-
mont and the other day I walked from cam-
pus to Trader Joes to purchase my weekly
groceries.
For some reason, my credit card was de-
nied at the register. I called my bank and
was put on and off hold for over an hour. I
am a Type 1 Diabetic and my blood sugar
was low, and the only food I had was the
groceries that I was unable to buy with the
block put on my credit card.
After being put on hold for the third time,
I broke down crying. As a college student,
it can be really hard being away from home
and thrown into an environment where you
dont have your family around to help you
out in such situations.
As I sat outside Trader Joes, a man came
out and offered to pay for my groceries.
When I tried to get his contact information
to pay him back, he told me that he under-
stood how hard it was to be a student, and
that he didnt want repayment. That was
one of the nicest things anyone has ever
done for me, and I am so grateful that there
are such good people out in the world.
I am so appreciative, and I hope I can fol-
low suit and reach out to someone else like
that man did for me. Thank you!
Tess Williams
Claremont
Building a bigger drought
Dear Editor:
Lakes and rivers at an all-time low.
Plants and trees gasping for water. Serious
drought being blasted in our ears on a con-
stant basis. Water bills skyrocketing, (espe-
cially for the chosen ones of Claremont).
Farmers worried about their future and
livelihood. $500 fines for washing cars or
anything deemed unnecessary. Grocery
prices steadily rising.
Hey ,Claremont, hey, California, I have a
solution...Lets build multi-unit housing de-
velopments and office buildings on every
conceivable piece of available land so that
tens of thousands of more people need pre-
cious water! Problem solved.
Carolyn Zimmerman
Claremont
Negotiate better rates
Dear Editor:
As a champion of the private sector,
lower taxes and less government interven-
tion in our lives, I abhor eminent domain
by our government in almost all cases. It is
my opinion, however, that Golden State
Water has been racketeering in Claremont
and that, since the PUC is allowing it, the
citizens of Claremont need to take control.
We need to overwhelmingly vote yes
on Measure W on November 4. As I said,
the citizens of Claremont need to take con-
trol. However, on November 5, I do not
necessarily believe that control means the
purchase of the water system. I believe it
is a certainty that Measure W will pass with
a substantial margin and, after it does, the
citizens will now have the control we need.
Armed with the cash after November 4
to be able to force the sale of the water sys-
tem from Golden State, maybe we should
then explore a binding and scalable water
rate negotiation contract in lieu of a pur-
chase.
Both Upland and La Verne have enviable
water rates from their municipally-owned
water systems that Im sure the vast major-
ity of Claremont residents would accept in
a heartbeat. Why not negotiate a binding
controlled rate with Golden State based on
the average of the rates paid by Upland and
La Verne residents and businesses?
Within this averaged rate, we could also
require that Golden State perform an equal
percentage amount for the maintenance, re-
pairs and replacement for their system as
Upland and La Verne do. As part of the
agreement, we could require Golden State
to equal or exceed the water quality stan-
dards and service times of the public water
companies in both Upland and La Verne.
Because of private sector efficiency vs.
public sector efficiency, I believe Golden
State could still make an acceptable profit
and Claremont could continue to receive
great quality water at a much-reduced price.
Golden State may simply refuse to ne-
gotiate and force our hand to pursue emi-
nent domain, in which case, I believe we
should go forward with eminent domain
proceedings.
However, I believe the ultimate goal of
Claremont citizens should be the ability to
maintain control of competitive water rates
in lieu of the ownership, maintenance and
operation of their own public system.
Kris M. Meyer
Claremont
READERS COMMENTS/page 7
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 2
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ADVENTURES
I N HAI KU
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With Steve Harrison's haikus
Sometimes. Sorry, Steve
Harrison Stephens
Haiku submissions should reflect upon life
or events in Claremont. Please email entries
to editor@claremont-courier.com.
Agendas for city meetings are avail-
able at www.ci.claremont.ca.us
GOVERNING
OURSELVES
Wednesday, October 1
Community & Human Services
Council Chamber, 7 p.m.
READERS COMMENTS
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 3
CITY NEWS
Claremonts youth stand front-and-center at council meeting
C
laremont is known for its high
level of civic engagement, and the
citys youngest residents are no
exception. Whether it is saving a life or
saving a landmark, Claremont kids are
ready to spring into action.
Never has that been more evident than at Tuesday
nights city council meeting.
The evening began with recognition of two heroic
children who saved the life of their father and ended
with the impassioned pleas of local Girl Scouts and
Boy Scouts trying to save La Casita, a structure that
faces for an uncertain future.
City staff, council members and first responders
gathered before a standing-room-only crowd as Mayor
Joe Lyons presented 6-year-old Moralia Herrejon-Rutte
and her 2-year-old brother Gael with a certificate for
their quick-thinking actions that saved the life of their
father this past summer.
On July 27, the two children were swimming with
their dad, Juan Herrejon, when he suddenly became
quiet and fell asleep after entering the family pool.
Moralia swam down to make sure he was not just hold-
ing his breath or playing before calling for her mother,
Cristina Herrejon-Rutte, who was inside the house.
Moments later, Gael came running into the house and
informed his mom, Daddy was floating at the bottom
of the pool!
Ms. Herrejon-Rutte ran out, dove in and pulled 36-
year-old Juan to the shallow end and onto the stairs.
Seeing he was unresponsive and not breathing, she
began chest compressions but was unable to lift him
completely out of the pool. Moralia ran into the house
to get the phone to call 911, while Gael remained calm
in a nearby chair.
The first responders got there within five minutes,
Ms. Herrejon-Rutte said. They tried to intubate him
but he had a locked jaw. Then they took him to
Pomona Valley Hospital.
Mr. Herrejons condition was life threatening for
several days. He remained unconscious with fluid in
his lungs and swelling in his brain. Thankfully, Mr.
Herrejon has since made a full recovery. Doctors attrib-
uted his survival to his good physical condition and the
quick response of the children and first responders.
Im very proud and very surprised by the chil-
drens actions, Mr. Herrejon told the COURIER.
They acted very maturely. I gave them life but they
gave it back to me.
Diagnosed with Long QT syndrome (LQTS), a heart
rhythm disorder that can potentially cause fast, chaotic
heartbeats, Mr. Herrejon has now been outfitted with a
pacemaker and the family continues to count its bless-
ings.
Moralia and Gael have both been involved with the
citys swim program and their parents credit the pool
staff for teaching their children pool safety.
We went as a family before the program ended to
thank the pool staff for safety training. Without it, my
husband may not be here today, Ms. Herrejon-Rutte
said. Were blessed the children acted quickly and
thoughtfully as trained.
Following the ceremony and the city managers re-
port, Mayor Lyons opened the meeting to public com-
ment on matters not on the agenda. In a room filled
with roughly 14 Girl Scout troops, two Boy Scout
troops and their leaders, Yvonne Murphy was first to
take the floor.
We are in here on behalf of past, present and future
Girl Scouts of Claremont, asking for your help in pre-
serving a true Claremont asset, and that is La Casita,
the Girl Scout leader told council members. Recently,
the Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles has placed La
Casita on a list of properties to be disposed of, sold off.
We need your help in keeping this precious and impor-
tant part of Claremont history, to secure a place in its
future. We are asking you to partner with us and con-
vince the Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles Council
to keep this property.
As the COURIER reported last week, the fate of La
Casita remains undecided as the Girl Scouts of Greater
Los Angeles considers retiring the property from its
repertoire pending a ratification vote next month. The
adobe structure, established by the first Girl Scout
leader in Claremont, has been an integral part of the
local scouting community for nearly 70 years, which
stands united in its mission to save La Casita.
If I can ask as a show of support, for those in the
audience that are here for the preservation of La Casita
to remain a Girl Scout property to please stand and join
me in saying the Girl Scout Promise, Ms. Murphy re-
quested at the council meeting.
The majority of the room stood and recited the
pledge in unison. On my honor, I will try to serve God
and my country, to help people at all times, and to live
by the Girl Scout Law.
When finished, the room filled with applause and the
scouts took their seats.
As you can see, we are very passionate about this,
said Ms. Murphy. There are other Girl Scouts and
Claremont residents who would like to share their rea-
sons why La Casita should remain a Girl Scout prop-
erty with access to all.
Over a dozen impassioned Girl Scouts, and a few
Boy Scouts, stepped forward to the podium to share
their La Casita experiences, while roughly 40 others
cheered them on. One sentiment rang true for all: La
Casita is a special place, and it should be preserved for
generations to come.
When I was in Cub Scouts, every year wed have
our family campout at La Casita and utilize the kitchen
and convert the parking lot to a campground, says
Jake, now a Boy Scout and high school senior. Its
where our troop decided to hold our ceremony for our
bridge into Boy Scouts. I know that I, and my fellow
Boy Scouts who were there to experience all of that,
will be very disappointed to have that resource sold or
renovated or torn down to be something else. I would
really like to see it preserved for Scouts.
Noting the Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles im-
pending ratification vote deadline of October 25, City
Manager Tony Ramos agreed to review the matter and
add it to the next council meeting agenda in October.
Regardless of the outcome, everyone walked away
feeling like something had been accomplished.
To see a packed room with allthose young people
engaged in the government process reminds me why I
got into public service, says Bevin Handel, Clare-
monts public information officer. From the great
story of our two younglifesavers surrounded by the
firefighters who helped them to the little ones asking
council to preserve their special placewhat agreat
example of why Claremont is a special community.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Local Girl Scouts attended Tuesday nights Claremont City Council meeting to voice their opposition to a plan
by the Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles to sell the La Casita facility.
A
Pomona judge sched-
uled a preliminary hear-
ing for the man accused
of raping a 12-year-old girl as
she slept in her Claremont
home this past March.
Joseph Chandler Davall is charged
with seven felony counts in Los Angeles
County, including two counts of aggra-
vated sexual assault of a child; one count
each of forcible rape; sexual penetration
by foreign object; and assault to commit
a felony during the commission of first-
degree burglaries.
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge
Jack P. Hunt scheduled Mr. Davalls pre-
liminary hearing to start on October 20.
At the conclusion of the hearing, the
judge will determine whether there is
enough evidence for the defendant to
stand trial. Among the evidence for con-
sideration is a seven-disk, 150-page
DNA report that was recently completed
and given to the defendants newly-ap-
pointed public defender.
The 34-year-old date farmer was
taken into custody at his Yucca Valley
home on April 18 after a short pursuit
involving Claremont police and the San
Bernardino County Sheriff. Police previ-
ously verified that evidence relating to
the Claremont crime was found at Mr.
Davalls residence.
The Los Angeles District Attorneys
office confirmed that authorities linked
the date farmer to the Claremont attack
through the Combined DNA Index Sys-
tem. If convicted as charged, Mr. Davall
faces a maximum sentence of life in
prison.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Friday, September 19
A burglary occurred on the 700 block
of West Tenth Street. At around 12:25
p.m., a witness saw the suspects and their
vehicle, but did not call the police until
after the suspects left the area.
According to the witness, a female
knocked on the front door of the home in
an attempt to verify if the home was oc-
cupied, then broke a glass door at the
back of the home to gain entry.
The second burglary occurred on the
1200 block of Northwestern Avenue be-
tween 6 a.m. and 3 p.m. A witness later
reported seeing a tall, thin black female
near the side of the residence prior to the
burglary. In both burglaries, rear glass
doors and windows were smashed to
gain entry. Both homes are located just
east and west of Mountain Avenue be-
tween Harrison Avenue and Foothill
Boulevard.
As a reminder, always lock all doors
and windows and immediately report
any suspicious vehicles or persons to the
Claremont PD by calling 9-1-1 or (909)
399-5411.
* * * *
A suspect attempting to break into the
dorms at Claremont McKenna College
couldnt outrun a Claremont police offi-
cer and his actions landed him in jail.
Around 1:32 a.m., officers responded
to CMC after a witness reported seeing
four suspects trying to break into rooms
at Beckett Hall. According to Lieutenant
Mike Ciszek, the officer located one of
the suspects, Angel Torres, running
through a backyard on the 100 block of
Brooks Avenue. When the officer and
Mr. Torres made eye contact, a chase en-
sued and the 19-year-old was detained
after a brief struggle. The Pomona resi-
dent was carrying a knife on his belt. Mr.
Torres was booked for resisting an offi-
cer, carrying a switchblade knife and an
outstanding warrant. He was later re-
leased on $10,000 bail with citations.
* * * *
A Claremont woman fighting with her
man over an ex-girlfriend spent four
hours in jail after striking him with an
open hand and closed fist. The 42-year-
old woman and the victim were heard ar-
guing inside their apartment when
officers responded to the location. The
40-year-old victim complained of pain to
his right ear and left cheek, although,
there was no visible injury. The woman
was arrested for battery and later released
on a $20,000 bond. According to police,
the couple, who live together, have been
dating for four months.
Saturday, September 20
He rang the doorbell 11 times but
when nobody answered, one thief fig-
ured hed let himself in. Around 11:29
a.m., an unknown suspect began ringing
the doorbell at a home on the 100 block
of Buena Vista while the victim slept in
another room. Thinking it was neighbor-
hood kids, the resident didnt respond.
Soon after, the resident heard two loud
booms followed by a third and then his
bedroom door was suddenly kicked in.
An unknown suspect stood in the door-
way, spotted the resident and then fled
the scene. The suspect is described as a
male Hispanic, about 18 to 19 years old,
59 with a thin build and a shaved head.
He was seen getting into a lowered,
white Mazda with custom rims, tinted
windows and a loud exhaust. The driver
was unidentifiable. Neither the suspect
nor the vehicle has been located.
* * * *
Road rage reared its ugly head off the
210 and Base Line, resulting in a fight on
the freeway shoulder and an off-duty of-
ficer drawing his weapon on the enraged
drivers. Around 6:43 p.m., two drivers
who had been brake-checking and cutting
each other off on the freeway had finally
had enough when 24-year-old Jancarlo
Gutierrez pulled to the shoulder to let the
other driver pass by. The other driver,
who is considered the victim in the inci-
dent, followed suit and approached Mr.
Gutierrez car. According to Lt. Ciszek,
the pair exchanged a few obscenities be-
fore the victim allegedly began punching
the suspect repeatedly in the face and
wouldnt let him out of his vehicle. Mr.
Gutierrez then grabbed a knife from the
car and slashed a four-inch laceration into
the victims left arm, causing him to step
back and enabling Mr. Gutierrez to leave
his vehicle. The men continued to fight
outside the car until an off-duty police of-
ficer stopped and ordered both to ground
by gunpoint. Mr. Gutierrez of San
Bernardino was arrested for assault. No
charges will be filed against the other
driver, it was determined he acting in self-
defense.
Sunday, September 21
Campus safety called Claremont po-
lice after underage drinkers were caught
fighting on the Claremont McKenna
College campus. Around 1:03 a.m., sus-
pect Arnoldo Gomez-Vallejo of Clare-
mont was spotted sitting in the middle of
the street with his head held down, shoe-
less. When asked by the officer for his
name, the 20-year-old yelled, Treat me
like an adult! He smelled of alcohol, his
speech was slurred and loud and he had
saliva dripping from his mouth. Mr.
Gomez-Vallejo was unable to answer
simple questions and was arrested for
public intoxication. He was later released
on $250 bail.
Monday, September 22
A Claremont woman set fire to her
home while her mother lay sleeping in a
nearby room. Officer were called the 500
block of Towne Avenue around 1:20 a.m.
after the 29-year-old covered herself
from head to toe with blue paint and
painted the words All Yours on a wall
in the family room of the home. She then
splattered paint all over the walls and
floors of the family room and kitchen be-
fore intentionally starting three separate
fires in the kitchen while her mother
slumbered. After igniting the fires, the
suspect lay down on the floor of the
kitchen. The suspects brother arrived
home shortly after and got both of the
women out of the house before extin-
guishing the fire with a hose. Over
$7,000 in damage occurred due to the
fire. The suspect was taken to Pomona
Valley Hospital for treatment and psy-
chiatric evaluation.
* * * *
A verbal altercation between a trio of
female students at Claremont High
School got taken to the next level when
someone broke out the pepper spray and
a knuckle sandwich. Three suspects, two
16-year-old girls and a 14-year-old girl,
were fighting when one of the suspects
pepper sprayed another in the face and
then struck her with a closed fist. An-
other student jumped in before school
staff broke up the fight. All three ladies
were arrested.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 4
CITY NEWS
POLICE BLOTTER
Drug take-back event
held tomorrow at Clare-
mont police station
The city of Claremont will observe Na-
tional Prescription Drug Take-Back Day
by hosting a free event on Saturday, Sep-
tember 27 at the Claremont Police De-
partment. Attendees are invited to bring
any prescription drugs to the station at 570
W. Bonita Ave. from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Submissions will be anonymous and
drugs will be received by police officers
with no questions asked. For more infor-
mation, contact the Claremont Police De-
partment at (909) 399-5411.
Hearing set for date farmer
I
ts the final weekend to register
and log your points for the
CoolCalifornia Challenge!
Residents have until Monday, Sep-
tember 29 at 11:59 p.m. to log on and
register and/or earn points towards
winning a portion of the $50,000 to
be distributed between cities based
on the number of points accumulated.
This will be the last opportunity to
enter energy and vehicle data for Au-
gust.
Earlier this week, Claremonters
had again taken the lead but didnt
hold it for long. With a difference of
129,306 points, Riverside is now in
first place.
Theres still time. Weve had this
great push this past weekend but we
need to keep moving forward, says
Chris Veirs, Senior Planner and Sus-
tainability Coordinator for the city of
Claremont
Mr. Veirs also wants residents to
know that if theyre having difficulty
figuring out how to enter their data,
there is help available. Residents
can always contact Sustainable
Claremont and someone can walk
them through the process. Theyre
happy to help he says.
To sign up, visit the website cool-
climate.berkeley.edu/challenge
On the main menu bar near the top
of the page, click Register
The city with the most points at the
end of the five-month challenge pe-
riod will be crowned the Coolest
California City for 2014 at an
awards ceremony at the Air Re-
sources Board meeting in October.
In addition, two runner-up cities
will each earn the title of Cool Cal-
ifornia City, and be awarded sec-
ond- and third-place prizes. All cities
will receive prize money based on the
percentage of overall points earned
by participants in their city during the
competition.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
CoolCalifornia deadline looms,
Riverside takes first again
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 5
Bleachers will be alive with the sound of music at CHS, El Roble concert
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Members of the Claremont High School band play Jupiter from The Planets by Gustav Holst on Wednesday at CHS. The band is preparing for
their upcoming show, Under the Lights: CHS Second Annual Community Concert, on Saturday at 6:30 p.m. at the CHS stadium.
T
he instrumental music programs of
El Roble Intermediate and Clare-
mont High School will present
their second annual community concert on
Saturday, September 27 from 6:30 to 8
p.m. at the CHS stadium.
The al fresco show, Under the Lights. which is
free and open to the public, will feature appearances
by the CHS Jazz Ensemble, the El Roble String Or-
chestra, the El Roble Marching Panthers, the CHS Or-
chestra and the CHS Marching Wolfpack,
accompanied by the high schools color guard.
The program, coordinated by music director
Melanie Riley-Gonzales, features everything from
classical music, with the El Roble String Orchestra
performing Autumn from Vivaldis Four Seasons to
rock music, with the CHS Orchestra undertaking a
rendition of Imagine Dragons Radioactive. The
CHS Marching Wolfpack will hearken to the space
age with tunes like the themes from Star Trek Gen-
erations and the videogame Halo.
Ms. Riley-Gonzales has become an instrumental
part (pun intended) of the music programs at Clare-
monts secondary schools. Last year, she took on the
orchestra and marching bands at El Roble in addition
to those at the high school, and this year she has taken
the reins of the CHS Jazz Ensemble.
Its a lot, but I love it. Its a lot of fun and I enjoy
the kids, Ms. Riley-Gonzales said. I like to add new
things each year. It keeps me motivated. It keeps me
going.
Having a big performance near the start of the
school year is a great way to get the band kids going,
she noted.
For the high school band, we perform at the foot-
ball games but there are so many other things going
on, its kind of distracting. This is an opportunity for
them to shine, she said. The El Roble kids, espe-
cially the orchestra, spend most of their time practic-
ing. Its fun to perform in front of other people and
show what you have learned.
Ms. Riley-Gonzales hopes lots of people show up
at this weekends concert and that they come to see
the bands play again at their spring concert.
I love the idea that the community can come out
and see how the kids are at the beginning of the year
and where they are
at the end of the
year, she said.
Theres so much
improvement. Its
night and day.
Thanks to active
recruiting at the ele-
mentary schools, as
well as at El Roble,
the 7th through 12th
grade programs are
having their own
transformation. Ms.
Riley-Gonzales took
a 40-student cap off the music classes at El Roble this
year. As a result, the orchestra now has 45 eager par-
ticipants, while the band boasts 54 students.
Nearly all of the 8th graders Ms. Riley-Gonzales
taught last year have continued with music as they
embark on their high school careers. The CHS march-
ing band has 78 musicians, and the orchestra has 45.
The jazz band has 33 members, who on Saturday will
fill the CHS stadium with the sounds of classics like
Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy.
Ms. Riley-Gonzales knows what its like to be a
band student as well as an instructor.
In our school, the instrumental program didnt
start until 5th grade. I started in 5th grade and fell in
love with the flute, and Ive been doing it ever since.
This weekends show will also offer attendees the
opportunity to support music in the Claremont Uni-
fied School District, with a chance to participate in
the CHS music programs annual Take Note
Fundraiser and to buy tickets for the Claremont Edu-
cational Foundations yearly Prius raffle.
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Music Director Melanie Riley-Gonzalez leads the CHS
band during rehearsal on Wednesday at Claremont
High. The band is getting ready for their second an-
nual fundraising concert to be held Saturday at the
high schools stadium.
WHAT: CHS/El Roble
Community Concert
WHEN: Saturday, Septem-
ber 27 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
WHERE: CHS stadium,
1601 N. Indian Hill Blvd.
COST: Free
The Basics
L
ast week, my new friend David
offered a gruesome explanation
for the origin of basket case. I
looked at him skeptically as he outlined a
grim story of quadriplegics in the early
20th century forced to live in baskets.
The tale seemed oddly too precise to be
true, so I assumed that it was a case of
folk etymology.
The Oxford English Dictionary, however, corrobo-
rates his story, stating that the expression was first
recorded in 1919 as a reference to those who had suf-
fered catastrophic wounds in war and had to be car-
ried to the hospital in a basket. After WWI, the US
Surgeon General officially denied the existence of
basket cases, but in 1934, the Washington Post
wrote that basket cases were causing confusion in
the hospitals as the patients were losing identification
tags. This spurred a second denial from the Surgeon
General, who again vehemently denied the circulating
stories regarding such men.
The irony of the idiom lies in the fact that it was
likely made popular through denial of the condition
rather than the existence of it. In 1945, Time magazine
did its own investigation and was able to track down
only two men who had suffered this miserable fate.
Many believe that the phrase could not possibly
have been popularized solely from these two cases,
but rather from its persistent use in written denials.
This has happened with other phrases, such as pink
elephant. It was the use of the compound, not the ex-
istence of the creature, that made the expression no-
table.
In the late 1940s, basket case began to take on a
variety of metaphorical meanings. It came to refer to
a car in a state of disrepair because of missing parts;
an ineffective or powerless person or organization in
severe economic or financial crisis; and a person
emotionally unable to cope with stress and anxiety.
I confess to having used basket case to describe
myself (and maybe others) in stressful situations. Has
my flippant use of the phrase been an offense to
some? Perhaps. Some people are still put off by the
idioms association with quadriplegics and specifi-
cally, the archaic connotation that a person without
limbs is worthless.
In an online response to an article in The Guardian,
one commenter wrote, I think the paper should avoid
the use of basket case. It is a shocking, distressing,
and distracting image. The Guardian would not use
spastic or quadriplegic as derogatives. Why use bas-
ket case?
Although Im guilty of accepting basket case into
my lexicon without vetting the provenance, I also un-
derstand that words and phrases change meaning over
time and, in some cases, lose all traces of whence
they came.
Most of us do not conjure gory wartime images
when saying dodge a bullet, ride shotgun, cross
swords, fight an uphill battle, open old wounds or
bite the bullet. These expressions, which were born
of distress, have significantly lost their power to
shock.
My ignorance about basket case, however, begs
the question, how many other potentially offensive
phrases have I been using? As it turns out, there are
several. I often accuse my children of running amok.
Little did I know that this expression comes from the
Malay amuk meaning attack furiously on the streets
and brutally kill as many people as possible. Even on
the most chaotic mornings, my kids arent that bad!
Deadline, a word I use every day, comes from the
1800s. It originally referred to the line drawn around
a military prison, beyond which the prisoner would be
shot down. The practice of raking over the coals was
literally the torture for non-Christians offered by well-
meaning people of the cloth, and a diehard is one
who has died reluctantly from a hanging...with a
struggle. I confess to using all of these expressions
freely with little concern to their appalling pasts.
The famous wordsmith Ambrose Bierce once said
that to apologize is to lay the foundation for a future
offense so, with this in mind, I will refrain from
apology. Rather, I will make a case for basket case,
deadline, diehard and others. It is time to let by-
gones be bygones and accept that that some offenses
are clearly a thing of the past.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 6
LEX
CITY
IN THE
The case for basket case and other offenses
by Mellissa Martinez
Rodney Smiths tricky taxes
[Editors note: The following letter was ad-
dressed to Rodney Smith, via the Claremont
COURIER, in response to his full-page ad-
vertisement published September 19. KD]
Dear Editor:
Dr. Smith, in your full-page adver-
tisement published in the COURIER on
September 19, you note that your state-
ment is sponsored by the Golden State
Water Company and supported by
Claremont Taxpayers and Homeown-
ers.
In that statement, you claim credit as
a water expert because you taught eco-
nomics at one of our highly-respected
Claremont Colleges. I also noticed that
in your postscript you refer to a website
that urges us all to Stop the Water
Tax.
We all are fully aware that we pay
many kinds of taxes: property taxes,
business taxes, sales taxes, gas taxes,
etc. But repayment of revenue bonds,
as specified in Measure W, are not re-
paid by taxes, but by a capital charge
on the revenue bonds.
Why do you and your cohorts keep
calling this a tax? Because it is a scary
word used to mislead the anxious?
All of us know that we have to pay
for the water company. It is really fairly
simple. If you buy a house, you expect
to pay a mortgage, and we expect to
pay a capital charge levied on the basis
of water use. That seems fair to all, and
it can be paid primarily from the profits
not going to a big national corporation.
Finally, I am sure you are aware that
all purchases of property are made on
the basis of an appraisal by an accred-
ited appraiser. The city of Claremont
has such an appraisal, for $55 million,
based on the stated basis of anticipated
income.
Golden State has no appraisal as of
yet and no basis chosen for one. Why
would you, an economist, not encour-
age them to secure an approved ap-
praiser and give you some accurate
figure with which to debate? Your esti-
mate of massive costs, allocated out to
$1000 per year, per meter connection,
have absolutely no credibility because
it is largely based on a Golden State
fantasy.
Citizens of Claremont are a thoughtful
and canny crowd. We understand, as do
the citizens in most of the cities nearby,
that local control and local decision-
making will serve our community far
better in the long run than a distant cor-
poration eager to reward highly compen-
sated executives and stockholders.
We plan to vote yes on Measure W
because it returns control to those who
use the water and moves it out of the
control of Golden State Water Com-
pany.
Joseph Hough
Former faculty member
and interim President
Claremont Graduate University
Measure W guarantees
higher water rates
Dear Editor:
Why would any thinking person be-
lieve that water rates will go down
when you load it with $135 million in
debt, a new cast of city administrators
and the highest prevailing wage for all
maintenance, repair and replacement as
required under Davis-Bacon?
1. Ask the city how it intends to
repay $135 million with interest:
Answer: This cost will simply be
passed on to each resident based upon
some undisclosed formula that the city
will create.
2. Ask the city how many new city
administrators will be hired to manage
the newly-acquired water system and
what their salaries will be:
Answer: Claremont will necessarily
hire a new cast of costly city employees
with lavish benefits to manage the
water system. The city managers
salary will certainly be increased due to
increased burden of managing the
water system. Existing and future city
employees are the primary beneficiaries
of Measure W.
3. Ask the city how they intend to pay
for maintenance, repair and replacement
of the 100-year-old water system with-
out passing costs along to us:
Answer: You will pay for all mainte-
nance at the highest prevailing wage.
Keep in mind that Golden State does
not need to pay prevailing wage under
Davis-Bacon to maintain the water sys-
tem. The city is required to pay the
highest prevailing wage for all mainte-
nance work resulting in higher mainte-
nance costs.
4. Ask the city what will be required
to increase rates after they acquire the
water system:
Answer: Golden State must petition
to the Public Utilities Commission for
permission to raise rates. Once the city
acquires the water system, the city
council will be able to raise rates when-
ever it wants without legitimate public
debate.
The city, consultants and attorneys
are the only possible beneficiaries of
Measure W. The best way to guarantee
higher water rates is to vote for Meas-
ure W. Objectively, Measure W is about
grabbing power, not lowering water
rates.
Exercising even a minimal amount of
analysis and common sense should re-
sult in defeat of Measure W.
Rod E. Fehlman
Claremont
Transparency needed from
Smith, CAWA and Golden State
Dear Editor:
Sigh. Not only election mailers from
CAWA, but now a past professor from
Claremont McKenna College using a
quasi-CMC letterhead as an obvious at-
tempt to gain clout on Measure W.
While Rodney Smith may be knowl-
edgeable on water issues, his anti-Mea-
sure W motives are apparent when one
looks at his Internet trail.
His own bio talks about his web pub-
lication that covers developments in
the emerging private corporate partici-
pation in western water matters (my
emphasis). So, his business interest is to
make money off water for himself and
those who are in the water business at
our expense.
Sorry, but any objective professorial-
academic perspective he could have
provided on this issue is nullified by his
work in the private sector to influence
public policy in the name of profits to
those who wish to own our water.
Also, Donna Lowe of CAWA com-
plaining in last weeks COURIER
about the citys legal costs is absurd
and ironic, considering she and her
group are themselves actively con-
tributing to the citys legal costs.
Lets have the same transparency she
demands from the city applied to
CAWA, herself and its backers for its
own election mailers and campaigning.
Lets see who is paying for what ex-
actly.
As for the true costs of municipal
water ownership: If Measure W costs
me $348 a year but does away with
Golden States unfair tiered rate struc-
ture, my water bill may actually go
down.
My penalty tiers were set after I had
greatly reduced my irrigation demands.
In addition, I have three more people
living in my home than I had when the
tiers were originally set. But neither
Golden State nor the CPUC have cared
to remedy this and amend my tier struc-
ture. They say there is nothing they can
do. I disagree.
Locally-owned water is the way to
go: of all the people I know in our sur-
rounding communities that have lo-
cally-owned water, not one of them is
unhappy with its service or rates.
In contrast, how many people are un-
happy with our privately-owned water
company that asks for double-digit rate
increases year after year, pays a huge
guaranteed rate of return to its share-
holders, and pays its CEOs and CFOs
grossly inflated salaries that come di-
rectly from our faucets?
Mr. Smith, Ms. Lowe and CAWA
continue to call the Measure W munici-
pal bond a tax. Clearly, they consider
tax a bad word and are hoping its use
will scare voters into rejecting the
bond.
As a lifelong Claremont resident, I
prefer instead to call Measure W an in-
vestment in our future.
Marcella Zita
Claremont
Too many what ifs
Dear Editor:
There are too many what ifs in re-
gard to the purchase of Golden State
Water Company by the city.
Looking back, I recall how we prop-
erty owners on Indian Hill were forced
to donate parts of our front yards so a su-
perhighway could be constructed from
Base Line Road to Armstrong Drive. It
seemed like a good idea at the time.
The roundabout in the Village seemd
like a good idea at the time.
The Wilderness Park and the ensuing
parking debacle seemed like a good
idea at the time.
I am not convinced that the purchase
of a utility company is in our best inter-
est.
John Schwartz
Claremont
Unwanted gifts
[Editors note: The following letter was ad-
dressed to the dog owners who utilize the
Wilderness Park and trails, often leaving be-
hind unsightly doggie bags. KD]
Dear Dog Owners:
Get a grip! What dont you under-
stand? You are given a free small black
bag at the trailhead of Johnsons Pas-
ture at the top of Mountain Avenue. It is
supposed to be returned to that area
after your stroll.
Today, I counted eight filled bags
along the road. Johnsons Pasture is a
pristine area for all of us to enjoy and
you ruined my hike.
My suggestion to you is to hire
someone to walk your dog who may be
more considerate than you are. They
will hopefully return the filled bags.
I would love for you to respond and
let me know why you leave the filled
bags begind. Shame on you!
Karen Gastineau
Claremont
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 7
READERS COMMENTS
F
or those of us who read the pages
of the COURIER each week, we
know that water has been a hot
topic in Claremont for many years. Ive
stayed on the sidelines and, until now,
have only shared my thoughts with fam-
ily and close friends.
Im writing this piece because Measure W, the
$135 million bond measure on the November ballot,
will cost Claremont families much more than were
already paying today. Ask yourself, why would you
place $135 million in debt on the community if it
would result in higher water bills for all residents for
decades?
Ive conducted my own research, including a thor-
ough review of the citys own impartial analysis, and
thats why Im going to vote no.
First, residents should know that Measure W, by
the citys own account, will not result in lower water
bills. If you want to save money, you should most cer-
tainly vote no. Supporters initially said that taking
over the water company would reduce water rates.
Yet city leaders have candidly said that Measure W
will not save any money for at least 17 years. The im-
partial analysis of Measure W says that water rates
will immediately go up for all residents, regardless of
how much water they use.
Former Claremont McKenna College professor
Rodney Smith, PhD, a local business owner and na-
tionally-recognized expert on water economics, has
done a comprehensive analysis of Measure W. He
concluded Measure W will cost the average home-
owner $1,217 per year. That is the equivalent of a
$101.42 charge on every residents monthly water bill
on top of what you are paying right now. If your bill
is currently $100 per month, under Measure W it will
be $201.42 per month. For my family, thats an ex-
pense we simply cannot afford.
Additionally, not one penny in Measure Ws $135
million proposal can be used to maintain, repair or
upgrade the water system. When we own the water
system, well be burdened with paying for every fix,
big and small. Southern Californias water system is
aging (Look what happened at UCLA) and the cost to
replace old pipes and mains cannot be understated.
Those costs will only be paid for in future water rate
increases beyond Measure Ws water tax.
Further, in the history of California, there has
never been a successful eminent domain takeover of a
private water company. This was illustrated a few
years ago in Santa Cruz County in a community
called Felton. The same kinds of interests, who are
today promoting Measure W, convinced Felton resi-
dents to enact a 30-year property tax to take over the
local water system. The promises werent kept.
The purchase price ended up being 250 percent
more than was promised. Residents are now paying
an annual $500 property tax for 30 years and monthly
bills have increased by 71 percent over the last eight
years. Thousands of residents objected to the most re-
cent double-digit increases, but their concerns were
ignored.
When residents consider Measure W, the bottom
line is that it will cost us a lot more money for a long
period of time. Well be paying for water service, the
level of which has not been detailed by takeover sup-
porters. Well be paying millions to lawyers and con-
sultants who will be part of a costly and divisive
eminent domain court fight. And if thats successful,
well be repaying $135 million in principal plus inter-
est payments to bondholders. Measure W is a budget-
buster for hardworking Claremont residents.
As a community, I hope that voters review all the
materials and look beyond the rhetoric. Theyll find
that Measure W is a fatally-flawed plan that will obli-
gate every household to $36,510 in debt repayments
over the next 30 years. Again, that is an extra $101.42
every month in addition to your existing water bill.
Ask yourselves, does Measure W offer the out-
come that Claremont desires? Please consider the
facts and vote no on the $135 million tax. Learn more
at www.stopthewatertax.com.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 8
VIEWPOINT
Measure W offers residents higher costs, no relief
by Danny Holznecht
Once a week in print. Every day online.
www.claremont-courier.com
Of course, we cover Claremont news 24/7
C
our er i
Claremont
claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 9
On the trail of the perfect shopping experience
by Jan Wheatcroft
I
love to shop almost as much as I
love to eat. Both experiences provide
adventure, anticipation and excite-
ment and challenge me to discover
something that will surprise and delight.
Each time I travel, I am always alert that
something new will be found or tasted as
well as a renewed acquaintance made
with some place I have already been that
has been pleasurable.
In London, for instance, I revisit one of my favorite
businesses, Muji, a Japanese shop featuring clever,
simple, basic items, especially inexpensive watches. I
love to wander around and browse often finding some-
thing new and clever. Then there are the bookstores,
such as Daunts and The Travel Bookstore where I can
lose myself for hours among the maps and books and
travel toys. The browsing is as much a part of the fun
as the actual finding of a treasure or a good book or a
clever key chain.
Then there are the antique marts and flea markets,
which make me quiver with excitement. Who knows
what jewels are waiting for me to dig out, just perfect
for my artwork at home? I have my favorite places in
London and know the dates when each flea market is
open and, by now, even recognize the sellers and their
specialities. And that is just in London. I havent even
begun with the fabric or ethnic clothing stores.
This summer, I went with my Swedish friend Su-
sanna to Berlin for four days. There was a heat wave
and Berlin was hot. We had great fun finding restau-
rants for dinner, tending toward Italian food and light
sparkling white wine while sitting outside sharing
plates heaped with seafood, pasta or risotto and lavish
salads. It was tasty and relaxing and a lovely way to
spend a warm evening. Its always delightful to figure
out the public transportation system and to walk about.
The taxis were good, too, as they gave us an overview
of a very large city. We even tried a boat ride through
the center of the city.
One day, I went on my own to visit some antique
stores, searching for antique jewelry I could take apart
and re-use in my own jewelry-making. I found a small
antique mall built into the arches of an old railway
station and full of rather fancy small shops. Most of the
things were way out of my league, but in one store I
found three enameled pendants that stood out as some-
thing special. I spent quite a bit of time bargaining with
the owner until I succumbed to his price and they were
mine. I knew that they were unique and beautiful, and
worth every bit I had to pay. When I used them in my
jewelry artwork, they were the first pieces to sell. I
knew I had found something rather extraordinary and
that is the joy of the hunt, made even more engaging in
a place that I am visiting for the first time.
However, sometimes visiting a store can be an expe-
rience in itself without having to buy anything. We had
been told that when in Berlin we must go to the store
KaDeWe. I had no idea what this store was but, of
course, we had to see and discover for ourselves. We
were told sixth floor and nothing more. We alighted
from the bus in front of a huge edificewide, tall and
filled with people crowding in and out of the front
doors. Inside, people sat and milled about, going from
one high-end shop with big name brands to another.
Not a single elite brand was left out, and this was only
the ground floor.
There were banks of elevators as well as a big glass
elevator in the center, which seemed like the one to
take for the view. Since we werent interested in high-
end clothing, we bypassed all the floors and rode up the
the sixth floor, obedient to those who had instructed us.
The sixth floor was food. Not just food, but food. Here
was the largest collection of every food item imagina-
ble. It was actually bigger and more complete than any-
thing I have ever seen, even in the basement of a
Japanese department store in Tokyo.
The first display in front of us was chocolates:
chocolates of every sort and size and from every coun-
try, chocolates from bitter to sweetbrands that I had
never seen or heard of. We hopped about, pointing out
the varieties of known and unknown chocolates that
covered almost half a supermarket. And that was only
chocolates. Other areas had candies, teas and coffees.
And then we discovered the bakery with the widest se-
lection of breads, cakes and sweet baked goods from
every part of Europe. The butcher section with fresh
and sealed meats almost covered an entire block with
every wurst and salami one could imagine as well as
cold cuts and pig heads and fresh meat. This section led
into the part of the market with fish and every other
critter of the sea. There were small bar areas where one
could perch and order wine or beer, coffee or tea and a
snack of the local speciality. It took us hours to wander
around discovering the imported goods, as well as
jams, mustards, oils and spices. The list goes on.
All of this was making us hungry, so we rode up in
our glass carriage to the seventh floor where we were
greeted by vast food tables filled with row after row of
cold dishes and cases with prepared hot dishes. I started
with the cold dishes first and then returned for the hot
dishes. It was difficult to make the choices. You loaded
your plate yourself and payment was by weight. Of
course, mine was more expensive than Susannas. We
were never able to go back for any hot dishes or for the
wide selection of dessert choices on that first day. So
for lunch on the day that we were to leave Berlin, we
returned to try some of the other choices. It was one
way to combine both the shopping and food experi-
ences. This is not a new store in a city that is constantly
building new stores, each one seemingly bigger than
the last one. No, this enormous store is over 100 years
old.
I just love to go shopping. I always have great ex-
pectations of finding something special or discovering
an unexpected treasure. Even if I buy nothing, just the
fun of being someplace new is a worthwhile experi-
ence. And to add to it, the chance to sit at a sidewalk
cafe for a coffee or a glass of wine and enjoy the world
around me.....well, that is the extra cream in my coffee.
architect
WOOTTON + HARDYMAN
ARCHITECTURE
595 Clarion Place
Claremont, CA 91711
(626) 536-9699
www.wharchitecture.com
Client-conscience, Design-conscience,
Environment-conscience
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 10
MIKE F. OBRIEN
Attorney at Law
212 Yale Avenue
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 626-9999
www.mikefobrien.com
www.facebook.com/moblawoffices
Specialist in personal injury and wrongful
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BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
A Law Corporation
414 Yale Avenue, Suite K
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-4707
41 years experience in: Business Law,
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architect
WHEELER & WHEELER
A.I.A. Architects, Inc.
133 South Spring Street
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 624-5095
www.wheelerarchitects.com
Building a better Claremont
since 1985
attorney
attorney
attorney
Christine D. Thielo
Attorney at Law
480 N. Indian Hill, Suite 1A
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 624-0733
Focused on Family Law, Divorce, Child
Custody and Criminal Law Matters
www.thielolaw.com
attorney
WILKINSON &
WILKINSON
341 W. First Street
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(909) 482-1555
Certified Specialists in Trusts, Probate
and Estate Planning. Litigation of same
attorney
Christiansen Accounting
Corina L. Christiansen, CPA
140 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite E
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(909) 447-6802
www.christiansenaccounting.com
www.facebook.com/christiansenaccountingcpa
Specialize in small business accounting
and tax planning since 1962.
accounting
Kendall &Gkikas LLP
Attorneys at Law
134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 482-1422
Specializing in Family Law in Claremont
since 1994: Divorce, Custody, Visitation
with Children, Property Division, Alimony,
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PROFESSIONAL
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HARTMANBALDWIN
DESIGN/BUILD
100 West Foothill Blvd.
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 670-1344
www.hartmanbaldwin.com
Since 1984
Residential remodeling, historic
restorations, and custom home building
architect/contractor
counseling
JOHN B. REID, PhD
(909) 646-0798
Individual and relationship
counseling.
Grief recovery issues.
www.stmcounseling.com
real estate broker
Geoff T. Hamill
Broker Associate, ABR. CRS. GRI,
E-PRO, SRES, D.R.E. #00997900
Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty
Phone: (909) 621-0500
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
#1 in Claremont sales &listings since 1988
Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time
Meticulous care and attention to detail
tax preparation/EA
D. PROFFITT, EA
Claremont, CA 91711
Phone: (909) 445-1379
dee@dproffittea.com
Visit my website at
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Income Tax Specialist since 1981
Payroll Service Accounting
SRS GENERAL
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design/build
PETER T. IGLER, D.D.S.
D. INGRID ROJAS, D.D.S.
Cosmetic & General Dentistry
615 W. Foothill Blvd.
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 624-6815
1 Hour In-Office Bleaching, Veneers,
White Fillings, Dental Implants, Dentures.
LIGHTFOOT RALLS
& LIGHTFOOT LLP
Certified Public Accountants
675 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 300
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 626-2623
Tax Planning & Preparation Accounting
c.p.a. financial consultants
SUZANNE H. CHRISTIAN
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER
Professional Securities offered through
LPL Financial
Member of FINRA/SIPC
419 Yale Ave. Claremont
(909) 625-1052
Your financial security is my priority
Ann M. Johannsen, O.D.
Brad A. Baggarly, O.D.
OPTOMETRY
695 W. Foothill Blvd.
Established 1972
(909) 625-7861
www.claremontoptometry.com
Eyemed - VSP - MES - Medicare
chiropractor
DR.MARTINS. McLEOD
411 N. Indian Hill Blvd.
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-1208
Joint &Muscle Pain Headache
Sciatica Pinched nerve
Most Insurance accepted
Personal injury
optometry
dentist
NEW CAR GUIDE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
Don McDonald, Pharmacist
Health insurance
333 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont
(909) 635-8933
RXDonald@gmail.com
New to the Golden Age? New to the area?
Leaving your employer or union coverage?
Need extra help paying for prescriptions?
We focus on your health and your healthcare
healthcare
Mary E. Betty Graber, a native of
San Dimas and longtime resident of On-
tario, died peacefully on Saturday, Sep-
tember 13, 2014 with her son Clifford
by her side. She had just celebrated her
98th birthday on September 4.
Betty grew up among the orange
groves of San Dimas, graduated with
the class of 1934 from Bonita High
School and married her sweetheart,
Robert Bob D. Graber, in 1936. They
lived in Ontario, where they raised their
two children, Clifford and Carolyn.
Alongside Bob, who in 1962 became
the sole proprietor of the Graber Olive
House, Betty dedicated herself to On-
tarios oldest business. It is now under
the management of her son, Clifford
Graber II. She established a charming
gift shop, took a special interest in the
shipping aspect of the company and
made a point of connecting with cus-
tomers.
Weve been in business here so
long, a lot of these people have become
old friends. Thats a good feeling, she
said in a 1980 San Bernardino Sun arti-
cle. It makes all our work seem worth-
while.
She echoed that sentiment in a 2002
edition of La Verne Magazine.
Were very complimented that peo-
ple drive out of their way to come out
here and see us, she said. We really
appreciate our customers; in fact, we
tell them they sort of own the place.
Mrs. Graber also made sure that em-
ployees felt at home.
The world lost an amazing woman!
Ill miss hearing the words, How are
you doing, dear? the most, Terre Au-
dibert, a seasonal employee at the
Graber Olive House, posted in an on-
line tribute.
A philanthropist at heart, Mrs.
Graber believed in doing ones best and
always looked for the finest in each in-
dividual. She belonged to many local
clubs and organizations including Ex-
ecutive Women International, Shake-
speare Club, Soroptimist Club,
Jamboleers, Chaffey Community Art
Association, Republican Women and
the San Antonio Hospital Foundation.
Among her many personal interests,
Betty developed a love of the arts at an
early age and became a patron of the
arts, supporting local artists and hosting
many art shows over the years.
As members of the Balboa Yacht
Club, she and Bob enjoyed power-boat-
ing and sailing, both locally and in the
San Juan Islands in Washington where
they spent their summers. Cliff recalls
his moms attempt once to cook pan-
cakes as the boat was rocking back and
forth. The kids renamed them pan-
wads, which is what the grandchildren
still often affectionately refer to them as.
Grandson Robert McBride recalls
one particular fishing trip. Mrs. Graber
hooked something and reeled it in to
discover she had caught a copper tea
kettle covered in barnacles. It was
agreed that only Grandma Betty, with
her keen eye for artistic things, could
catch such a treasure.
In recent years, Betty and Bob
moved to the Mt. San Antonio Gardens
retirement community in Claremont.
Her legacy to her children and many
grandchildren was that one should not
just do their best but be understanding
of others and help them to become their
very best as well. One must take the
time to do everything right
Betty was preceded in death by her
husband of 71 years, Bob Graber. She
is survived by her son Cliff (Maura)
and daughter Carolyn; by eight grand-
children, Bill, Robert, Catherine (John),
Peggy (Ron), Clifford (Katie), Crystal,
Kat (Manny) and Robert; by 19 great-
grandchildren and by two great great-
grandchildren.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be
sent to The Braille Institute or to The
Homeship Fund, Mt. San Antonio Gar-
dens, 900 E. Harrison, Pomona, CA
91767, or to the charity of your choice.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 11
Betty Graber
Graber Olive House matriarch
OBITUARIES
Longtime Claremont resident and
Pomona Valley Hospital and Medical
Center physician Dr. Richard D. Davis
died early in the morning on Saturday,
September 13, 2014 at the age of 83.
Born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1931
and raised in the Pittsburgh area, Dr.
Davis graduated medical school from
the University of Pittsburgh in 1954 and
completed his one-year internship at St.
Luke Hospital in Ohio. Deferred from
the Korean War because he was in train-
ing, he spent the next two years in the
Navy, based out of Camp Pendleton,
California as a lieutenant assigned to the
Marine Corps Base.
He completed his Family Medicine
residency training at the University of
Colorado in Denver in 1959, moving to
Claremont and opening his medical
practice with Dr. Walter McCleery in
1960. He practiced family medicine in
the Pomona Valley area for the next 44
years, retiring in 2004. He was prede-
ceased by his wife, Martha Marty S.
Davis, in 1997.
Dr. Davis loved the practice of medi-
cine, and established strong bonds with
his patients. He also was very active
with the hospital, and served on numer-
ous medical staff committees his entire
career as well as serving as chief of staff
at Pomona Valley Hospital and Medical
Center.
He and his wife Marty, a registered
nurse, helped start Pomona Valley
Health Plan and Valley Independent
Physicians, which later became Inter-
Valley Health Plan and ProMed. More
recently, he helped create the Family
Practice Residency Program with part-
ners Duane Styles, MD and Greg
Dahlquist, MD.
Physically active most of his life, Doc
Davis enjoyed playing tennis and adult
league soccer, hiking with his dogs and
bicycle riding. He also enjoyed travel-
ing, making numerous trips to distant
destinations around the world with fam-
ily and close friends. Soccer was his pas-
sion. With family and close friends, he
attended games and held football
watching parties for various incarna-
tions of US professional soccer and 50-
plus years of World Cup matches.
He was well known for his dry wit,
self-deprecating manner, intelligence
and matter-of-fact approach to life. To
close family and friends, he was gener-
ous, kind and held a steadfast love for
all. Even in illness, all these traits carried
through to the end. Happiest spending
time with his family and close friends,
he particularly enjoyed ski trips with his
children and grandchildren during the
winter and beach trips with family and
friends during the summer.
Pops or Doc, as he was affection-
ately called by family and friends, is sur-
vived by his mother Esther Davis (103
years old), by his three children, Beverly
(Bev), Richard Jr. (Rick) and Lenning III
(Lenny), and by his daughters-in law,
Tina and Kelley. He also leaves nine
grandchildren, Leigh Ann, Lauren,
Ryan, Nick, Dani, Randi, Kevin, Han-
nah and Lenny, as well as great-grand-
children Kenzie and Carson.
Richard D. Davis, MD
Dedicated physician, soccer fan
Once a week in print. Every day online.
www.claremont-courier.com 621-4761
Of course, we cover Claremont news 24/7
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Claremont
claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 12
Delores Elizabeth Quinn
Loving mother and grandmother, prayer warrior
OBITUARIES
www.claremont-courier.com
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Delores Quinn died on September 6, 2014 in Clare-
mont, just two months shy of her 92nd birthday. A lov-
ing wife, mother of four children, grandmother of 10
and great-grandmother of 13, she lived a life filled with
family, friends and her strong faith.
She was born to John and Caroline Proehl on No-
vember 30, 1922 in Fernando, Minnesota. The middle
of three children, young Delores spent her early years
helping on the family farm. After graduating high
school, she moved to Buffalo Lake where she cared for
her great aunt and began her first job at the Buffalo
Lake Bank.
While working for the bank, she began a pen pal cor-
respondence with a friends cousin, a soldier fighting in
the war. After three years communicating only through
letters, Delores and L. Bernard Quinn met face-to-face
for the first time in late September, got engaged in Oc-
tober and married in November in Minnesota. They en-
joyed 62 years together as husband and wife.
The newlywed couple left the Midwest for Califor-
nia and lived in South Gate, Bernards hometown.
They later moved to Bellflower, where they raised their
four children and became active members of their
church and local community. Mrs. Quinn was a dedi-
cated Christian all her life, teaching Sunday school,
leading Bible studies and presiding as president of her
local Christian Womens Club. She was affectionately
known by family and friends as a Prayer Warrior, a
role she was dedicated to and of which she was ex-
tremely proud.
In 1978, the Quinns retired in Squaw Valley, Califor-
nia, where they built their own house and resided for
20 years. Visits to their Squaw Valley home are a cher-
ished memory for all those lucky enough to have vaca-
tioned there. Friends and family considered their home
like a bed and breakfast and fondly remember De-
lores freshly baked bread, sweet smile and warm hos-
pitality.
In 2000, they moved to Leisure World in Seal Beach
to live closer to family, which now included a growing
list of great-grandchildren. Bernard died in 2007 and in
2011, Mrs. Quinn moved to Claremont where she lived
close to her daughter Carolyn and many grandchildren
and great-grandchildren. At the time of her death, De-
lores was a resident of Claremont Manor and a mem-
ber of Baseline Community Church.
She is survived by her sister Lorraine Grabow, her
two sons Barry Quinn and Tom Quinn (Phyllis) and her
daughters Carolyn Zitar (Fred) and Joy Shopfner
(Dave). She also leaves her 10 grandchildren, 13 great-
grandchildren and numerous extended family members
and friends.
Oak Park Cemetery expansion
grand opening celebration
The community is invited to a grand opening of the
Oak Park Cemetery expansion. The event will be held
on Tuesday, September 30 at 10 a.m. at the cemetery
(410 S. Sycamore Ave.) Light refreshments will be
served following the program.
Clay hand-building for begin-
ning students
The Human Services Department will offer a begin-
ning pottery class from October 23 through December
18 (Thursdays) from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the
Hughes Center. Students will explore a variety of tech-
niques for beginners, including basic hand-building
using slabs, stamps and cut-outs. Entry-level knowledge
of glazing and firing will also be covered. Students will
create projects that can be displayed at home or in the
garden. Contact the Hughes Center for information,
Commissions reorganize,
install new members
The following commissions have reorganized and
recently selected new chairs and vice chairs.
Architectural Commission: James Manifold, chair;
Mark Schoeman, vice chair. Community & Human
Services Commission: Robert Miletich, chair; Maury
Feingold, vice chair. Planning Commission: Cynthia
Humes, chair; KM Williamson, vice chair. Police Com-
mission: Sayeed Shaikh, chair; Darryl Qualls, vice chair.
New commissioners were also recently installed. They
include: Architectural Commission, Marta Perlas and
Robert Perry; Community & Human Services Commis-
sion, Eric Garton and Michael Loader; Planning Com-
mission, James Jackson, Douglas Lyon and Rick Reed;
and Police Commission, Edgar Reece and Jon Strash.
Democratic Club resumes fall
meeting schedule
The Democratic Club of Claremont will hold its first
members meeting of the fall on Monday, September
29 at 7 p.m. The speaker will be Gilda Ochoa, profes-
sor of sociology and Chicana/o-Latina/o studies at
Pomona College. Her talk will be a presentation of
some themes from her recent award-winning book, Ac-
ademic Profiling: Latinos, Asian Americans and
the Achievement Gap.
A brief business meeting will take place after Ms.
Ochoas talk, which will include a resolution concern-
ing the forthcoming vote on the water bond.
The meeting will be held at Porter Hall on the Pil-
grim Place campus.
OUR TOWN
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 13
Thomas and Juanita Thielo
On September 25, 2014, Thomas and Juanita
Thielo reached a milestone and celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary.
Thomas was born and raised in Brooklyn, New
York, and Juanita is from Delta, Colorado. As adven-
turesome young adults, they both moved to California
to start new lives and met at the apartment complex
where they were both living in Azusa.
Tom, when asked what he remembered most about
his first meeting with Juanita, said, She had a great
body. She just had a way about her, and I knew right
away that she was the one.
Tom also remembered waiting nine months before
telling Juanita that he loved her. Juanita fondly re-
members her first meeting with her future husband.
He was tall, handsome and I remember seeing him
studying in the common areas, she said. He had my
attention from the start.
The two spent nine months dating until Tom was
called off to serve in the US Navy Air for six months.
During Toms service, the couple kept in touch
through letters.
After his return, Tom proposed on August 16, 1964
and they were married at the Little Chapel of Flowers
in West Covina on September 25, 1964. Juanita re-
called rose petals falling from the ceiling all around
them as they kissed at the end of the service.
The couple have lived and raised their family in
Claremont since 1973. Tom and Juanita have two
daughters, Terry and Christine, and a son, Tim. Tom
worked for General Dynamic/Hughes Raytheon and
Juanita worked at the Claremont Unified School Dis-
trict.
When reflecting on his 50-year marriage, Tom
stated, Marriage is a grind. You have to take it one
day at a time. Its not a sprint but a marathon. You
have to put up with a lot but there are so many bene-
fits, which include sharing the love you have for one
another and watching that love change and grow
throughout the years.
Juanita agrees.
Its nice to have someone to share good and bad
times with and to tell you that everything will be
okay. Before I was married, I remember feeling afraid
but after, I always felt strong because as a couple you
feel like you can get through everything. We did
everything we wanted to, and we have gone every-
where we wanted to go. We enjoy a lot of the same
things and that has been a strength in our marriage.
The Thielo family marked the happy occasion with
a family dinner celebration.
Claremont couples celebrate 50th wedding anniversaries
Steve and Nancy Farrow
Congratulations to Steve and Nancy Farrow,
who are celebrating 50 years of wedded bliss on
October 2, 2014! Friends and family wish them
health,happiness and many more years together.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 16
CALENDAR
Performing arts
Candlelight Pavilion presents
Monty Pythons Spamalot.
Page 19
Friday, September 26 through Saturday, October 4
CONFERENCE Jan Karski Centen-
nial Conference: Discussion of the
Responsibility to Protect. Malott
Commons, Hampton Room, 345 E.
Ninth St., Clarmeont. Call (909) 607-
8103 for conference information.
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Stroll
through the Village and listen to free,
live music from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Public
Plaza, the chamber and city hall.
YOGA Safe and Gentle Yoga with Ross
at the Claremont Friends Meeting
House at 9 a.m. A gentle blend of med-
itation and movement, RRs hour-long
class is an immersive experience guar-
anteed to integrate mind, body and spirit
in a deep and enriching way. All ages,
all levels, all genders. 727 W. Harrison
Ave., Claremont. (909) 908-0882.
WALK FOR THE WILD A celebra-
tion of the 50th anniversary of the
Wilderness Act with a Wilderness
Festival and fun walk. Festival in-
cludes food trucks, music, fun activi-
ties, photo contest and information
about wilderness areas and conserva-
tion. The Walk for the Wild is $12 and
includes garden admission. Register
online at active.com. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Walk begins any time between 9 and
noon. The festival continues through
4 p.m. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic
Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Clare-
mont.
CONCERT Singer/songwriter, Tom
Freund, whose sound has garnered com-
parisons to Tom Waits and Rickie Lee
Jones, attended the Claremont Colleges
in California in the early 90s and per-
formed as a duo with Ben Harper. The
two recorded a vinyl-only album in
1992 called Pleasure and Pain. Shortly
thereafter, he became the bass player for
roots rock mainstays the Silos. Freund
plays guitar, ukulele, keyboards and
stand-up bass. Between his traditional
touring and European festivals, this is a
unique opportunity to see this versatile
multi-instrumentalist and singer/song-
writer in a small, intimate setting. Doors
open at 7 p.m. $12. The Folk Music
Center, 220 Yale Ave., Claremont.
THE MOJAVE TRIO The Mojave
Trio returns to Pomona College to per-
form music by Beethoven, Brahms and
Flaherty. Members include Sara Parkins,
violin; Margaret Parkins, cello; and fac-
ulty artist Genevieve Feiwen Lee, piano.
Free admission with open seating, no
tickets. Doors open approximately 30
minutes prior to performance. More info
is available on the Concert Calendar at
music.pomona.edu. 8 p.m. Bridges Hall
of Music, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont.
FARMERS MARKET Shop local in
this Village street fair between 8 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Organic produce, farm-
fresh cheeses, plants, crafts and more.
COMIC BOOK SHOW See comic
books, collectibles and art dealers from
around southern California, with New
and vintage comic books, graphic nov-
els, original art, prints, action figures,
games and collectibles. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Claremont Packing House, 532 W. First
St., Claremont.
VIOLIN-PIANO RECITAL Dr.
Rachel Huang, violin and Dr.Tatiana
Thibodeaux, piano, perform their
annual Fall concert. This short pro-
gram ranges from classic to jazz-in-
spired to a High Holy Days blessing.
3 to 4:15 p.m. Free admission. Gar-
rison Theaters Boone Recital Hall.
(909) 607-3266.
POETRY Alice Pero is the author of
Thawed Stars. Her poems have ap-
peared in many journals and literary
magazines. She is the founder and
co-producer of the Moonday poetry
reading series in La Caada
Flintridge. Krista Lukas is the author
of Fans of My Unconscious (Black
Rock Press). Poems from this collec-
tion were featured in several publi-
cations. As always, this event is free
and open to the public. Light snacks
will be provided and poets will have
copies of their books available for
purchase. 2 to 4 p.m. Claremont Li-
brary, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Clare-
mont. (909) 621-4902.
GENETIC ENGINEERING Pro-
fessor of government at Cornell
University Ronald Herring will
present, Social Conflict: Science
and Genetic Engineering (GMOs).
6:45 to 8 p.m. Marian Miner Cook
Athenaeum, 385 E. Eighth St., Clare-
mont. (909) 621-8244.
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS
9-DAY CALENDAR
continues on the next page
COURIERCrossword
Check out this weeks puzzle
by Myles Mellor.
Page 20
September
Friday 26
September
Saturday 27
September
Sunday 28
September
Monday 29
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 17
MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT LANGUAGE The
speaker is Pomona professor Mary Paster. Buffet lunch
is $13 or dessert and coffee is $6. 11:30 a.m. Hughes
Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont.
(909) 594-3111.
TUESDAY NOON ACADEMY Scripps College
visiting fellow and former Assistant Clinton Adminis-
tration Secretary for Postsecondary Education, A. Lee
Fritschler discusses his recent book, Closed Minds?
Politics and Ideology in American Universities.
Bring lunch or purchase lunch at the Malott Commons
Dining Hall. Coffee and Tea will be provided. Doors
open at 11:45 a.m. Malott Commons Hampton Room,
345 E. Ninth St., Claremont. (909) 607-9372.
THE FUTURE OF MEDIA Andrew Sullivan, blog-
ger of The Daily Dish, author, Intimations Pursued:
The Voice of Practice in the Conversation of Michael
Oakeshott (2008) and The Conservative Soul: Fun-
damentalism, Freedom, and the Future of the Right
(2007). 6:45 to 8 p.m. Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum,
385 E. Eight St., Claremont. (909) 621-8244.
THEATER Inland Valley Repertory Theater presents
A Midsummer Nights Dream. Doors open at 6:45
p.m. $25 plus handling fee. Candlelight Pavilion, 455
W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. (909) 859-4878.
TRANSFORMING A TOPOLOGY Engineering
program seminar presented by Philip Vegdahl. 4:10 to
5:30 p.m. Shanahan Center, 320 E. Foothill Blvd.,
Claremont. (909) 621-8964.
SCIENCE SEMINAR Where the Rubber Meets the
Road: Ecological Restoration and Research in the
United States Largest Urban National Park. 11 a.m.
to noon. WM Keck Building, Joint Science Center, 925
N. Mills Ave., Claremont. (909) 621-8298.
LECTURE & TEA Rembrandt Club scholarship win-
ners will report on their activities. Presentations include
The Later Works of Mark Rothko by art historian Zoe
Jameson and US Puppet Theaters: Art, Activism and
Community by studio artist Nissa Gustafson. Tea fol-
lows in the Pomona College Museum of Art courtyard.
1:30 to 3 p.m. Thatcher Music Building, Lyman Hall,
340 N. College Ave., Claremont. (909) 981-7245.
DINNER & LECTURE Richard Joesph of Northwest-
ern University and the Brookings Institution will lead a
conference dinner organized by the Eyes on Africa Ini-
tiative. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Pomona College Frank Dining
Hall, 260 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. (909) 621-8000.
ART WALK Visit galleries in the Village for opening
receptions featuring refreshments, live music plus meet
and greet with artists. 6 to 9 p.m.
FALL PLANTING FESTIVAL California native
plants for sale, food trucks, live music, free lectures and
workshops, free expert horticultural advice celebrating
the fall planting season in southern California and the
opening of Grow Native Nursery for the season. 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N.
College Ave., Claremont. (909) 625-8767.
9-DAY CALENDAR
continued from the previous page
September
Tuesday 30
October
Wednesday 1
October
Thursday 2
October
Friday 3
October
Saturday 4
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 18
BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave.,
Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
buddhamouse.com. (909) 626-3322.
Though September 31: Sacred Space works on
paper by Christopher and acrylic and mixed-media
works by Sequoia. Sequoia is now 11 and has worked
with her father in his studio and has taken art classes to
improve her style. Though born in New York City,
Christopher Cousins was raised in Oklahoma where he
was greatly influenced by the various artistic expres-
sions of American Indian cultures. He graduated with
a BFA from Boston University and is currently work-
ing as an actor in Los Angeles. He kept up with his
drawing and the need to paint gnawed at him for years.
He started showing his work in 2000 in the Los Ange-
les area. In 2004, he joined Pharmaka, a group of like-
minded LA-based artists. In 2005, he participated in
his first international exhibition in Venice, Italy. Mr.
Cousins works with Bert Green Fine Art in LA, The
Lowe Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia, and with the Foster.
October 3 through 31: Musomania, new work by
Anne Seltzer. This is an art exhibition tailored for Bud-
dhamouse Emporium with images inspired by the am-
biance of the shop: contentment, peace and beauty.
Opening reception: Friday, October 3 from 6 to 8 p.m.
Join in for refreshments and to meet the artist.
BUNNY GUNNER GALLERY: 254 W. Bonita
Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to
6 p.m. Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. (909) 624-7238.
Through September 30: Dee Marcellus Cole and
John Neiuber exhibit three-dimensional artwork.
CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Cham-
ber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. (909) 398-1060.
Though September 30: Abandoned Fabric:
Flow by Sumi Foley.
CLAREMONT FORUM BOOKSHOP &
GALLERY: 586 W. First St., Claremont Packing
House. Tuesday through Thursday, noon to 7 p.m.; Fri-
day and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, noon
to 7 p.m. (909) 626-3066.
Through September 30: Paintings by Donna Brand.
THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St.,
#204, Claremont Packing House. Open Wednesday
through Saturday, 1 to 7 p.m. Extended hours on the
first Friday of the month for Claremont Art Walk until
9 p.m. Visit loft204.com. Email info@loft204.com
for information about purchasing monthly wall space
for artwork display or to inquire about event rental of
gallery space. Call Vicki at (626) 224-7915 or (626)
963-4238 for one-on-one art instruction for junior
high and high school age students.
Through September 27: 1960s abstract paintings
by Edward D. Herrington. The late Mr. Herrington
graduated in 1968 with a masters degree in art at
California State University Fullerton and was a
teacher at Montvue Elementary School in Pomona.
Three of his large-scale paintingssome over six feet
tallwere given to close friends and have never been
on view to the public until now. For the first time
ever, Mr. Herringtons private collection pieces will
be available to the public. These colorful and impres-
sive pieces are an interior designers dream.
October 3 through 31: The Colony celebrates Dia
de Los Muertos with featured exhibition Speaker of
the Dead by Rachel Walker as well as a collaboration
with the University of La Verne Latino Student Forum.
The Latino Student Forum will be featuring a student-
made mural, which will be raffled off as a fundraiser
at the opening reception. Opening reception: Friday,
October 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. ULV Latino Student Forum
presents DJ Exotick, face painting, salsa lessons (7 to
8 p.m.), raffle (announced at 8:30 p.m.), seasonal ac-
tivities and refreshments. Raffle tickets are $2 each;
opportunities for free tickets will also be available.
Come out to support University of La Verne students.
FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250
W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through
Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (909) 626-5455.
Through October 3: Tile Show 2014 Featuring
Vicente Siso. The 24th Annual Tile Show continues
to build on the traditions of community exchange
and inclusion that have made the Tile Show such a
unique and successful event. This years iteration
features new ceramic sculpture by Vicente Siso, a
native of Argentina who creates whimsical vessels
adorned with animals and flowers. His paintings and
drawings will also be for sale in the studio.
GALERIA DE PROLAS: 532 W. First St. #211,
Claremont Packing House. Open by appointment.
Tuesdays: Tribe Tuesday, an open studio session
for artists to share the space and work on their pieces.
Open to artists of all levels from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Space
is limited to 10 people per session. Call (909) 236-
1562 or visit facebook.com/galeriadeperolas.
SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to
6 p.m., or by appointment. Square i is an annex of
the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approxi-
mately every six weeks. Call (909) 621-9091 or
email info@squareigallery.com.
Through September 30: Estate Sale featuring art-
work by Millford Zornes, Karl Benjamin, Millard
Sheets, Jim Strombotne and Susan Hertel.
GALLERIES
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 19
CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill
Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday
evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15
p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., per-
formance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday mati-
nees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m.
(909) 626-1254, ext.1 or candlelightpavilion.com.
Through October 19: Monty Pythons Spamalot
tells the story of King Arthur and his quest for the
Holy Grail. With the help of his knights of the round
table, they take us on a merry romp through a forest,
all the while lampooning historical figures and events
in a gleeful, Busby Berkeley way. Dont miss this
laugh-filled, stupidly ridiculous, Tony Award-win-
ning juggernaut.
October 24 through November 23: Jekyll & Hyde
is based on Robert Louis Stevensons classic story
about a brilliant doctor whose experiments with
human personality create a murderous counterpart.
Convinced the cure for his fathers mental illness lies
in the separation of mans evil nature from his good,
Jekyll unwittingly unleashes his own dark side,
wreaking havoc in the streets of London as the sav-
age, maniacal Edward Hyde.
November 29 through December 27: Its Christmas
Every Day. For Barnie and Betty Walli, it is quite lit-
erally Christmas Every Day. They own Wallis Christ-
mas Pavilion, a holiday decorators palace, where
Christmas lasts all the year through. After 25 years of
making spirits bright, Barnie has lost his Christmas
feeling. But with the help of Betty and his employees
(a madcap team of holiday decorating fools), he wont
be a humbug for long.
DRINKWARD RECITAL HALL: 320 E.
Foothill Blvd., Claremont at Harvey Mudd College.
Thursday, October 2: Popular folk musician
Jayme Stones Alan Lomax Project is a collabo-
ratory of celebrated roots musicians featuring
banjoist Stone, accordionist Moira Smiley, gui-
tarist Eli West, fiddle player Tatiana Hargreaves
and bassist Joe Phillips. The group recycles and re-
imagines traditional music collected by folklorist
Alan Lomax. Their repertoire includes Bahamian
sea shanties, African-American a cappella singing
from the Georgia Sea Islands, ancient Appalachian
ballads, fiddle tunes and work songs collected
from well-known musicians as well as everyday
people. They plan to release a full-length album in
March 2015.
PERFORMING ARTS
Image courtesy of Candlelight Pavilion
Performances Monty Pythons Spamalot continue through October 19 at Candlelight Pavilion in Claremont.
A
c c l a i me d
Nigerian au-
thor Chima-
manda Ngozi Adichie,
whose novel Ameri-
canah won the Na-
tional Book Critics
Circle Award and was
named to the New York
Times 10 Best Books
of 2013 list, will be
speaking at Pomona
College on Wednesday, October 1 at
7 p.m. in Bridges Auditorium. This
talk is free and open to the public.
Both social critique and tender
storytelling, Americanah, selected
as Pomonas first-year class book,
is a novel about race, immigration,
love and class, traversing between
Nigeria, the US and Britain.
Ifemelu and Obinze are young and
in love when they depart military-
ruled Nigeria for the West. In
America, Ifemelu is forced to grap-
ple with what it means to be black
for the first time. Obinze hopes to
join her in the US, but post-9/11
America is closed to him, and he is
mired in a dangerous, undocu-
mented life in London. Fifteen
years later, they reunite in a newly
democratic Nigeria and reignite
their passion for each other and
their homeland.
Americanah is witheringly trench-
ant and hugely empathetic, both
worldly and geographically precise, a
novel that holds the dis-
comfiting realities of
our times fearlessly be-
fore us. It never feels
false, writes the New
York Times.
Americanah was
named a Great Reads
book by NPR and won
the Chicago Tribunes
2013 Heartland Prize
for Fiction, among
other honors. It will be
made into a film starring Lupita Ny-
ongo and produced by Brad Pitt.
Adichies work has been trans-
lated into 30 languages and has been
published in The New Yorker,
Granta, The O. Henry Prize Stories,
the Financial Times and Zoetrope,
among other publications. Her pre-
vious novels are the award-winning
Purple Hibiscus and Half of a Yel-
low Sun, and the story collection
The Thing Around Your Neck.
Adichie also is a recipient of a
MacArthur Foundation Fellowship.
She recently appeared on the
cover of Ms. magazine, and Bey-
onc sampled her TED talk, We
Should All Be Feminists, in the
song Flawless.
Each summer, incoming Pomona
students read a first-year class book
before arriving on campus, fol-
lowed by discussions and, in many
cases, a talk from the author.
Bridges Auditorium is located at
450 N. College Way, Claremont.
Award-winning Americanah author
to speak at Pomona College
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 20
COURIER CROSSWORD
Across
1. Like some booms
6. Trace
10. Unrefined
13. "The ___ and the Ecstasy"
by Irving Stone
14. Highest male voice
15. Prepare for publication
17. Mellow brass
19. Domesticate
20. Seafood selection
21. Southeast Asian tongue
22. Tackle
24. Not great, not terrible
25. Sheep's clothing
26. Game the Claremont Club
was originally constructed for
28. Long green
31. Flew for the first time flying
32. ____ do person
33. Law in La Paz
35. Door openers
36. Camera sweep
37. Miss Patsy
39. Puppy bark
40. Prized mushroom
41. Clippers
42. Bleep out
45. Tense
46. "One of ___" (Willa Cather novel)
47. Job
48. Athlete who plays for pay on
a part-time basis
51. Back of a boat
52. Maple is one in Claremont
55. Andy's old radio partner
56. The Claremont Kiwanis are
____ years old as of 2014
59. Collapse
60. It's often part of
cell-phone charges
61. Wed
62. Object or thing
63. Lotus ___
64. Claw
Down
1. Jewel repository
2. Figure in "Jack and the
Beanstalk"
3. Wassailer's song
4. Roadhouse
5. Twisters
6. Exuberant cries
7. UN org concerned with labor
interests, abbr.
8. "OZ's" scarecrow, e.g.
9. Flat boat
10. To relate again
11. Eve's partner
12. Cowardly sort
16. Asian festival
18. Member of Polish sect
23. Moreover
24. High-hatter
26. Gin's partner
27. Abscond
29. Something to go under
30. Any of eight English kings
31. The ___ is the limit!
32. Spending limit
34. Okay!
36. Individual
37. Reddish-brown horse
38. Covertly divulge information
40. Damage
41. Can of worms
43. Sounds
44. Feast
45. St George native
48. Be hardly lively
49. Moslem prince
50. "Shake a leg!"
52. Seed case
53. Kind of power
54. Happy place
57. Info at J.F.K.
58. Letters heard on "CSI"
Crossword by Myles
Mellor. Puzzle #282
Answers to last weeks puzzle #281
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is
a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment.
(909) 445-1200.
Thursdays: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m.
Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: Romantic gui-
tarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m.
Sundays: Mariachi San Pedro. Brunch. 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St.,
Claremont. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday
through Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Sat-
urday. Hoppy Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. (909)
445-8875.
Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros.
Brewery pints.
Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass.
Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the
week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every
month.
Thursdays: All Titos Vodka drinks $2 off and Eu-
reka Thursday Night Music.
THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave.,
Claremont Village.
Open mic night, the last Sunday of every month.
Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30
to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. (909) 624-2928 or folk-
musiccenter.com.
HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St.,
Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday,
5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission:
Two-drink minimum. Info: (909) 447-6700 or hip-
kittyjazz.com.
Friday, September 26: Hobo Jazz. 8 p.m. $5 cover
charge.
Saturday, September 27: Griff Hamlin and the Cir-
cle City Horns. 8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
Sunday, September 28: The Andy Waddell Quintet.
9 p.m.
Tuesday, September 30: Gutter Candy. 9 p.m.
Wednesday, October 1: Open Jam with The Clare-
mont Voodoo Society. 8 p.m.
Thursday, October 2: The Mike Taylor Trio. 7 p.m.
Friday, October 3: The Headcutters. 8 p.m. $5
cover charge.
Saturday, October 4: Lil A and the Allnighters.
8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until
2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21 and over
after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No
cover. (909) 625-4808.
Friday, September 26: Squeakin Wheels (folk). 10 p.m.
Saturday, September 27: The Inciters (soul). 10 p.m.
Sunday, September 28: Piano Sunday with Amy
Rowe at 6 p.m. and Press Karaoke Sunday at 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, September 30: King Trivia Night. 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, October 1: Wine Wednesday with
piano music performed by Joe Atman at 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, October 2: Baldy Mountain Jazz Band.
8:30 p.m. and KSPC Reggae DJ at 11 p.m.
Friday, October 3: Dave Gleason (country/rock).
10 p.m.
PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont.
Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and
Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8
p.m. to 1 a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge on Fri-
days and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge
with student ID). (909) 547-4266.
Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coro-
nas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with
the band.
Wednesdays: Rockstar Karaoke. Rock the mic
or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka
Rockstars. 9 p.m.
NIGHTLIFE
RESTAURANT ROW
CALL MARYTODAY: 621-4761
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 21
COURIER photos/Steven Felschudneff
Claremont fullback Jeremiah Maldonado looks for a hole in the Colts defense during the first quarter of the Wolfpacks rout of visiting Covina Colts on Friday in Clare-
mont. Maldonado had only the one carry during the game but it was good for 41 yards and set up the Packs first touchdown.
T
he Wolfpack beat the Covina
High School Colts, in their third
non-league game, 52-19, at
home on Friday, September 19.
CHS students dressed in white for the
white out theme and gathered in the park-
ing lot for a tailgate before the game.
Some people were eating, others were listening to
music but everyone was just
really excited for the white
out game, senior Emily Spi-
vack said.
With wins against Salesian
and Mountain View, the
Wolfpack worked hard at
their practices to prepare for
the game against Covina.
With the heat, it was diffi-
cult to practice and the sched-
ule was mixed up, senior quarterback Ryan OConnor
said. But we got a good practice in on Wednesday night
and prepared as best as we could.
The Colts kicked off the ball and the Wolfpack imme-
diately showed their fighting spirit, taking the Colts to
their 20-yard line within the first five minutes of the first
quarter. The Wolfpack took the lead with a four-yard rush-
ing touchdown by sophomore running back Duy Tran-
Sampson. CHS was up 7-0 by the end of the first quarter.
Within the first five minutes of the second quarter,
Tran-Sampson scored again by running a seven yard
rushing touchdown to give the Wolfpack a 14-0 lead. The
Colts immediately responded with a long pass that gave
them a 50-yard gain, allowing them to score a touchdown.
Senior tight end Parker Bowman blocked the Colts ad-
ditional point and the Colts were down 14-6.
CHS played with more zeal following the Colts touch-
down and slowly made their way back to the two-yard
line by attacking holes in the Colts defense. Tran-Samp-
son scored another touchdown, putting the Pack ahead,
21-6. The Colts continued to make short passes, only to
be stopped by CHS defenders, forcing them to punt for a
second time. The Pack was back on offense.
With five seconds left in the first half, and CHS on the
35 yard line, quarterback OConnor threw a perfect spi-
ral into the air, and senior wide receiver Jordan Goodrich
sprinted down the right side of the field with a Covina de-
fender chasing him. Once in the end zone, the ball landed
perfectly in Goodrichs hands, and thundering cheers
erupted from the Claremont Crazies. The Wolfpack was
up 28-6 at the end of the first half.
All of the captains told everybody to settle down be-
cause the game wasnt ours yet, Bowman said.
With more intensity than the first half, the Pack had full
control the third quarter. At the 25-yard line, OConnor
threw a 75-yard pass to Goodrich making the game 35-6,
Claremont. CHS defense stopped the Colts, and kicker
Jacob Olesniewicz kicked a field goal at the 35-yard line,
putting CHS far ahead at 38-6.
Unable to get the first down, the Colts attempted to
punt, only to be blocked by junior fullback Markelle
Davis. Senior linebacker James Stephens, also known as
the heavy hitter, picked up the ball and ran it to the end
zone for a defensive touchdown.
A few plays later, freshman linebacker Solomon Tuli-
aupupu scored a defensive touchdown to give Claremont
a 52-6 lead. Covina scored at the end of the third and
fourth quarters, making the final score 52-19, Claremont.
CHS Head Coach Mike Collins said, Our team played
with great intensity all four quarters and our offensive line
opened huge holes all night for our running backs.
CHS will play away tonight, Friday, September 26
against Bell Gardens. They are a very tough, hard-hitting
team and we are expecting a war! Coach Collins said.
Andrew Im
[Editors note: Andrew Im is a senior at Claremont High
School. This is his first year on the Wolfpacket staff. He is an
avid golfer, playing on the schools golf team. KD]
Andrew Im
Pack football continues winning streak against Covina
The CHS defensive line stops a Covina running back behind the line of scrimmage in the second quarter of
Friday nights game. Covina had a hard time moving the ball resulting in a lopsided Claremont victory 52-19.
SPORTS
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 26, 2014 22
A
lthough its still over two months
until the start of basketball season,
the Claremont Wolfpack varsity
and junior varsity squads were in
actionSunday at CHS against Song Sang
High School from Taipei, Taiwan.
The varsity team won by a score of 57-41 and was
led in scoring by sophomore Kyle Scalamini with 13
points and junior Harlan Maass with 10 points. The
junior varsity team lost by a score of 69-63, but was
led in scoring by Dante Dorton, who had a game-high
of 19 points, and Luke McCay with 15 points.
Song Sang is a national championship team thatis
in the midst of a three-weektour ofCalifornia, play-
ing high school teams in preparation for their sea-
son.Coach Stan Tolliver stated that Song Sangs
program is solid, theyrevery well-coached, andthey
havetremendous talent at all positions.They provided
great competition forboth teamsand if they played in
the areawould be highly ranked.
CROSS COUNTRY
The cross country team had great success at the
Woodbridge Invitational on Saturday and in their first
Palomares league meet on Tuesday.
Freshman girls, sophomore girls, junior varsity
girls, sophomore boys, and junior varsity boys all
won the team titles, with more than 50 schools in
each race. Sophomore Jonah Evans was the overall
winner of the boys sophomore race with a time of
15:48 and teammate Owen Bishop placed second a
fraction of a second behind (also scored as 15:48).
Varsity boys placed second in the prestigious
sweepstakes division, finishing behind division 1
powerhouse Great Oak. Led by seniors Adam John-
son at 14:41, Mike Lowrie at 14:43, Jonah Ross at
14:47 and Dylan Powers at 15:10, junior Tom Engle-
bert rounded out our top five at 15:36.As a result, the
team is now ranked number one in CIF Southern Sec-
tion Division 2. Varsity girls placed eleventh in the
sweepstakes race.
The league meet was a great day for Claremont
with all five teams, freshman boys, junior varsity
boys, junior varsity girls, varsity girls and varsity
boys claiming first-place finishes.
In doing so, they defeated Ayala, Bonita, Glendora,
South Hills and Diamond Bar, thus beginning league
competition with a perfect 25-0 record, according to
Coach Rob Lander.
GIRLS VARSITY TENNIS
Girls varsity tennis lost its first Palomares League
match against visiting Ayala Bulldogs on Tuesday by
a score of 12-6, according to Coach Clint Rees. The
junior varsity team, led by Coach Mark Anderson, did
much better against the Bulldogs, winning 14-4 at
Ayala. Next varsity match up will be an away game
against Glendora at 3:15 p.m. on September 30.
WATER POLO
Water polo did not play this week. Their next game
is 11 a.m. Saturday against San Marcos High School
at home.
GIRLS GOLF
Girls golf defeated Hacienda Heights Wilson Tues-
day, 249-264, and are now 3-3 in the Palomares
League. Nicole Curti shot a 44 and Allison Gallegos
shot a 45 to lead the team. The score of 249 is the
lowest all season, reflecting a great effort from all
players.
We have a young team with one freshman and
four sophomores in the starting lineup. They are
peaking at the right time because we are halfway
through league play, said Coach Octavio Hernandez.
GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Results for girls volleyball were not provided to the
COURIER.
Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com
CHS WEEKLY SPORTS ROUND UP
Photo courtesy of Diane Tecotzky
Claremont High School junior Harlan Maass looks to pass the ball during a game against Song Sang High
School recently at CHS. Song Sang, a championship team from Taiwan, is currently on a three-week tour of
California, playing games in advance of the regular basketball season.
SPORTS
Claremont High School is currently ac-
cepting any biographies as donations.
English classes every year have a biogra-
phy project and the schools librarian, Jim
Munsey, reports that CHS is in need of
more books. As the school library strives
to build its collection, they would prefer bi-
ographies, not autobiographies.
Residents with books to donate may
bring them to the Claremont High School
Library during school hours. For more in-
formation, contact Mr. Munsey, teacher
and librarian at Claremont High School, at
(909) 624-9053 ext. 30426 or by email at
jmunsey@cusd.claremont.edu.
COURIERphoto/Steven Felschundneff
CHS running back Duy Tran-Sampson breaks a tackle with the assistance of Caleb Tay-
lor during the Packs romp of visiting Covina High, 52-19. Sophomore Tran Sampson had
an amazing night with 25 carries for 129 yards and three touchdowns.
RENTALS
Cottage For Rent
CLAREMONT cottage for
rent. Sweet home. Two bed-
rooms, 1.75 bathrooms.
Garage, fireplace, enclosed
patio. $1800 monthly. Call
909-273-7516.
Condo For Rent
QUAIL Creek two bedroom,
two bathroom, downstairs
condo. $1400 monthly, $1600
security deposit. Agent, 909-
626-0395.
QUAIL Creek, one bedroom,
one bathroom, large bright
living room with sliders to
deck and storage. Garage,
pool, spa, tennis, security
gated. No smoking. $1150.
Credit check. 951-741-5032.
Office Space For Rent
EXECUTIVE office. Conven-
ient Claremont address. Newly
remodeled interior/exterior.
Fully furnished. 24/7 access.
Conference room. Phone/in-
ternet. Reserved parking. 909-
670-0600 ext.121.
Apartment For Rent
CLAREMONT: Three bed-
room, two bathroom apart-
ment. $1600 monthly. $800
security deposit on approved
credit. 909-624-9958.
House For Rent
WALK to colleges. Foothill,
Mills. Furnished. Hardwood
floors. Large yard. Utlilites,
gardener included. $2250
monthly. CCaporal@aol.com.
THREE bedroom, 1.75 bath-
room house located on W.
Twelfth St. No pets. Water, city
and gardener included. $2100
monthly. 909-626-3757.
Room for Rent
COMFORTABLE house
with big backyard and
pool/Jacuzzi. One room with
full kitchen access and house
privileges. All appliances and
utilities included. $800
monthly. 909-618-8965.
REAL ESTATE
Condo For Sale
QUAIL Creek two bedroom,
two bathroom, move-in ready,
downstairs condo. $225,000.
Agent, 909-626-0395.
Land For Sale
THIRTY-NINE acre self-suffi-
cient ranch, $193 monthly.
Secluded, quiet 6100-ft. north
Arizona ranch. Evergreen
trees, meadowland blend.
Sweeping ridge mountaintop,
valley views. Borders 640
acres of Federal woodlands.
Free well access, loam gar-
den soil, mild climate, camp-
ing and RV okay. $19,900,
$1990 dn, guaranteed financ-
ing. Pictures, maps, weather,
area information. 1st United
800-966-6690. (Cal-SCAN)
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
DRIVERS: Start with our
training or continue your solid
career. You have options!
Company drivers, lease pur-
chase or owner operators
needed! 877-369-7091. cen-
t ral t ruckdri vi ngj obs. com.
(Cal-SCAN)
TRUCK drivers, obtain Class
A-CDL in two-and-a-half
weeks. Company sponsored
training. Also hiring recent
truck school graduates, expe-
rienced drivers. Must be 21 or
older. Call 866-275-2349.
(Cal-SCAN)
ATTENTION: Drivers! New
Kenworth trucks! APU
equipped. Earn up to 50 CPM
plus bonuses! Full benefits.
Pet and rider program.
CDL-A required. 877-258-
8782. www.ad-drivers.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
ALWAYS broke? Be your own
boss! Seeking women 21 and
over! Set your own hours!
Get paid to shop, eat, date
and travel! Free information
passthesugar.com. (Cal-SCAN)
MARKETPLACE
Announcements
IF you or a loved one suffered
a stroke, heart attack or died
after using testosterone sup-
plements you may be entitled
to monetary damages. Call
877-884-5213. (Cal-SCAN)
DID you know that not only
does newspaper media reach
a huge audience, they also
reach an engaged audience?
Discover the power of news-
paper advertising. For a free
brochure call 916-288-6011
or email cecelia@cnpa.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
DID you know seven in 10
Americans or 158 million US
adults read content from news-
paper media each week? Dis-
cover the power of newspaper
advertising. For a free brochure
call 916-288-6011 or email
cecelia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN)
DREAM Workshop Wednes-
days, October 1 to November
12, 4:30 to 6 p.m. at Bud-
dhamouse, 134 Yale, Clare-
mont. $15 per session.
banbury.catherine@gmail.com.
DID you know 144 million US
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the power of newspaper ad-
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call 916-288-6011 or email
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SCAN)
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adoption? Call us first. Living
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and continued support after-
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1-877-879-4709. (Cal-SCAN)
DID you know newspaper-
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call 916-288-6011 or email
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SCAN)
rentals..............23
legals...............27
services...........25
real estate.......29
CLASSIFIEDS
Friday 09-26-14
909.621.4761
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 23
PRICING
Classified:
1-16 words $20.00,
each additional word $1.25
Display Ad:
$10 per column/inch,
3 column minimum
Service Ad:
Please call for pricing.
DEADLINES
Classified:
Wednesday
by noon
Real Estate:
Tuesday by 5 pm
Service Pages:
Tuesday by 5 pm
All new accounts and
Garage Sale ads must be
prepaid. Payment by
cash, check. Credit cards
now accepted.
Sorry no refunds.
Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice.
The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify, revise or
reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error
that may be in your ad immediately. The Courier is not re-
sponsible for any unreported errors after the first publica-
tion. It is the advertisers obligation to verify the accuracy
of his/her ad.
EMPLOYMENT
Administrative Assistant
Well-established financial services firm seeks part-time
administrative assistant for clerical support and of-
fice/client management duties. Experience/education
in customer service, computer skills, record keeping
preferred. Strong organizational skills, self-motivated,
able to work well in a small, family-like environment.
Seeking someone who prefers to work part-time. Some
flexibility in work schedule.
Send resume to J. Fukagawa at 246 N. Indian Hill,
Claremont, CA 91711
Fax: (909) 399-3399
Phone: (909) 624-3949
Public Art Coordinator
Volunteer
The successful candidate will be responsible for administering
the citys Public Art Program, promoting the incorporation of
art within the community, organizing special events, providing
staff support for the Public Art Committee, collecting and de-
veloping information related to public art initiatives within the
community and assisting with other economic development
and community development activities.
The Public Art Program Coordinator plays a pivotal role in lead-
ing the planning, development and implementation of active
public art projects from inception through completion and final
close-out and ensuring the highest quality of commissioned
public art projects.
Additional information about job duties and qualifications are
available on the city website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us. A
completed application is required the position is open until
filled. Equal opportunity employer.
Claremont Chamber of Commerce is looking for an experienced
part-time membership salesperson with a successful record of
achievement to help build the Chambers membership.
Approximately 15-20 hours per week.
Qualities must include:
Self motivated, advanced computer skills in Microsoft Office,
Excel. Excellent communication skills and ability to work well in
a small office.
Send Resume to:
Maureen Aldridge, CEO
Claremont Chamber of Commerce
205 Yale Ave, CA 91711
Or email to
Maureen@claremontchamber.org
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 26, 2014 24
909-621-5626
Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly
and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care serv-
ice, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene,
Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping.
For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available
24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance.
Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114
Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com
Complete Flooring Custom Kitchens & Bathrooms
Showroom in Claremont next to Sprouts
(909) 981-0319
Come see our monthly specials!
SERVICES
HOME IMPROVEMENT HOME IMPROVEMENT HOME IMPROVEMENT
COMPUTERS HEALTH&WELLNESS AUTOMOTIVE
MARKETPLACE
Antiques
A BARN and house full of an-
tiques, furniture and smalls.
Refinishing too! 909-593-
1846. La Verne. Kensolden-
oddities.com.
Donations
DONATE your car, truck or
boat to Heritage for the Blind.
Free three-day vacation, tax
deductible, free towing, all pa-
perwork taken care of. 888-
902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)
MARKETPLACE
Financial
DO you owe over $10,000 to
the IRS or State in back
taxes? Get tax relief now! Call
BlueTax, the nations full serv-
ice tax solution firm. 800-393-
6403. (Cal-SCAN)
REDUCE your past tax bill by
as much as 75 percent. Stop
levies, liens and wage gar-
nishments. Call the Tax Dr.
now to see if you qualify. 1-
800-498-1067.
MARKETPLACE
Financial
ARE you in big trouble with
the IRS? Stop wage and bank
levies, liens and audits, un-
filed tax returns, payroll is-
sues and resolve tax debt
fast. Seen on CNN. A BBB.
Call 1-800-761-5395. (Cal-
SCAN)
IS your identity protected? It
is our promise to provide the
most comprehensive identity
theft prevention and response
products available! Call today
for a 30-day free trial, 1-800-
908-5194. (Cal-SCAN)
Garage Sales
1721 Orangewood, Upland:
Garage and estate sale. Sun-
day, September 28, 7 a.m. to
noon. Everything including
the house!
BULLETINS
Business
DIRECTV starting at $24.95
monthly. Free three months of
HBO, Starz, Showtime and
Cinemax. Free receiver up-
grade! 2014 NFL Sunday
ticket included with select
packages. Some exclusions
apply. Call for details 1-800-
385-9017. (Cal-SCAN)
BULLETINS
Business
AVON: Earn extra income
with a new career! Sell from
home, work, online. $15
startup. For information call,
877-830-2916. (Cal-SCAN)
DISH TV retailer. Starting at
$19.99 a month for 12
months and high speed inter-
net starting at $14.95 a month
(where available). Save! Ask
about same day installation!
Call now! 1-800-357-0810.
(Cal-SCAN)
GET cash loan. Free ap-
proval, no obligation. CA
BRE#00707520. 661-330-2222.
Equity1loans@gmail.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
OWN your own medical alert
company! Be the first and
only distributor in your area!
Unlimited money return.
Small investment required.
Call toll-free 1-844-225-1200.
(Cal-SCAN)
Health
SAFE Step Walk-In Tub alert
for seniors. Bathroom falls
can be fatal. Approved by
Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic jets. Less than four-
inch step-in. Wide door.
Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included.
Call 800-799-4811 for $750
off. (Cal-SCAN)
BULLETINS
Health
LOWEST prices on health
and dental insurance. We
have the best rates from top
companies! Call now! 888-
989-4807. (Cal-SCAN)
BROKEN power wheelchair
or scooter? We will repair
your power wheelchair onsite.
Call for repair, maintenance
or sales for assistance with
your scooter. 888-490-6446.
(Cal-SCAN)
Hotlines
HOUSE of Ruth Domestic Vi-
olence Services. If you have
been abused or beaten by
your intimate partner and
need help for yourself or your
children, please call our 24-
hour hotline, 988-5559.
NAMI HELPLINE National Al-
liance on Mental Illness,
Pomona Valley Chapter, pro-
vides information and referral
in a supportive spirit. Call any
day or time. 399-0305.
PROJECT Sister Sexual As-
sault Crisis Prevention Serv-
ices. If you have been sexu-
ally assaulted or victimized by
child sexual abuse and need
help for yourself or your chil-
dren, call the 24-hour hotline
626-HELP (4357).
BULLETINS
Personals
MEET singles right now! No
paid operators, just real peo-
ple like you. Browse greet-
ings, exchange messages
and connect live. Try it free.
Call now, 1-800-945-3392.
(Cal-SCAN)
ANIMALS
Animal Shelters
Inland Valley
Humane Society
623-9777
Upland Animal Shelter
931-4185
H.O.P.E Upland
1800-811-4285
West End Animal Shelter
947-3517
Free Animal
FREE to a good home: Abby
a 11 year old female
Golden/Sheltie mix. House
broken, micro-chipped. Loves
children, prefers to be the
only dog. Owner moved to LA
and cant keep her. Linda,
909-519-5789.
MARKETPLACE
REALTORS!
Place your ads in the most
widely read real estate
section in the area.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds
Call JESSICA at 621-4761
G
A
R
A
G
E
S
A
L
E
S
Are you having a
garage sale?
Place your ad
in the Claremont
COURIER
Classifieds!
909-621-4761
One BOW WOW of a Yard Sale!
Saturday 27 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
374 Sycamore Ave., Claremont
Stylish dogs and owner parting ways with lots of:
doggy Halloween costumes, doggy life jackets,
tons of plants, rugs and home dcor galore.
Nordstroms womens clothing 8-12, pants 8-12L,
leather shoes size 10. No early birds.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 25
SERVICES
Friday 09-26-14
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acousti-
cal contractor, specializing in
acoustic removal, texture,
painting, acoustic re-spray
and drywall repairs.
Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.
AC/Heating
STEVES HEATING
& Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over
25 years. Repairs all
makes/models. Free
service call with repair.
Free estimate on new units.
MC/Visa. 100 percent
financing. Senior discounts.
Lic.744873
909-985-5254
SAME DAY SERVICE
Free Service Call with Repair
Only $69.50 diagnostic fee
without repair
We repair all brands
SCE Quality Installation
Approved
Great Prices
Friendly Service
909-398-1208
www.novellcustom.com
Lic.958830
Art Lessons
VISUAL artist available for art
and design lessons at our stu-
dio in Upland, CA. Children
and adults. Classes and work-
shops also available. 511 Art
Studio. 909-241-2131.
Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite
authorized dealer.
Bathtubs and sinks.
Showers, tile, countertops.
Refinish - Reglaze - Restore
Porcelain, ceramic,
fiberglass.
Quick and affordable.
Please call 909-945-7775.
www.bath-brite.com
Caregiver
EXPERIENCED, mature care-
giver for hire. Live-in or live-
out. Private, long-term care.
Great references. Joann, 909-
568-4635.
Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to
finish remodeler. Kitchens,
porches, doors, decks, fences,
painting. Lots more! Paul,
909-919-3315.
Cabinet Refacing
Custom Cabinets-
Entertainment Centers-
Fireplace Mantles-
Molding and more.
Lic#900656.
References available.
Free estimates.
909-262-3144
Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service.
Claremont resident serving
Claremont since 1985. Power-
ful truck mounted cleaning
units. Expert carpet repairs
and stretching. Senior dis-
counts. 24-hour emergency
water damage service. Please
call 909-621-1182.
ED EY The Carpet Guy. Car-
pet repairs and re-stretching.
Claremont resident. Free es-
timates. 909-621-1867.
Childcare
YEAR-ROUND program. In-
fant to 12 years. Meals pro-
vided. Monday through Fri-
day, 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Lic.198017727. 909-477-0930.
Chimney Sweep
Quality Fireplace
& BBQ
Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace,
woodstove installation,
service and repair.
Spark arrestor supply
and installation.
Call 909-920-6600
392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney
cleaning. Repairs, chimney
covers, spark arrestors,
masonry and dampers.
BBB. Please call
909-467-9212.
Concrete
JDC CONCRETE
909-624-9000
Driveways/walkways, block
walls, pavers, bricks,
stone veneer,
concrete staining, drainage.
Lic.894245 C8, C29.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
Stamped, broom,
color finishes.
Slate, flagstone, planters,
walls and walkways.
Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area
30 years!
Lic.323243
Contractor
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
New and repairs.
909-599-9530
Serving Claremont
for 30 years!
Lic.323243
WENGER Construction. 25
years experience. Cabinetry,
doors, electrical, drywall, crown
molding. Lic.707381. Compet-
itive pricing! 951-640-6616.
Contractor
PPS General Contractor.
Kitchen and bathroom remod-
eling. Flooring, windows, elec-
trical and plumbing. Serving
Claremont for 25 years.
Lic.846995. 951-237-1547.
KOGEMAN
CONSTRUCTION
Room additions.
Kitchen/bath remodeling.
Custom cabinets.
Residential/commercial.
909-946-8664
Lic.B710309
Visit us on Facebook!
Cooking
Fresh Healthy Food
Personal Chef
Special Diets
Tasty Party Fare
Cooking Classes
Private Lessons
www.LotsaFlavor.com
Chef Linda Heilpern
909-625-9194
Counseling
"INNER Child Healing" with
Joanne Dinsmore, author of
Pathways to the Healing Arts,
having trained at the John
Bradshaw Center. Has spe-
cialized for 20 years in this
creative unique process for
healing the past. Its never to
late to rediscover your true
self, path and purpose. Call
909-946-9098. Visit American
Institute of the Healing
Arts.com for all other services.
Drywall
THOR McAndrew Construc-
tion. Drywall repair and in-
stallation. Interior plaster re-
pair. Free estimates. CA
Lic.742776. Please call 909-
816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.
Electrician
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
Old home rewiring specialist.
24-hour emergency service.
909-982-8910
* Senior Discount *
Lic.359145
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service
changes, repairs, service calls,
outdoor lighting and room addi-
tions. Lic.258436. Call 909-
241-7671, 909-949-8230.
Electrician
SPARKS ELECTRIC
Local electrician for all your
electrician needs!
909-946-8887
Lic.922000
MOR ELECTRIC &
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Free estimates
and senior discounts.
909-989-3454
Residential * Industrial *
Commercial. We do it all.
No job too big or small!
24/7 emergency services.
Reasonable and reliable.
Lic.400-990
30 years experience.
Serving Claremont
Since 1995. Residential,
Commercial.
Recessed lighting and
design, breaker replacement,
service panel upgrades,
ceiling fans, troubleshooting,
landscape lighting, rewires
and LED lighting. Free
estimates. 24-hours emer-
gency service. References.
909-900-8930
909-626-2242
Lic.806149
Fences & Gates
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
New, repairs.
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Business Name
Statement (D.B.A.) is required if
you're in business. You are re-
quired to file and publish a DBA
in the local newspaper. You must
renew your FBNS every five (5)
years. You must file and repub-
lish if any changes have been
made to your business. If your
business is located in LA
COUNTY, The COURIER will
help you file your FBNS with L.A.
County Clerk, publish the state-
ment and provide you with proof
of publication. Fees start at $26
to the County and $95.00 to the
Courier. Notary Public available
to help notarize your Affidavit Of
Identity for your FBNS for an
additional fee. Claremont
COURIER: 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont.
Call Vickie, 621-4761.
Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com.
Taking the time to care for
Courier readers complete
restoration needs since 1965.
La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.
Gardening
THAI'S Gardening Service.
Maintenance: Weekly, bi-
weekly, monthly. Sprinkler sys-
tem repair, installation. Gen-
eral cleanup, planting flowers,
new lawn. Free estimates. Ex-
tra work: Floor and stair instal-
lation. 909-389-8338.
Gardening
Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$2 sq. ft. rebate*
MANUELS Garden Service.
General cleanup. Lawn mainte-
nance, bush trimming, general
maintenance, tree trimming and
removal. Low prices and free
estimates. Please call 909-391-
3495 or 909-239-3979.
Garden Maintenance
Hand-pull weeding, mowing,
trimming, sprinkler work,
monthly service, cleanups
and junk removal.
Free estimates.
David, 909-374-1583
Girl Friday
EXPERIENCED pet-sitter
available. Five plus years car-
ing for animals of all varieties.
Yard care, mail pickup and
dog walking also available.
Call Kristen 909-261-3099.
I'M here to help! Housekeep-
ing, shopping, errands. Senior,
pet, house sitting. Jenny Jones,
909-626-0027, anytime!
DOTWill Do It! A full-service er-
rand business. Dorothy "Dot"
Sheehy. 909-621-9115 or 909-
782-2885. dotwilldoit.com.
Call Working Girls Girlfriend.
Customized services with you
in mind. Light housekeeping,
local errands, light gardening,
dog walking, grocery shop-
ping and food preparation.
Reasonable rates. Free con-
sultation, 909-418-4388.
ATTENTION busy and home-
bound. Let me run your
errands. Sues Errand Service.
Honest, dependable service.
References available. 909-
957-4566.
Handyman
STRACK Construction. Gen-
eral contractor. Handyman
services available. No job too
small. Quality-Affordable.
909-292-5781. Lic#988284.
Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing,
gates, brick block, concrete
cutting, breaking and repair.
25 years in Claremont. Paul,
909-753-5360.
A-HANDYMAN
New and Repairs
Inside, outside, small,
large, home, garage, yard.
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
30 years experience!
Claremont area.
Claremont
Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs,
gates, lighting,
small painting projects.
Odd jobs welcome!
Free consultations.
909-921-6334
HOME Repair by Ken. Local
for 11 years. We can get it
done for you! 909-374-0373.
ODD jobs, small repairs, low
prices. Jim, 951-264-2898.
Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates.
Senior discount!
WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE!
909-382-1210
626-383-1442
sameday-haulaway.com
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Same Day
One call does it all!
Garage, yard, home,
moving!
909-599-9530
Heath
HYPNOTHERAPY: "Past Life
Regressions" are truly fascinat-
ing and quite revealing. Some-
times, when all else fails, a
residual issue from a past life is
the obstacle to healing phobias,
ongoing physical conditions
and unfufillment. A regression
can also reawaken your talent
and direction. Call Joanne
Dinsmore, Author of Pathways
to the Healing Arts, 909-946-
9098. Visit americaninstitute
ofthehealingarts.com.
HEALTH and energy issues?
Try my product. Income
issues? Try my business.
Looking for leader with posi-
tive, entrepreneurial spirit.
Work from home in Claremont.
Call Joyce 951-809-5737.
House Cleaning
20 YEARS experience. Free es-
timates. Excellent references.
Tailored to your individual
needs. Senior care, day or night.
Call Lupe, 909-452-1086.
Established, upbeat,
licensed house cleaning
service. Specializing in
larger homes. Organic
cleaning supplies used.
26 years of experience.
Jeanette 909-224-1180,
909-946-7475.
Shirley's Cleaning Service
28 years in business.
Office/residential
No job too small.
Free estimates.
We do spring cleaning!
909-730-8564
House Cleaning
CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning.
Family owned for 25 years. Li-
censed. Bonded. Senior rates.
Trained professional services
including: baseboards, ovens,
windows. Hauling. Move in/out.
In home care. House/pet sit-
ting. 10 percent discount to
Claremont College faculty.
Robyn, 909-621-3929.
Irrigation
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
24-hour emergency
service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS
EXPERT REPAIRS
DRIP SYSTEM
SPECIALISTS
C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151
909-621-5388
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 Now
Cell: 626-428-1691
Expert Repairs
Retrofit Experts
Ask us how to save water.
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the Area
Since 1983
Landscaping
Dale's Tree &
Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting,
irrigation and yard cleanup.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
GREENWOOD
LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for
complete landscaping,
irrigation, drainage,
designing and gardening.
Lic.520496
909-621-7770
Drought Tolerant and Cali-
fornia Native Design
Water Conserving Irrigation
Lighting and Maintenance
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the Area
Since 1983
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, refurbish or repair.
Design, drainage, concrete,
slate, flagstone, lighting, irri-
gation, decomposed granite.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and De-
sign. Claremont native spe-
cializing in drought tolerant
landscaping, drip systems
and lighting. Artistic solu-
tions for the future. Over 35
years experience. Call:
909-225-8855, 909-982-
5965. Lic.585007.
DANS GARDENING
SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, re-
paired. Clean-up, hauling.
Sod, seed, planting,
lighting, drainage.
Free written estimates.
Insured. References.
Since 1977. Lic.508671.
Please call 909-989-1515
Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$2 sq. ft. rebate*
Learn Japanese
TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani
at the Claremont Forum in
the Packing House. Mon-
day, Tuesday, Wednesday
afternoons/eveni ngs. Al l
l evel s welcome. Excellent
brain exercise for seniors!
909-626-3066.
Martial Arts
KIDS Kung Fu $99/nine
weeks, uniform half-off! Back
to school special. 909-447-
5654. WeiTuoAcademy.com.
Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
BONDED and INSURED
Many references.
Claremont resident.
35 years experience.
Lic.315050
Please call: 909-624-5080,
909-596-4095.
D&D Custom Painting.
Bonded. Lic.423346. Resi-
dential, commercial. Interior
or exterior. Free estimates.
909-982-8024.
Painting
COLLINS Painting & Con-
struction Company, LLC. In-
terior, exterior. Residential
and commercial. Contractors
Lic.384597. 909-985-8484.
KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting,
40 years experience!
Competitive rates.
Small repairs.
No job too small.
References available.
We work our own jobs.
Carrie or Ron
909-615-4858
Lic.778506
STEVE LOPEZ
PAINTING
Extensive preparation.
Indoor, outdoor, cabinets.
Offering odorless green
solution. 33-year master.
Lic.542552
Please call
909-989-9786
AFFORDABLE. Traditional or
green options. Custom work.
No job too big or too small. 20
years of Claremont resident
referrals. Free estimates.
Lic.721041. 909-228-4256.
www.vjpaint.com.
RESIDENTIAL/Commercial.
Quality work at reasonable
prices. Free estimates.
Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.
Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair.
Concrete, masonry, lighting,
planters and retaining walls.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
Pet/House Care
EXPERIENCED house/pet
sitter. Will provide loving
care for house/pets in ex-
change for accommoda-
tions. Two week minimum
and long term. Retired for-
mer resident. Email Kather-
ine, pieplace@boreal.org.
Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas.
Stucco and drywall repair
specialist. Licensed home
improvement. Contractor
Lic.614648. 909-984-6161.
www.wall-doctor.com.
Plumbing
RENES Plumbing and AC. All
types residential repairs,
HVAC, new installation, re-
pairs. Prices to fit the working
familys budget. Lic.454443.
Insured professional service.
909-593-1175.
EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated.
30 plus years experience.
Expert plumbing repairs and
drain cleaning. Water
heaters, faucets, sinks,
toilets, disposals,
under slab lead detection,
sewer video inspection.
Licensed, bonded and
insured. Lic.917874.
909-945-1995
STEVES PLUMBING
24-hour service* Low cost!
Free estimates.
All plumbing repairs.
Complete drain cleaning,
leak detection,
water heaters.
Your local plumber
for over 25 years.
Senior discounts.
Insured, Lic.744873.
* 909-985-5254 *
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
NO JOB TOO BIG
OR SMALL!
24-hour emergency service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing.
Reroofing, repairs of all types.
Free estimates. Quality work.
Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884.
DOMINICS Roofing. Resi-
dential roofing and repairs.
Free estimates. Lic.732789.
Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.
Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell: 626-428-1691
DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install,
repair, automate. Since 1982.
Free estimates. Lic.540042.
Call 909-982-1604.
Sprinklers & Repair
WASTING WATER?
Poor Coverage?
Sprinkler repair.
Installations
and modifications.
C.F. Privett
909-621-5388
Lic.557151
Tile
MASTER tile layer. Quick
and clean. Stone and gran-
ite work. Residential, com-
mercial. Lic.830249. Ray,
909-731-3511.
Regrout, clean, seal, color
grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888-
764-7688.
Tree Care
BAUER TREE CARE
40 plus years
in Claremont.
Pruning of your small
and medium perennials.
909-624-8238
www.bauertreecare.com
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning
and removals. Landscaping,
corrective and restoration
trimming and yard clean up.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
MGT Professional Tree Care.
Providing prompt, dependable
service for all your tree care
needs. Certified arborist.
Lic.#836027. Matt Gray-Trask.
Call 909-946-7444.
TOM Day Tree Service. Fine
pruning of all trees since 1974.
Free estimate. 909-629-6960.
Johnny's Tree Service
Tree trimming
and demolition.
Certified arborist.
Lic.270275, insured.
Please call:
909-946-1123
951-522-0992
Tutoring
NIVER Tutelage. Raise SAT
scores. Improve your grades.
Write more eloquently. Pick
your college. 909-223-1631
Upholstery
PINK UPHOLSTERY
48 years of experience. Up to
30 percent discount on fabric.
Free pickup and delivery.
Please call 909-597-6613.
Weed Abatement
JOHNNY'S Tree Service.
Weed abatement/land clear-
ing. Disking and mowing.
Please call 909-946-1123,
951-522-0992. Lic.270275.
TIRED of dealing with weed
problems on your lot or field?
Help control the problem in an
environmentally safe manner.
To receive loads of quality wood
chips. Please call 909-214-
6773. Tom Day Tree Service.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Weed eating, mowing,
tractor fields,
manual slopes, hauling.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning.
For window washing, call na-
cho, 909-816-2435. Free esti-
mates, satisfaction guaranteed.
Number one in LA County.
26
Claremont COURIER Classifieds
SERVICES
Friday 09-26-14
tax help antiques house cleaning landscaping
pet care roofing elder care computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the
Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 26, 2014 27
APN: 8735-055-030 Trustee Sale No. 1192378-
31 Space Above This Line For Recorders Use
NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE
TRA:008442 REF: CORONA, ENRIQUE
UNVER Property Address: 978 BARCELONA
PL, WALNUT CA 91789-4346 IMPORTANT
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU
ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF
TRUST, DATED October 13, 2005. UNLESS
YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR
PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUB-
LIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANA-
TION OF THE NATURE OF THE
PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU
SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On Octo-
ber 02, 2014, at 9:00am, CAL-WESTERN
RECONVEYANCE LLC, as duly appointed
trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust
recorded October 25, 2005, as Inst. No. 05
2561195, in book XX, page XX, of Official
Records in the office of the County Recorder of
LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFOR-
NIA executed by: ENRIQUE E CORONA A
MARRIED MAN WILL SELL AT PUBLIC
AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR
CASH, CASHIERS CHECK DRAWN ON A
STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK
DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY
A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND
LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIA-
TION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN
SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE
AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN
THIS STATE: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN
LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA,
400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA POMONA
CALIFORNIA all right, title and interest con-
veyed to and now held by it under said Deed of
Trust in the property situated in said County and
State described as: COMPLETELY DE-
SCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The
street address and other common designation, if
any, of the real property described above is pur-
ported to be: 978 BARCELONAPLWALNUT
CA 91789-4346 The undersigned Trustee dis-
claims any liability for any incorrectness of the
street address and other common designation, if
any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but
without covenant or warranty, express or im-
plied, regarding title, possession, condition, or
encumbrances, including fees, charges and ex-
penses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by
said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining princi-
pal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of
Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of
the obligation secured by the property to be sold
and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and ad-
vances at the time of the initial publication of the
Notice of Sale is: $878,843.36. If the Trustee is
unable to convey title for any reason, the suc-
cessful bidders sole and exclusive remedy
shall be the return of monies paid to the
Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have
no further recourse. The beneficiary under said
Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered
to the undersigned a written Declaration of De-
fault and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice
of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned
caused said Notice of Default and Election to
Sell to be recorded in the county where the real
property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL
BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on
this property lien, you should understand that
there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee
auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the
property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee
auction does not automatically entitle you to free
and clear ownership of the property. You should
also be aware that the lien being auctioned off
may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bid-
der at the auction, you are or may be responsible
for paying off all liens senior to the lien being
auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to
the property. You are encouraged to investigate
the existence, priority, and size of outstanding
liens that may exist on this property by contact-
ing the county recorders office or a title insur-
ance company, either of which may charge you a
fee for this information. If you consult either of
these resources, you should be aware that the
same lender may hold more than one mortgage
or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO
PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on
this notice of sale may be postponed one or more
times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a
court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California
Civil Code. The law requires that information
about trustee sale postponements be made
available to you and to the public, as a courtesy
to those not present at the sale. If you wish to
learn whether your sale date has been post-
poned, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time
and date for the sale of this property, you may
call (619)590-1221 or visit the Internet Web
Site WWW.DLPPLLC.COM using the file
number assigned to this case 1192378-31. In-
formation about postponements that are very
short in duration or that occur close in time to
the scheduled sale may not immediately be re-
flected in the telephone information or on the
Internet Web Site. The best way to verify post-
ponement information is to attend the sched-
uled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION:
(619)590-1221 CAL-WESTERN RECON-
VEYANCE LLC 525 EAST MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 22004 EL CAJON CA 92022-9004
Dated: August 21, 2014 CAL-WESTERN RE-
CONVEYANCE LLC By: Authorized Signa-
ture (DLPP-439586 09/12/14, 09/19/14,
09/26/14)
APN: 8704-021-101 TS No: CA05000736-14-1
TO No: 8419620 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S
SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST DATED February 6, 2002.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT
YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A
PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA-
NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PRO-
CEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD
CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 7, 2014 at
09:00 AM, behind the fountain located in Civic
Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona
CA 91766, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee
Corps, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and
pursuant to the power of sale contained in that
certain Deed of Trust recorded on February 12,
2002, as Instrument No. 02 0332766, of official
records in the Office of the Recorder of Los An-
geles County, California, executed by ROBERT
SUAREZ, A SINGLE MAN , as Trustor(s), in
favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGIS-
TRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. as Ben-
eficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO
THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the
United States, all payable at the time of sale, that
certain property situated in said County, Califor-
nia describing the land therein as: AS MORE
FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF
TRUST The property heretofore described is
being sold as is. The street address and other
common designation, if any, of the real property
described above is purported to be: 510
GOLDEN SPRINGS DRIVE, #E, DIAMOND
BAR, CA 91765-1459 The undersigned Trustee
disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the
street address and other common designation, if
any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without
covenant or warranty, express or implied, regard-
ing title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the
remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured
by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as
provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under
the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the
trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total
amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations
secured by the property to be sold and reasonable
estimated costs, expenses and advances at the
time of the initial publication of this Notice of
Trustees Sale is estimated to be $115,714.55 (Es-
timated). However, prepayment premiums, ac-
crued interest and advances will increase this
figure prior to sale. Beneficiarys bid at said sale
may include all or part of said amount. In addi-
tion to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashiers
check drawn on a state or national bank, a check
drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check
drawn by a state or federal savings and loan as-
sociation, savings association or savings bank
specified in Section 5102 of the California Fi-
nancial Code and authorized to do business in
California, or other such funds as may be accept-
able to the Trustee. In the event tender other than
cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the is-
suance of the Trustees Deed Upon Sale until
funds become available to the payee or endorsee
as a matter of right. The property offered for sale
excludes all funds held on account by the prop-
erty receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is un-
able to convey title for any reason, the successful
bidders sole and exclusive remedy shall be the
return of monies paid to the Trustee and the suc-
cessful bidder shall have no further recourse. No-
tice to Potential Bidders If you are considering
bidding on this property lien, you should under-
stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a
Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not
on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a
Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you
to free and clear ownership of the property. You
should also be aware that the lien being auctioned
off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bid-
der at the auction, you are or may be responsible
for paying off all liens senior to the lien being
auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to
the property. You are encouraged to investigate
the existence, priority, and size of outstanding
liens that may exist on this property by contacting
the county recorder's office or a title insurance
company, either of which may charge you a fee
for this information. If you consult either of these
resources, you should be aware that the same
Lender may hold more than one mortgage or
Deed of Trust on the property. Notice to Property
Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of
Sale may be postponed one or more times by the
Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pur-
suant to Section 2924g of the California Civil
Code. The law requires that information about
Trustee Sale postponements be made available to
you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not
present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether
your sale date has been postponed, and, if appli-
cable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale
of this property, you may call Priority Posting
and Publishing at 714-573-1965 for information
regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet
Web site address listed below for information re-
garding the sale of this property, using the file
number assigned to this case, CA05000736-14-1.
Information about postponements that are very
short in duration or that occur close in time to the
scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected
in the telephone information or on the Internet
Web site. The best way to verify postponement
information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date:
September 2, 2014 MTC Financial Inc. dba
Trustee Corps TS No. CA05000736-14-1 17100
Gillette Ave Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300
Joseph Barragan, Authorized Signatory SALE
INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON
LINE AT www.priorityposting.com FOR AU-
TOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE
CALL: Priority Posting and Publishing AT 714-
573-1965 MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps
MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR
ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY
INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED
FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1110751 9/12, 9/19,
09/26/2014
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No.:
9448-4313 TSG Order No.: 1602239 A.P.N.:
8304-003-025 NOTE: THERE IS A SUM-
MARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS
DOCUMENT ATTACHED (The above state-
ment is made pursuant to CA Civil Code Sec-
tion 2923.3(c)(1). The Summary will be
provided to Trustor(s) and/or vested owner(s)
only, pursuant to CA Civil Code Section
2923.3(c)(2).) YOU ARE IN DEFAULT
UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED
02/15/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION
TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY
BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NA-
TURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST
YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A
LAWYER. NBS Default Services, LLC, as the
duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to
the power of sale contained in that certain Deed
of Trust Recorded 02/25/2005 as Document
No.: 05 0431875, of Official Records in the of-
fice of the Recorder of Los Angeles County,
California, executed by: BARBARA A
SHAVER, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as
Trustor, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION
TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH
(payable in full at time of sale by cash, a
cashier's check drawn by a state or national
bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit
union, or a check drawn by a state or federal
savings and loan association, savings associa-
tion, or savings bank specified in section 5102
of the Financial Code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state). All right, title and interest
conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed
of Trust in the property situated in said County
and state, and as more fully described in the
above referenced Deed of Trust. Sale Date and
Time: 10/28/2014 at 09:00 AM Sale Location:
Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, Vine-
yard Ballroom, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Nor-
walk, CA 90650 The street address and other
common designation, if any, of the real prop-
erty described above is purported to be: 1154
BRIARCROFT ROAD, CLAREMONT, CA
91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any
liability for any incorrectness of the street ad-
dress and other common designation, if any,
shown herein. Said sale will be made in an "AS
IS" condition, but without covenant or war-
ranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, pos-
session, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining
principal sum of the note(s) secured by said
Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as pro-
vided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the
terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the
trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit:
$419,112.67 (Estimated). Accrued interest and
additional advances, if any, will increase this
figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the time
of sale the opening bid may be less than the
total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTEN-
TIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bid-
ding on this property lien, you should
understand that there are risks involved in bid-
ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on
a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the
highest bid at a trustee auction does not auto-
matically entitle you to free and clear owner-
ship of the property. You should also be aware
that the lien being auctioned off may be a jun-
ior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auc-
tion, you are or may be responsible for paying
off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned
off, before you can receive clear title to the
property. You are encouraged to investigate the
existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens
that may exist on this property by contacting the
county recorder's office or a title insurance
company, either of which may charge you a fee
for this information. If you consult either of
these resources, you should be aware that the
same lender may hold more than one mortgage
or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO
PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on
this notice of sale may be postponed one or
more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of
the California Civil Code. The law requires that
information about trustee sale postponements
be made available to you and to the public, as a
courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has been
postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled
time and date for the sale of this property, you
may call, 1-800-280-2832 for information re-
garding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet
Web site, www.auction.com, for information re-
garding the sale of this property, using the file
number assigned to this case, T.S.# 9448-4313.
Information about postponements that are very
short in duration or that occur close in time to
the scheduled sale may not immediately be re-
flected in the telephone information or on the
internet Web site. The best way to verify post-
ponement information is to attend the scheduled
sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for
any reason, the successful bidder's sole and ex-
clusive remedy shall be the return of monies
paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder
shall have no further recourse. NBS Default
Services, LLC 301 E. Ocean Blvd. Suite 1720
Long Beach, CA 90802 800-766-7751 For
Trustee Sale Information Log On To: www.auc-
tion.com or Call: 1-800-280-2832. NBS De-
fault Services, LLC, Nicole Rodriguez,
Foreclosure Associate This communication is
an attempt to collect a debt and any information
obtained will be used for that purpose. How-
ever, if you have received a discharge of the
debt referenced herein in a bankruptcy pro-
ceeding, this is not an attempt to impose per-
sonal liability upon you for payment of that
debt. In the event you have received a bank-
ruptcy discharge, any action to enforce the debt
will be taken against the property only. A-
4486850 09/26/2014, 10/03/2014, 10/10/2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014252522
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
SOME CRUST BAKERY, 119 Yale Ave., Clare-
mont, CA91711. Registrant(s): THE FEEMSTER
CO., INC., 119 Yale Ave., Claremont, CA91711.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 12/01/1997.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Lawrence Carlton Feemster Title: President
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
09/08/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally ex-
pires at the end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk,
except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section
17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in
the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section
17913 other than a change in the residence address of
a registered owner. Anew Fictitious Business Name
Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effec-
tive January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business Name
Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of
Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself author-
ize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name
in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 12, 19, 26 and October 3, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014201242
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as THE AWV STUDIO OF VOICE AND LAN-
GUAGE, AWV STUDIOS, 226 W. Foothill
Blvd., Ste. C, Claremont, CA 91711. Regis-
trant(s): Amanda Marie Workman, 250 College
Park Drive, Apt. O34, Upland, CA 91786.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious name or names listed above on
06/16/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Amanda Marie Workman Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 08/27/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gen-
erally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the state-
ment pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name State-
ment must be filed before the expiration. Effec-
tive January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Af-
fidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 12, 19, 26 and October 3, 2014
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE
AND OF INTENTION TO TRANSFER AL-
COHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE(S)
(UCC Sec. 6105 et seq. and B & PSec. 24073 et seq.)
Escrow No. C130009
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale of
assets and a transfer of alcoholic beverage li-
cense(s) is about to be made. The name(s) and
business address(es) of the Seller(s)/Licensee(s)
are: HIP KITTY INC, 502 WEST 1ST ST,
CLAREMONT, CA 91711
Doing Business as: HIP KITTY JAZZ & FON-
DUE LOUNGE
All other business names(s) and address(es) used
by the seller(s)/licensee(s) within the past three
years, as stated by the seller(s)/licensee(s), is/are:
The name(s) and address(es) of the buyer(s)/ap-
plicant(s) is/are: WHISPER HOUSE LLC, 1135
FALLEN LEAF RD, ARCADIA, CA 91006
The assets being sold are generally described as:
EQUIPMENT, FURNISHINGS, FURNITURE,
FIXTURES and are located at: 502 WEST 1ST
ST, CLAREMONT, CA 91711
The type of license(s) and license no(s) to be
transferred is/are: Type: ON SALE GENERAL
EATING PLACE License No. 47-448065 And
are now issued for the premises located at: 502
WEST 1ST ST, CLAREMONT, CA 91711
The bulk sale and transfer of alcoholic beverage
license(s) is/are intended to be consummated at
the office of: WFG NATIONAL TITLE INSUR-
ANCE CO, 18881 VON KARMAN AVE, STE
500, IRVINE, CA 92612 and the anticipated date
of sale/transfer is OCTOBER 20, 2014
The purchase price or consideration in connec-
tion with the sale of the business and transfer of
the license, is the sum of $480,000.00, including
inventory, estimated at $.00, which consists of
the following: DESCRIPTION, AMOUNT:
CASH $360,000.00; PROMISSORY NOTE
$120,000.00
It has been agreed between the seller(s)/li-
censee(s) and the intended buyer(s)/applicant(s),
as required by Sec. 24073 of the Business and
Professions code, that the consideration for trans-
fer of the business and license is to be paid only
after the transfer has been approved by the De-
partment of Alcoholic Beverage Control.
Dated: 09/14/14
HIP KITTY INC, Seller(s)/Licensee(s)
WHISPER HOUSE LLC, Buyer(s)/Applicant(s)
LA1458813 CLAREMONT COURIER 9/26/14
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014244957
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as THE IVY HOUSE ANTIQUES, 214 W.
Foothill Blvd,, Claremont, CA 91711. Regis-
trant(s): Lisa Marie Schlick, 405 Grinnell Drive,
Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious name or names listed above on
08/02/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Lisa Marie Schlick Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 08/28/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gen-
erally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the state-
ment pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name State-
ment must be filed before the expiration. Effec-
tive January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Af-
fidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 12, 19, 26 and October 3, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014236600
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
MAJIKL HAIR, 655 West Arrow Highway, Suite
13, San Dimas, CA91773. Mailing address: 1822
East Route 66, # 249, Glendora, CA91740. Regis-
trant(s): Cheryl Ann Widmeier, 1822 East Route 66,
Glendora, CA91740.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Cheryl Ann Widmeier Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/CountyClerkofLosAngelesCountyon08/20/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally ex-
pires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except,
as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where
it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth
in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than
a change in the residence address of a registered
owner. Anew Fictitious Business Name Statement
must be filed before the expiration. Effective January
1, 2014, the Fictitious Business Name Statement must
be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself author-
ize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name
in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 19, 26, October 3 and 10, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014257195
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as CHEESE CAVE, CLAREMONT CHEESE,
325 Yale Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Regis-
trant(s): CHEESE CAVE LLC, 325 Yale Ave.,
Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by a Limited Liabil-
ity Company.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 06/18/2010.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Ashley Marnie Clarke Title: Managing Member
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 09/12/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally
expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk,
except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section
17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in
the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to sec-
tion 17913 other than a change in the residence ad-
dress of a registered owner. A new Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be filed before the
expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be accompanied by
the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself author-
ize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name
in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 19, 26, October 3 and 10, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014248629
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as INDIAN HILL SHELL, 747 South Indian
Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s):
Andrew Martin Kayba, 747 South Indian Hill
Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious name or names listed above on 07/01/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Andrew Martin Kayba Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 09/03/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gen-
erally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the state-
ment pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name State-
ment must be filed before the expiration. Effec-
tive January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Af-
fidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 12, 19, 26 and October 3, 2014
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
LEGAL TENDER
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 26, 2014 28
County of Los Angeles
Department of the Treasurer
and Tax Collector
Notice of Divided Publication
Pursuant to Sections 3702,
3381, and 3382, Revenue and
Taxation Code, the Notice of Sale of Tax De-
faulted Property Subject to the Power of Sale in
and for the County of Los Angeles, State of Cal-
ifornia has been divided and distributed to vari-
ous newspapers of general circulation published
in said County for publication of a portion
thereof, in each of the said newspapers.
Public Auction Notice (R&TC 3702)
Of Sale Of Tax-Defaulted Property Subject To
The Power Of Sale (Sale No. 2014A)
Whereas, on June 17, 2014, I, MARK J. SAL-
ADINO, Treasurer and Tax Collector, was di-
rected by the Board of Supervisors of Los
Angeles County, State of California, to sell at
public auction certain tax-defaulted properties
which are Subject to the Power of Sale. Public
notice is hereby given that unless said properties
are redeemed prior thereto, I will, on Monday,
October 20, 2014, and Tuesday, October 21,
2014, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at the Fairplex Los
Angeles County Fairgrounds, 1101 W. McKinley
Avenue, Building 5, Pomona, California, offer for
sale and sell said properties at public auction to
the highest bidder for cash or cashier's check in
lawful money of the United States for not less
than the minimum bid. If no bids are received on
a parcel, it will be re-offered at the end of the pub-
lic auction at a reduced minimum price.
The minimum bid for each parcel is the total
amount necessary to redeem, plus costs, as re-
quired by Section 3698.5 of the Revenue and Tax-
ation Code.
Following the public auction, unless redeemed
prior thereto, I will re-offer for sale and sell unim-
proved properties that remain unsold at the end of
the public auction beginning Monday, November
17, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. (PT) and will run contin-
uously until Wednesday, November 19, 2014, at
12:00 p.m. (PT) at online auction at www.bid4as-
sets.com/losangeles.
Prospective bidders should obtain detailed infor-
mation of this sale from the County Treasurer and
Tax Collector. Pre-registration and a $5,000 de-
posit in the form of cash, cashier's check or bank
issued money order is required at the time of reg-
istration. No personal checks, two-party checks
or business checks will be accepted for registra-
tion. Registration will be from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m., beginning Monday, September 15, 2014, at
the Treasurer and Tax Collector's Office located at
225 North Hill Street, Room 130, Los Angeles,
California, and will end Friday, October 3, 2014,
at 5:00 p.m.
If the property is sold, parties of interest, as de-
fined by Section 4675 of the Revenue and Taxa-
tion Code, have a right to file a claim with the
County for any proceeds from the sale, which are
in excess of the liens and costs required to be paid
from the proceeds. If excess proceeds result from
the sale, notice will be given to parties of inter-
est, pursuant to law.
All information concerning redemption, provided
the right to redeem has not previously been ter-
minated, will upon request be furnished by
MARK J. SALADINO, Treasurer and Tax Col-
lector.
According to law, if redemption of the property
is not made by the close of business on the last
business day prior to the first day of auction, Fri-
day October 17, 2014, at 5:00 p.m., the property
will be offered for sale. If the property is not sold
at the public auction, the right of redemption will
revive and remain until Friday, November 14,
2014, at 5:00 p.m. If the property is not redeemed
by Friday, November 14, 2014, at 5:00 p.m., it
will be scheduled for the follow-up online auc-
tion as indicated above.
The Assessor's Identification Number (AIN) in
this publication refers to the Assessor's Map
Book, the Map Page, and the individual Parcel
Number on the Map Page. If a change in the AIN
occurred, both prior and current AINs are shown.
An explanation of the parcel numbering system
and the maps referred to are available from the
Office of the Assessor located at 500 West Tem-
ple Street, Room 225, Los Angeles, California
90012.
A list explaining the abbreviations used in this
publication is on file in the Office of the Treas-
urer and Tax Collector, 225 North Hill Street,
Room 130, Los Angeles, California 90012, or
telephone 1(213) 974-2045.
I certify under penalty of perjury that the forego-
ing is true and correct. Executed at Los Angeles,
California, on August 26, 2014.
MARK J. SALADINO
Los Angeles County
Treasurer and Tax Collector
State of California
The real property that is subject to this notice is situ-
ated in the County of Los Angeles, State of Califor-
nia, and is described as follows:
PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE OF SALE OF TAX-
DEFAULTED PROPERTY SUBJECT TO THE
POWER OF SALE(SALE NO. 2014A)
5488 AIN 8315-029-025 ARTER,MARGARET H
LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES
$46,913.00
5809 AIN 8669-010-011 CANNING,HELEN R
AND MC CABE,MICHAEL M LOCATION
COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $1,698.00
5810 AIN 8670-025-028 HABOUD,ALMALO-
CATION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $2,760.00
5812 AIN 8671-036-053 DIALO,BOUBAKARY
LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES
$10,300.00
5816 AIN 8675-012-014 TOBIAS JENNIFER LO-
CATION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $1,376.00
5817 AIN 8675-012-023 SEPS,MERRILL M
DECD EST OF LOCATION COUNTY OF LOS
ANGELES $1,372.00
5818 AIN 8678-019-012 SEAVER,RICHARD C
EXEC SEAVER,BYRON D DECD EST OF C/O
NORTHERN TRUST NA REAL EST D LOCA-
TION COUNTYOF LOS ANGELES $39,011.00
CN903389
Publish: September 19, 26 and October 3, 2014
NOTICE OFPUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the
Municipal Code of the City of Claremont and the
California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the
Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing
to consider a variance request for a home located at
220 West 11th Street in Claremont. The variance
(File #14-V02) would to allow 505 square feet of ad-
ditional floor area to be constructed without requir-
ing the existing one-car garage to be expanded to
two-car capacity as required by the code.
The Claremont Planning Commission will conduct
the public hearing on Tuesday, October 7, 2014,
at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber, 225 W.
Second Street, at which time all interested persons
are invited to appear and be heard.
NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Director
of Community Development has determined that
the Variance for the proposed use is categorically
exempt from the provisions of the California En-
vironmental Quality Act pursuant to Section 15301
(e)(1) in that the project consists of a minor addi-
tion to an existing structure that will not result in an
increase in more than either 50% of the existing
floor area or 2,500 square feet. Therefore, no fur-
ther environmental review is necessary.
Copies of the application and proposed plans are
available at the Planning Division, Claremont City
Hall, 207 Harvard Avenue, Monday through Thurs-
day, from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. For more infor-
mation on the proposal, please contact Principal
Planner Chris Veirs at (909) 399-5486, or send
written comments to P.O. Box 880, Claremont, CA
91711-0880.
Finally, in compliance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act of 1990, any person with a disability
who requires a modification or accommodation in
order to participate in a City meeting should contact
the City Clerk at (909) 399 5461 VOICE or (800)
735-2929 TT/TTY at least three (3) working days
prior to the meeting, if possible.
PLANNING COMMISSION
CITYOF CLAREMONT
Publish: September 26, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014265123
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
SLENDERIQUE, NATURALTRIMWELLNESS,
919 Mullaghboy Rd., Glendora, CA91741. Regis-
trant(s): Kara L. Michalsen, 919 Mullaghboy Rd.,
Glendora, CA91741.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Kara L. Michalsen Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 09/19/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gen-
erally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the state-
ment pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name State-
ment must be filed before the expiration. Effec-
tive January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Af-
fidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: September 26, October 3, 10 and 17, 2014
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER:
(Nmero del Caso):
CIVDS1401559
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT:
(AVISO ALDEMANDADO):
(SOLO PARAUSO DE LACORTE)
FERNANDO FLORES, DOES 1 TO 20, IN-
CLUSIVE
YOU ARE BEING SUED BYPLAINTIFF:
(LO EST DEMANDANDO EL DEMAN-
DANTE):
MERCURYCASUALTYINSURANCECOMPANY
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may de-
cide against you without your being heard unless you
respond within 30 days. Read the information
below.
You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this sum-
mons and legal papers are served on you to file a
written response at this court and have a copy served
on the plaintiff. Aletter or phone call will not protect
you. Your written response must be in proper legal
form if you want the court to hear your case. There
may be a court form that you can use for your re-
sponse. You can find these court forms and more in-
formation at the California Courts Online Self-Help
Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county
law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you can-
not pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee
waiver form. If you do not file your response on time,
you may lose the case by default, and your wages,
money, and property may be taken without further
warning from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You may
want to call an attorney right away. If you do not
know an attorney, you may want to call an attor-
ney referral service. If you cannot afford an attor-
ney, you may be eligible for free legal services
from a nonprofit legal services program. You can
locate these nonprofit groups at the California
Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifor-
nia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help
Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by con-
tacting your local court or county bar association.
NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived
fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration
award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court's lien must be paid before the court will dis-
miss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro
de 30 das, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin
escuchar su versin. Lea la informacin a
continuacin.
Tiene 30 DAS DE CALENDARIO despus de
que le entreguen esta citacin y papeles legales
para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta
corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al deman-
dante. Una carta o una llamada telefnica no lo
protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar
en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su
caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formula-
rio que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede
encontrar estos formularios de la corte y ms in-
formacin en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de
California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca
de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede
ms cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de pre-
sentacin, pida al secretario de la corte que le d un
formulario de exencin de pago de cuotas. Si no
presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el
caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podr quitar
su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin ms advertencia.
Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que
llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a
un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisin
a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es
posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener
servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos
grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de Califor-
nia Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en
el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.sucorte.ca.gov) o ponindose en contacto con
la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas
y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre
cualquier recuperacin de $10,000 ms de valor
recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesin de
arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que
pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte
pueda desechar el caso.
CASE NUMBER: CIVDS1401559
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccin de la corte es):
Superior Court Of California,
County Of San Bernardino,
San Bernardino Division
303 West 3rd Street
San Bernardino, CA92415
The name, address, and telephone number of plain-
tiff's attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is:
(El nombre, la direccin y el nmero de telfono del
abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no
tiene abogado, es):
Mark R. Nivinskus, Bar No.195335
Nivinskus Law Group, ALaw Corporation
134 W. Wilshire Ave.
Fullerton, CA92832
(714) 533-8110
Date: February 4, 2014
Clerk, by Vivian L. Santillanes, Deputy (Adjunto)
Publish: September 26, October 3,10 and 17, 2014
NOTICE OFOSC
RE: SERVICE COMPLETION
Case No. CIVDS1401559
MERCURY CASUALTY INSURANCE
COMPANY, Plaintiff,
vs.
FERNANDO FLORES, et al., Defendant
Superior Court Of California,
San Bernardino County,
San Bernardino Division
Date: 12-18-2014, Division: S30, Time: 8:30 A.M.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an OSC re:
Service Completion has been scheduled for the time
and place noted above.
Nivinskus Law Group, ALC
/s/ Mark R. Nivinskus, Bar No. 195335
Attorney For Plaintiff
Nivinskus Law Group, ALaw Corporation
134 W. Wilshire Ave.
Fullerton, CA92832
(714) 533-8110
Attorneys for Plaintiff, Our File No.: 13002618
Dated: September 8, 2014
Publish: September 26, October 3, 10 and 17, 2014
STORMWATER AND RUNOFFPOLLUTION
CONTROLORDINANCE
SUMMARYOFORDINANCE NO. 2014-06
INTRODUCED ATTHE SPECIALCITY
COUNCILMEETING OFSEPTEMBER 9, 2014
AND ADOPTED ATREGULAR CITYCOUN-
CILMEETING OFSEPTEMBER 23, 2014
(Full text of this ordinance is on file in the office
of the City Clerk)
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL
OF THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, CALI-
FORNIA, AMENDING CHAPTER 16.148 OF
THE CLAREMONT MUNICIPAL CODE
REGARDING PUBLIC ART. APPLICANT -
CITY OF CLAREMONT
As part of the Public Art Master Plan Process,
the Citys Public Art Ordinance, Chapter 16.148
of the Claremont Municipal Code is proposed
to be updated to provide clearer direction on the
administration of the Public Art Program. Some
of the changes to the ordinance include chang-
ing the title from Community Art Program to
Public Art Program, as well as the addition of
definitions for key terms that are used through-
out the document. The title Public Art Pro-
gram was selected because the ordinance is
specific to public art. Community art pro-
grams typically refer to a comprehensive arts
and culture program that embraces and supports
both public and private efforts.
THE FOLLOWING IS A SUMMARY OF
THE ABOVE TITLED ORDINANCE:
Establishes a Public Art Committee, consist-
ing of 7 members appointed by the City Coun-
cil to provide expert advice regarding the Public
Art Program policies and procedures, artist se-
lection, review panels, artwork review,
processes for development projects, and main-
tenance and conservation of artwork.
Establishes the requirement that ten percent of
the value of all new public art projects with a
required artwork valuation of $20,000 or greater
be deposited into a Public Art Fund for future
maintenance and implementation of the Public
Art Program.
Establishes policies for the gifts and loans of
artwork, as well as the deaccession of artwork.
Provides minor adjustments to the public art
requirements for the process for reviewing pub-
lic art for new development projects.
Revises the Architectural Commissions role
in reviewing public art for new development
projects.
Assigns responsibility to the City Manager, or
his designee, for the administration of the Pub-
lic Art Program.
Clarifies the process for the approval of pub-
lic art for new development.
Expands the requirement for maintenance and
replacement of public art for new development.
Revises the eligible uses for the Public Art Fund.
Requires the creation of an annual Public Art
Workplan developed by the Public Art Committee.
STATE OF CALIFORNIA )
COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES ) ss.
CITY OF CLAREMONT )
I, Shelley Desautels, City Clerk of the City of
Claremont, County of Los Angeles, State of
California, hereby certify that the foregoing Or-
dinance No. 2014-06 was introduced at a spe-
cial meeting of said council held on the 9h day
of September, 2014, that it was regularly passed
and adopted by said city council, signed by the
Mayor, and attested by the City Clerk of said
city, all at a regular meeting of said Council
held on the 23rd day of September, 2014, and
that the same was passed and adopted by the
following vote:
AYES:Councilmembers:
Calaycay, Lyons, Nasiali
NOES: Councilmembers: None
ABSENT: Councilmembers: Pedroza, Schroeder
ABSTAINED: Councilmembers: None
__________________________________
City Clerk of the City of Claremont
Publish: September 26, 2014
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
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Claremont COURIER Classifieds 29
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classified@claremont-courier.com
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Top 10 reasons why the COURIER is a great investment
C
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Claremont
claremont-courier.com
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WHY SUBSCRIBE?
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PREMIUM UPSCALE CLAREMONT
VILLAGE WALK END UNIT TOWNHOME
$550,000
Newly built in 2007 and best oriented end unit
townhome in the community. Downtown Claremont.
Walk to the Village, theatre, restaurants, shopping
and Metrolink. (H120)
Geoff Hamill
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com - 909.621.0500
PRESTIGIOUS PADUA HILLS
HILLSIDE VIEW ESTATE - $1,100,000
Enjoy picturesque valley, mountain,
and canyon views from this beautiful newer built
semi-custom Craftsman style residence
quietly nestled in famed locale among
the Claremont foothills. (V4368)
Geoff Hamill
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com - 909.621.0500
1527 SPYGLASS DRIVE,UPLAND
UPLAND HILLS ESTATES
Resort style living on the golf course. New hardwood, cork floors,
fixtures, LED lighting and freshly painted interior. Three bedrooms,
three bathrooms, 2194 sq. ft. Spacious patio overlooking the fairway
and mountain views. Community, pools and tennis courts.
HOA dues $325 per month. (S1527)
Bernadette Kendall
Bernadette.Kendall@sothebysrealty.com - 909.670.1717
TRADITIONAL ELEGANT
GARY MILLER HOME
1740 BRENTWOOD AVE.,
UPLAND - $650,000
You will find traditional elegance in this Gary Miller built home.
Rich wood accents, soaring ceilings, remodeled kitchen,
three fireplaces and a pool. (B1740)
Jeannette Ewing
jeannette@realtyagent.com - 909.670.0322
LOVELY NORTHTOWNE PARKTOWNHOUSE
CLAREMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT
640 PARKWOOD LANE,POMONA - $310,000
Light and bright three bedrooms, two-and-a-half bathrooms, has
large master with walk-in closet. Beautiful grounds with lush
greenbelts, association pool and spa.Walk to schools, shopping,
transportation and eateries.A rare find in Pomona. (P640)
Eurydice Turk
eurydice@eurydiceturk.com - 909.730.1901
POMONA ADDRESS
CLAREMONT SCHOOL DISTRICT
481 BERRIAN ST.,POMONA $535,000
Claremont schools. Impeccably maintained Gold Medallion all
electric home.A private cul-de-sac setting with approximately
13,000 sq. ft. lot. Four bedrooms, two-and-a-half bathrooms and
an open kitchen to the family room. (B481)
Jeannette Ewing
jeannette@realtyagent.com - 909.670.0322
Susan Emerson
909.447.7710
Jeannette Ewing
909.670.0322
Diane Fox
909.447.7709
Geoff Hamill
909.621.0500
Rose Ishman
909.624.1617
Bernadette Kendall
909.670.1717
Cheryl Knight
909.447.7715
Rob & Amy Titus
909.450.7415
Maria Silva
909.624.1617
Madhu Sengupta
909.260.5560
Mason Prophet
909.447.7708
Heather Petty
909.447.7716
B.J. Nichka
909.625.6754
Coleen Smouse
909.539.7512
Betty Leier
909.262.8630
Sally Tornero
909.447.7718
Eurydice Turk
909.447.8258
Ryan Zimmerman
909.447.7707
Sue Gold
909.447.7714
Gloria Alvarez
909.670.0322
Paul Steffen
Broker/Owner
Chris Macaulay
909.227.0162