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BSR 64000 SNMP

Configuration and
Management Guide
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Release 6.3.1
Notice
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Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Release 6.3.1
Published: 1/12
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 iii
Contents
Contents
Preface
Scope ............................................................................................................................................vii
Audience.......................................................................................................................................vii
Documentation Set .......................................................................................................................vii
Conventions.................................................................................................................................... x
Notes, Cautions, Warnings ............................................................................................................ xi
If You Need Help........................................................................................................................... xi
Telephone Support.............................................................................................................. xi
Online Support...................................................................................................................xii
Motorola BSR Customer Website.......................................................................xii
1 Introduction to the Simple Network Management Protocol
Overview.....................................................................................................................................1-1
About SNMP MIBs.....................................................................................................................1-2
SNMP Commands.......................................................................................................................1-3
How a MIB is Organized.............................................................................................................1-3
Defining MIB Objects ......................................................................................................1-4
Obtaining SNMP MIB Archive Files for the BSR......................................................................1-5
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2 Standard MIB Support
Overview.....................................................................................................................................2-1
Accessing MIBs with RFC Numbers ...............................................................................2-1
Accessing MIBs with a DOCSIS Name...........................................................................2-2
MIB II..........................................................................................................................................2-2
Transmission ...............................................................................................................................2-6
SNMP..........................................................................................................................................2-9
Experimental .............................................................................................................................2-10
Standard IP Multicast and IGMP MIBs ....................................................................................2-10
3 Motorola Private MIBS
Overview.....................................................................................................................................3-1
Motorola Private CMTS and PacketCable Private MIBs............................................................3-2
4 Configuring SNMP through the CLI
Overview.....................................................................................................................................4-1
Configuring SNMP Server Parameters .......................................................................................4-2
Configuring SNMP Informs and Traps .......................................................................................4-8
Setting Trap Logging Control...........................................................................................4-8
Configuring a Trap Destination........................................................................................4-9
Specifying the Destination IP Address ..............................................................4-9
Specifying Specific Trap Types .......................................................................4-10
Specifying SNMP Trap Versions ..................................................................... 4-11
Enabling Informs............................................................................................................4-12
Enabling Traps................................................................................................................4-12
Enabling CMTS Traps .....................................................................................4-13
Restricting Trap Rates ....................................................................................................4-15
Disabling Traps...............................................................................................................4-16
Configuring a Loopback Interface for an SNMP Trap Source.......................................4-16
Trap Configuration Examples ........................................................................................4-17
Disabling SNMP .......................................................................................................................4-19
Configuring SNMPv3 ...............................................................................................................4-19
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Configuring SNMP Server Identification .................................................................................4-24
Configuring System Contact Information ......................................................................4-25
Configuring System Location Information ....................................................................4-25
Configuring the EngineID..............................................................................................4-25
Configuring SNMP Access Levels ...........................................................................................4-26
Defining a Community Name ........................................................................................4-27
Configuring USM and VACM Security .........................................................................4-29
Configuring a Group Model.............................................................................4-30
Configuring a MIB View .................................................................................4-31
Associating Groups to MIB Views ..................................................................4-32
Configuring an SNMP Context........................................................................4-32
Configuring Packet Size............................................................................................................4-33
Monitoring SNMP.....................................................................................................................4-33
5 MIB Traps
Overview.....................................................................................................................................5-1
Accessing MIB traps with a DOCSIS Name....................................................................5-1
Accessing MIB traps with RFC Numbers........................................................................5-2
DOCSIS and Standard MIB Trap Information............................................................................5-3
Motorola Private Trap Information .............................................................................................5-6
Motorola Private CMTS and PacketCable Private Traps............................................................5-9
Trap Severity Levels .................................................................................................................5-10
Private Traps and Their Severity Levels ........................................................................ 5-11
Enabling or Disabling Traps......................................................................................................5-15
Filtering Traps ...........................................................................................................................5-16
6 Using a MIB Browser to Access MIB Variables
Overview.....................................................................................................................................6-1
About MIB Browsers ..................................................................................................................6-2
Contacting the Device .................................................................................................................6-2
Browsing the MIB Tree...............................................................................................................6-3
SNMP Get/Get Next....................................................................................................................6-5
SNMP Set ....................................................................................................................................6-6
Compiling and Importing New SNMP MIBs .............................................................................6-6
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Sample Tasks...............................................................................................................................6-6
Accessing MIB Variable Information...............................................................................6-7
Sample Task .......................................................................................................6-7
Changing MIB Variables ................................................................................................ 6-11
Sample Task ..................................................................................................... 6-11
7 DOCSIS 2.0/3.0 MIB Support
Introduction .................................................................................................................................7-1
MIB File Differences Between DOCSIS 2.0 and DOSIS 3.0.....................................................7-2
MIB Files Supported in DOCSIS 2.0 Only......................................................................7-2
MIB Files Supported in DOCSIS 3.0 Only......................................................................7-3
MIB Files Common to DOCSIS 2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0.....................................................7-3
MIB Files Identical for DOCSIS 2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0....................................................7-4
Deprecated DOCSIS 2.0 MIB Tables...............................................................................7-5
Deprecated DOCSIS 3.0 MIB Tables...............................................................................7-6
Obsoleted DOCSIS 2.0 MIB Tables and RFCs................................................................7-7
DOCSIS 2.0/3.0 Tables with Different OIDs..............................................................................7-8
Index
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Preface
Scope
This document provides descriptions of the standard SNMP and private MIBs
supported by the Motorola Broadband Services Router 64000 (BSR 64000). It
also provides a tutorial on how to walk the MIBs using an SNMP MIB browser and
provides example tasks that can be performed using the SNMP or private MIBs.
Audience
This document is for use by those persons who will configure and manage the
BSR 64000 product. Only trained service personnel should configure and manage
the BSR 64000.
Documentation Set
The following documents comprise the BSR 64000 documentation set:
n BSR 64000 Quick Start Guide
The quick start guide provides a "roadmap" to the tasks involved in physically
installing the BSR 64000 product, physically connecting it to your network/HFC
infrastructure, and performing configuration tasks to enable the BSR 64000 to
operate in your networking environment.
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n BSR 64000 Chassis Installation Guide
This guide provides detailed instructions for physically installing the BSR 64000
product including: procedures for rack mounting, making physical network cable
connections, connecting DC power, and for determining the status of the BSR
64000 after applying power to it. This document also provides a description of the
BSR 64000 chassis, its hardware components and modules.
n BSR 64000 Module Installation Guide
This guide contains procedures for installing additional and replacement
Resource and I/O Modules in a BSR 64000 chassis and for making physical cable
connections to the modules.
n BSR 64000 Command Line Interface Users Guide
For users, this guide describes the structure of the BSR 64000 Command Line
Interface (CLI) and its various command modes. It also provides rules and
guidelines for navigating through the CLI.
n BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide
This guide contains individual descriptions of the entire set of commands that
comprise the BSR 64000 Command Line Interface (CLI). These commands are
used to interface with, configure, manage, and maintain the BSR 64000.
n BSR 64000 System Administration Guide
For system administrators, this guide provides detailed procedures for performing
initial configuration tasks including setting up: user accounts and passwords;
telnet and console access; system logging; and associated servers such as DHCP,
DNS, etc.
n BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide
This guide provides the instructions and procedures for configuring and
managing BSR 64000 CMTS operation.
n BSR 64000 Routing Configuration and Management Guide
This guide contains the instructions and procedures for configuring and managing
BSR 64000 routing operation, including RIP, OSPF, and BGP.
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n BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide
This guide provides the instructions and procedures for configuring and
managing BSR 64000 Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) operation.
It also describes SNMP MIBs; provides information that describes standard and
proprietary MIB support; describes how to walk MIBs; and how to compile and
load SNMP MIBs.
n BSR 64000 BGP/MPLS VPN Configuration Guide
This guide provides the instructions and procedures for configuring and
managing the BSR 64000 to support and implement Border Gateway Protocol/
MultiProtocol Label Switching Virtual Private Networks (BGP/MPLS VPNs).
n BSR 64000 Troubleshooting Guide
This guide contains instructions and procedures for troubleshooting typical
configuration problems that might be encountered using the BSR 64000. It also
offers suggestions for information to record, and have available should the need
arise to call Motorola support for assistance with BSR 64000 operational
problems.
n BSR 64000 Release Notes
These documents are specific to each release of the BSR 64000 product (software
and hardware). Release notes provide information about features not documented
or incorrectly documented in the main documentation set; known problems and
anomalies; product limitations; and problem resolutions.
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Conventions
This document uses the conventions in the following table:
Convention Example Explanation
angle brackets < > ping <ip-address>
ping 54.89.145.71
Arguments in italic and enclosed by angle
brackets must be replaced by the text the
argument represents. In the example,
54.89.145.71 replaces <ip-address>. When
entering the argument, do not type the angle
brackets.
bar brackets [ ] disable [level] Bar brackets enclose optional arguments. The
example indicates you can use the disable
command with or without specifying a level.
Some commands accept more than one
optional argument. When entering the
argument, do not type the bar brackets.
bold text cable relay-agent-option Boldface text must be typed exactly as it
appears.
brace brackets {} page {on | off} Brace brackets enclose required text. The
example indicates you must enter either on or
off after page. The system accepts the
command with only one of the parameters.
When entering the text, do not type the brace
brackets.
italic text boot system <filename> Italic type indicates variables for which you
supply values in command syntax descriptions.
It also indicates file names, directory names,
document titles, or emphasized text.
screen display Wed May 6 17:01:03
2000
This font indicates system output.
vertical bar | page {on | off} A vertical bar separates the choices when a
parameter is required. The example indicates
you can enter either command:
page on or page off
When entering the parameter, do not type the
vertical bar or the brace brackets.
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Notes, Cautions, Warnings
The following icons and associated text may appear in this document.
If You Need Help
Support for your BSR 64000 hardware and software is available via telephone and the
Internet.
Telephone Support
If you need assistance while working with the BSR 64000, contact the Motorola
Technical Response Center (TRC):
The Motorola TRC is on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
When calling for technical support, please have the following information available:
n Your customer information, including location, main contact, and telephone
number
n BSR product and modules
Note: A note contains tips, suggestions, and other helpful information, such
as references to material not contained in the document, that can help you
complete a task or understand the subject matter.
Caution: The exclamation point, within an equilateral triangle, is intended to
alert the user to the presence of important installation, servicing, and
operating instructions in the documents accompanying the equipment.
Warning: This symbol indicates that dangerous voltage levels are present
within the equipment. These voltages are not insulated and may be of
sufficient strength to cause serious bodily injury when touched. The symbol
may also appear on schematics.
U.S. 1-888-944-HELP (1-888-944-4357)
International +215-323-0044
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n Detailed description of the issue
n Specific information to assist with resolving the problem, including:
BSR hostname
BSR error messages and logs
Output of BSR show tech command
Cable modem information
n List of troubleshooting steps you have performed before calling the TRC.
n Current state of your BSR 64000 product
n Severity of the issue you are reporting
When calling for repair or Advanced Component Exchange (ACE) replacement,
please provide the following additional information:
n Output of BSR show version command, with part numbers and serial numbers of
BSR components
n Shipping information for the replacement, including contact name, company
name, address, phone number, and email address
Online Support
Motorola BSR Customer Website
The BSR customer website, http://bsr.motorola.com, is available for BSR customers
with active service contracts to access the latest product information, software
updates, troubleshooting information, and technical publications for the BSR 64000,
BSR 2000, and BSR 1000 product line.
You may request access to the site by emailing the BSR product support team at
bsrsupportonline@motorola.com with the following information:
n Company name
n Contact name, phone number, and email address
n Motorola Support contact
n BSR product under service contract
The BSR product support team will email an invitation to you with further
instructions on how to set up an account on the BSR customer information website.
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1
Introduction to the Simple
Network Management
Protocol
Overview
The Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is described in the following
sections:
About SNMP MIBs
SNMP Commands
How a MIB is Organized
Obtaining SNMP MIB Archive Files for the BSR
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About SNMP MIBs
Request for Comments (RFC) 1155 defines the Structure of Management
Information (SMI) framework for using SNMP to control different types of
information. SMI places objects as nodes in an object tree. The object tree groups
logically related objects into subtrees. Each of these subtrees is called a
Management Information Base (MIB).
A MIB is a database maintained by the device that stores all of its known management
information. Each individual element of information in the MIB is called an Object. A
MIB is much like an information warehouse with specific floors, aisles and racks
stocked with inventory.
Request for Comments (RFC) MIBs and Internet Drafts are written by Internet
Engineering Task Force (IETF) working groups and are available for public use and
are often referred to as Standard MIBs. Other MIBs have been developed by private
organizations specifically for their products and are often referred to as Private or
Proprietary MIBs.
The BSR supports the following Standard and Private MIBs:
Refer to Chapter 2 Standard MIB Support for a list of Standard MIBs supported
by the BSR.
Refer to Chapter 5 MIB Traps for a list of Private MIBs supported by the BSR.
An SNMP agent is used to communicate information between a remote management
system and the information database on a device. An SNMP agent accomplishes this
by retrieving information from a MIB and storing information to a MIB.
SNMP management follows this model:
MIBs located on the SNMP network management station describe the
information that is relayed from the SNMP agents.
The SNMP network management station or application can send queries to each
SNMP agent.
Each SNMP agent collects information about its device and provides that
information to the SNMP network management station. The agent process acts as
a server in a typical client-server model.
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SNMP Commands
The following describes the SNMP Get, GetNext, and Set commands, as defined in
RFC 1157, that are supported by the SNMP agent software on the BSR:
How a MIB is Organized
Because networking devices are made by a variety of manufacturers they must all be
able to communicate with one another. The Internet standards organization requires
that each network device organize its management information according to a
pre-defined tree format. This tree structure branches out from the Internet layer into
several subtrees, with each subtree organized into branches (groups of related
information) and leaves (the individual pieces of information, or objects). Among
these subtrees is an Enterprises subtree, in which private vendors can apply to the
Internet Assigned Numbers Authority for a branch in which to store management
information (or objects) specific to their products.
Each layer of this tree is numerically encoded, so that each group and object is
identified by a unique number known as an Object Identifier (OID). This identifier is
a path to the information stored as the objects value, and provides the means by
which the SNMP agent is able to locate the object in a devices MIB. An ASCII name
is also assigned to each branch or OID, for convenience in identifying a management
object. For example, the MIB II object ipForwarding is identified as follows:
Numeric OID: 1.3.6.1.2.1.4.1
ASCII string: iso/org/dod/internet/mgmt/mib-2/ip/ipForwarding
Table 1-1 SNMP Commands
Command Description
Get Retrieves the value of a specific object from
one of the supported MIBs.
GetNext Traverses the MIB tree to retrieve the next
objects management information.
Set Modifies the values of MIB objects. The BSR
64000 private MIBs and several objects in
the standard MIBs allow you to configure the
BSR 64000 from an SNMP management
station on the network.
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Some objects may occur multiple times for a single device. Objects of this type are
called tabular objects and are organized in tables. Each occurrence of a tabular object
is called an instance, and each instance also numerically encoded. For example, if you
were querying a two-port bridges interface table, there would be two instances
(values) returned for each object in the table (one for each port), and each instance
would have a unique instance value appended to the objects OID.
Defining MIB Objects
MIB objects represent data that the device can retrieve or configuration information
that can be modified.
RFC 1155 (Structure and Identification of Management Information for TCP/
IP-based Internets) describes the layout and encoding of exchanged data
objects. The SMI uses the ISO standard ASN.1 (Abstract Syntax Notation
One) to define a method for describing a hierarchical name space for managed
information.
RFC 1212 (Concise MIB Definitions) is an easier-to-read form used in most
standard MIBs today. It defines the private enterprise MIB.
A MIB object is defined and identified by the following:
OBJECT_TYPE The objects ASN.1 (Abstract Syntax Notation.1) defined
name and type.
SYNTAX How the data represented by this object is structured: Integer,
Octet String, Object Identifier, Null, Sequence, Sequence of,
IpAddress, NetworkAddress, Counter, Gauge, TimeTicks,
Opaque, or some other user-defined data type.
ACCESS The level of management access available for this specific
object: read-only (instances of the object may be read, but not
set), read-write (instances of the object may be read or set),
write-only (instances of the object may be set but not read), or
not-accessible (instances of the object may not be read or
set). Note that this does not designate the level of access
provided by the community name you used to contact the
device, but the maximum level of access available for the
object by definition.
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The following is an example of the MIB object ifNumber which is part of the
Interfaces group of RFC 1213 (Management Information Base for Network
Management of TCP/IP-based internets:MIB-II.)
ifNumber OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read-only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
"The number of network interfaces (regardless of their
current state) present on this system.
::= { interfaces 1 }
Obtaining SNMP MIB Archive Files for the BSR
Contact Motorola Technical Response Center (TRC) to obtain the SNMP MIB
archive files for use with the BSR 64000 software. Refer to If You Need Help on page
xi for more information.
: Indicates whether a managed device is required to implement
this object in its MIB. A status of mandatory indicates that the
device must use this object (by convention, all MIBs adhering
to the Internet-standard contain only mandatory objects); a
status of optional indicates that the device may implement this
object (by Internet-standard MIB convention, this is used to
denote objects within an experimental MIB); and a status of
obsoleted indicates that the device need no longer implement
this object, as it is no longer meaningful in an
Internet-standard MIB.
DESCRIPTION A brief description of the management information provided by
this object.
::= The variable name of the object, in the form OBJECT TYPE
OBJECT IDENTIFIER fragment.
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2
Standard MIB Support
Overview
This chapter gives instructions on how to access standard MIBs and provides
information for the standard MIBs supported by the BSR 64000:
Accessing MIBs with RFC Numbers
Follow these steps to access MIBs with Request for Comments (RFCs) numbers:
1. Click on the blue World Wide Web link to access an RFC from the Internet
Engineering Task Force (IETF) Web site:
http://www.ietf.org/rfc.html
2. Find the desired RFC number and enter it in the field and click the go button. The
RFC displays as a text document.
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Accessing MIBs with a DOCSIS Name
Follow these steps to access DOCSIS-related MIB names through CableLabs:
1. Click on the blue World Wide Web link to access the CableLabs Web site:
http://www.cablelabs.com
2. Find the desired MIB name and enter it in the Search field and click the Search
button. Once you find the document, the document displays as a PDF in your
Web browser.
MIB II
Table 2-1 provides a list of MIB Request for Comments (RFCs) and/or MIB names
for the MIB-II group, which includes their corresponding Internet Engineering Task
Force (IETF) working groups and document titles:
Table 2-1 Supported MIB II Groups
RFC/MIB Filename IETF Working Group Title
RFC 1213
RFC1213-MIB.mib
SNMP Management Information Base for
Network Management of TCP/
IP-based internets: MIB-II
RFC 1493
BRIDGE-MIB
Bridge Sub-Working Group
of the SNMP Working
Group.
Definitions of Managed Objects for
Bridges
RFC 1657
BGP4-MIB.mib
BGP Definitions of Managed Objects for
the Fourth Version of the Border
Gateway Protocol (BGP-4) using
SMIv2
RFC 1724
RIPv2-MIB.mib
RIP-II Routing Information Protocol
Version 2 MIB Extension.
RFC 1850
OSPF-MIB.mib
OSPF-TRAP-MIB.mib
OSPF OSPF Version 2 Management
Information Base
RFC 1870
SMTP Size Declaration
Standards Track SMTP Service Extension for
Message Size Declaration
RFC 2013
UDP-MIB.mib
SNMPv2 SNMPv2 Management Information
Base for the User Datagram
Protocol using SMIv2
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RFC 2096
IP-FORWARD-MIB.mib
OSPF IP Forwarding Table MIB
RFC 2213
INTEGRATED-SERVICES-MIB.mib
Integrated Services Integrated Services Management
Information Base using SMIv2
RFC 2493
PerfHist-TC-MIB.mib
AToMMIB and TrunkMIB Textual Conventions for MIB
Modules Using Performance
History Based on 15 Minute
Intervals
RFC 2578
SNMPv2-SMI.mib
SNMPv2 Structure of Management
Information Version 2 (SMIv2)
RFC 2579
SNMPv2-TC.mib
Textual Conventions for SMIv2
RFC 2863
IF-MIB.mib
Interfaces MIB The Interfaces Group MIB
CLAB-DEF-MIB.mib IP over Cable Data Network
(IPCDN)
CableLabs Definition MIB
Specification
DOCS-LOADBALANCING-MIB.mib
DOCS-TEST-MIB.mib CableLabs DOCSIS 2.0 Testing
MIB Specification
DSG-IF-MIB.mib DOCSIS Set-top Gateway (DSG)
Interface Specification
DOCS-BPI2-MIB.mib Management Information Base for
DOCSIS Cable Modems and
Cable Modem Termination
Systems for Baseline Privacy Plus
RFC 3083
DOCSIS Baseline Privacy MIB
Baseline Privacy Interface
Management Information Base for
DOCSIS Compliant Cable
Modems and Cable Modem
Termination Systems
DOCS-IF-EXT-MIB.mib
DOCS-IFEXT2-MIB.mib
Extends RFC 2670 by providing:
docsIfDevDocsisCapability
docsIfDevDocsisOperStatus
docsIfCmtsCmStatusDocsisVersio
n
Table 2-1 Supported MIB II Groups
RFC/MIB Filename IETF Working Group Title
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DOCS-CABLE-DEVICE-TRAP-MIB.mib IPCDN (continued) Trap definitions for DOCSIS cable
devices
DOCS-SUBMGT-MIB.mib RFC-version of Subscriber
Management MIB
RFC 2669
DOCS-CABLE-DEVICE-MIB.mib
DOCSIS Cable Device MIB Cable
Device Management Information
Base for DOCSIS compliant Cable
Modems and Cable Modem
Termination Systems
DOCS-IF-MIB.mib Radio Frequency (RF) Interface
Management Information Base for
DOCSIS 2.0 compliant RF
interfaces
DOCS-QOS-MIB.mib Data Over Cable System Interface
Specification Quality of Service
Management Information Base
RFC 2787
VRRP-MIB.mib
VRRP Definitions of Managed Objects for
the Virtual Router Redundancy
Protocol (VRRP)
RFC 2737
ENTITY-MIB.mib
ENTMIB Entity MIB (Version 2)
RFC 2666
ETHER-CHIPSET-MIB.mib
802.3 Hub MIB Definitions of Object Identifiers for
Identifying Ethernet Chip Sets.
RFC 2933
IGMP-STD-MIB.mib
Inter-Domain Multicast
Routing (IDMR)
Internet Group Management
Protocol (IGMP) MIB
RFC 2011
IP-MIB.mib
SNMPv2 SNMPv2 Management Information
Base for the Internet Protocol
using SMIv2. This MIB is
enhanced to support
sub-interfaces
RFC 2012
TCP-MIB.mib
SNMPv2 Management Information
Base for the Transmission Control
Protocol using SMIv2
ISIS-MIB
draft-ietf-isis-wg-mib-18
IS-IS for IP Internets Management Information Base for
IS-IS
Table 2-1 Supported MIB II Groups
RFC/MIB Filename IETF Working Group Title
Release 6.3.1 Standard MIB Support
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 2-5
IANAifType-MIB.mib Internet Assigned Numbers
Authority (IANA)
This MIB module defines the
IANAifType Textual Convention,
and thus the enumerated values of
the ifType object defined in
MIB-II's ifTable
IANA-RTPROTO-MIB.mib This MIB module defines the
IANAipRouteProtocol and
IANAipMRouteProtocol textual
conventions for use in MIBs which
need to identify unicast or
multicast routing mechanisms
IANA-ADDRESS-FAMILY-NUMBERS-MI
B.mib
This MIB module defines the
AddressFamilyNumbers textual
convention.
RFC 2932
IPMROUTE-STD-MIB.mib
IETF IDMR IPv4 Multicast Routing MIB
RFC 3291 INET-ADDRESS-MIB.mib Operations and
Management Area
Textual Conventions for Internet
Network Addresses
RFC 3289
DIFFSERV-DSCP-TC.mib
DIFFSERV-MIB.mib
Differentiated Services Management Information Base for
the Differentiated Services
Architecture
Table 2-1 Supported MIB II Groups
RFC/MIB Filename IETF Working Group Title
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
2-6 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Transmission
Table 2-2 provides a list of MIB Request for Comments (RFCs) and/or MIB names
for the Transmission group, which includes their corresponding Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF) working groups and document titles:
Table 2-2 Supported Transmission Groups
RFC/MIB Name
IETF Working
Group Title
RFC 2665
EtherLike-MIB.mib
Ethernet Interfaces
and Hub MIB
The Definitions of Managed Objects for the IP
Network Control Protocol of the Point-to-Point
Protocol
RFC 1471
PPP-LCP-MIB.mib
PPP The Definitions of Managed Objects for the Link
Control Protocol of the Point-to-Point Protocol.
RFC 1473
PPP-IP-NCP-MIB.mib
The Definitions of Managed Objects for the IP
Network Control Protocol of the Point-to-Point
Protocol
RFC 2558
SONET-MIB.mib
AToM MIB Definitions of Managed Objects for the SONET/SDH
Interface Type
Release 6.3.1 Standard MIB Support
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 2-7
RFC 3811
MPLS-TC-STD-MIB.mib
Multiprotocol Label
Switching (MPLS)
Definitions of Textual Conventions for Multiprotocol
Label Switching (MPLS) Management
RFC 3812
MPLS-TE-STD-MIB.mib
Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Traffic
Engineering Management Information Base
Supported tables:
mplsTunnelTable
mplsTunnelHopTable
RFC 3813
MPLS-LSR-STD-MIB.mib
MPLS Label Switch Router Management Information
Base Using SMIv2
Supported tables:
mplsInterfaceConfTable
mplsInSegmentTable
mplsInSegmentPerfTable
mplsOutSegmentTable
mplsOutSegmentPerfTable
mplsXCTable
RFC 3814
MPLS-FTN-STD-MIB
Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Forwarding
Equivalence Class To Next Hop Label Forwarding
Entry (FEC-To-NHLFE) Management Information
Base (MIB). Supported table:
mplsFTNTable
RFC 3815
MPLS-LDP-STD-MIB.mib
Definitions of Managed Objects for the Multiprotocol
Label Switching (MPLS), Label Distribution Protocol
(LDP)
Supported tables:
mplsLdpEntityTable
mplsLdpPeerTable
mplsLdpSessionTable
mplsLdpSessionStatsTable
mplsLdpHelloAdjacencyTable
mplsInSegmentLdpLspTable
mplsOutSegmentLdpLspTable
mplsFecTable
mplsLdpLspFecTable
mplsLdpSessionPeerAddrTable
Table 2-2 Supported Transmission Groups
RFC/MIB Name
IETF Working
Group Title
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
2-8 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
MPLS-VPN-DRAfT-05.mi
b
PPVPN MPLS/BGP Virtual Private Network Management
Information Base Using SMIv2
PPVPN-TC-MIB.mib Definition of Textual Conventions for Provider
Provisioned Virtual Private Network (PPVPN)
Management
Table 2-2 Supported Transmission Groups
RFC/MIB Name
IETF Working
Group Title
Release 6.3.1 Standard MIB Support
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 2-9
SNMP
Table 2-3 provides a list of MIB Request for Comments (RFCs) and/or MIB names
for the SNMP group, which includes their corresponding Internet Engineering Task
Force (IETF) working groups and document titles:
Table 2-3 Supported SNMP Groups
RFC/MIB Name IETF Working Group Title
RFC 3411
SNMP-FRAMEWORK-MIB.mib
SNMPv3 An Architecture for Describing Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
Management Frameworks
RFC 3412
SNMP-MPD-MIB.mib
Message Processing and Dispatching for
the Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP)
RFC 3413
SNMP-TARGET-MIB.mib
SNMP-NOTIFICATION-MIB.mib
SNMP-PROXY-MIB.mib
Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP) Applications
RFC 3414
SNMP-USER-BASED-SM-MIB.mib
User-based Security Model (USM) for
version 3 of the Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMPv3)
RFC 3415
SNMP-VIEW-BASED-ACM-MIB.mib
View-based Access Control Model
(VACM) for the Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP)
RFC 3418
SNMPv2-MIB.mib
Management Information Base (MIB) for
the Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP)
RFC 2576
SNMP-COMMUNITY-MIB.mib
Coexistence between Version 1, Version
2, and Version 3 of the Internet-standard
Network Management Framework
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
2-10 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Experimental
Table 2-4 provides a list of MIB Request for Comments (RFCs) and/or MIB names
for the Experimental group, which includes their corresponding Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF) working groups and document titles:
Standard IP Multicast and IGMP MIBs
Table 2-5 describes additional Standard MIB support for IP Multicast features:
Table 2-4 Supported Experimental Groups
RFC/MIB Name IETF Working Group Title
RFC 1075 Host Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol
RFC 2934
PIM-MIB.mib
IDMR Protocol Independent Multicast MIB for IPv4.
Table 2-5 IP Multicast MIB Support
RFC/MIB Name IETF Group MIB Name Supported Tables
RFC 2236 Network Internet Group Management Protocol All
RFC 2932
IPMROUTE-STD-MIB.mib
IPv4 Multicast Routing MIB ipMRouteTable
ipMRouteNextHopTable
ipMRouteInterfaceTable
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 3-1
3
Motorola Private MIBS
Overview
Table 3-1 describes the Motorola BSR 64000 Private MIBs:
Table 3-1 Motorola Private MIBs
MIB Filename Module Identities Description
RDN-CHANNEL-BONDING-MIB.mib RDN-CHANNEL-BONDING-MIB Channel Bonding
RDN-CHASSIS-MIB.mib RDN-CHASSIS-MIB BSR 64000 chassis
RDN-CMTS-MIB.mib RDN-CMTS-MIB Cable Modem Termination
System (CMTS)
RDN-DEFINITIONS-MIB.mib
RDN-PRODUCTS-MIB.mib
RDN-CHASSIS-TYPE-MIB.mib
RDN-SLOTS-MIB.mib
RDN-MODULES-MIB.mib
RDN-PORTS-MIB.mib
RDN-SENSOR-TYPE-MIB.mib
RDN-DEFINITIONS-MIB
RDN-PRODUCTS-MIB
RDN-CHASSIS-TYPE-MIB
RDN-SLOTS-MIB
RDN-MODULES-MIB
RDN-PORTS-MIB
RDN-SENSOR-TYPE-MIB
Definitions for Motorola
products, chassis, ports,
modules, etc.
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
3-2 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Motorola Private CMTS and PacketCable Private
MIBs
Table 3-2 describes additional tables and objects provided with the
RDN-PKTCABLE-GROUP-MIB and RDN-CMTS-MIB Motorola Private MIBs.
RDN-DLP-MIB.mib RDN-DLP-MIB Dynamic Load Balancing MIB
evenly distributes voice and/or
data traffic across upstream and
downstream channels within a
Load Balance group.
RDN-PKTCABLE-GROUP-MIB.mib RDN-PKTCABLE-GROUP-MIB PacketCable
RDN-PROCESS-MIB.mib RDN-PROCESS-MIB Active system processes and
memory usage
RDN-SENSOR-MIB.mib RDN-SENSOR-MIB Hardware sensors
RDN-SYSLOG-MIB.mib RDN-SYSLOG-MIB System log
RDN-MIB.mib RDN-MIB Motorola module definitions
RDN-CABLE-SPECTRUM-MIB.mib RDN-CABLE-SPECTRUM-MIB Cable Spectrum Management
for MCNS compliant Cable
Modem Termination Systems
(CMTS)
RDN-CABLE-SPECTRUM-GROUP-
MIB.mib
RDN-CABLE-SPECTRUM-GRO
UP-MIB
Cable Spectrum Group
Management for MCNS
compliant Cable Modem
Termination Systems (CMTS)
RDN-EVT-NOTIFICATIONS.mib RDN-EVT-NOTIFICATIONS Critical and higher level EVT
notifications
Note: All of the supported MIB tables and objects described in Table 3-2 are
included in the RDN-CMTS-MIB with the exception of the
rdnPktDQoSEmergencyPreemption object, which is included in the
RDN-PKTCABLE-GROUP-MIB.
Table 3-1 Motorola Private MIBs
MIB Filename Module Identities Description
Release 6.3.1 Motorola Private MIBS
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 3-3
Table 3-2 Additional Motorola Private MIB Support for the BSR 64000
Supported Tables or Objects Description
rdnCableInterceptTable Lawful Cable Intercept information.
rdnCableUgsStatsTable The table contains statistics summarizing UGS flows per
CMTS slot/port on the BSR.
rdnCableUgsStatsEntry A row in the rdnCableStatsTable. Each row contains a
set of statistics, totaled for all UGS flows on a particular
upstream port.
rdnCableUgsStatsSlot The physical chassis slot number relative to the
containing module or chassis, to which this row of UGS
statistics is being applied.
rdnCableUgsStatsPort Chassis port number, on the associated module, to
which this row of UGS statistics is being applied.
rdnCableUgsCurrentTotalFlows Snap shot of the current total number of UGS flows that
are active, to the associated ifIndex.
rdnCableUgsMaxFlowsLastFiveMinutes Maximum number of UGS flows that were active during
the last 5 minutes, for the associated ifIndex.
rdnCableUgsAvFlowsLastFiveMinuets Average number of UGS flows that were active, during
the last 5 minutes, for the associated ifIndex.
rdnCableUgsMinFlowsLastFiveMinuets Minimum number of UGS flows that were active, during
the last 5 minutes, for associated ifIndex.
rdnCableUgsMaxFlowsLastWindow Maximum number of UGS flows that were active during
the rdnUgsStatsWindow for the associated ifIndex.
rdnCableUgsAvFlowsLastWindow Average number of UGS flows that were active during
the rdnUgsStatsWindow for the associated ifIndex.
rdnCableUgsMinFlowsLastWindow Minimum number of UGS flows that were active during
the rdnUgsStatsWindow for the associated ifIndex
interface.
rdnCableUgsResetStats A set of this object to TRUE (1) causes all statistics in
the row to be reset to zero. This object always returns
FALSE (2) when read.
rdnCmToCpeTable Maps customer premise equipment to their associated
cable modems. Includes IPv6 support.
rdnCmtsServiceClassEntry Allows administrators to configure the Maximum
Assigned Bandwidth (MAB), Configured Active Percent
(CAP), scheduling priority, addmitted bandwidth
threshold and allow share parameters for a service class.
rdnPktDQoSEmergencyPreemption Indicates whether the PacketCable Emergency
Preemption is disabled or set to a specific option of
dropping a normal DQoS voice call. If its value is set to
most-recent (1), the most-recent normal DQoS voice call
of that Service Class is dropped when the bandwidth of
the Emergency Service Class has maxed out. The
Preemption can only occur if that Service Class has
'allowShared' turned on. Otherwise, Preemption can not
occur and thus, the high priority call can not be
completed. If the value is oldest (2), the oldest normal
DQoS voice call is dropped. If the value is random,
random normal DQoS voice call is dropped. By default,
this object has the value disabled (0).
rdnRQueryCmtsCmStatusExtTable This table allows the BSR to act as an SNMP Manager,
which collects statistics from cable modems by using
SNMP get/next requests.
rdnRQueryCmtsCmStatusExtTable This table extends the rdnRQueryCmtsCmStatusTable.
rdnRQueryCmtsCmStatusExtEntry An entry in the rdnRQueryCmtsCmStatusExtTable. The
table is indexed by a rdnRQueryCmtsCmStatusEntry.
rdnRQuerySwCurrentVers The model and software version of this CM as parsed
from its sysDescr.
rdnServiceClassStatsTable This table contains statistics summarizing flows within
Service Classes on the BSR.
rdnServiceClassStatsEntry A row in the rdnServiceClassStatsTable. Each row
contains a set of statistics related to flows within a
particular service class and associated with a particular
value of ifIndex.
The table is indexed by:
1. ifIndex, associated with a CMTS upstream port
(ifType = 129) or CMTS downstream port (ifType =
128)
2. docsQosServiceClassName = Service Class Name.
rdnServiceClassStatsIfDirection Specifies whether the associated service class template
applies to upstream or downstream service flows.
rdnServiceClassStatsSlot The physical chassis slot number relative to the
containing card or chassis to which this row of service
class statistics is being applied.
Table 3-2 Additional Motorola Private MIB Support for the BSR 64000
Supported Tables or Objects Description
Release 6.3.1 Motorola Private MIBS
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 3-5
rdnServiceClassStatsPort Chassis port number on the associated module to which
this row of service class statistics is is being applied.
rdnServiceClassStatsTotalPackets Count of total packets that have been transmitted for the
associated ifIndex and service class.
rdnServiceClassStatsTotalBytes Count of total bytes that have been transmitted for the
associated ifIndex and service class.
rdnServiceClassCurrentTotalFlows Snap shot of the current total number of flows that are
admitted and active for the associated ifIndex and
service class.
rdnServiceClassDeferredFlows Count of deferred flows for the associated ifIndex and
service class.
rdnServiceClassRestrictedFlows Count of restricted flows for the associated ifIndex and
service class.
rdnServiceClassRejectedFlows Count of rejected flows for the associated ifIndex and
service class.
rdnServiceClassBandWidth Admitted bandwidth, in bits per second, for this ifIndex
and service class.
rdnServiceClassResetStats A 'set' of this object to TRUE(1) will cause all statistics in
the row to be reset to zero. This object will always return
FALSE(2) when read.
rdnUgsStatsWindow The sliding, sampling time window collects statistics for
the rdnServiceClassStatsTable.
Table 3-2 Additional Motorola Private MIB Support for the BSR 64000
Supported Tables or Objects Description
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
3-6 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Figure 3-1 shows the Motorola BSR 64000 Private MIB structure:

Figure 3-1 Motorola BSR 64000 Private MIB Structure
ISO (1)
ORG (3)
DoD (6)
Internet (1)
Private (4)
Enterprises (1)
RDN (4981)
rdn-cmts (2)
rdn-syslog (3)
rdn-chassis (1)
rdn-definitions (4)
RDN-CABLE-SPECTRUM (6)
rdn-SpectrumGroup (8)
rdn-sensor (5)
rdn-pktcable (7)
rdnProcessMIB (20)
rdn-evtNotifications (0)
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 4-1
4
Configuring SNMP
through the CLI
Overview
This chapter describes the Command Line Interface (CLI) commands used to
configure SNMP for managing the BSR 64000
TM
system and monitoring the network
using the command line interface. For further information on the CLI commands
described in this chapter, refer to the BSR Command Reference Guide. Configuring
SNMP for the BSR involves the following tasks:
Configuring SNMP Server Parameters
Configuring SNMP Informs and Traps
Disabling SNMP
Configuring SNMPv3
Configuring SNMP Server Identification
Configuring SNMP Access Levels
Configuring Packet Size
Monitoring SNMP
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
4-2 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Configuring SNMP Server Parameters
To configure SNMP Agent operations, you use a series of snmp-server commands.
To issue snmp-server commands, do the following:
1. Enter Global Configuration mode.
MOT:7A#configure
2. Type snmp-server followed by the available SNMP command and its associated
parameters that are listed in Table 4-1:
Table 4-1 snmp-server Commands
Command Description Value Default
snmp-server access Define SNMP
Access Policy
information.
Enter the SNMP access
group name and
information.
Not
configured
snmp-server chassis-id Define chassis
ID to uniquely
identify this
system by writing
to the chassisId
MIB object.
1 to 255 alphabetic-
numeric characters.
Not
configured
snmp-server community Set community
string and
access privilege
Read-Only or
Read-Write.
Read-Only
snmp-server
community-table
Configures
snmpCommunity
MIB (RFC 2576)
Octet alpha numeric string
that is used as an index into
the snmpCommunityMIB
table.
Not
configured
snmp-server contact Define system
contact
information by
writing to the
sysContact MIB
object.
1 to 225 alphabetic
characters.
Not
configured
snmp-server context Define context
information.
Name and OID of context
and referenced MIB view.
Not
configured
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Configuring SNMP through the CLI
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 4-3
snmp-server convert
[password | key]
Convert
Authentication or
Privacy
password or key
to a localized
key.
Name of the password or
key.
Not
configured
snmp-server
docs-trap-control
Set SNMP
DOCSIS traps.
cmtsBPKMTrap
cmtsBpiInitTrap
cmtsDCCAckFailTrap
cmtsDCCReqFailTrap
cmtsDCCRspFailTrap
cmtsDynServAckFailT ap
cmtsDynServReqFailTrap
cmtsDynServRspFailTrap
cmtsDynamicSATrap
cmtsInitRegAckFailTrap
cmtsInitRegReqFailTrap
cmtsInitRegRspFailTrap
Not
configured
snmp-server enable Enable SNMP
traps, informs, or
coexistence.
Traps, informs, or
coexistence
Not
configured
snmp-server engineID Define SNMP
Engine
information.
Numeric character string Not
configured
snmp-server group Define a User
Security Model
group.
Name of SNMP Group Not
configured
snmp-server host Define an SNMP
host to receive
SNMP
notification
information.
IP address of host machine Not
configured
Table 4-1 snmp-server Commands (continued)
Command Description Value Default
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
4-4 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
snmp-server location Define system
location
information by
writing to the
sysLocation MIB
object.
1 to 225 alphabetic
characters.
Not
configured
snmp-server notify
{<octet-string>}
{<octet-string>} [inform
| trap] [nonvolatile |
volatile] [active |
not-in-service | <cr>]
Configure the
notification table.
1. Specify the first
octet-string, which
specifies the notification
name.
2. Specify the second
octet-string, which
specifies the notification
tag.
3. Choose whether the
notification messages
sent to the host is a trap
or inform.
4. Choose whether the
message is stored in
nonvolatile and volatile.
5. Set the RowStatus to
active or not-in-service.
RowStatus
is active.
snmp-server target-addr
{<octet-string>}
{<octet-string>}
{A.B.C.D} udp-port
{<0-65535}
Configuring the
SNMP server
target address
table.
1. Set the first octet-string,
which specifies the
snmpTargetAddr table
name.
2. Configure second
octet-string, which
specifies the
snmpTargetAddrName
(index into
snmpTargetAddrTable).
3. Set the IP address of
the SNMP notification
host.
4. Enter the UDP port
number.
Not
configured
Table 4-1 snmp-server Commands (continued)
Command Description Value Default
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Configuring SNMP through the CLI
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 4-5
snmp-server
notify-filter
{<octet-string>}
{<OID>} {<octet-string>
[included | excluded]
[nonvolatile | volatile]
[active | not-in-service |
<cr>]
Configure
snmpNotifyFilter
table.
1. Specify the first
octet-string, which
specifies the
snmpNotifyFilter table
profile name (index #1).
2. Specify the
snmpNotifyFilter
subtree (index #2) OID,
which defines the family
of included and
excluded subtrees.
3. Specify the second
octet-string, which is the
snmpNotifyFilter mask
that combines with
snmpNotifyFilter
subtree to define the
family; the default is an
empty string.
4. Choose whether
subtrees are included or
excluded.
5. Choose whether the
message is stored in
nonvolatile and volatile.
6. Set the RowStatus to
active or not-in-service.
Not
configured.
Table 4-1 snmp-server Commands (continued)
Command Description Value Default
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
4-6 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
snmp-server
notify-filter profile
{<OID>} {<octet-string>
[included | excluded]
[nonvolatile | volatile]
[active | not-in-service |
<cr>]
Configures the
snmpNotifyFilter
subtree profile.
1. Specify the
snmpNotifyFilter
subtree (index #2) OID,
which defines the family
of included and
excluded subtrees.
2. Specify the first
octet-string, which
specifies the
snmpNotifyFilter mask
table profile name.
3. Choose whether
subtrees are included or
excluded.
4. Choose whether the
message is stored in
nonvolatile and volatile.
5. Set the RowStatus to
active or not-in-service.
Not
configured.
snmp-server packetsize Define the
maximum
allowable SNMP
packet size. This
is the maximum
packet size the
server can send
or receive.
484 to 17940 bytes 1400 bytes
snmp-server port Define a new
SNMP Agent
port number.
Port number 161
Table 4-1 snmp-server Commands (continued)
Command Description Value Default
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Configuring SNMP through the CLI
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 4-7
snmp-server shutdown Shuts down the
SNMP Agent,
thus preventing it
from processing
incoming SNMP
packets, but
retains all SNMP
configuration
data in the event
the agent is
restarted.
N/A Disabled
snmp-server sysname Define system
name
information by
writing to the
sysName MIB
object.
SNMP system name Not
configured
snmp-server
target-params
Configure the
snmpTarget-par
ams table
(rfc2573).
Octet alpha numeric string
that is used as an index into
the snmpTarget-params
table.
Not
configured
snmp-server trap Restrict the rate
of SNMP trap
messages
generated.
0-2147483648/number of
seconds
Not
configured
snmp-server user Define a USM
user who can
access the
SNMP Engine.
SNMP User name Not
configured
snmp-server view Define a
particular set of
MIB objects that
a particular
security group
can access.
Included/Excluded Excluded
Table 4-1 snmp-server Commands (continued)
Command Description Value Default
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
4-8 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Configuring SNMP Informs and Traps
SNMP traps and informs are disabled by default. SNMP traps are generated according
to standard and enterprise MIB specifications. The SNMP Agent maintains a
configuration of IP hosts to which traps are sent. This section provides information
for:
Setting Trap Logging Control
Configuring a Trap Destination
Enabling Informs
Enabling Traps
Restricting Trap Rates
Disabling Traps
Configuring a Loopback Interface for an SNMP Trap Source
Setting Trap Logging Control
Trap logging control allows you to specify which type of trap messages are logged to
which destinations (console, SYSLOG, etc.) - either through the CLI or automatically
through the DOCSIS docsDevEvControlTable.
In DOCSIS logging control mode, the BSR uses DOCSIS conventions for SYSLOG/
trap forwarding based on the DOCSIS standard. Each individual severity level (1-8)
can be enabled or disabled for trap reporting. This is achieved with the logging
reporting set of commands.
In proprietary logging control mode, the BSR can be configured to forward SNMP
traps for a specified severity level and higher. This is achieved with the logging
snmp-trap command. Proprietary logging control mode also provides a separate
threshold for SNMP trap rate throttling with the snmp-server trap rate-limit
command.
In DOCSIS logging control mode, the logging rate-limit command controls both the
trap and SYSLOG throttling limits. The snmp-server trap rate-limit command is
disabled in this mode.
Note: Before configuring SNMP traps or informs, the type of logging control
must be specified.
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Configuring SNMP through the CLI
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 4-9
Configuring a Trap Destination
The SNMP Agent maintains a configuration of IP hosts to which traps are sent. Each
entry in the table contains:
The IP address of the trap destination
The community or user name to send in the trap message
The host destination configured to receive specific trap types
The SNMP format (v1, v2c, or v3) of the trap PDU to use for that destination
Trap destinations are specified with the snmp-server host command. This command
is intended to simplify trap configuration by automatically generating entries in
multiple standard tables from rfc2573 such as the snmpNotifyTable,
snmpTargetAddrTable, and snmpTargetParamsTable. These tables can also be
manipulated directly through the CLI. Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference
Guide for detailed descriptions of the associated commands.
Specifying the Destination IP Address
1. Use the snmp-server host command in Global Configuration mode to specify a
destination machine to receive SNMP trap information. This command is
disabled by default, specifying that no trap notifications are sent. If you enter the
snmp-server host command with no keywords, all trap types are sent to the host.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server host <A.B.C.D> {<WORD>}{[traps |
informs] [version {1 | 2c | 3 [auth | noauth | priv]}{<WORD>}}
where:
host-address is the destination machine to receive SNMP trap information.
traps indicates enable SNMP traps.
informs indicates enable SNMP informs.
WORD is the SNMPv1/v2c community string or SNMPv3 user name.
Note: Before to using the snmp-server host command, the user should
configure a community string for SNMPv1/v2c or an SNMPv3 user name. See
Defining a Community Name on page 4-27 and Configuring USM and VACM
Security on page 4-29 respectively.
A maximum of 40 remote hosts can be specified with the snmp-server host
command.
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version indicates the version of notifications. If no version keyword is
specified, the default is version 1.
1 is the SNMP version 1 message processing model.
2c is the SNMP version 2c message processing model.
3 auth is the SNMP version 3 message processing model with authentication
and uses unscrambled packets.
3 noauth is the SNMP version 3 message processing model with no
authentication and uses unscrambled packets.
3 priv is the SNMP version 3 message processing model that authenticates
and scrambles packets.
2. Use the no snmp-server host command to remove the specified host.
Specifying Specific Trap Types
Use the snmp-server host traps command in Global Configuration mode to
configure an SNMP trap host to receive specific trap types as shown below. If no trap
type is specified, all traps are sent to this trap host.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server host <A.B.C.D> traps {<WORD>} [udp-port
<0-65535>] [bgp | docsdevcmts | entity | environ | flap | ospf | pim | snmp | vrrp]
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address of the host
WORD is the SNMPv1/v2c community string or SNMPv3 user name.
udp-port 0-65535 is the UDP port number.
Note: If the community-string is not defined using snmp-server community
command prior to using the snmp-server host command, the default form of
the snmp-server community command is automatically inserted into the
configuration. The password (community-string) used for this default
configuration is the same as that specified in the snmp-server host
command.
When removing an SNMP trap host from the trap host list with the no
snmp-server host command, the community name that is specified in the
command must exist. If the community name does not exist, the command
will fail.
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bgp specifies BGP state change traps.
docsdevcmts specifies DOCSIS device CMTS traps.
entity specifies entity state change traps.
environ specifies environment change traps.
flap specifies flap state change traps.
ospf specifies OSPF state change traps.
pim specifies PIM state change traps.
snmp specifies SNMP state change traps.
vrrp specifies VRRP state change traps.
Specifying SNMP Trap Versions
Use the snmp-server host version command in Global Configuration mode to
configure the SNMP trap version for the specified trap type as shown below.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server host <A.B.C.D> [version {1 | 2c | 3 [auth |
noauth | priv]}{<WORD>}} [udp-port <0-65535>] [bgp | docsdevcmts | entity |
environ | flap | ospf | pim | snmp | vrrp]
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address of the host.
WORD is the SNMPv1/v2c community string or SNMPv3 user name.
udp-port 0-65535 is the UDP port number.
bgp specifies BGP state change traps.
docsdevcmts specifies DOCSIS device CMTS traps.
entity specifies entity state change traps.
environ specifies environment change traps.
flap specifies flap state change traps.
ospf specifies OSPF state change traps.
pim specifies PIM state change traps.
snmp specifies SNMP state change traps.
vrrp specifies VRRP state change traps.
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Enabling Informs
Use the snmp-server enable informs command in Global configuration mode to
enable SNMP Informs:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server enable informs
To disable informs, use the no snmp-server enable informs command.
Enabling Traps
The snmp-server enable traps command enables SNMP traps or specific types of
traps and allows this SNMP management station (the BSR) to send an unsolicited
notification to one or more pre-configured management stations that are identified to
receive traps with the snmp-server host command. For the SNMP management
station to send traps, at least one SNMP-server host must be configured with the
snmp-server host command and traps globally enable the trap through the
snmp-server enable traps command.
The no snmp-server enable traps command entered with no keywords disables
traps, but not informs, to the host.
Follow these options to configure and enable SNMP traps:
Use the snmp-server enable traps command in Global Configuration mode to
enable SNMP traps. This command configures the BSR to send SNMP traps. If
you do not specify the trap type, all trap types are enabled.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server enable traps [bgp | docsdevcmts | entity |
environ | flap | ospf | pim | registration | snmp | snr | vrrp]
where:
traps enables BGP, OSPF, SNMP, and VRRP state change traps.
bgp enables BGP state change traps.
docsdevcmts enables DOCSIS device CMTS traps.
entity enables entity state change traps.
environ specifies environment change traps.
Note: For SNMP informs to be sent, you must also SNMP enable traps with
the snmp-server enable traps command even if there are no hosts to which
you are actually sending traps.
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flap enables flap state change traps.
ospf enables OSPF state change traps.
pim enables PIM state change traps.
registration enables CM (de)registration traps
snmp enables SNMP state change traps.
snr enables Signal/Noise Ratio measurement traps.
vrrp enables VRRP state change traps.
Enabling CMTS Traps
CMTS traps are enabled with the snmp-server docs-trap-control command in
Global Configuration mode, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server docs-trap-control {cmtsBPKMTrap |
cmtsBpiInitTrap | cmtsDCCAckFailTrap | cmtsDCCReqFailTrap |
cmtsDCCRspFailTrap | cmtsDynServAckFailTrap | cmtsDynServReqFailTrap |
cmtsDynServRspFailTrap | cmtsDynamicSATrap | cmtsInitRegAckFailTrap |
cmtsInitRegReqFailTrap | cmtsInitRegRspFailTrap}
Table 4-2 describes each CMTS trap in detail.
Table 4-2 CMTS Trap Definitions
CMTS Trap Name Definition
cmtsBPKMTrap
the failure of a BPKM operation detected on the
CMTS side
cmtsBpiInitTrap
the failure of a BPI initialization attempt happened
during the CM registration process and detected on
the CMTS side
cmtsDCCAckFailTrap
the failure of a dynamic channel change
acknowledgement that happened during the
dynamic channel change process on the CMTS
side
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cmtsDCCReqFailTrap
the failure of a dynamic channel change request
that happened during the dynamic channel change
process on the CM side and detected on the CMTS
side
cmtsDCCRspFailTrap
the failure of a dynamic channel change response
that happened during the dynamic channel change
process on the CMTS side
cmtsDynServAckFailTrap
the failure of a dynamic service acknowledgement
that happened during the dynamic services process
and detected on the CMTS side
cmtsDynServReqFailTrap
the failure of a dynamic service request that
happened during the dynamic services process and
detected on the CMTS side
cmtsDynServRspFailTrap
the failure of a dynamic service response that
happened during the dynamic services process and
detected on the CMTS side
cmtsDynamicSATrap
the failure of a dynamic security association
operation detected on the CMTS side
cmtsInitRegAckFailTrap
the failure of a registration acknowledgement from
the CM that happened during the CM initialization
process and was detected on the CMTS side
cmtsInitRegReqFailTrap
the failure of a registration request from the CM
happened during the CM initialization process and
was detected on the CMTS side
cmtsInitRegRspFailTra
the failure of a registration response happened
during the CM initialization process and was
detected on the CMTS side
Table 4-2 CMTS Trap Definitions
CMTS Trap Name Definition
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Restricting Trap Rates
To restrict the rate of SNMP traps in proprietary logging control mode, use the
snmp-server trap rate-limit command in Global Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server trap rate-limit <0-2147483647>
<0-2147483647>
where:
0-2147483647 is the number of SNMP traps.
0-2147483647 is the number of seconds during which the specified number
of trap messages are logged.
The following example sets a limit of 100 traps per second.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server trap rate-limit 100 1
To restrict the rate of SNMP traps in DOCSIS logging control mode, use the logging
rate-limit command in Global configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#logging rate-limit <0-2147483647> <1-2147483647>
where:
0-2147483647 is the number of SNMP traps.
1-2147483647 is the number of seconds at which the specified number of
SYSLOG and trap messages are logged.
The following example indicates that the rate-limit on SNMP traps is 10 traps per
second:
MOT:7A(config)#logging rate-limit 10 1
Note: When the number of traps exceeds the limit, trap generation is
automatically disabled.
Note: For both logging control modes, logging admin-status needs to be
set to "maintainBelowThreshold" or "stopAtThreshold" for a rate limit to apply.
If logging admin-status is set to "unconstrained" or "inhibited", then any rate
limit configuration is overridden and ignored.
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Disabling Traps
There are three ways to disable or severely restrict the generation of SNMP traps, as
follows:
1. To disable SNMP traps but retain the ability to do SNMP queries enabled, use the
no snmp enable traps command in Global Configuration mode, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#no snmp enable traps
2. To disable SNMP traps via throttling, set the trap count to "0" with the
snmp-server trap rate-limit command in Global Configuration mode, as
follows:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server trap rate-limit 0 60
3. To disable most SNMP traps, set the trap reporting severity level to a high value
with the logging snmp-trap command in Global Configuration mode, as
follows:
MOT:7A(config)#logging snmp-trap emergencies
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide for detailed descriptions of these
commands.
Configuring a Loopback Interface for an SNMP Trap Source
The snmp-server trap-source loopback command allows an operator to control the
source IP address of SNMP traps generated by the BSR by specifying a loopback
interface as the source IP address for SNMP traps. The normal convention for
generated SNMP traps is to set the source IP address equal to the IP address of the
outgoing interface. Use the snmp-server trap-source loopback command in Global
Configuration mode to override this convention and instead uses the IP address of the
specified loopback interface.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server trap-source loopback <1-255>
where:
1-255 is the loopback interface number.
Note: Before using the snmp-server trap-source loopback command, the
loopback interface must be configured and assigned an IP address.
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Trap Configuration Examples
This section provides SNMP trap configuration examples as they would in the
startup-config or running-config system configuration files.
Example #1 SNMPv1 traps in proprietary logging control mode
no logging control docsis
logging admin-status unconstrained
logging snmp-trap warnings
snmp-server community public rw
snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host 150.31.1.180 traps version 1 public
Example #2 SNMPv3 traps in proprietary logging control mode
no logging control docsis
logging admin-status maintainBelowThreshold
logging snmp-trap warnings
snmp-server engineid local 80001375030030b8022d0000
snmp-server user myuser eng-id 80001375030030b8022d0000
snmp-server group myuser myuser v3
snmp-server access myuser v3 noauth notify labview
snmp-server enable traps snmp
snmp-server enable traps ospf
snmp-server enable traps vrrp
snmp-server enable traps bgp
snmp-server enable traps entity
snmp-server enable traps docsdevcmts
snmp-server enable traps flap
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snmp-server enable traps pim
snmp-server enable traps environ temp
snmp-server enable traps environ power
snmp-server enable traps environ fan
snmp-server enable traps environ srm-switchover
snmp-server view labview dod included
snmp-server view labview at included
snmp-server host 150.21.2.61 traps version 3 noauth myuser udp-port 1500
snmp-server trap rate-limit 100 1
Example #3 SNMPv3 informs in DOCSIS logging control mode
logging control docsis
logging admin-status maintainBelowThreshold
logging rate-limit 20 60
snmp-server engineid remote 150.31.1.180 udp-port 1596 8000052301961f01b4
snmp-server user myusertrap eng-id 8000052301961f01b4
snmp-server group myusertrap myusertrap v3
snmp-server access myusertrap v3 noauth notify labview
snmp-server enable traps docsdevcmts
snmp-server view labview dod included
snmp-server view labview at included
snmp-server notify 0x01 myusertrap inform nonvolatile active
snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsInitRegReqFailTrap
snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsInitRegRspFailTrap
snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsInitRegAckFailTrap
snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsDynServReqFailTrap
snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsDynServRspFailTrap
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snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsDynServAckFailTrap
snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsBpiInitTrap
snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsBPKMTrap
snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsDynamicSATrap
snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsDCCReqFailTrap
snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsDCCRspFailTrap
snmp-server docs-trap-control cmtsDCCAckFailTrap
snmp-server target-addr 0x01 150.31.1.190 udp-port 162 1500 3 myusertrap
MYPARAM NULL 1400 nonvolatile active
snmp-server target-params MYPARAM 3 3 myusertrap noauthnopriv nonvolatile
active
Disabling SNMP
If you must disable the SNMP, use the snmp-server shutdown command in Global
Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server shutdown
Configuring SNMPv3
This section describes the procedure to configure the SNMP Agent to receive,
process, and respond to SNMPv3 packets. The procedure includes configuring the
following:
Local SNMP name (Engine-ID) (only if not already configured)
SNMP User
SNMP Group
SNMP Access Policy
SNMP View
SNMP Context (only if not already configured)
Use the CLI to configure an SNMP User, an SNMP Group to associate the user to an
access policy, and an SNMP Access Policy. If they are not already configured,
configure the local SNMP Engine-ID of the agent and an appropriate SNMP Context.
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1. A default local Engine-ID is configured to the MAC address of the SRM. To
determine if a local Engine-ID is configured and to ensure that the agent is
running, use the show snmp engineID command in Privileged EXEC mode:
MOT#show snmp engineID
Output similar to the following is displayed:
Local SNMP engine-ID: 0030b8008300000000000000
2. When the agent is running, and if no local Engine-ID is configured or if you want
to change the previously configured value, enter the snmp-server engineID local
command to specify the desired Engine-ID:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server engineID local <WORD>
where:
WORD is the desired engine name.
3. The user name is the same user name you specify in a remote network
management station (a MIB browser, for example) when you wish to contact
the agent via SNMPv3. Use the snmp-server user command in Global
Configuration mode to configure an SNMP User with the appropriate security
attributes:
Note: The local SNMP Engine-ID is configured as
b80042005959000000000000. If the agent is not running, you can enable it
by entering any SNMP command in Global Configuration mode, such as
defining a community string using the snmp-server community public
command.
Note: If you have configured SNMP Users and you change the local SNMP
Engine-ID, you must also update the users to use them or delete them and
set new ones.
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MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server user {<WORD>} [auth [sha | md5] [key
<string> | local <string>} | password <string> | string [eng-id <WORD> | priv
des56 <string> [eng-id <WORD> | ] | eng-id <WORD> [public | <cr> ]]
where:
WORD is the name of the user.
auth indicates the user authentication parameter.
sha indicates the HMAC-SHA algorithm for authentication.
md5 indicates the HMAC-MD5 algorithm for authentication.
key <string> is the standard key.
local <string> is the localized authentication key for user.
password <string> is the assigned password; valid size is up to 64
characters.
string sets authentication password string for user.
priv des56 <string> sets privacy authentication parameters for users.
eng-id <WORD> specify the engine ID octet string associated with this user.
WORD specifies the engine-id with this user; local value of engine ID.
public sets the usmUserPublic SNMP object.
4. Assign an SNMP User to an SNMP Group by first configuring an SNMP Group
with the user defined in the Group and then assign the Group to an Access Policy.
Configuring an SNMP Access Policy assigns SNMP Groups to particular views
into the MIB tree and further identifies them with an SNMP version. Use the
snmp-server group command in Global Configuration mode to configure a new
SNMP Group or a table that maps SNMP Users to SNMP Groups. Use the no
snmp-server group command to remove a specified SNMP Group.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server group <WORD> <WORD> v3
Note: If the local engineID changes and existing users are used with the new
engineID, you must update the users with the new engineID. This feature
guards the SNMP Agent against tampering.
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where:
WORD is the desired name of the SNMP Group.
WORD is the name of the SNMP User (security name) assigned to the group.
5. Assign an SNMP Access Policy to an SNMP Group to set the MIB objects that
the SNMP Group can access. This relates to the set of MIB objects that an SNMP
User can access.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server access <WORD> {v1 | v2c | v3 {noauth |
auth | priv }} [match {exact | prefix} | notify <WORD>] [prefix <WORD>]
[read <WORD> [notify | write]] [write <WORD> [notify]]
where:
WORD is the name of the SNMP Group.
v1 accesses SNMP group using v1 security model.
v2c accesses SNMP group using v2c security model.
v3 accesses SNMP group using v3 security model.
noauth specifies no authentication.
auth specifies authentication.
priv specifies privacy.
match specifies a match paramter (exact or prefix).
notify WORD specifies a notify view name from 0 to 32 bits in length.
prefix WORD specifies a prefix name from 0 to 32 bits in length.
read WORD specifies a read view name from 0 to 32 bits in length.
notify specifies a notify view for this access group
write specifies a write view for this access group.
write WORD specify a write view name from 0 to 32 bits in length
6. Configure an SNMP View specifying the desired set of MIB objects. The view is
either read, write, or read and write, depending on the SNMP Access Policy
configured. Configure an SNMP View entry using the snmp-server view
command in Global Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server view <name> <group> {included |
excluded}
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where:
name is the desired name of the view.
group is the group name or the object identifier (OID) value.
7. By default, the proper SNMP Context is automatically configured when the
SNMP Access Policy is configured, and you need not configure a context.
However, if you change parameters for the access policy, you may want to
manually configure a context. To verify the proper SNMP Context is set, use the
show snmp context command:
MOT:7A#show snmp context
Output similar to the following is displayed:
context #1:
context #2: public
8. If you do not see the proper context, you can set an SNMP Context by issuing the
snmp-server context command:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server context <name>
where:
name is the SNMP Context name.
9. To view the configuration of SNMPv3 entries, use the show running config
command in Privileged EXEC mode:
MOT:7A#show running config
Note: Since no prefix is specified in the configuration of the SNMP Access
Policy, a prefix, or context, of blank (that is, "") is associated with this access
policy and is automatically configured. This is seen as context #1 in the
output above.
Note: If you specify a prefix of public, for example, while configuring the
SNMP Access Policy, a prefix public is associated with this access policy and
a context public is automatically added also. This is seen as context #2 in the
output above.
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Example
The example below uses the commands described above to specify sha_user as
the user, sha as the authentication algorithm, and motorola as the password. It
assigns the user to an SNMP Group auth_g and specifies that this user and group
combination applies for SNMPv3 only. It then configures an SNMP Access
Policy for the SNMP Group auth_g to have read and write privileges according to
the SNMP View auth_view. The example then configures the SNMP View
auth_view and gives access to the mib-2 MIB group and all its MIB objects.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server group auth_g sha_user v3
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server group auth_g v3 auth read auth_view
write auth_view
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server view auth_view mib-2 included
MOT:7A#show running config
The final command results in a display with SNMPv3 information similar to the
following:
snmp-server engineid local 123456700000000000000000
snmp-server context
snmp-server user sha_user auth sha local
6efff7e12db360a1b0f97ce84501c6d9aff2d282 eng-id
123456700000000000000000
snmp-server group auth_g sha_user v3
snmp-server access auth_g v3 auth match exact read auth_view write
auth_view
snmp-server community public ro
snmp-server view auth_view mib-2 included
Configuring SNMP Server Identification
Configuring the following parameters provides unique network identification for the
SNMP Agent:
Contact person
System location
Engine identifier
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Configuring System Contact Information
Establish a system contact string using the snmp-server contact command in Global
Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server contact <text>
where:
text is the system contact name.
Configuring System Location Information
Set the system location string using the snmp-server location command in Global
Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server location <text>
where:
text is the location of the system on the network.
Configuring the EngineID
1. Use the snmp-server engineID command in Global Configuration mode to
configure the Engine-ID for the local or remote SNMP entity. An SNMP entity
can be an agent or management station.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server engineID {local <engine-id> | remote
<ip-address> [udp-port <port-num>] <engine-id>}
where:
engine-id is the local or remote SNMP Engine engineID.
Note: For specifying a local engineID, you need not specify the entire
24-character engineID if it contains trailing zeros. You can specify only the
portion of the engineID up to the trailing zeros.
Note: Upon shipment, the agent has a default engineID that is equal to the
chassis MAC address.
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ip-address is the remote SNMP Engine IP address.
port-num is the optional UDP port number.
2. To remove an Engine-ID for the local or remote SNMP entity, use the no
snmp-server engineID command as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server engineID {local <engine-id> | remote
<ip-address> [udp-port <port-num>] <engine-id>}
where:
engine-id is the local or remote SNMP Server engineID.
ip-address is the remote SNMP Engine IP address.
Configuring SNMP Access Levels
Access to an SNMP Server by an SNMP client is determined by a specified access
level. You can set access levels using the following methods:
The community name method of access control and View-based Access Control
Method (VACM) are used with SNMPv1 and SNMPv2. A community name is a
text string used to authenticate messages between a management station and an
SNMP client.
The User-based Security Model (USM) and VACM are used with SNMPv3.
USM establishes user names and passwords and provides encryption. VACM
determines whether to permit access from a management station to a managed
object on the local SNMP client.
Figure 4-1 provides an overview of the SNMP access level configuration process and
the SNMP version (v1, v2c, or v3) that supports each snmp-server command.
Note: A local SNMP Engine-ID must be configured to use SNMPv3.
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Defining a Community Name
The community name access method, used predominantly with SNMPv1 and
SNMPv2, uses an SNMP Community Table that identifies those communities that
have read-only, read-write, or administrative permission to the SNMP MIB stored on
a particular server. You must define at least one SNMP community string. The
community string acts like a password to permit access to the SNMP Agent.
Optionally, you can specify one or more of the following characteristics associated
with the string:
An access list of IP addresses of the SNMP managers that are permitted to use the
community string to gain access to the agent.
A MIB view that defines the subset of all MIB objects accessible to the given
community. Refer to Configuring a MIB View on page 4-31, later in this chapter.
Read-write or read-only permission for the MIB objects accessible to the
community.
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Figure 4-1 SNMP Access Level Configuration Process
1. Use the snmp-server community command in Global Configuration mode to
define a community access string to permit access using SNMPv1 and SNMPv2
to the SNMP Agent as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server community <community-name> [ro | rw]
[view <view-name>] [<number>]
where:
community-name is the name of the SNMP community.
view-name is the name of the view.
number is the number of the access list.
Create
User
Model
Create
Group
Model
Create
MIB
View
Associate
MIB View

Associate
User
Model
snmp-server user user-name
snmp-server group group-name user user-name
snmp-server view view-name
snmp-server access
Create
Community
Name
snmp-server community community-name
to Group
group-name view-name
Community Name
snmp-server community community-name view-name

Associate
MIB View to
SNMPv3 SNMPv1/v2c
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2. Use the no snmp-server community command to remove the specified
community string.
Example
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server community public
Configuring USM and VACM Security
You can define security levels for each SNMP Server by establishing a USM with
defined access levels. Set permissions to a specified set of MIB objects with the
VACM. These security methods encrypt transmissions between an SNMP client and
server and allow the SNMP Server to authenticate each user requesting access. They
also let you specify various protection levels (unsecured, authenticated, and
authenticated with encryption) that are common to SNMPv3. USM specifies
authentication and encryption functions. VACM specifies how access-control rules
are handled. Configuring USM and VACM security for an SNMP Server involves the
following tasks:
Configuring a Group Model
Configuring a MIB View
Associating Groups to MIB Views
Configuring an SNMP Context
Caution: Using only a community name to establish SNMP access levels is
not a completely secure access control method. The community string is
included in every packet transmitted between an SNMP client and server
but is not encrypted, which makes SNMP Get/Set operations potentially
accessible to any packet capture software. Access to SNMP Get/Set
operations could provide the following:
A blueprint of a network topology and configuration
Control of a device configured for remote SNMP management
Note: If you do not specify a view, the system sets a default to the dod MIB
group (that is, 1.3.6). If you do not specify an administrative permission
(read-only or read-write), the system uses the default of read-only.
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4-30 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
1. To configure a new SNMP User, use the snmp-server user command in Global
Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server user <username> [auth {sha | md5}
{password <password> | key <key> | local <localized_key>} [priv des56
{password <password> | key <key> | local <localized_key>}] [eng-id
<engine-id>]]
where:
username is the new SNMP User.
password is the assigned password; valid size is up to 64 characters.
localized_key is the localized key.
engine-id is the engine name.
2. Use the no snmp-server user <user-name> command to remove a user.
where:
username is the SNMP User to be removed.
Configuring a Group Model
1. Use the snmp-server group command in Global Configuration mode to
configure a new SNMP Group or a table that maps SNMP Users to SNMP
Groups:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server group <group-name> <user-name> {v1 | v2c
| v3}
where:
group-name is the new SNMP Group name.
username is the SNMP User.
2. Use the no snmp-server group command to remove a specified SNMP Group:
MOT:7A(config)#no snmp-server group <group-name>
where:
group-name is the removed SNMP Group name.
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Configuring a MIB View
You can assign MIB views to SNMP Groups or community strings to limit the MIB
objects that an SNMP manager can access. You can use a predefined view or create
your own view. You create or update an SNMP View entry using the snmp-server
view command in Global Configuration mode. You can enter this command multiple
times for the same view record. Later lines take precedence when an object identifier
is included in two or more lines.
1. MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server view <name> <oidsubtree> {included |
excluded}
where:
name is the new MIB view name.
oidsubtree is the subtree of the MIB view family name.
included specifies the subtree is included in view.
excluded specifies the subtree is excluded from view.
2. Use the snmp-server view <new-view-name> to view the available MIB groups
when configuring the view. The following example creates a view that includes
all objects in the MIB-II subtree:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server view <name> mib-2 included
where:
name is the new MIB view name.
3. Use the no snmp-server view <new-view-name> command to remove the
specified SNMP MIB view entry.
Examples
The following example creates a view that includes all objects in the MIB-II system
group and all objects in the RiverDelta Networks, Inc. Enterprise MIBs:
snmp-server view <new-view-name> system included
snmp-server view <new-view-name> riverdelta included
The following example creates a view that includes all objects in the MIB-II group
except for the Interfaces group:
snmp-server view <new-view-name> mib-2 included
snmp-server view <new-view-name> interfaces excluded
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Associating Groups to MIB Views
You can associate an SNMP Group to specific SNMP MIB views. This restricts
access to the MIB objects defined in the view to the SNMP Group, limiting which
MIB objects an SNMP manager can access.
Use the snmp-server access command in Global Configuration mode to map SNMP
Groups to SNMP MIB views.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server access <group-name> {v1 | v2c | v3 noauth | v3
auth | v3 priv} [prefix <>] [match exact | match prefix] [read
<new-MIB-view-name>] [write <new-MIB-view-name>] [notify
<new-MIB-view-name>]
Example
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server access <group-name> v3 auth write
<new-MIB-view-name>
Configuring an SNMP Context
An SNMP Context is a collection of managed object resources that an SNMPv2 entity
can access. Configuring a context record as part of an access policy further restricts
access to MIB views. The object resources identified by a context are either local or
remote. An SNMP Context that refers to local object resources is identified as a MIB
view. The SNMP entity uses local mechanisms to access the management information
identified by the context.
1. To create or update a context record, use the snmp-server context command in
Global Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server context <context-name>
2. Use the no snmp-server context command to remove the specified SNMP
Context.
Note: You must configure a context in conjunction with configuring an access
policy. If a prefix name is configured with the snmp-server access
command, it should have the same name as the context.
Note: If you do not specify a prefix name with the snmp-server access
command, you must add a blank context such as snmp-server context.
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Configuring SNMP through the CLI
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 4-33
Example
The following example shows how to create a context to be used to further restrict
access:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server context mycontext
Configuring Packet Size
1. Use the snmp-server packetsize command in Global Configuration mode to
change the permitted SNMP packet size that the SNMP Server can receive or
transmit:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server packetsize <value>
where:
value is the permitted SNMP packet size, expressed in bytes; valid range is
484 to 17940; default is 1400.
2. Use the show snmp packetsize to view the currently configured packet size.
Monitoring SNMP
To monitor the status of SNMP operations on your network and check current SNMP
settings, you use a series of show snmp commands. To issue show snmp commands,
do the following:
1. Enter the Privileged EXEC or Global Configuration mode.
2. Use the show snmp command to check the status of SNMP communications and
access counter information for SNMP operations. Use the show snmp command
with the command-name option to access specific SNMP information.
Table 4-3 lists the show snmp commands.
Table 4-3 show snmp Commands
Command Description
show snmp Provides counter information for SNMP operations.
It also displays the chassis ID string.
show snmp access Displays SNMP Access information.
show snmp community Displays SNMP community information.
show snmp contact Displays SNMP system contact information.
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show snmp context Displays SNMP v3 context information.
show snmp description Displays SNMP system description.
show snmp engineID Displays local and remote engineIDs.
show snmp group Display the names of the SNMP Groups, security
names, security models, status of the different
views, and storage type for each group.
show snmp host Displays SNMP host notification information.
show snmp location Displays SNMP system location information.
show snmp packetsize Displays the currently configured SNMP PDU
packet size.
show snmp port number Displays SNMP Agent port information.
show snmp sysname Displays SNMP sysname system information.
show snmp users Displays information for SNMP User names in the
SNMP Group user name table.
show snmp view Displays SNMP View information including subtree,
status, storage type, and security.
show snmp description Displays SNMP system description.
Table 4-3 show snmp Commands
Command Description
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 5-1
5
MIB Traps
Overview
This chapter gives instructions on how to access both standard and private MIB traps
that are supported by the BSR 64000.
Accessing MIB traps with a DOCSIS Name
Follow these steps to access DOCSIS-related MIB trap names through CableLabs:
1. Click on the blue World Wide Web link to access the CableLabs Web site:
http://www.cablelabs.com
2. Find the desired MIB trap name and enter it in the Search field and click the
Search button. Once you find the document, the document displays as a PDF in
your Web browser.
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
5-2 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Accessing MIB traps with RFC Numbers
Follow these steps to access MIB traps with Request for Comments (RFCs) numbers:
1. Click on the blue World Wide Web link to access an RFC from the Internet
Engineering Task Force (IETF) Web site:
http://www.ietf.org/rfc.html
2. Find the desired RFC number and enter it in the field and click the go button. The
RFC displays as a text document.
Release 6.3.1 MIB Traps
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 5-3
DOCSIS and Standard MIB Trap Information
Table 5-1 displays a description and the DOCSIS and Standard MIB file names that
are supported by the BSR 64000. The Associated Traps Column provides the trap
names for each DOCSIS and Standard MIB file.
Table 5-1 DOCSIS and Standard MIB Traps
MIB File Associated Traps
DOCS-CABLE-DEVICE-TRAP.mib docsDevCmInitTLVUnknownTrap
docsDevCmDynServReqFailTrap
docsDevCmDynServRspFailTrap
docsDevCmDynServAckFailTrap
docsDevCmBpiInitTrap
docsDevCmBPKMTrap
docsDevCmDynamicSATrap
docsDevCmDhcpFailTrap
docsDevCmSwUpgradeInitTrap
docsDevCmSwUpgradeFailTrap
docsDevCmSwUpgradeSuccessTrap
docsDevCmSwUpgradeCVCFailTrap
docsDevCmTODFailTrap
docsDevCmDCCReqFailTrap
docsDevCmDCCRspFailTrap
docsDevCmDCCAckFailTrap
docsDevCmtsInitRegReqFailTrap
docsDevCmtsInitRegRspFailTrap
docsDevCmtsInitRegAckFailTrap
docsDevCmtsDynServReqFailTrap
docsDevCmtsDynServRspFailTrap
docsDevCmtsDynServAckFailTrap
docsDevCmtsBpiInitTrap
docsDevCmtsBPKMTrap
docsDevCmtsDynamicSATrap
docsDevCmtsDCCReqFailTrap
docsDevCmtsDCCRspFailTrap
docsDevCmtsDCCAckFailTrap
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
5-4 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
docs-diag.mib docsDiagLogSizeHighThrshldReached
docsDiagLogSizeLowThrshldReached
docsDiagLogSizeFull
docs-if3.mib docsIf3CmtsEventNotif
docsIf3CmEventNotif
draft-bgp4.mib bgpEstablished
bgpBackwardTransition
draft-ietf-ppvpn-mpls-vpn-mib-05.mib mplsVrfIfUp
mplsVrfIfDown
mplsNumVrfRouteMidThreshExceeded
mplsNumVrfRouteMaxThreshExceeded
mplsNumVrfSecIllglLblThrshExcd
mplsNumVrfRouteMaxThreshCleared
rfc1850.mib ospfIfStateChange
ospfVirtIfStateChange
ospfNbrStateChange
ospfVirtNbrStateChange
ospfIfConfigError
ospfVirtIfConfigError
ospfIfAuthFailure
ospfVirtIfAuthFailure
ospfIfRxBadPacket
ospfVirtIfRxBadPacket
ospfTxRetransmit
ospfVirtIfTxRetransmit
ospfOriginateLsa
ospfMaxAgeLsa
ospfLsdbOverflow
ospfLsdbApproachingOverflow
rfc2578.mib MACRO::=
rfc2737.mib entConfigChange
rfc2787.mib vrrpTrapNewMaster
vrrpTrapAuthFailure
Table 5-1 DOCSIS and Standard MIB Traps
MIB File Associated Traps
Release 6.3.1 MIB Traps
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 5-5
rfc2863.mib linkDown
linkUp
rfc2934.mib pimNeighborLoss
rfc3418.mib coldStart
warmStart
linkDown::={snmpTraps3}
linkUp::={snmpTraps4}
authenticationFailure
rfc3812.mib mplsTunnelUp
mplsTunnelDown
mplsTunnelRerouted
mplsTunnelReoptimized
rfc3813.mib mplsXCUp
mplsXCDown
rfc3815.mib mplsLdpInitSessionThresholdExceeded
mplsLdpPathVectorLimitMismatch
mplsLdpSessionUp
mplsLdpSessionDown
rfc4133.mib entConfigChange
rfc4188.mib newRoot
topologyChange
Table 5-1 DOCSIS and Standard MIB Traps
MIB File Associated Traps
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
5-6 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Motorola Private Trap Information
Table 5-2 describes each applicable Motorola Private MIB and its associated trap(s):
Table 5-2 Motorola Private Traps
MIB File Trap Name
rdn-chassis.mib chassisPowerFailureTrap
chassisFanFailureTrap
rdnBSRSrmSwitchoverTrap
rdnLinkUpTrap
rdnLinkDownTrap
rdnBsrTestTrap
rdn-cmts.mib rdnCmtsCmRegisteredNotification Trap
rdnCmtsCmDeregisteredNotification Trap
rdnCmtsUpstreamIfLinkUpTrap
rdnCmtsUpstreamIfLinkDownTrap
rdnRQueryPollDoneNotification
rdnPktDQoSAdmittedBwThresholdTrap
rdn_pktcable.mib rdnPktDQoSCopsTrap
rdnPktDQoSResReqTrap
rdnPktDQoSEmergencyTrap
rdnPktDQoSEmergencyPreemptTrap
rdnPktESTrap
rdnPktDQoSRKSTrap
rdn-sensor.mib rdnSensorThresholdExceeded
rdn-syslog.mib rdnSyslogSeverityTrap
RDN-CABLE-SPECTRUM.mib rdnFlapListNotification
rdnFlapModemNotification
Release 6.3.1 MIB Traps
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 5-7
rdn-evtNotifications.mib
Note: Refer to Configuring EVT
Logging in Chapter 3 of the BSR
64000 Configuration and
Management Guide for more
information on configuring EVT
traps.
rdnEvtMacrtrGetQIdFailure
rdnEvtMacrtrUnknownCase
rdnEvtMacrtrMsgQReceiveFailure
rdnEvtMacrtrRdbDefineTableFailure
rdnEvtMacrtrRxUnexpectedMsgType
rdnEvtMacrtrRegTaskMonFailure
rdnEvtMacrtrInvalidFuncParam
rdnEvtMacrtrUnknownCmId
rdnEvtBpiLoadAuthRunRecFailure
rdnEvtBpiLoadTekRunRecFailure
rdnEvtBpiLoadCmCertificateFailure
rdnEvtDraTaskSpawnFailure
rdnEvtDraMsgQCreateFailure
rdnEvtDraMsgQReceiveFailure
rdnEvtDraRegTaskMonFailure
rdnEvtDraCreateRdbFailure
rdnEvtDraRxUnexpectedMsgType
rdnEvtDraRxUnexpectedMsgSubType
rdnEvtDraTmrInitFailure
rdnEvtDraInvalidFuncParam
rdnEvtDraInvalidMsgParam
rdnEvtRdbMsgQCheckFailure
rdnEvtRdbCreateDatabaseFailure
rdnEvtRdbInitDatabaseFailure
rdnEvtRdbSemCreateFailure
rdnEvtRdbUnknownTableFromPeer
rdnEvtRdbDefineTableNotEnoughMemory
rdnEvtRdbMsgBufAllocFailure
rdnEvtRdbMemPoolAllocFailure
rdnEvtRdbMallocFailure
rdnEvtDrmSpareCmtsActive
rdnEvtDrmFailedAutoTakeover
rdnEvtDrmFailedAutoGiveback
rdnEvtDrmSpareXmittersRcvrsMismatch
rdnEvtAccrtrRdbDefineTableFailure
Table 5-2 Motorola Private Traps
MIB File Trap Name
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
5-8 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
rdn-evtNotifications.mib
(continued)
rdnEvtAccrtrRdbNextFailure
rdnEvtAccrtrNotFrozenLoad
rdnEvtArdrtrRdbDefineTableFailure
rdnEvtArdrtrRdbNextFailure
rdnEvtArdrtrNotFrozenLoad
rdnEvtArdrtrLoadFailure
rdnEvtMacmgrValidateCmError
rdnEvtMacmgrInvalidateCmError
rdnEvtMacmgrNullPtr
rdnEvtDocsifCmtsCmIndexAddFreeListFailure
rdnEvtDocsifCmtsCmIndexDelFreeListFailure
rdnEvtDocsifCmtsCmIndexReloadFreeListFailure
rdnEvtUpcTaskSpawnFailure
rdnEvtUpcMsgQCreateFailure
rdnEvtUpcMsgQReceiveFailure
dnEvtUpcRegTaskMonFailure
rdnEvtUpcRxUnexpectedMsgType
rdnEvtUpcRxUnexpectedMsgSubType
rdnEvtUpcSemCreateFailure
rdnEvtSvcfloNullPtr
rdnEvtSvcfloWriteNextFlowTlvError
rdnEvtSvcfloSidInsertFailure
rdnEvtUbshaCollectionRspMallocError
rdnEvtUbshaTaskSuspended
Table 5-2 Motorola Private Traps
MIB File Trap Name
Release 6.3.1 MIB Traps
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 5-9
Motorola Private CMTS and PacketCable Private
Traps
Table 5-3 lists additional Motorola Private CMTS and PacketCable MIB Traps.
RDN-SpectrumGroup.mib rdnCableSnrAbortTrap
rdnCableSnrResultReadyTrap
rdnCableFrequencyHopTrap
rdnCableFrequencyRollbackTrap
rdnCableModulationProfileHopTrap
rdnCableModulationProfileRollbackTrap
rdnCableFrequencyRevertedTrap
rdnCableModulationProfileRevertedTrap
rdnCableChannelImpairedTrap
rdnCableChannelNormalTrap
rdnCableChannelPendingTrap
rdnCableFrequencyHopFailureTrap
rdnCableModulationProfileHopFailureTrap
rdnCableSpectrumGroupConflictTrap
Table 5-3 Private DOCSIS and PacketCable MIB Traps
MIB File Associated Traps Object Object Description
rdn-Cmts rdnCmtsCmRegisteredN
otification
docsIfCmtsCmStatusIPAddress Indicates the IP address of the
registered Cable Modem.
rdn-Pktcable rdnPktDQoSEmergency
PreemptTrap
rdnPktDQoSEmergencyPreempt
Reason
This trap occurs when the High
Priority call (e.g. 911
Emergency Call) is preempted
successfully. The trap provides
the reason code, MAC
address, service name and the
gate ID.
Table 5-2 Motorola Private Traps
MIB File Trap Name
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
5-10 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Trap Severity Levels
Table 5-4 describes the trap severity levels that are described in this book from 1,
which is most severe, to 7, which is informational:
Table 5-4 Trap Severity Levels
Level Severity Description
1 emergencies Emergency conditions where the system is unusable - reserved for
vendor-specific, fatal hardware or software errors that prevents normal system
operation and causes reporting system to reboot.
2 alerts Conditions where immediate action is needed - a serious failure which causes the
reporting system to reboot but is not caused by hardware or software
malfunctioning.
3 critical Critical conditions - a serious failure that requires immediate attention and
prevents the device from transmitting data but the system could recover without
rebooting.
4 errors Error conditions - a failure occurred that could interrupt the normal data flow.
5 warnings Warning conditions - a failure occurred that could interrupt the normal data flow.
6 notifications Normal but significant conditions - an event of importance occurred which is not a
failure.
7 informational Informational descriptive system messages - an unimportant event, which could
be helpful for tracing normal operations.
Release 6.3.1 MIB Traps
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 5-11
Private Traps and Their Severity Levels
Table 5-5 provides a list of SNMP Trap severity levels for SNMP traps:
Table 5-5 Private Trap Severity Levels
Trap Severity Level Associated Traps
Emergency None
Alert rdnEvtMacrtrGetQIdFailure
rdnEvtMacrtrUnknownCase
rdnEvtMacrtrMsgQReceiveFailure
rdnEvtMacrtrRdbDefineTableFailure
rdnEvtMacrtrRxUnexpectedMsgType
rdnEvtMacrtrRegTaskMonFailure
rdnEvtMacrtrInvalidFuncParam
rdnEvtMacrtrUnknownCmId
rdnEvtBpiLoadAuthRunRecFailure
rdnEvtBpiLoadTekRunRecFailure
rdnEvtBpiLoadCmCertificateFailure
rdnEvtDraTaskSpawnFailure
rdnEvtDraMsgQCreateFailure
rdnEvtDraMsgQReceiveFailure
rdnEvtDraRegTaskMonFailure
rdnEvtDraCreateRdbFailure
rdnEvtDraRxUnexpectedMsgType
rdnEvtDraRxUnexpectedMsgSubType
rdnEvtDraInvalidFuncParam
rdnEvtDraInvalidMsgParam
rdnEvtRdbMsgQCheckFailure
rdnEvtRdbCreateDatabaseFailure
rdnEvtRdbInitDatabaseFailure
rdnEvtRdbSemCreateFailure
rdnEvtRdbUnknownTableFromPeer
rdnEvtRdbDefineTableNotEnoughMemory
rdnEvtRdbMsgBufAllocFailure
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
5-12 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Alert (continued) rdnEvtRdbMemPoolAllocFailure
rdnEvtRdbMallocFailure
rdnEvtDrmSpareXmittersRcvrsMismatch
rdnEvtAccrtrRdbDefineTableFailure
rdnEvtAccrtrRdbNextFailure
rdnEvtAccrtrNotFrozenLoad
rdnEvtArdrtrRdbDefineTableFailure
rdnEvtArdrtrRdbNextFailure
rdnEvtArdrtrNotFrozenLoad
rdnEvtArdrtrLoadFailure
rdnEvtMacmgrValidateCmError
rdnEvtMacmgrInvalidateCmError
rdnEvtMacmgrNullPtr
rdnEvtDocsifCmtsCmIndexAddFreeListFailure
rdnEvtDocsifCmtsCmIndexDelFreeListFailure
rdnEvtDocsifCmtsCmIndexReloadFreeListFailure
rdnEvtUpcTaskSpawnFailure
rdnEvtUpcMsgQCreateFailure
rdnEvtUpcMsgQReceiveFailure
rdnEvtUpcRegTaskMonFailure
rdnEvtUpcRxUnexpectedMsgType
rdnEvtUpcRxUnexpectedMsgSubType
rdnEvtUpcSemCreateFailure
rdnEvtSvcfloNullPtr
rdnEvtSvcfloWriteNextFlowTlvError
rdnEvtSvcfloSidInsertFailure
rdnEvtUbshaCollectionRspMallocError
rdnEvtUbshaTaskSuspended
coldStart
warmStart
chassisFanFailureTrap
chassisPowerFailureTrap
Critical rdnEvtDrmSpareCmtsActive
rdnEvtDrmFailedAutoTakeover
rdnEvtDrmFailedAutoGiveback
Table 5-5 Private Trap Severity Levels
Trap Severity Level Associated Traps
Release 6.3.1 MIB Traps
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 5-13
Error rdnFlapModemNotification
rdnFlapListNotification
docsDevCmBpiInitTrap
docsDevCmBPKMTrap
docsDevCmDynamicSATrap
Warning rdnPktDQoSCopsTrap
rdnPktDQoSResReqTrap
rdnPktDQoSEmergencyTrap
rdnPktESTrap
authenticationFailure
docsDevCmtsInitRegReqFailTrap
docsDevCmtsInitRegRspFailTrap
docsDevCmtsInitRegAckFailTrap
docsDevCmtsDynServReqFailTrap
docsDevCmtsDynServRspFailTrap
docsDevCmtsDynServAckFailTrap
docsDevCmtsDCCReqFailTrap
docsDevCmtsDCCRspFailTrap
docsDevCmtsDCCAckFailTrap
Table 5-5 Private Trap Severity Levels
Trap Severity Level Associated Traps
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
5-14 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Notice rdnLinkDownTrap
rdnLinkUpTrap
rdnCmtsUpstreamIfLinkUpTrap
rdnCmtsUpstreamIfLinkDownTrap
rdnCmtsCmRegisteredNotification
rdnCmtsCmDeregisteredNotification
linkDown
linkUp
rdnSensorThresholdExceeded
GrdnSyslogSeverityTrap
Note: All other types not listed default to the Notice level
including:
bgpEstablished
bgpBackwardTransition
ospfIfStateChange
entConfigChange
vrrpTrapNewMaster
vrrpTrapAuthFailure
pimNeighborLoss
Information None
Debug None
Table 5-5 Private Trap Severity Levels
Trap Severity Level Associated Traps
Release 6.3.1 MIB Traps
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 5-15
Enabling or Disabling Traps
Table 5-6 describes the Motorola Private SNMP trap enable and disable flags and
their associated CLI commands. Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide
for more detailed configuration information pertaining to these commands:
Table 5-6 Enabling or Disabling Trap Flags using their associated CLI commands
Private MIB File Trap Flag Associated CLI Command(s)
RDN-CABLE-SPECTRUM.
mib
flapListTrapEnable cable flap-list trap-enable
no cable flap-list
percentage-threshold
rdn-cmts.mib rdnCmtsLinkUpDownTrapEnableTabl
e
cable upstream trap-enable-cmts
no cable upstream trap-enable-rdn
rdnCmtsLinkUpDownTrapEnableEntry
rdnCmtsLinkupDownTrapEnable
rdnCmtsCmRegisteredTrapEnable snmp-server enable traps
registration
no snmp-server enable traps
registration
rdn-pktcable.mib rdnPktDQoSCopsTrapEnable dqos cops-trap-enable enable
dqos cops-trap-enable disable
rdnPktDQoSResReqTrapEnable dqos res-req-trap-enable enable
dqos res-req-trap-enable disable
rdnPktESTrapEnable es trap-enable enable
es trap-enable disable
clear configuration es
rdnPktDQoSEmergency TrapEnable dqos emergency-trap-enable
rfc2863.mib ifLinkUpDownTrapEnable trap-enable-if
no trap-enable-if
rfc3418.mib rfc3418snmpEnableAuthenTraps snmp-server enable traps snmp
auth-failure
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
5-16 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
Filtering Traps
Table 5-7 describes the SNMP trap filter tables and their associated CLI commands.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide for more detailed configuration
information pertaining to these commands:
Table 5-7 Using the CLI to Filter Traps
MIB File Trap Filter Table Associated CLI Command(s)
docs-cable-device-trap.mib docsDevEvControlTable logging snmp-trap
logging reporting severity
no logging control docsis
docsDevCmtsTrapControl snmp-server docs-trap-control
no snmp-server docs-trap-control
mib2c.mib snmpNotifyFilterProfileTable snmp-server notify-filter-profile
snmp-server host
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6
Using a MIB Browser to
Access MIB Variables
Overview
This chapter provides a brief overview of using a graphical interface MIB browser
including:
Basic procedures for using the browser
The SNMP Get, GetNext, and Set commands
The rationale behind updating a MIB database.
Note: The information and procedures provided use a generic graphical
interface MIB browser application as an example. There are many
interface-based MIB browsers available and, while they support similar
functions and presentation, there are vendor-specific differences in
procedure.
There are also several command line MIB browsers available which are
beyond the scope of this document.
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About MIB Browsers
With a MIB browser, you can examine the MIBs supported by an active device on
your network and perform SNMP Get, GetNext, and Set commands on the MIB
objects.
To successfully communicate with intelligent devices with SNMP, some MIB
browsers rely on their own database of MIB information. The OIDs, ASCII names,
and other technical information stored in this database allow you to easily search for
and select the objects whose information you want to view or change. You use the
MIB browser application to both query and set objects in your intelligent devices.
The following sections describe using a MIB browser to:
Contact a device
Navigate through its supported MIBs
Query the device for MIB values
Set a new value for a MIB object at the device
Contacting the Device
Before you can access MIB information for a device through a MIB browser, you
must establish contact with the device. You contact a device through the MIB browser
interface by specifying the devices IP address and the community name.
SNMP community names are used to control management access to a device. The
level of control that a managing entity has over the device corresponds to the access
level provided by the community name used in a management request: Read Only,
Read-Write, or Superuser.
For SNMP communication to take place, the SNMP agent must be running on the
device and the specified community name must match one of the devices community
names. SNMP runs as a daemon on Solaris and as a service on NT.
Follow these steps to determine if the SNMP agent is running on the device:
1. Telnet to the device
2. Issue the ps command and look for an entry for the snmpd process. For
example, this entry may read:
407 0 S0 7e8d0 103c 7f7f4 12 12 0 18 0:00.017 ? snmpd
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Browsing the MIB Tree
A graphical MIB browser provides an interface that lets you query any SNMP device
on your network and examine its supported MIBs. The MIB information is visually
structured into a tree format, similar to a directory tree. Using the mouse, you can
scroll through the tree and click on folder icons to open the tree layer of interest. Like
a file directory tree, the MIB Tree is represented by a series of collapsible and
expandable folders, with the individual MIB Objects contained in each folder.
Once you have successfully contacted a device, you will be able to browse its
supported MIBs through a MIB tree display in the browser window, and query the
device for its MIB object values. Like a file directory tree, the MIB tree is represented
by a series of collapsible and expandable folders, containing the individual MIB
objects.
Figure 6-1 shows the top level of the MIB tree is shown. When you click on a level of
a tree, it is highlighted to show that it is selected. Each branch of the tree is indicated
by a folder.
Figure 6-1 The Top Level of the MIB Tree
iso (1)
ccitt (0)
joint-iso-ccitt (2)
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Figure 6-2 shows that the iso > org > dod > internet branch has been opened.
Each folder icon changes and is marked with a minus sign (-) to denote that it has
been expanded. The mgmt and private folders are marked with a plus sign (+),
indicating that they are expandable to reveal more information, but have not yet been
opened.
A folder without a plus sign (+) or minus sign (-) indicates an empty tree branch that
is not expandable.
Figure 6-2 The Path to the Internet Branch of the MIB Tree
iso (1)
org (3)
dod (6)
internet (1)
directory (1)
mgmt (2)
private (4)
experimental (3)
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Figure 6-3 shows the MIB tree further expanded to reveal a management object (leaf),
specifically the iso -> org -> dod -> internet -> mgmt -> mib-2 -> system ->
sysDescr object
Figure 6-3 The MIB Tree Expanded to Reveal an Object
SNMP Get/Get Next
To find the current value set at the selected device for a specific MIB object or set of
objects, you must query the device for the information. A query consists of an SNMP
Get (to retrieve a specific piece of management information) or SNMP GetNext (to
traverse a portion of the tree and retrieve all its information) command issued by the
browser to the contacted device. When you query a device, it returns a value for every
instance of the specified object(s).
iso (1)
org (3)
dod (6)
internet (1)
directory (1)
mgmt (2)
mib-2 (1)
system (1)
sysDescr (1)
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SNMP Set
With a MIB browser, you can change the value of a writable object in a devices MIB.
This is accomplished with an SNMP Set command. If you attempt to change the
value of an object and a message similar to Selected item is not write enabled.
appears. This may occur because:
You do not have permission to write to the device
The object itself has been designated read-only.
Objects which are present in the device have not been added to the current MIB
database.
Before you begin, you can determine if an object is writable by performing a query on
the object and reading the data that is returned.
Compiling and Importing New SNMP MIBs
There are several reasons that you may want to import additional or updated MIBs
into your database, or create custom MIB databases:
You want to manage third-party devices not already supported, you will need to
import their vendors private MIBs (which will not be included in your default
MIB database).
MIBs especially private MIBs are frequently updated, and you may need to
import a new version of a MIB.
Some of your newer networking devices may still be under heavy development,
and new firmware may include functionality provided by entirely new private
MIBs.
By importing new and updated MIBs to create custom MIB databases, you can ensure
that your MIB databases remain up-to-date and contain all the MIB information you
need to successfully monitor and manage your network devices.
Sample Tasks
This section provides two sample tasks using a graphical MIB browser:
Accessing MIB variable information
Changing a MIB variable
Release 6.3.1 Using a MIB Browser to Access MIB Variables
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Accessing MIB Variable Information
To find the current value set at the selected device for a specific MIB object or set of
objects, the MIB browser issues an SNMP Get command (to retrieve a specific piece
of management information) or SNMP Get Next command (to traverse a portion of
the tree and retrieve all its information).
Sample Task
A network administrator needs to know how long a particular device has been on-line
since it was last rebooted. In our example, we will be finding the value of the
sysUpTime object. The MIB hierarchy that leads to the sysUpTime object is:
1.2.6.1.2.1.13
iso -> org -> dod-> internet -> mgmt -> mib-2 -> system -> sysUpTime
To query a device for the value of the sysUpTime object, do the following:
1. Start your MIB browser.
2. Connect to the device of interest by specifying the devices IP address and
community name.
Note: Be sure that you have contacted the device and that you are using a
community name which provides you with write access to the desired MIB
object. The appropriate community name may depend upon which MIB
component contains the object you want to set. Refer to Contacting the
Device on page 6-2.
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3. In the MIB tree display, navigate through the MIB hierarchy until you reach the
mib-2 folder (Figure 6-4)
Figure 6-4 The mib-2 Hierarchy
4. Open the mib-2 folder

iso (1)
dod (6)
internet (1)
mgmt (2)
org (2)
mib-2 (1)
Navigate to the
mib-2 folder
Release 6.3.1 Using a MIB Browser to Access MIB Variables
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 6-9
5. Open the system folder to display the objects in the system group (Figure 6-5).

Figure 6-5 The mib-2 and system Folders
iso (1)
dod (6)
internet (1)
mgmt (2)
org (2)
mib-2 (1)
system (1)
interface (2)
sysServices (7)
sysLocation (6)
sysName (5)
sysContact (4)
sysUpTime (3)
sysObjectID (2)
sysDescr (1)
Open the mib-2
and system folders
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6. Select the sysUpTime object (Figure 6-6).
Figure 6-6 Selecting the sysUpTime Object
iso (1)
dod (6)
internet (1)
mgmt (2)
org (2)
mib-2 (1)
system (1)
interface (2)
sysServices (7)
sysLocation (6)
sysName (5)
sysContact (4)
sysObjectID (2)
sysDescr (1)
sysUptime (3)
Select the
sysUpTime object
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All or part of the following should be retrieved and displayed for the sysUpTime
object:
Object Name sysUpTime
Object ID 1.2.6.1.2.1.1.3
Type TimeTicks
Access read-only
Description The time (in hundredths of a second)
since the network management portion
of the system was last
re-initialized.
Value 28 days 20:05:41
Changing MIB Variables
To change the value of a writable MIB object, the MIB browser issues an
SNMP Set command. Before you begin, you can determine if an object is writable by
performing a query on the object and reading the data that is returned. See Accessing
MIB Variable Information on page 6-7.
Sample Task
A network administrator wants to clear all messages from the syslog files on a remote
syslog server device. In our example, we will be changing the value of the
rdnSyslogClear object. The MIB hierarchy that leads to the rdnSyslogClear object is:
1.2.6.1.4.1.4981.3.7
iso -> org -> dod -> internet -> private -> enterprises -> rdn -> syslog
->rdnSyslogClear
Follow these steps to change the value of the rdnSyslogClear object on a device:
Note: Depending on the particular MIB browser application that you are
using, the query information for the sysUpTime object may be accessed and
displayed differently. Refer to your MIB browser documentation.
Note: Be sure that you have contacted the device and that you are using a
community name which provides you with write access to the desired MIB
object. The appropriate community name may depend upon which MIB
component contains the object you want to set. Refer to Contacting the
Device on page 6-2.
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6-12 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
1. Start your MIB browser.
2. Connect to the device of interest by specifying the devices IP address and
community name.
3. In the MIB tree display, navigate through the MIB hierarchy until you reach the
rdn folder (Figure 6-7).

Figure 6-7 The rdn MIB Hierarchy
4. Open the rdn folder

iso (1)
dod (6)
internet (1)
private (4)
org (2)
rdn (4981)
Navigate to the
rdn folder
enterprises (1)
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Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 6-13
5. Open the syslog folder to display the objects in the syslog group (Figure 6-8).
Figure 6-8 The rdn and syslog Folders
iso (1)
dod (6)
internet (1)
private (4)
org (2)
enterprises (1)
rdn (4981)
syslog (3)
rdnSyslogClear (7)
rdnSyslogConsoleSeverity (6)
rdnSyslogSeverity (5)
rdnSyslogServerTable (4)
rdnSyslogServerEnable (3)
rdnSyslogMaxSize (2)
rdnSyslogSize (1)
cmts (2)
Open the
rdn folder
Open the
syslog folder
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6. Select the rdnSyslogClear object (Figure 6-9).
Figure 6-9 Selecting the rdnSyslogClear Object
7. Set the rdnSyslogClear object to TRUE.
Note: The exact procedure for changing an objects value through a MIB
browser interface depends on the particular MIB browser application that you
are using. Refer to your MIB browser documentation.
iso (1)
dod (6)
internet (1)
private (4)
org (2)
enterprises (1)
rdn (4981)
syslog (3)
rdnSyslogConsoleSeverity (6)
rdnSyslogSeverity (5)
rdnSyslogServerTable (4)
rdnSyslogServerEnable (3)
rdnSyslogMaxSize (2)
rdnSyslogSize (1)
cmts (2)
rdnSyslogClear (7)
Select the
rdnSyslogClear object
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 7-1
7
DOCSIS 2.0/3.0 MIB Support
Introduction
This chapter provides a high-level summary of the MIB differences between DOCSIS
2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0 MIBs. BSR 64000 software releases produce two compressed
.tar files containing the MIBs for a particular build, as follows:
<Release Name>nonprivatemibs.tgz (DOCSIS standard MIBs)
<Release Name>privatemibs.tgz (Motorola proprietary MIBs)
The nonprivatemibs.tgz file contains the DOCSIS 3.0 MIB files at the top
level. There is also a subdirectory called mibs_2.0 that contains the older DOCSIS
2.0 MIBs. This subdirectory is a copy of the main directory for Release 5.2.0 and
earlier. Both the DOCSIS 2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0 standard MIBS are essentially
unchanged from the Cablelabs versions. Customers can also download DOCSIS
MIBs directly from the Cablelabs website:
http://www.cablemodem.com/
Customers can organize these MIBs, in their SNMP Managers, according to their
preferences or any vendor-specific requirements. Motorola does not require any
specific directory structure on customer management systems.
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7-2 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
MIB File Differences Between DOCSIS 2.0 and
DOSIS 3.0
This section summarizes the differences between MIB files in the DOCSIS 2.0 and
DOCSIS 3.0 directories. This includes a listings of MIBs that are supported in
DOCSIS 2.0 only, DOCSIS 3.0 only, or are common to both DOCSIS 2.0 and 3.0.
This section also includes a listing of deprecated tables and obsoleted tables and
RFCs.
The following topics are provided in this section:
MIB Files Supported in DOCSIS 2.0 Only
MIB Files Supported in DOCSIS 3.0 Only
MIB Files Common to DOCSIS 2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0
MIB Files Identical for DOCSIS 2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0
Deprecated DOCSIS 2.0 MIB Tables
Deprecated DOCSIS 3.0 MIB Tables
Obsoleted DOCSIS 2.0 MIB Tables and RFCs
MIB Files Supported in DOCSIS 2.0 Only
Note: As a rule, the BSR continues to support deprecated DOCSIS 2.0
tables, along with any DOCSIS 3.0 table that has functionally replaced it, as
long as the BSR had previously implemented support for the DOCSIS 2.0
table. Customers can reference tables in this category from either the
DOCSIS 2.0 or DOCSIS 3.0 directory levels since these tables do not involve
any conflicts.
If a table has already been deprecated before it was ever implemented, the
BSR does not attempt to retroactively implement the table.
DOCS-BPI2-MIB.mib DOCS-QOS-MIB.mib
IGMP-STD-MIB.mib RFC1213-MIB.mib
Release 6.3.1 DOCSIS 2.0/3.0 MIB Support
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 7-3
MIB Files Supported in DOCSIS 3.0 Only
MIB Files Common to DOCSIS 2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0
CLAB-TOPO-MIB.mib DOCS-DIAG-MIB.mib
DOCS-DRF-MIB.mib DOCS-IETF-BPI2-MIB.mib
DOCS-IF-M-CMTS-MIB.mib DOCS-IF3-MIB.mib
DOCS-LOADBAL3-MIB.mib DOCS-MCAST-AUTH-MIB.mib
DOCS-MCAST-MIB.mib DOCS-QOS3-MIB.mib
DOCS-SEC-MIB.mib DOCS-SUBMGT3-MIB.mib
MGMD-STD-MIB.mib
Note: The DOCSIS 2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0 directories have the same MIB
filenames listed below but there are slight differences in content.
CLAB-DEF-MIB.mib DOCS-CABLE-DEVICE-MIB.mib
DOCS-IF-MIB.mib ENTITY-MIB.mib
EtherLike-MIB.mib IANA-ADDRESS-FAMILY-NUMBERS-MIB.mib
IANAifType-MIB.mib OSPF-MIB.mib
PPP-IP-NCP-MIB.mib PPP-LCP-MIB.mib
RDN-CMTS-MIB.mib RDN-SENSOR-MIB.mib
RDN-SYSLOG-MIB.mib RIPv2-MIB.mib
SNMP-COMMUNITY-MIB.mib
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MIB Files Identical for DOCSIS 2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0
BGP4-MIB.mib DIFFSERV-DSCP-TC.mib
DIFFSERV-MIB.mib DOCS-CABLE-DEVICE-TRAP-MIB.mib
DOCS-IF-EXT-MIB.mib DOCS-IFEXT2-MIB.mib
DOCS-LOADBALANCING-MIB.mib DOCS-SUBMGT-MIB.mib
DOCS-TEST-MIB.mib DSG-IF-MIB.mib
ETHER-CHIPSET-MIB.mib IANA-RTPROTO-MIB.mib
IF-MIB.mib INET-ADDRESS-MIB.mib
INTEGRATED-SERVICES-MIB.mib IP-FORWARD-MIB.mib
IP-MIB.mib IPMROUTE-STD-MIB.mib
IPV6-ICMP-MIB.mib IPV6-MIB.mib
IPV6-TC.mib MPLS-FTN-STD-MIB.mib
MPLS-LDP-GENERIC-STD-MIB.mib MPLS-LDP-STD-MIB.mib
MPLS-LSR-STD-MIB.mib MPLS-TC-STD-MIB.mib
MPLS-TE-STD-MIB.mib MPLS-VPN-MIB-DRAFT-05.mib
OSPF-TRAP-MIB.mib PIM-MIB.mib
PPVPN-TC-MIB.mib PerfHist-TC-MIB.mib
RDN-CABLE-SPECTRUM-GROUP-MIB.mib RDN-CABLE-SPECTRUM-MIB.mib
RDN-CABLE-TRAFFIC-MANAGEMENT-MIB
.mib
RDN-CHANNEL-BONDING-MIB.mib
RDN-CHASSIS-MIB.mib RDN-CHASSIS-TYPE-MIB.mib
RDN-DEFINITIONS-MIB.mib RDN-DLB-MIB.mib
RDN-EVT-NOTIFICATIONS.mib RDN-MIB.mib
RDN-MODULES-MIB.mib RDN-PKTCABLE-GROUP-MIB.mib
Release 6.3.1 DOCSIS 2.0/3.0 MIB Support
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 7-5
Deprecated DOCSIS 2.0 MIB Tables
RDN-PORTS-MIB.mib RDN-PROCESS-MIB.mib
RDN-PRODUCTS-MIB.mib RDN-SENSOR-TYPE-MIB.mib
RDN-SLOTS-MIB.mib SNMP-FRAMEWORK-MIB.mib
SNMP-MPD-MIB.mib SNMP-NOTIFICATION-MIB.mib
SNMP-PROXY-MIB.mib SNMP-TARGET-MIB.mib
SNMP-USER-BASED-SM-MIB.mib SNMP-VIEW-BASED-ACM-MIB.mib
SNMPv2-MIB.mib SNMPv2-SMI.mib
SNMPv2-TC.mib SONET-MIB.mib
TCP-MIB.mib UDP-MIB.mib
VRRP-MIB.mib
DOCSIS 2.0 MIB File Deprecated Table
IF-MIB.mib ifTestTable
IP-FORWARD-MIB.mib ipCidrRouteTable
IP-MIB.mib ipAddrTable
IP-MIB.mib ipNetToMediaTable
PIM-MIB.mib pimRPTable
RFC1213-MIB.mib atTable
TCP-MIB.mib tcpConnTable
UDP-MIB.mib udpTable
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Deprecated DOCSIS 3.0 MIB Tables
DOCSIS 3.0 MIB File Deprecated Table
DOCS-CABLE-DEVICE-MIB.mib docsDevNmAccessTable
DOCS-CABLE-DEVICE-MIB.mib docsDevFilterIpTable
DOCS-CABLE-DEVICE-MIB.mib docsDevFilterPolicyTable
DOCS-CABLE-DEVICE-MIB.mib docsDevFilterTosTable
DOCS-CABLE-DEVICE-MIB.mib docsDevCpeTable
DOCS-IF-M-CMTS-MIB.mib docsIfMCmtsCoreDownstreamTable
DOCS-IF-M-CMTS-MIB.mib docsIfMCmtsEqamDownstreamCapabilitiesTable
DOCS-IF-M-CMTS-MIB.mib docsIfMCmtsEqamGroupDependencyTable
DOCS-IF-M-CMTS-MIB.mib docsIfMCmtsChannelBlockTable
IF-MIB.mib ifTestTable
IP-FORWARD-MIB.mib ipCidrRouteTable
IP-MIB.mib ipAddrTable
IP-MIB.mib ipNetToMediaTable
PIM-MIB.mib pimRPTable
TCP-MIB.mib tcpConnTable
UDP-MIB.mib udpTable
Release 6.3.1 DOCSIS 2.0/3.0 MIB Support
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 7-7
Obsoleted DOCSIS 2.0 MIB Tables and RFCs
DOCSIS 2.0 MIB File Obsoleted Table/RFC
BGP4-MIB.mib bgpRcvdPathAttrTable
BGP4-MIB.mib bgpPathAttrASPath
IP-FORWARD-MIB.mib ipForwardTable
OSPF-MIB.mib ospfAreaRangeTable
IGMP-STD-MIB.mib RFC 2933 (entire) - replaced by the MGMD-STD-MIB in
DOCSIS 3.0
ENTITY-MIB.mib RFC 2737 - replaced by RFC 4133 which is also called
ENTITY-MIB.mib in the DOCSIS 3.0 directory
DOCS-IF-MIB.mib DOCSIS 2.0 version was based on a draft earlier than RFC
2670 which was obsoleted by the DOCSIS 3.0 version of
DOCS-IF-MIB.mib
RFC1213-MIB Updated in DOCSIS 3.0 by RFC 4293 (IP-MIB), RFC
4022 (TCP-MIB) and RFC 4113 (UDP-MIB)
IANAifType-MIB.mib Note: The IANAifType MIB was updated by RFC 3635
(EtherLike-MIB).The following specific type values were
obsoleted by RFC 3635 not the entire IANAifType MIB.
fastEther(62)
fastEtherFX(69)
gigabitEthernet (117)
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7-8 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
DOCSIS 2.0/3.0 Tables with Different OIDs
This section lists individual tables that have the same table name in both DOCSIS 2.0
and DOCSIS 3.0 but are identified with different OIDs between the two DOCSIS
versions. If different OIDs represent the same table name then, from the SNMP
agents perspective, they are essentially different tables as tables are referenced in
SNMP requests by the OID value and not by the table name.
DOCSIS 2.0/3.0 tables having the same table name but different OIDs were the
primary reason for separating MIB files into DOCSIS 2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0
directories.The following tables are identified in DOCSIS 2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0 using
different OID values:
docsBpi2CmtsBaseTable
docsBpi2CmtsAuthTable
docsBpi2CmtsTEKTable
docsBpi2CmtsIpMulticastMapTable
docsBpi2CmtsMulticastAuthTable
docsBpi2CmtsProvisionedCmCertTable
docsBpi2CmtsCACertTable
docsQosPktClassTable
docsQosParamSetTable
docsQosServiceFlowTable
docsQosServiceFlowStatsTable
docsQosUpstreamStatsTable
docsQosDynamicServiceStatsTable
docsQosServiceFlowLogTable
docsQosServiceClassTable
docsQosPHSTable
docsQosCmtsMacToSrvFlowTable
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 Index-1
A
Abstract Syntax Notation One, 1-4
access control
using community name, 4-26
access policy
creating, 4-29
associating
group to MIB view, 4-29, 4-32
B
BSR 64000
proprietary MIBs, 1-3
RDN, 3-1
SNMP agent software, 1-3
C
Cable Modem Termination Systems, 3-1
commands
snmp-server community, 4-10
snmp-server enable traps, 4-12
snmp-server host, 4-9, 4-10
snmp-server host traps, 4-10
snmp-server host version, 4-11
snmp-server trap rate-limit, 4-15
community name
defining, 4-27
configuring
group model, 4-30
MIB view, 4-31
packet size, 4-32
SNMP
context, 4-32
SNMP access levels, 4-26
SNMP server identification, 4-24
SNMP traps, 4-33
system contact information, 4-25
system location information, 4-25
trap destination, 4-9
trap source, 4-9
USM security, 4-29
VACM security, 4-29
creating
access policy, 4-29
user models, 4-29
D
defining
community name, 4-27
MIB view, 4-29
destination IP address
specifying, 4-9
E
enabling
SNMP, 4-8
traps, 4-12
F
firmware, 6-6
folder, 6-3
icon, 6-4
Index
Index-2 Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.3.1
G
Get, 1-3
GetNext, 1-3
group
associating to MIB, 4-29, 4-32
group model
configuring, 4-30
group models
handling, 4-29
H
handling
group models, 4-29
I
IETF, 1-2
Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, 1-3
Internet Engineering Task Force, 1-2
IP address, 6-2, 6-7, 6-12
M
Management Information Base, 1-2
MIB, 1-2
browser, 6-1, 6-3, 6-6
command line, 6-1
graphical, 6-1, 6-6
interface, 6-1, 6-14
compiling, 6-6
database, 6-1, 6-6
hierarchy, 6-7, 6-8, 6-11, 6-12
importing, 6-6
Object Identifier, 1-3
OID, 1-3
organization, 1-3
private, 1-2, 6-6
proprietary, 6-6
RFC, 1-2
standard, 2-1
supported, 6-2, 6-3
tree, 6-3, 6-8, 6-12
browsing, 6-3
values, 6-2
variable
accessing, 6-6
changing, 6-6
MIB view
configuring, 4-31
defining, 4-29
monitoring
SNMP, 4-33
O
object
ACCESS, 1-4
DESCRIPTION, 1-5
instance, 1-4
OBJECT_TYPE, 1-4
STATUS
mandatory, 1-5
obsoleted, 1-5
optional, 1-5
SYNTAX, 1-4
tabular, 1-4
writable, 6-6, 6-11
P
packet
size
configuring, 4-32
Q
query, 6-2, 6-5
R
Request for Comments, 1-2
restricting
trap rates, 4-15
S
Set, 1-3, 6-6
SMI, 1-2, 1-4
SNMP, 1-1, 1-2
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2 Index-3
Release 6.3.1 Index
access levels
configuring, 4-26
agent, 1-2, 1-3, 6-2
commands, 1-3
community name, 6-2, 6-7, 6-11
context
configuring, 4-32
enabling, 4-8
Get, 6-5
get, 6-1, 6-7
get next, 6-7
GetNext, 6-2, 6-5
management, 1-2
monitoring, 4-33
network management station, 1-2, 1-3
server identification
configuring, 4-24
Set, 6-2, 6-6, 6-11
traps
configuring, 4-33
specific trap types
specifying, 4-10
specific trap versions
specifying, 4-11
specifying
destination IP address, 4-9
specific trap types, 4-10
specific trap versions, 4-11
Structure of Management Information, 1-2
system
contact information
configuring, 4-25
location information
configuring, 4-25
T
trap destination
configuring, 4-9
trap rates
restricting, 4-15
trap source
configuring, 4-9
traps
enabling, 4-12
tree
branches, 1-3
leaves, 1-3
MIB, 6-3
structure, 1-3
U
user models
creating, 4-29
USM security
configuring, 4-29
V
VACM security
configuring, 4-29
VRRP, 2-4
Compass ID: 391449725 Version 2
1/12
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