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Stories provide pleasure to young learners.

It is a relaxing escape from daily problems for both listeners and


readers, and it fills leisure moments. Making time for recreational reading and using high-quality literature help to
develop enthusiastic readers and improve achievement (Block & Mangieri, 2002). According to Rosenblatt (1995,
p. 175),.
Undoubtedly, stories can instil the sense of contentment, satisfaction and pleasure in the lives of both listeners
and readers. Generally, stories serve as a getaway from the problems that occur in their daily lives and could
meaningfully deliver messages for them to cope with their problems during their leisure time. Setting apart some
time for some recreational reading and the inclusion of high-quality reading materials help to nurture enthusiastic
readers and boost their achievement (Block & Mangieri, 2002). According to Rosenblatt (1995, m. 175), "The
power of literature to offer entertainment and recreation is . . . still its prime reason for survival." Thus, it is
critically the love for literature to be developed as a recreational activity and to be recognised as a significant
possible outcome of a literature programme.

In conclusion, literature materials provide a solid foundation for young learners to develop their skills and gain
experiences. Through the exposure of various experiences that children have to undergo, they now have deepen
their insights. By learning from the past as well as the present through the blending of old and new, different
cultures with their own, all of these could prove to be a priceless experience for them. Despite obvious
differences, yet they could still highlight common desired goals and emotions that are expressed by people from
different times and places. For an example, Nory Ryans Song by Patricia Reilly Giff potrays the similar
experiences which centres on a story which was set in Ireland about undergoing the unforgiving potato famine in
1845.
Lastly, literature materials build experience for young learners. Children expand their horizons through vicarious
experiences. They visit new places, gain new experiences, and meet new people. They learn about the past as
well as the present and learn about people from other cultures, including their own, can be a valuable learning
experience for all children. They discover the common goals and similar emotions found in people of all times
and places. An example of book that provide such experiences would be Nory Ryan's Song by Patricia Reilly
Giff, a harsh survival story set in Ireland during the potato famine of 1845.